btsarnia

A tribute to the life and work of Brian Torode

Terrett Engineers of Kingswood Part II

THE TERRETT FAMILY

 

William Terrett (1785-1812) and Susannah Dunn (1781-1843)

Labourer of Wotton-under-Edge

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 Daniel Terrett (1809-1876) and Hannah Palser (1807-1879)

Millwright and Engineer of Wotton-under-Edge and Kingswood

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Henry Terrett (1850-1908) and Ellen Smith (1862-1930)

Millwright, Engineer and Publican of Kingswood

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William Edward Terrett (1898-1965) and Grace Margaret Eley (1897-1940)

Watchmaker & Jeweller of Tetbury and Storekeeper of Cam

 


See my blog: Terrett Engineers of Kingswood Part I: https://wp.me/p4BX9P-E1


HENRY TERRETT, Great Grandfather

Son of Daniel Terrett and Hannah (nee Palser)

Husband of Ellen Smith

Father of William Edward Terrett

Also Husband of Clara Jones

Also Father of Julia, Edith Jane Smith, Annie Louise Werrett, Frederick Henry, Edward Frank, Lucy Ethel Terrett, Alice Maud Herrick, Florence Emily Milner and Sidney George

Henry Terrett was born on 12th December 1849 at Kingswood and he was baptised on 3rd February 1850 at St Mary’s Wotton-under-Edge. He was the eighth child and fifth son of Daniel and Hannah Terrett. His father was an Engineer and his mother a Clothworker of Kingswood. Edward Page registered his birth on 16th January 1850 and the informant was Henry’s mother who made her mark.

Henry was recorded in both the 1851 and 1861 census returns. In 1851 he was at home, aged two years and born at Kingswood. In 1861 he was at home, aged ten years, a scholar, born at Kingswood.

On 17th July 1869 he married his first wife, Clara Jones, at St Mary’s Church, Kingswood. The witnesses at the wedding were Joseph Jones, Sarah Jones, Daniel Terrett and Ellen Cox.

In the 1871 return Henry Terrett was living at Abbey Street, Kingswood. He was described as a twenty-one-year-old millwright born at Kingswood. Clara, his wife, was twenty-two-years-old and born at Forest Green. Living next door was probably his father-in-law, Joseph Jones, a fifty-year-old baker, who was born at Bisley. In residence with Joseph Jones was Samuel Jones, an eighteen-year-old clothworker, who was born at Chalford Hill.

Henry’s father, Daniel Terrett, died in 1876 and the family business changed from ‘Daniel Terrett & Son, Millwright and Engineer’ to ‘Terrett Brothers’. In trade directories for 1879, 1885, and 1889 Henry Terrett was described as a grocer of Kingswood.

Henry and Clara had three daughters between the years 1871 and 1879 – Julia, Edith and Annie Louise. Their mother, Clara Terrett, died at Kingswood on 25th January 1881 aged only thirty-two years. She was described on her death certificate as the wife of Henry Terrett, Millwright. The cause of death was given as Phthisis and was certified by D. H. Forty, LRCPC. Benjamin Simmons, Registrar, registered the death on 31st January 1881 and the informant was Henry Terrett of Kingswood, widower, who was present at the death.

Dursley Gazette:

 23rd January 1881 – at Kingswood, Wotton-under-Edge, Clara, wife of Mr. Henry Terrett, aged 32 years.

She was buried on 1st February 1881 shortly before the night of the 1881 census which recorded that Henry was a thirty-year-old widower, millwright and grocer of The Street, Kingswood, and that he was living with two of his daughters, Edith Jane aged five years and Annie Louise aged one year. All three were born at Kingswood. Also with them was twenty-one-year-old Ellen Smith, a General Domestic Servant, who was described as born at Cromhall.

Ellen Smith was a first cousin of Ann Woodward, the wife of Daniel Terrett, Henry’s brother. Henry was probably acquainted with the Smith and Woodward Families from as early as their marriage on 29th October 1870 at Kingswood when he acted as a witness.

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On 12th September 1881 Henry Terrett married his second wife, Ellen, his former servant, at the Parish Church of St Barnabas in the City of Bristol. He was thirty-one-years-old and she was ten years younger than him. Their address was given on the marriage certificate as 17 Denbigh Street in Bedminster. Sadly, Henry’s eldest daughter from his first marriage, Julia Terrett, was buried on 1st June 1882, aged twelve years.

Henry and Ellen Terrett were to have seven children between 1882 and 1902. Their second son, Edward Frank Terrett, was buried at Kingswood on 25th October 1887, aged two years and six months.

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In the 1891 census Henry was a Publican and Millwright of the Star Inn, Kingswood. He was aged forty-years and born at Kingswood. His wife, Ellen, was aged twenty-eight-years and born at Earthcott. Their children were Edith aged fifteen; Annie aged eleven; Frederick aged nine; Ethel aged three years and Alice M. aged seven months. All were born at Kingswood.

2632 THE LONDON GAZETTE, MAY 15, 1891.

 NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore existing between William Terrett, Joseph Terrett, Daniel Terrett, and Henry Terrett, carrying on business as Millwrights and General Machinists, at Kingswood, near Wotton-under-Edge, in the county of Gloucester, under the name or style of Terrett Brothers, is dissolved as from the 25th day of March, 1891. The said Joseph Terrett retires from the business, which will in future be carried on by the said William Terrett, Daniel Terrett, and Henry Terrett, under the name or style of Terrett Brothers.—Dated this 24th day of April, 1891.

WILLIAM TERRETT. DANIEL TERRETT. JOSEPH TERRETT. HENRY TERRETT.

In directories for 1894, 1897, 1904 and 1906 Henry Terrett was listed as a Beer Retailer of Kingswood.

In the 1901 census Henry Terrett was described as a Millwright and Innkeeper of the Chipping, Kingswood. He was shown on the return as a fifty-one-year-old employer, born in Kingswood. His wife, Ellen, was aged thirty-eight-years, she ran the pub and was born at Earthcott. His children were Annie, aged twenty-one-years; Ethel aged thirteen; Maud aged ten; Florence aged seven and William aged three years. All of them were born at Kingswood.

The marriage of his second daughter, Annie to Frederick Werrett was the occasion for major celebrations including the taking of a large family photograph at the Star.

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Wedding of Frederick George Werrett and Annie Louise Terrett 25th April 1906 at Kingswood

 ‘The Rev. C.R. Cottell performed the ceremony. The bride, who was given away by her uncle Mr Daniel Terrett, was charmingly attired in a cream silk crepoline dress, with veil of orange blossoms. She also wore a spray of flowers and carried an ivory prayer book the gift of the bridegroom. There were three bridesmaids, Miss Edith Terrett sister of the bride, who wore a dress of gray tweed with satin and lace and heliotrope velvet with hat to match. She also wore a spray and carried an ivory prayer book the gift of the bridegroom. The other bridesmaids were Miss Flo Terrett sister of the bride, and Miss Beatrice Werrett niece of the bridegroom, who were both dressed in pale blue silk voile trimmed with lace and ribbons, and carried bouquets of flowers. Mr Phil Werrett of Warmley, brother of the bridegroom, acted as best man. There was a large number of guests present to witness the ceremony including Misses Ethel and Maud Terrett sisters, Misses Louise, Alice and Mrs D. Terrett cousins, Mr Fred Terrett brother, Miss Werrett of Warmley, Misses Jefferies, Wills, Lviours, Musty, Sampson, Cossons, and Hart, friends of the bride. Afterwards a reception was held at the home of the bride when a large number including the rector was present. In the evening the happy couple left for their future home at Warmley amid the good wishes of all. The bride’s travelling dress was of navy blue coat and skirt trimmed with silk pf pasementerie and navy blue hat to match. The carriage was supplied by Mr Gothard of the Railway Hotel, Wickwar…’

Henry Terrett made his will on 21st March 1905:

The Will of Henry Terrett:

‘The Last Will and Testament of Henry Terrett of Kingswood, Wotton-under-Edge, Millwright and Innkeeper. My wife Ellen Terrett and my son Frederick Henry Terrett to be the Executors and Trustees. To my wife, use, enjoyment of my household furniture, and other similar articles during her life and whilst she remains my widow. On her death or re-marriage, all the said bequests form part of my residuary estate. I devise my share in Walk Mills, the Abbey Property, the Cottages near the chapel and the Crow Meadow Cottages all in Kingswood and any other hereditiments, I bequeath absolutely to my daughter Jane Terrett, to my daughter Annie Louise Terrett absolutely £150; and my share in stock in trade of Terrett Bros Millwrights, to my said son Frederick Henry Terrett; I devise and bequeath the rest of my estate to my Trustees to call in and convert to money to invest the proceeds and pay income to my wife upon her widowhood. On her re-marriage or death to divide the same upon trust between my six children by my present wife, including the said F.H. Terrett or such as shall attain the age of 21, or being daughters, marry under that age, in equal shares. 21st March 1905. Signed by Evelyn Chas Lloyd with the name of the above named testator, by his direction in the presence of E.C. Lloyd, solicitor, Wotton-under-Edge, G.E. Jobbins, Clerk to Goldingham & Lloyd, Solicitors.’

Henry Terrett died on 27th October 1908. His death certificate recorded that he was a Mechanical Engineer, aged fifty-eight-years. The cause of death was given as Gout, Diabetes and Convulsions and this was certified by R.H. Forty MRCS. The Registrar registered the death on 27th October 1908 and the informant was Jn. J. Rogers of Hillesley Road, Kingswood, who was present at the time of the death.

Henry Terrett was buried on 30th October at St Mary’s Churchyard, Kingswood.

The Dursley Gazette for Saturday 31st October 1908 reported the ‘Death of Mr. Henry Terrett’:

‘We regret to record the death of Mr. Henry Terrett of Kingswood, Wotton-under-Edge, Partner in the firm of Terrett Bros., engineers, who died on Tuesday last. The deceased was well-known and highly respected in the neighbourhood’

A week later on 7th November the Dursley Gazette offered a fuller report:

Funeral at Kingswood. The Late Mr. Henry Terrett. The funeral of the late Mr. Henry Terrett of the well-known engineering firm of Terrett Bros. Who died at his residence – The Chipping, Kingswood, on Tuesday October 27th took place at the St Mary’s Church on Friday afternoon October 30th amid manifestations of deep sympathy.

The deceased was very popular and highly respected consequently a large number followed the remains to its last resting place.

The coffin was conveyed on a wheeled bier to the Church entrance where the cortege was met by the Rev. C.R.Cottell, who conducted the obsequies in a most impressive manner throughout. The bearers were Messrs. H. Bennett, T. Jones, W. Crew, M. Always, W. Peglar and W. Derrett.

The coffin was of English polished oak with massive brass furniture and was inscribed ‘Henry Terrett, died Oct. 27th 1908, aged 58 years.’ The funeral arrangements were carried out by Mr. A. Hart.

The principal mourners were as follows:

Messrs. Frederick and William Terrett (sons)

Mr. Daniel Terrett (brother)

Messrs. Harry, Daniel, Edward, William and Walter Terrett (nephews)

Messrs. Henry and J. Grimes (nephews)

Mr G. Werrett (son-in-law)

Mr E.J.H. Smith and Mr W. Newman of Bristol (Brothers-in-law)

Mr. Flowers (Lydney); Mr R. Wyatt; Mr Graham Arnold (Wickwar); Messrs B. Hunt, J. Roberts, A. Pocock, J. Lacey, R. Lovell, H. Barber, J Cook, T. Jones, W.H. Cox, E.C. Lloyd (solicitor) S. Rice, S. Pinnigar and others.

Beautiful floral tributes were sent as follows:

In ever loving memory of a dear husband and father from his sorrowing wife and children.

With deepest sympathy from a loving nephew and niece Daniel and Emily

With deepest sympathy from his sorrowful nephew and niece Ted and Lily

With deepest sympathy from his affectionate daughter Annie and husband

In affectionate memory from Harry and Annie (Wickwar)

Sent in deepest sympathy from Eli Herrick

With deepest sympathy from Mr and Mrs Jones and Family

Others from Mr H. Bennett and family; an old friend James Roberts (Wickwar); Mr and Mrs P. Werrett (Warmley); F and M. B..ton; Aunt and Edie; All at Sunnybank;

As a token of respect to an old and valued tenant from the landlords

His will was proved on 6th January 1909.

His memorial stone, a handsome cross executed by his son-in-law, F. Werrett of Kingswood, was recently vandalised by the District Council: It reads, ‘In Loving Memory of Henry Terrett, died Oct 27th 1908 aged 58 years – In hope of eternal life’

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Star Inn, The Chippings (Dinneywicks) The Star Inn is still trading but it is now known as the Dinneywicks Inn. It was acquird by Wadworth, brewers of Devizes, Wiltshire, in 1991 and the name was changed then. The ‘new’ name refers to the name of a field at the back of the village. The owner of the field levied a toll because it straddled a highway. Another local story is that the nearby Dinneywicks Hill was a burial ground for horses in the English Civil War. The pub, as the Star Inn, had an annual rateable value of £9.10s.0d. in 1891 and £16.0s.0d. in 1903. (‘Last orders’ were called at 10 p.m.) Map reference ST 747918.

                1891 Henry Terrett. Beerhouse. Arnold Perrett & Co. Ltd., Wickwar Brewery

                1903 Henry Terrett. Beerhouse. Arnold Perrett & Co. Ltd., Wickwar Brewery

                1939 Thos. Humphrey Fitz. Jones

Extract from the Sale Papers for Terrett Bros in 1920:

And whereas the said Henry Terrett by his will dated the 21st day of March 1905 after appointing his wife Ellen Terrett and his son Frederick Henry Terrett to be the Executors and Trustees thereof … and devised his share in the hereditiments being assured and to his daughter the said Edith Jane Terrett absolutely. And whereas the said Henry Terrett died on 27th day of October 1908 without having revoked or altered his will which was duly proved by the executors on the 6th day of January 1909 in the Gloucester District Probate Registry of the High Court of Justice. And whereas the said Ellen Terrett and Frederick Henry Terrett executors to the devise… in the will of the said Henry Terrett with Edith Jane Terrett…executor of the said will doth hereby acknowledge.


CLARA TERRETT, the first wife of Henry Terrett

Clara Jones was born in about 1849 at Forest Green, Nailsworth. Her parents were   Joseph and Jane Jones, a baker. Her father was born at Bisley and her mother at Minchinhampton.

Back in the 1851 census we find the Jones family at Dunkirk, Nailsworth. Joseph Jones was described as a thirty-one-year-old baker who was born in Bisley. His wife Jane was aged thirty-one-years and born at Minchinhampton. Their children included Joseph aged four years and born in Avening; Clara aged two years and born in Avening and Sarah aged eight months and born in Avening.

By the time of the 1861 census Joseph was a thirty-eight-year-old baker of Kingswood. With him were his children Sarah aged thirteen, Samuel aged eight and Clara, aged eleven and born in Avening parish.

On 17th July 1869 Daniel Terrett married his first wife, Clara Jones, at St Mary’s Church, Kingswood. The witnesses at the wedding were Joseph Jones, Sarah Jones, Daniel Terrett and Ellen Cox.

In the 1871 census return Clara’s father was still a baker of Kingswood and living next to Henry and Clara Terrett in Abbey Street. Living with Joseph Jones was Clara’s younger brother, Samuel, aged eighteen-years. He was described as a cloth worker and he was born at Chalford Hill.

Henry and Clara had three daughters between the years 1871 and 1879 – Julia, Edith and Annie Louise. Their mother, Clara Terrett, died at Kingswood on 25th January 1881 aged only thirty-two years. She was described on her death certificate as the wife of Henry Terrett, Millwright. The cause of death was given as Phthisis and was certified by D. H. Forty, LRCPC. Benjamin Simmons, Registrar, registered the death on 31st January 1881 and the informant was Henry Terrett of Kingswood, widower, who was present at the death.

Clara Terrett was buried on 1st February 1881 at the age of thirty-two-years.

Dursley Gazette:

 23rd January 1881 – at Kingswood, Wotton-under-Edge, Clara, wife of Mr. Henry Terrett, aged 32 years.


The three children of Henry and Clara Terrett:

1. JULIA TERRETT

Julia was baptised on 3rd December 1870 at Kingswood and she died on 1st June 1882 aged twelve years. From 5th February 1881 until 27th May 1882 she was at the ‘Lunatic Asylum’ in Gloucester.

2. EDITH JANE SMITH

 

Edith Jane was baptised on 10th October 1875 at St Mary’s Kingswood. In the 1891 census return Henry Terrett, her father, was described as a publican and millwright of the Star Inn, Kingswood. He was aged forty-years. His new wife, Ellen, was aged twenty-eight-years and born at Earthcott. Edith was aged fifteen years.

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On 31st August 1910 she married George Smith, a brother of her stepmother, Ellen Smith…

For more information visit my blog:

‘Thomas and Sarah Smith of Hill, Earthcott, Cromhall and Tytherington’

https://wp.me/p4BX9P-KW

3. ANNIE LOUISE WERRETT

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Annie Louise was baptised on 6th July 1879 at St Mary’s Church, Kingswood.

In the 1891 census her father Henry was a publican and millwright of the Star Inn, Kingswood. He was aged forty-years. His new wife, Ellen, was aged twenty-eight-years and born at Earthcott. Annie was aged eleven years.

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In the 1901 census she was at home, aged twenty-one-years and born in Kingswood. On the afternoon of Wednesday 25th April 1906 she married Frederick George Werrett, the youngest son of the late John Werrett of Kingswood, and we have a newspaper account of the celebration:

‘The Rev. C.R. Cottell performed the ceremony. The bride, who was given away by her uncle Mr Daniel Terrett, was charmingly attired in a cream silk crepoline dress, with veil of orange blossoms. She also wore a spray of flowers and carried an ivory prayer book the gift of the bridegroom. There were three bridesmaids, Miss Edith Terrett sister of the bride, who wore a dress of gray tweed with satin and lace and heliotrope velvet with hat to match. She also wore a spray and carried an ivory prayer book the gift of the bridegroom. The other bridesmaids were Miss Flo Terrett sister of the bride, and Miss Beatrice Werrett niece of the bridegroom, who were both dressed in pale blue silk voile trimmed with lace and ribbons, and carried bouquets of flowers. Mr Phil Werrett of Warmley, brother of the bridegroom, acted as best man. There was a large number of guests present to witness the ceremony including Misses Ethel and Maud Terrett sisters, Misses Louise, Alice and Mrs D. Terrett cousins, Mr Fred Terrett brother, Miss Werrett of Warmley, Misses Jefferies, Wills, Lviours, Musty, Sampson, Cossons, and Hart, friends of the bride. Afterwards a reception was held at the home of the bride when a large number including the rector was present. In the evening the happy couple left for their future home at Warmley amid the good wishes of all. The bride’s travelling dress was of navy blue coat and skirt trimmed with silk pf pasementerie and navy blue hat to match. The carriage was supplied by Mr Gothard of the Railway Hotel, Wickwar. The presents were both numerous and costly, including the following:- Mr and Mrs H. Terrett (parents) cutlery, Mr Fred Terrett overmantel, Master W. Terrett pastry board and rolling pin, Master G. Terrett cream jug and sugar basin, Misses Ethel, Maud and Flo Terrett epergne. Mrs W. Terrett pair of sheets and cushion, Miss Edith Terrett pillow cases and bolsters, Mr Daniel Terrett bread board and knife, Mrs Daniel Terrett copper kettle, Miss Alice Terrett silver sugar tongs, Mr And Mrs D. Terrett Jun. Set of jugs, Mr and Mrs H. Terrett vases, Mrs Louie Terrett trinket set, Mr Ted Terrett cheese dish, Aunt Sarah (Cam) toilet cover, and damask fancy table cloths… Mr and Mrs Rowland Wyatt ‘Lady’s Companion’, and more beside….

Frederick George Werrett was the son of John Werrett (1841-1904) and Martha Mealing (1836-1883). He was born at Norwood in London but his father came from Hillesley.

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In 1881 he and his family were living at Norwood. His father was described as John Brooks, a thirty-eight-year-old stone mason born at Hillesley and his mother Martha was a dressmaker born in Hillesley. George was listed as the eighth child aged four years. The Brooks name comes from the first marriage of Frederick George’s grandmother, Ann Stinchcomb (1811-1863) who married Frederick Brooks (1807-1838) before marrying George Werrett (1818-1882) in 1841

In 1901 George Werrett was living with his father at Church Street, Kingswood. His father was described as a fifty-six-year-old mason working on his own account. His new wife Sarah Ann (nee Long) was aged thirty-five-years, a grocer and shopkeeper, born in Trowbridge. George was himself aged twenty-four-years, a mason, born in South Norwood.

He worked as a monumental mason at 41 Deanery Road, Warmley, Kingswood, Bristol. His father John died on 29th September 1904 in the Keynsham district.

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At the time of the 1911 census Frederick George was described as a stone and marble mason, aged thirty-four-years. Annie Louise was aged thirty-one, born at Kingswood, Wotton-under-Edge, married for five years and with one child. Henry John was aged one year and born at Warmley.

Frederick George Brookes Werrett died on 23rd February 1945 at 41 Deanery Road. Administration was granted to his widow and son on 14th May 1945 at Bristol. His personal effects were valued at £2,204-15-1d.

There is a sanctuary lamp in St Barnabas’s Church, Warmley, in his memory.

Annie Louise died on 1st March 1957 at 41 Deanery Road, Warmley, aged seventy-seven years. Probate was granted at Bristol on 3rd April 1957 to Henry John Werrett, monumental mason. Her personal effects were valued at £3,454-8-9

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Their son Henry John Werrett was born on 2nd June 1909 at Warmley and was aged one year at the time of the 1911 census. He too became a monumental mason of Warmley and was the last of four generation of Werrett stonemasons – George Werrett (1818-1882) of Hawkesbury (from time of 1851 census), John Werrett (1841-1904), Frederick George (1877-1945). He married Laura May Warner, the daughter of a local farmer, at St Barnabas Church, Warmley, on 5th August 1957. Henry died in September 1982 aged seventy-three-years. May died on 18th April 2013 aged ninety-three years and her funeral service took place on 3rd May at St Barnabas’s Church, Warmley.

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ELLEN JONES, Second wife of Henry Terrett and Great II Grandmother

Daughter of Thomas Smith and Sarah (nee Woodward)

Wife of Henry Terrett

Mother of Frederick Henry, Edward Frank, Lucy Ethel Terrett, Alice Maud Herrick, Florence Emily Milner, William Edward Terrett and Sidney George

Also Wife of Thomas Fitzherbert Jones

Ellen Smith was born on 13th October 1862 at Earthcott, Alveston. She was the fifth child and second daughter of Thomas Smith, an agricultural labourer and horse dealer and his wife Sarah. By 1871 the family was living at Weir Bridge, Cromhall and her father was described in the census return as a beer shop keeper and dealer.

Bristol Mercury 2nd July 1870

 Highway Robbery by a boy – an incorrigible boy named Greenman, whose friends live at Crossways, near Thornbury, on Friday met two little girls aged 8 and 11 respectively the daughters of Mr. Thomas Smith of Cromhall, going toward Thornbury and immediately pounced on them, threw down the eldest child and rifled her pockets, taking there form in money 4s 6d. The young culprit, who is only 12 or 13 years of age, a short time since lived for several days in Prest Wood, a large covert belonging to Earl Ducie, and for food caught very young rabbits, skinned and cooked them. He is now in the custody of the Thornbury police, who will at the earnest request of the young vagabond’s friends ask the magistrate to send him to a reformatory school.

Ellen would have been eighteen-years-old when her mother, Sarah Smith, died on 16th December 1880 at Tytherington. She was fifty-years-old and described on her death certificate as the wife of Thomas Smith, a pig dealer.

By the time of the 1881 census her father was working as an agricultural labourer and living at Tower Hill Cottages, Tytherington. This same census reveals that his daughter, Ellen, was employed as a General Domestic Servant in the home of Henry Terrett after his wife Clara died. Ellen was a first cousin of the wife of Daniel Terrett, Henry’s brother, so the families were connected from as early as their marriage in 1870.

On 12th September 1881 Ellen married Henry Terrett, her former employer, at the Parish Church of St Barnabas in the City of Bristol. He was then thirty-one-years-old and she was ten years younger than him. Their address was given on the marriage certificate as 17 Denbigh Street, Bristol.

Henry and Ellen Terrett were to have seven children between 1882 and 1902. Their second son, Edward Frank Terrett, was buried at Kingswood on 25th October 1887, aged two years and six months.

In the 1891 census Henry was a Publican and Millwright of the Star Inn, Kingswood. He was aged forty-years. His wife, Ellen, was aged twenty-eight-years and born at Earthcott. Their children were Edith aged fifteen; Annie aged eleven; Frederick aged nine; Ethel aged three years and Alice M. aged seven months.

In the 1901 census Henry Terrett was described as a Millwright and Innkeeper of the Chipping, Kingswood. He was shown on the return as a fifty-one-year-old employer, born in Kingswood. His wife, Ellen, was aged thirty-eight-years, she ran the pub and was born at Earthcott. His children were Annie, aged twenty-one-years; Ethel aged thirteen; Maud aged ten; Florence aged seven and William aged three years. All of them were born at Kingswood.

Henry Terrett died on 27th October 1908. Mr E.J.H. Smith and Mr W. Newman of Bristol (brothers-in-law) attended the funeral. Perhaps I misread this and it should be Messrs. E.J. and H. Smith!)

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Great Grandparents Henry and Ellen Terrett with daughter Florence and Sons William Edward (in front of his mother) and Sidney George (in front of his father)

After Henry Terrett’s death his widow, Ellen Terrett, continued at The Star, Kingswood, and in the directories for 1911 and 1914 she was listed as a Beer Retailer. In September 1909 Ellen’s daughter, Lucy Terrett, married her cousin Albert Terrett and in August of the following year Ellen’s own brother, George Smith, married her step-daughter, Edith Terrett.

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 In 1911 Ellen Terrett was living at the Star Inn, Kingswood. She was described as a forty-eight-year-old widow who was married for 24 years living in eleven rooms. She revealed that she was the mother of seven children, six of whom were still living. She was herself the landlady of a public house working at home but did not know where she was born believing it to be somewhere towards Bristol. Living with her were her daughter Maud Alice Herrick aged twenty and who had been married for less than a year. She was born in Kingswood. Her daughter Florence Emily was seventeen-years-old, a draper’s assistant and born in Kingswood. Her son William Edward was aged thirteen years, a printer’s apprentice at Letter Press and born at Kingswood. Also living with her was her son George Sidney, aged nine years and born at Kingswood. Also Elliott Alfred Herrick, her son-in-law, aged twenty-one-years, a Printer of Letter Press working on his own account and born in Wotton-under-Edge.

 Extract from the Sale Papers of Terrett Bros in 1920:

‘And whereas the said Ellen Terrett and Frederick Henry Terrett executors to the division… in the said will of the said Henry Terrett to the said Edith Jane Terrett and the said F. H. Terrett as…executor of the said will doth hereby acknowledge’

 On 16th August 1913 Ellen Terrett married Thomas Humphrey Fitzherbert Jones at Bedminster Parish Church, Bristol. He was described on the marriage certificate as a thirty-nine-year-old bachelor, a Dealer of 16 Hebron Road. His father was given as Thomas Humphrey Fitzherbert Jones, a Postman. Ellen was a forty-nine-year-old widow of the same address, daughter of Thomas Smith, deceased, a Dealer.

After their marriage the couple settled at The Star at Kingswood.

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Gloucester Journal, 14th February 1914

District Brewster Sessions – Wotton-under-Edge. License of the Star Inn, Kingswood, to Mr. Thomas Jones, he having married Mrs. Terrett, the present licensee.

Thomas Fitzherbert Jones was born in about 1874 at Berkeley. In the 1881 census he was at home with his parents Thomas and Julia Jones at Stones Cottages, Wotton Road, Kingswood. His father was described as a thirty-three-year-old baker, born in Luckington, Wiltshire. Julia was a thirty-four-year-old woman born in King Stanley. Their children were Alice aged eleven, a scholar, born in Bristol; Thomas, a scholar, aged seven and born at Berkeley; Hounds (sic) aged nine, a scholar, born in Bristol; Lucy aged five, a scholar, born in Kingswood and Kate aged fourteen months and born in Kingswood.

Ten years later in 1891 Thomas H.F. Jones was a baker of Charfield Road, Kingswood. His wife, Julia, was with him and six of their children. These included Fownes F. Jones, a clerk in an elastic factory; Thomas, a braid worker; Lucy, Kate, John and Mabel. The four younger children were all born in Kingswood.

 In 1901 Thomas F. Jones was a fifty-three-year-old baker of Hillesley Road, Kingswood. His wife Julia was fifty-four and their children at home included Thomas F. Jones, a twenty-seven-year-old elastic web maker, born in Berkeley; John F. Jones an eighteen year-old elastic web maker and Mabel F. Jones a fifteen-year-old assistant teacher at the school.

Ellen Jones died on 16th September 1930 and was buried on 20th September at Kingswood.

On the death certificate Ellen was described as having died at The Chipping, Kingswood, aged sixty-eight-years. She was the wife of Thomas Humphrey Fitzherbert Jones an elastic braider. The cause of death was given as Uraemia and Chronic Interstitial Nephritis. No post mortem took place and the death was certified by Charles Davies M.R.C.S.. Ellen Meek, Registrar, registered the death on 17th September 1930 and the informant was A.M. Herrick, her daughter, of The Chipping, Wotton-under-Edge, who was present at the death.

Citizen, Thursday 12th September 1907

The Revision Courts of Mid Gloucestershire – The Conservatives had one claim for the Kingswood List which was allowed – Mr T.H.F. Jones

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Great Uncle Frederick Henry Terrett (1882-1949) with his mother Ellen Jones (1862-1930), nee Smith (Great Grandmother) and his wife Margaret (1885-1965) nee Cornock and others. An original photograph given to me by Olive Terrett. Left to Right Back row: Frederick Henry Terrett, Ellen Jones, X, Margaret Terrett nee Cornock. Front row: X, Ruth Ellen Terrett (1916- ) who later married Walter Henry Warner.

Dursley Gazette 20th September 1930:

A loss to Kingswood – Kingswood has to mourn the loss of Mrs. T.H.F. Jones whose death occurred at the Star Inn on Tuesday after an illness of about 6 weeks duration. Mrs. Jones has lived in Kingswood for the past 50 years and was held in high respect and esteem by all. The funeral has been fixed for this afternoon.

Dursley Gazette 27th September 1930:

Largely attended Kingswood Funeral. The Late Mrs. T.H.F. Jones

There was a large attendance at the funeral at Kingswood Church on Saturday of Mrs. Jones, wife of Mr. Thomas H.F. Jones of whose death at the age of 63 years was recorded in last week’s Gazette. Rev. P.R. Ormsby (Rector) officiated.

Principal Mourners: Mr. T.H.F. Jones (widower); Messrs. Fred; William and George Terrett (sons);

Mrs. G. Smith, Mrs G. Werrett of Warmley, Mrs A. Terrett of Bath, Mrs E. Herrick of Wotton-under-Edge and Mrs. G. Milner of Meare (daughters); Messrs G. Werrett and E. Herrick (sons-in-law); Messrs. G. Smith, Edward Smith of Bristol, Alfred Smith of Gloucester and Josiah Smith of Bristol (brothers); Mrs. William Newman of Bristol (sister); Mr William Newman, Mr Fownes Jones and Mr. Jack Jones (brothers-in-law) and Mrs Josiah Smith (sister-in-law); Messrs. Dan Terrett and Edward Terrett (nephews); Mr jim Terrett (grandson) and Sid Terrett, Stanley Jones and Lawrie Jones (nephews) …

Wreaths: Husband Tom; Her beloved children; Elly and children (Wotton); Lilly, Gracie and Family; Dan, Emily and Family; Ted, Lill and Family; Josh, Hetty and Family; Harry, Rose and Family; Uncle Tom and Aunty Alice; Fownes, Eva and Family; Will, Walt and Lottie (Mountain Ash); Mr and Mrs Hedley Mogg; Hilda, Denis and Hubert (Derby); Mrs Cornock and Family (Hawkesbury Upton); H. Bennett and Mr. And Mrs. Pockett; Mrs Evans; Mr and Mrs Neil and Family; Mabel and Walter; Mr and Mrs M. Always; S. Always and M. Lewis; Mr and Mrs H. Pearce; Mr and Mrs H. Organ; and a few friends. Committee and Members of Kingswood Branch of the Women’s Unionist Conservative Association.

 On 29th December 1941 Thomas Fitzherbert-Jones married a widow, Eva Matilda Blick, of 28 Lower Street, Stroud, at Holy Trinity Church, Stroud. She was the daughter of Alfred Davis, a cloth worker. Thomas Fitzherbert-Jones died on 9th June 1951 aged seventy-seven-years and was buried on 14th June 1951 at Kingswood. His widow, Eva, died on 17th June 1959, aged eighty-one-years, at Uplands, Stroud.

For more information about the Smith Family see my blog:

Thomas and Sarah Smith of Hill, Earthcott, Cromhall and Tytherington

https://wp.me/p4BX9P-KW

The children of Henry and Ellen Terrett:

4. FREDERICK HENRY TERRETT

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Frederick Henry Terrett was born in 1882 and baptised at St Mary’s Kingswood on 2nd April 1882.

In the 1891 census his father, Henry was a publican and millwright of the Star Inn, Kingswood. He was aged forty-years. His wife, Ellen, was aged twenty-eight-years and born at Earthcott. Frederick was aged nine years

In the 1901 census he was living at Cowmeadow, Kingswood. He was described as a nineteen-year-old millwright and worker, born in Kingswood. His landlord was Rowland Wyatt, a widower, of twenty-nine-years, a stone mason, worker, born in Sinwell, Wotton-under-Edge.

The Dursley Gazette for 10th April 1909 reported that Mr. Frederick H. Terrett had purchased a dwelling house and garden in Wickwar Road, Kingswood, from Mr. Fred. W. Fry.

On 13th March 1910 he married Margaret Cornock at Wotton-under-Edge. Margaret was the sister of Annie Cornock who had married Fred’s cousin, Henry Terrett, in 1895. Their parents Charles and Ruth Cornock had fourteen children in total.

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Dursley Gazette 16th April 1910:

Pretty Wedding at Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church – Terrett-Cornock

A great deal of interest was manifested in the marriage on Wednesday last of Mr. Frederick Henry Terrett (son of the late Mr. H. Terrett) of the well-known engineering firm of Terrett Bros. Kingswood to Miss Margaret Cornock, youngest daughter of the late Mr. Charles Cornock (well known in connection with Coombe Valley Brewery Co.) and Mrs. Cornock of Coombe Road, Wotton-under-Edge. The wedding took place at the Parish Church with Rev. C.R. Cottell (Rector of Kingswood) officiating. The Bride was given away by her brother Mr. Newton Cornock of Slimbridge. Maud and Louisa Terrett (sister and cousin of the Groom) were bridesmaids. Mr. Henry Terrett of Wickwar, cousin of the Groom, fulfilled the duties of best man. The reception took place at the home of the bride’s mother. There were numerous gifts including a handsome silver teapot the gift of Mrs. Stanley Tubbs.

Citizen, Thursday 14th April 1910:

Wotton-under-Edge Wedding

A pretty wedding took place at the St Mary’s Church on Wednesday, the contracting parties being Mr. Frederick Henry Terrett, son of the late Mr. Henry Terrett, of the well-known engineering firm of Terrett Bros, Wotton-under-Edge, and of Miss Margaret Cornock, daughter of the late Mr. Charles Cornock, well-known in connection with the Coombe Valley Brewery Co.

The bride, who was given away by her brother, was attired in primrose silk with silver braid, and carried a lovely shower bouquet of marguerites and lilies. She was attended by two bridesmaids – the Misses M. and L. Terrett (sister and cousin of the bridegroom respectively) – both of whom wore blue delaine dresses, with large white hats trimmed with roses and foliage and carried shower bouquets. After a reception at the bride’s mother’s Mr and Mrs Terrett left for Devonshire, the bride’s travelling dress being of blue cotton. The presents were very numerous.

In 1911 Frederick Henry Terrett was aged twenty-nine and had been married for less than a year. He was described as a millwright working at home and born at Kingswood, Wotton-under-Edge. Margaret was aged twenty-five and born at Wotton-under-Edge. They were living at Chestal Villa, Kingswood, in six rooms.

In 1913 Fred received a quarter share in the business premises at Walk Mill and he became established as an engineer.

The story was taken up in the Stroud News & Journal report of 1980:

 ‘After a huge fire demolished the timber mill, the firm moved to Crowmeadow in about 1920 and has traded there until the present time. Built by Mr. Frederick Terrett the premises traded under his name until 1955 when a Limited Company was formed… The majority of the local quarries including Barnhill, Yate Rocks, the Ridings, Wickwar and Slickstones were started by F.H. Terrett with Frederick installing the first crusher himself at Chipping Sodbury Quarry, which is now part of the big ARC complex. He was well-known locally as a general engineer with vast experience in steam and water power, and he became closely connected with R.A. Lister & Co. Ltd of Dursley.’

Fred Terrett died on 18th September 1949 aged 67 years and he was buried on 21st September at Kingswood. His wife Margaret, aged 80 years, died on 27th September 1965 at Fleet. She is buried with her husband at Kingswood.

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Headed Notepaper:

Frederick H. Terrett, Practical Engineer and Millwright. Specialist in steam, oil & water power, repairs, overhauls etc. Hydraulic rams also windmills supplied and fitted for all classes of water schemes. First Class Workmanship. All descriptions of Machinery supplied and fitted. Hillesley Road, Kingswood, W-u-E, Established 100 years, Railway Station: Charfield L.M.S. Telegrams – “Frederick Terrett, Kingswood, Wotton-under-Edge. Telephone Wotton-under-Edge 2146.

Valuation of the Estate of F.H. Terrett for Messrs Goldingham & Jotcham, Solicitors:

Furnished Tenancy of ‘The Laurels’, Household Furniture, Wearing Apparel & Effects valued by Davis, Champion & Payne in Oct 1949: Value £165-17-0d.

Valuation of Machinery (very old), stock in trade and utensils by Rouch & Penny of Bristol:

 Value £188-5-0d

Valuation of Ford Flat Bed Lorry 24 H.P. 1931 Model, HY3589: Value £25

The Properties on 28th October for District Valuer:

‘A detached brick built and slated dwelling house known as ‘The Laurels’, Hillesley road, Small entrance passage, two reception rooms, kitchen, pantry, scullery, bathroom with fitted bath and W.C., three bedrooms, two attics, small office and stores. Elec., gas, town water, small garden, garage, yard and brick built workshop with corrugated iron roof, concrete floor and sliding double doors. Rateable Value Ho. £12, Workshop £3, Roof in poor condition. Value £1,350

Two stone built, slated cottages – 3 and 4 Comeley’s Row. Each: 2 bedrooms, living room, back kitchen, Mains Gas, Water, Vault lavatories, small garden. Let to Mrs Dumbolds and Mr F. Sutton at rentals of £28-12-0d per annum. Landlord paying rates. Rateable Value £5 each. Value £150’

5. EDWARD FRANK TERRETT

Edward Frank was baptised at Kingswood on 26th June 1885 and was buried as Frank Edward on 25th October 1887 aged two years and six months.

 6. LUCY ETHEL TERRETT

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Lucy was born on 11th January 1888 and baptised at St Mary’s Church, Kingswood, on 1st April in that year.

In the 1891 census her father Henry was a publican and millwright of the Star Inn, Kingswood. He was aged forty-years. His wife, Ellen, was aged twenty-eight-years and born at Earthcott. Ethel was aged three years.

In the 1901 census she was at home, aged thirteen years and born in Kingswood. She married her first cousin, Albert Terrett on 29th September 1909 at Kingswood. Albert was born on 7th December 1876 and he joined the Hong Kong Police in 1897. He was killed in the execution of his duty in 1919 on his way to Canton to make an arrest. When he died he held the rank of Detective Chief Inspector.

From 1922 Mrs A. Terrett was living at 11 George’s Road, Fairfield Park, Bath according to the Post Office Directories. It was a small terraced house five doors down from the Claremont public house, on the very edge of town. Ethel seems to have remained there until 1930 when she appears to have moved down the road to 15 Eastbourne, nearly opposite to the Claremont Methodist Church. Ethel was listed at this address until the 1965 Post Office directory but not 1967.

On 17th October 1925 Grace Margaret Eley was married from this address, bride of Ethel’s brother, William Edward Terrett. The voters lists for 1924 and 1925 do not reveal that either Bill or Grace were living at that address as the only person listed is Lucy Ethel Terrett. In the directories for 1926 to 1928 George Edward Denman was living at 13 George’s Road. He may have been Bill Terrett’s former employer in Bristol. Perhaps he retired to Bath.

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Ethel lived in Bath and died on 8th October 1961.

Their son, Herbert Ramsey Terrett, was born on 19th January 1914 and married Beatrice M. Salter during the third quarter of 1948 in Chippenham Registration District. He joined the Royal Hong Kong Police on 30th August 1935. He was a prisoner of war from December 1941 until September 1945 during the Japanese occupation of Hong Kong. In May 1946 he was promoted to Sub Inspector and in 1955 he was awarded the Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service. He retired in October 1967 having been promoted to Senior Superintendent in August 1961. He died in January 1998 in the Poole Registration District.

The local newspaper reports:

‘Interesting Wedding at Kingswood, Terrett-Terrett. An interesting and pretty wedding took place at St Mary’s Parish Church, Kingswood, on Wednesday, Sept 29th, when the officiating clergyman was the Rev. C.R. Cottell, who united in holy wedlock, Mr Albert Terrett (Detective Sergeant. of the China Police) and second son of the late Mr Joseph Terrett of Kingswood, and Miss Ethel Lucy Terrett, 3rd daughter of the late Mr. H. Terrett, Kingswood (both being of the family of the well-known engineering firm of Terrett Bros.) The bride, who was given away by her brother, Mr Frederick Henry Terrett, was charmingly attired in an Empire Gown of Chinese Crepe Silk, with train of similar material, the trimming being guipure lace, with pearl, silver and gallon finish. She wore an embroidered tulle veil and a wreath of orange blossoms, while she also carried a beautiful shower bouquet of roses, lilies, fern, etc., the gift of the bridegroom. She was attended by two bridesmaids, these were Miss Maud Alice Terrett (sister of the bride), and Miss Louisa Terrett (sister of the bridegroom). Both were prettily dressed in pale blue satin striped delaine, trimmed with Peau-de-Soie silk, lace and passementerie, with hats to match both dresses and trimming. They carried bouquets of roses, sweet peas, and maiden-hair fern, and wore novel gold brooches, the gifts of the bridegroom. The duties of best man were undertaken by Mr. William Terrett (brother of the bridegroom). There was an exceedingly large congregation to witness the nuptials, both families being very well known, while there was also a large number of guests.

Upon leaving the Church the bridal party was liberally showered. They were at once driven to the home of the bride’s mother at The Chipping, Kingswood, where a large number of guests sat down at the wedding breakfast, and after the usual good wishes, and receiving many hearty congratulations, Mr and Mrs Terrett left for a tour in the South of England, via Weymouth, where they arranged to spend the first week of the honeymoon. The bride’s travelling dress was of saxe blue cloth trimmed with black silk and black ouida, with hat to match. She also wore a Chinese silver waistband, the gift of the bridegroom. After their tour, Mr and Mrs Terrett who were the recipients of about 100 presents of a useful and costly variety, will return to Kingswood, and then leave for their future home, which will be at Hong Kong, China.’

Provisional List
Hong Kong Police Deaths in the Course of Duty (1841-1941)

Albert TERRET* Detective Inspector 5.6.1919 Drowned in the East River, Guangdong, whilst on the way to Ho Yuen, to locate a suspect

Inscriptions for cemetery sections 17-47

This list was compiled by Patricia Lim with the help of Cliff Atkins. It is part of the research for Patricia’s recently released book, Forgotten Souls: A Social History of the Hong Kong Cemetery

1—/01/02- In loving remembrance/ of/ Albert Terrett/ native of Kingswood/ Gloucestershire/ late detective inspector of/ Hong Kong Police Force/ who was drowned in the East River/ near Waichow/ June 4th 1919/ aged 43 years/ Sleep on our loved one and face thy rest/ we loved thee well/ but Jesus loved thee best/ erected by his loving wife CEW & Co. Ltd. # 8360HK

On January 22, 1918, the violent deaths of five police officers shocked Hong Kong, in one of the most sensational incidents to have ever taken place in the territory.

Commonly referred to as the “Siege of Gresson Street”, this description does not fully reflect the scope of the encounter. Initiated by an apparently routine execution of a search warrant to locate the proceeds of an inside robbery, it led to a running gun battle through the streets of Wanchai, before the remaining culprits were surrounded in their lair, at No. 6 Gresson Street. In the aftermath, five Police Officers were dead, including Detective Inspector Mortimer O’Sullivan, Detective Sergeant A87 Henry Goscombe Clarke, Detective Constable C88 Kwong Kui, Detective Constable C29 Kwong Sang and Police Constable B402 Moola Singh. Five other Police Officers were wounded. Three of the culprits were killed and another shot and apprehended. A number of bystanders were also injured.

The siege phase of the incident was remarkable for a number of things. Firstly, and probably for the only time, a Governor of Hong Kong attended a crime scene and personally negotiated with a barricaded and armed suspect. Sir Francis Henry May had, of course, served as the Captain Superintendent of Police between 1893 and 1901. Secondly, the Royal Garrison Artillery was used to “bomb” out the last member of the gang, who had refused to surrender. The full story of this incident has yet to be told, with many of the details lost with the destruction of Force records during World War II.

The grandsons of Sergeant Henry Goscombe Clarke visited the Force in January. Simon Clarke from England was visiting his brother Dennis who lives and works in Hong Kong. The family has extensive links with the Force. Their father Goddard Goscombe Clarke joined the Force in the 1930s (and was posted to the current Wanchai Police Station just after it was built), as did their uncle Jack Goddard. They visited Gresson Street, Wanchai Police Station, and the vacated Central Police Station complex. They also met retired Senior Superintendent, Wally Scragg who had been interned in Stanley Internment Camp (where Dennis was born) with their father and uncle during WWII. Their grandfather is buried in the Hong Kong Cemetery in Happy Valley. They also have a brother who did not survive internment, and is buried in Stanley Military Cemetery.

Also on hand to meet the Clarke family at Central Police Station were Inspector Wally Murison of Marine Police Headquarters, the grandson of Chief Detective Inspector William Murison, and Dominic Stead, currently living and working in Hong Kong, who is the great-grandson of Chief Inspector (later Assistant Superintendent) James Kerr. Chief Inspectors Murison and Kerr both received King’s Police Medals at a presentation ceremony in Central Police Station on July 8 1921 from H.E. the Governor Sir Reginald Edward Stubbs. At that time, they were the only two Chief Inspectors in the Force. Both had joined in the 1890s, and had risen through the ranks. William Murison who took part in the investigation into the Gresson Street case, retired in 1923. James Kerr had an eventful career, with Police Launch 4 sinking under him in 1896, as well as being in command of the Fire Brigade in 1918, at the time of the fire that destroyed the Jockey Club stands in Happy Valley killing over 600 people. He was the first officer in the Force to rise from the rank of Constable to Assistant Superintendent, and retired in 1925 when he was in command of the Water Police.

(Article contributed by Mr Richard Morgan, member of Force Museum Advisory Committee)

Photo: Hong Kong Police detective staff in 1914: (front row left to right) Sergeant Pincott, Sergeant Mills (wounded at Gresson Street), unknown, Inspector William Murison, Chief Detective Inspector Collett, Inspector Albert Terrett; (second row left to right) Sergeant Murphy, Sergeant Henry Goscombe Clarke (killed at Gresson Street), Sergeant Reynolds, unknown, unknown, unknown, unknown, Sergeant Kendall.

7. ALICE MAUD HERRICK

Alice Maud Terrett was born during 1890 but not baptised until 29th May 1898 when she was christened with her sister Flo and brother Bill at St Mary’s Church, Kingswood.

In the 1891 census her father Henry was a publican and millwright of the Star Inn, Kingswood. He was aged forty-years. His wife, Ellen, was aged twenty-eight-years and born at Earthcott. Alice M. was aged seven months. In the 1901 census she was aged ten years, at home and born in Kingswood.

She married Elliott Alfred Herrick, a printer of Wotton-under-Edge during the first quarter of 1911 in Dursley Registration District. He was born during the second quarter of 1890 in the same registration district. At the time of the 1891 census his family was living at Long Street, Wotton-under-Edge. Alfred Charles Herrick was a thirty-five-year-old Printer and Drawing Tutor born at Haverstock Hill, London. His wife Ellen Jane was aged thirty-eight-years and born at Berkhampstead, Hertfordshire. Elliott Alfred was aged one year and was the youngest of five children. It would appear from the children’s places of birth that the Herricks had moved to Wotton from Glemsford, Suffolk, in about 1886. In 1891 their neighbours were James and Jane Brown, Watchmakers. Ten years later he was a pupil at Melksham Farm, Stinchcombe, a small private school run by Henry W.F. Smith.

In 1911 Ellen Terrett was living at the Star Inn, Kingswood. She was described as a forty-eight-year-old widow who was married for 24 years living in eleven rooms. She revealed that she was the mother of seven children, six of whom were still living. She was herself the landlady of a public house working at home but did not know where she was born believing it to be somewhere towards Bristol. Living with her were her daughter Maud Alice Herrick aged twenty and who had been married for less than a year. She was born in Kingswood. Elliott Alfred Herrick, her son-in-law, aged twenty-one-years, a Printer of Letter Press working on his own account and born in Wotton-under-Edge.

Elliott A. Herrick and a Maude A. Herrick both  died during 1965 in Bristol Registration District.

8. FLORENCE EMILY MILNER

Florence Emily Terrett was born on 14th June 1893 and baptised with Alice and Bill on 29th May 1898. In the 1901 census she was at home aged seven years and born in Kingswood.

In 1911 Ellen Terrett was living at the Star Inn, Kingswood. She was described as a forty-eight-year-old widow who was married for 24 years living in eleven rooms. She revealed that she was the mother of seven children, six of whom were still living. She was herself the landlady of a public house working at home but did not know where she was born believing it to be somewhere towards Bristol. Living with her was her daughter Florence Emily who was seventeen-years-old, a draper’s assistant and born in Kingswood.

Florence Emily married William George Milner who was a Sergeant in the Royal Air Force during the First World War. William George, born in 1892, was the son of Robert George Milner, a licensee. Their wedding took place at St Mary’s Kingswood on 26th September 1917. The Dursley Gazette for Saturday 6th October 1917 reported: ‘St Mary’s Church, Kingswood on September 26th (Wednesday) Flo Emeline Terrett (sic) youngest daughter of the late Henry Terrett of Kingswood, to Flight Sergeant W. Milner R.F.C. of Mere, Wilts. The bride was given away by her brother Fred Terrett’. Later on they were licensees of the Butt of Sherry at Mere.

The parents of William George Milner were Robert George Milner who died aged fifty-seven-years in 1921 in Mere Registration District and his wife Rose M. Milner (nee Wiscombe) who died in the same registration district during 1948 aged eighty-two-years. They married in Sherborne Registration District during the first quarter of 1891.

In 1911 Robert G. Milner and his wife Rose were living in six rooms at Bay Villa, Gillingham in Shaftesbury Registration District. Robert was a forty-seven-year-old colour sergeant instructor in the Territorial Force, 4th Dorset Regiment, who had been married for twenty-one-years with one child. Robert was born in South Hackney, London. His forty-six-year-old wife was born in Sherborne and her father, William Wiscombe, a retired dairyman, aged seventy-five-years, was staying with them. He was born at Yarcomb in Devon. William George was not at home on the night of the census. He may be the W.G. Milner, aged nineteen years, who was boarding in Bedford and was involved in electrical engineering. His place of birth was not known.

Twenty years earlier Robert Milner had been a twenty-seven-year-old Sergeant in the Dorset Regiment and he was stationed at Fordington St George at the District Depot Barracks.

William G. Milner died in Mere Registration District during 1942 aged fifty years and Florence Emily died in 1976 in the same registration district.

9. WILLLIAM EDWARD TERRETT

William Edward Terrett was born on 28th February 1898, the third son of Henry and Ellen Terrett of the Star Inn, Kingswood. He was baptised with his sisters Alice and Flo at St Mary’s Church, Kingswood, on 29th May 1898.

In the 1901 census Henry Terrett was described as a Millwright and Innkeeper of the Chipping, Kingswood. He was shown on the return as a fifty-one-year-old employer, born in Kingswood. His wife, Ellen, was aged thirty-eight-years, she ran the pub and was born at Earthcott. His children were Annie, aged twenty-one-years; Ethel aged thirteen; Maud aged ten; Florence aged seven and William aged three years. All of them were born at Kingswood.

Henry Terrett died on 27th October 1908. His death certificate recorded that he was a Mechanical Engineer, aged fifty-eight-years. The cause of death was given as Gout, Diabetes and Convulsions. We know from newspaper reports that William attended his father’s funeral and we also know that he was not specifically provided for in his father’s will.

William went to the local school and there is a photograph of him supporting the Kingswood A.F.C. Team in 1908-9.

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In 1911 Ellen Terrett was living at the Star Inn, Kingswood. She was listed in the census return as being a forty-eight-year-old widow who had been married for 24 years and living in eleven rooms. She was the mother of seven children, six of whom were still living. She was herself the landlady of a public house working at home but did not state where she was born believing it to be somewhere towards Bristol. Living with her were her daughter Maud Alice Herrick aged twenty and who had been married for less than a year. She was born in Kingswood. Her daughter Florence Emily was seventeen-years-old, a draper’s assistant and born in Kingswood. Her son William Edward, aged thirteen years, was working as a printer’s apprentice at Letter Press and was born at Kingswood. Also her youngest son, George Sidney, was at home aged nine years and born at Kingswood. In residence at the Star was also Elliott Alfred Herrick, her son-in-law, aged twenty-one-years, a Printer of Letter Press,   working on his own account and born in Wotton-under-Edge.

At the beginning of the First World War we know from a later newspaper account that William Edward Terrett was working as an assistant to Mr R.H. Searle, the outfitter of Wotton-under-Edge.

It was at Wotton-under-Edge, on 1st September 1914, that William Edward Terrett, then aged only sixteen years, enlisted in the Army Ordnance Corps for three years or for as long as the war was to last. In his attestation he stated that he was nineteen-years-old. The notice was read to him by Colour Sergeant J.R. Fry of the Gloucestershire Regiment and this man was to witness his signature. He took his oath before John Morton J.P. The certificate of Medical Examination described him as ‘Fit for Army’ and was signed by Ernest F. Clowes, Recruiting Medical Officer (Civil). We also discover from the extant paperwork that he was 5’8 ½ inches tall (in one reference 5’ 9 ½”). He weighed 119 lbs and he had a 34” expanded chest measurement (which in later records increased to 35 ½”) with a range of two inches. His complexion was described as ‘Fresh’, eyes ‘blue’ and hair ‘brown’. His physical development was listed as ‘F’ and pulse rate as 70. He bore a vaccination mark on his left arm and had been vaccinated during his infancy. His vision was recorded as RE – V = 6/6 and LE – V = 6/6. He was also listed as being a member of the Church of England.

Pte Terrett received the number 01299 and went on to join up the Corps at Aldershot where he was approved on 9th September by Colonel H.D.E. Parsons.

His service was in fact only to last twenty-one-days because he was discharged on 21st September as ‘not being likely to become an efficient soldier’ by Lieutenant Colonel   J.A. Murray who was then commanding the AOC Training Depot at Aldershot. The new recruit’s character was described as ‘Good’ and his address was given as ‘The Chipping, Kingswood, Gloucestershire’. In his papers his trade was altered from ‘outfitter’s assistant’ to ‘storeman’ or ‘warehouseman’. The reason for his discharge was a medical one – ‘displaced internal (illegible) cartilage (?)’.

Clearly he was not deterred by this experience because he enlisted once again into the Army Ordnance Corps, for the duration of the War, on 22nd December 1914, this time with the number 03296. In his attestation papers sworn at Bristol he stated that he had served in the A.O.C and had been discharged. The notice was given to him this time by Colour Sergeant Clarke, a recruiter, and his signature was witnessed by Sergeant W.H. Billingham. Pte Terrett joined the Corps at Woolwich on 28th December. He clearly wasn’t at Woolwich for very long because the date of his entry into the ‘Theatre of War’ in France was given as 21st January 1915.

On 3rd November 1916 he transferred to the 15th Training Reserve Battalion (W.O. 121/8455. A.G. 2b.) with number TR/6/17095 and came back to England. According to the paperwork preserved by War Pensions he retained his former scales of pay. On 19th December 1916 Pte Terrett found himself in trouble whilst serving at Brocton. He was found guilty of ‘Insubordination, Neglecting to Obey an Order and Using Obscene Language to a Non Commissioned Officer’. The witnesses were Lance Corporals Blair, Evans and Mc Claren. The following day Major W.H. Scott imposed his punishment of 7 days ‘FP’ (Full Pay?) No 2. The story is told that a soldier offered to fight and grandfather offered to challange him because the fellow had been responsible for getting him into trouble.

On 1st March 1917 Pte Terrett was posted to the 12th Training Reserve Battalion and he served at home in the United Kingdom until 23rd May 1917.

From the pages of the Wotton Gazette:

 12th May 1917: ‘Kingswood – Joined Army at 16. Pte W. Terrett of Kingswood has been home on draft leave. He recently transferred to the Infantry and now belongs to the Notts & Derby Regt (sic). It will be remembered that Pte Terrett was formerly engaged at Mr Searle’s. He volunteered at the commencement of the war, when he was 16 and was accepted for the Ordnance Corps. He was quickly in France where he served for two years. Pte Terrett expects to go overseas again next week’.

On 23rd May 1917 he was posted to France with the British Expeditionary Forces and was serving with the Sixth Battalion, Northamptonshire Regiment from 27th June 1917, as Private 40476. His army number was 5.877.293. On 4th August 1917 he received a ‘G.S.’ (gun shot?) wound to his right shoulder.

From 14th until 28th February 1918 we know from the records that Pte Terrett was on leave in England but he then returned to France and was at Noyon, south of the River Somme. On 22nd March 1918 he suffered a ‘G.S. (gun shot?) wound to his left leg (severe) and was posted back to depot in England on 27th March.

From the pages of the Wotton Gazette:

6th April 1918: ‘Kingswood Soldier’s Terrible Experiences. Writing from hospital at Leicester Pte W. Terrett, a Kingswood soldier, relates the following thrilling experiences in the great enemy offensive:- “We were having a great time the night before it started at Noyon. On the 20th we got the order the stand to, and early the following morning we were driven up as near to the line as possible in motor lorries, and from there we marched into action. We were fighting all that day, and I can tell you there were some men lost on both sides. They drove us back by sheer numbers. The same night old Fritz started to get in on our flanks so we got the order to retire, and I think it was a blessing too, for all the artillery behind us had been knocked out. The Germans soon found we had gone and were soon after us, but anyway we retired in good order and kept them at a distance. After coming back about 4 miles we all got into position just the other side of the canal, the only bridges being mined just ready to blow up. Old Fritz was soon after us. He came flying across the bridge but after about 200 had got over the bridge was blown up, giving them no chance to get over. It was real hell in that position, but my turn did not come until the night of the 22nd, when a shell burst right at my feet. Really I thought my leg had been blown off. A big piece of shell went right through it, breaking the bones, and another piece smashed my big toe. As they were carrying me away another shell burst under the stretcher and blew me in the air, wounding me again, and knocking out all the bearers. I caught it in the back this time. I was then picked up by 2 lancers, who carried me quite five miles to the dressing station. Those two men I think saved my life, for I was bleeding badly. Private Terrett adds that he is going on favourably though in much pain. He lost all his kit.’

He remained in England throughout his long period of convalescence. On 9th April 1918 a request was made for his medical records from North Evington War Hospital in Leicester. On 17th September 1919 a further enquiry was made, this time to the Officer-in-Charge of North Evington War Hospital, Leicester:

‘Please inform me of the present situation of No 40476 Pte W.E. Terrett 6th Northants Regt as the latest information I have of the man is that he was granted leave from the hospital under your command from 20th to 31st December 1918 ‘under W.O. Tel 6953 (a.m. 10.2) 7/12/18 – treat this as urgent’.

On 25th August 1919 Pte Terrett was transferred to the War Hospital at Combe Park, Bath, but there is also some correspondence dated 21st September 1919 which refers to the 5th Northern General Hospital. A Furlough was granted and from 21st January until 21st February 1920 he was to reside at home at the Chipping, Kingswood. At the end of February 1920 there is correspondence held by War Pensions involving the Military Hospital at Devonport.

Whilst convalescing he learnt to embroider and to paint.

Pte Terrett was finally discharged from the Northamptonshire Regiment on 18th September 1920 – ‘being no longer physically fit for War Service’. Pension papers state that he suffered severe injury to his right leg attributed to war service. He had a compound fracture to his Tibia. As a result it was accepted that he had 100% disability and would receive forty shillings per week from 19th August 1920 until 22nd March 1921. His character was described as ‘Very Good’ and he was awarded two wound stripes and a red chevron.

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Having largely recovered, William Edward Terrett was by this time serving his apprenticeship with G.E. Denman, Watchmakers, of 173 Whiteladies Road, Redland, Bristol.

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On 17th October 1925 William Edward Terrett was married after banns to Grace Margaret Eley at St Mary’s Church, Bathwick, Bath, by the Rector, Herbert Folsy Napier. On the certificate the bridegroom was described as a twenty-seven-year-old Watchmaker residing at the time of the marriage at 7 Forester Avenue Bath. His father was given as Henry Terrett dec’d but, in another hand, someone has incorrectly added the word ‘watchmaker’ to the certified copy written on the day. The bride’s details were given as Grace Margaret Eley, a twenty-eight-year-old spinster with no occupation and residing at 11 St George’s Road, Fairfield Park, Bath. Her father was given as Ernest Edward Eley, Farmer. The witnesses were George Edward Jotcham and Ernest Edward Eley.

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7 Forester Avenue was situated close to St Mary’s Church and was occupied by Joseph and Lily Mitchell with John J. Henderson also in residence. These names appear in the Voters’ Registers for 1924 and 1925 and the name Joseph Mitchell appears in the Post Office Directories for 1922 and 1924. The name William Terrett does not appear in these records.

11 St George’s Road, Fairfield Park, is actually 11 George’s Road. The house was occupied from 1922 until about 1929 by Ethel Terrett, Bill’s widowed sister. Again there are no further clues offered in the registers of voters for 1924 and 1925. This terraced house was very much on the edge of Bath and five houses down from the former Claremont Public House. In about 1929 Ethel Terrett moved down the road to 15 Eastbourne, almost opposite to the Claremont Methodist Church. Interestingly from about 1926 a George Edward Denman was residing at 13 George’s Road. Was this Bill Terrett’s former employer?

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From about 1927 until 1936 Bill Terrett had a Watchmaker and Jewellery business at 7 Church Street, Tetbury. Headed notepaper proudly announced – ‘Repairs a speciality’ –  Member of the National Association of Goldsmiths of Great Britain & Ireland –  Union of Licensed Gold & Silversmiths, Jewellers, Watchmakers & Opticians.

Grace died in the Gloucester Royal Infirmary on 4th September 1940.

On 5th March 1947 he married Olive Wyatt at Stroud Registry Office. He was described as a Toolmaker at Electrical Engineers. In about 1956 they moved to Ashleigh, High Street, Kingswood,

William Edward Terrett died at Ham Green Hospital, Easton-in-Gordano, on 11th March 1965 aged sixty-seven years.

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10. SIDNEY GEORGE TERRETT

7 Terrett II Gt 8 10.jpgSidney George Terrett was born on 31st December 1902 and was baptised at St Mary’s Kingswood on 19th July 1903. In 1911 Ellen Terrett was living at the Star Inn, Kingswood. She was described as a forty-eight-year-old widow who was married for 24 years living in eleven rooms. She revealed that she was the mother of seven children, six of whom were still living. She was herself the landlady of a public house working at home but did not know where she was born believing it to be somewhere towards Bristol. Living with her was her son George Sidney, aged nine years and born at Kingswood.

He was a factory worker and during the early 1960’s lived at Ashleigh with his brother Bill and Olive. After Bill’s death he went to live in a cottage at Crow Meadow, Kingswood. He later moved to Eastington House Residential Home and died at Quedgeley on July 8th 1992. During the Second World War he served in the Kingswood station of the Fire Service.

The newspaper reported:

‘A well known former resident of Kingswood, Wotton-under-Edge, Mr George Sidney Terrett (89), died at Woolstrop House, Quedgeley on July 8th. Born in Kingswood where he had resided all his life, prior to going to Eastington and Woolstrop House, he has been employed by Messrs Tubbs Lewis up to retirement. Mr Terrett, who formerly lived in Crow Meadow, was known in the village for his gardening and grass cutting. The funeral service took place on July 11th at Kingswood Parish Church… and was followed by interment in Kingswood Cemetery’.


FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS FAMILY PLEASE CONTACT: btsarnia@gmail.com

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