btsarnia

A tribute to the life and work of Brian Torode

Barton Family of the Forge, Slimbridge, Part II

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Sarah Barton (nee Perrett) 1818-1909 with her daughter, Fanny

BARTON FAMILY OF THE FORGE, SLIMBRIDGE, PART II

The sixty-one Grandchildren of John and Sarah Barton:

 


Eight children of Mary (nee Barton) and Joseph Alfred Woodward

Five children of Elizabeth Perrett (nee Barton) and James Cookley

Five children of Eliza (nee Barton) and Charles Sims

Twelve children of Louisa (nee Barton) and James Seymour Merrett

Thirteen children of William and Ellen Barton (nee Pick)

Six children of Fanny (nee Barton) and William Drinkwater

Seven children of David and Laura Barton (nee Lucas)

Five children of Henry and Fanny Kate Barton (nee Boulton)


Barton Family of Thornbury, North Nibley and Slimbridge

Robert Barton (1604(?)-1663) and Susannah Holway (-1684)

Yeoman of Thornbury

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 John Barton I (1636-1687) and Mary Thurston (1645-1691)

 Yeoman of Thornbury

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John Barton II (1672-1727) and Sarah Winstone (1679/80-1745)

Butcher of Thornbury

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Thomas Barton (1714-1774) and Sarah Giles (Fosket) (-1788)

Butcher of Thornbury

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Richard Barton (1741-1801) and Hannah Watts (1757c-1820)

Farmer of North Nibley

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William Barton I (1784-1842) and Mary Dommett (1789-1870)

Farmer and Butcher of Churchstanton, Woodford, Easton-in-Gordano|

John Barton III (1818-1878) and Sarah Perrott (1820c-1909)

Blacksmith of Cambridge and Slimbridge

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The children of Mary and Joseph Alfred Woodward:

1. FREDERICK GEORGE WOODWARD

Frederick George Woodward, son of Joseph Woodward, a gardener, and his wife, Mary, was baptised at Stinchcombe on 10th March 1867. He was at home in North Nibley with his family for the 1871 to 1881 censuses but in 1891 they were at Berrow in Worcestershire.

Frederick married Brenda Beard on 1st June 1898 at Redmarley D’Abitot Church. Frederick was described as a thirty-two-year-old Farmer of Berrow, son of Joseph Alfred Woodward, a farmer. Brenda was a twenty-six-year-old daughter of Richard Beard, a farmer of Redmarley. The witnesses were Richard and Blanche Beard.

Brenda was born during the first quarter of 1872 in Upton-upon-Severn Registration District. In 1881, on the night of the census, her parents were living at Lower Road, Cottage, Hanley Castle. Her father, Richard Beard, was a thirty-two-year-old coachman, born at Colwall, and her mother Rose, aged thirty-six-years, was born at Bosbury. Brenda was then a nine-year-old scholar.

By 1901, Fred G. Woodward was farming back in Stinchcombe at Standall Farm and he was described as an employer. He was listed in the return as aged thirty-two-years and born in Stinchcombe. His wife Brenda was born in Malvern Wells and aged twenty-nine-years. Their children included Muriel M., aged one year, and born in Stinchcombe and Fred. S. Woodward, who was aged one month, and born in Stinchcombe. Staying with them was Fred’s cousin Henry C. Sims, a farmer’s cousin, aged twenty years, and born in Slimbridge. Another was Winifred Beard, a general domestic servant aged thirteen years, born in Kingston, Surrey.

In 1911 Frederick Woodward was farming at Standall Farm, Stinchcombe and living in eight rooms. He was described in the return as aged forty-four-years, married for twelve and with three children. He was listed as a farmer and employer born at Stinchcombe. His wife Brenda was aged thirty-nine-years and was born at Malvern Wells. Their children included Muriel Mary aged eleven years; Frederick Stanley aged ten years and Freda Christabel Joyce aged two years. All three children were born at Stinchcombe.

Frederick Woodward died on 3rd November 1920, aged fifty-three-years, and his wife, Brenda, died on 2nd January 1923 aged fifty-one-years. They were both buried at Stinchcombe and their memorial is near to the door of the church. The inscriptions include the words ‘For ever with the lord’ and ‘Asleep in his arms’.

2. CHARLES HENRY WOODWARD

Charles Henry Woodward was born on 8th March 1868 at North Nibley and baptised at Stinchcombe on 26th April 1868. He was at home for the 1871 and 1881 censuses. In the first he was aged three years and in the second thirteen.

At the time of the 1891 census Charles H. Woodward was described as a twenty-three-year-old Assistant Farmer and he was born at Stinchcombe. He was staying with his uncle and aunt, Henry and Julia Woodward, at Whitehouse Farm, Stinchcombe. Henry Woodward was a forty-five-year-old farmer, who had been born at Stinchcombe, and Julia was aged forty-six and born at Uley. Their general domestic servant, Charlotte Fryer, was sixteen sixteen-years-old and came from Berkeley. Ten years later Henry and Julia Woodward were still farming at Whitehouse Farm.

On 13th February 1896 Charles Henry Woodward married Louisa Kate Morgan at Dursley. She was born  on 17th September 1873, the daughter of Henry J. Morgan, who was, in 1901, a builder of Churchend, Slimbridge.

In 1901 Charles Henry Woodward and his wife, Louisa Kate, were farming at Dursley Road, Cam. He was described on the return as a thirty-three-year-old farmer and employer born at Stinchcombe. His wife was aged twenty-seven-years and born at Slimbridge. At home was their ten month old son, Alfred H. Woodward who was born at Cam

In 1911 Charles Henry Woodward was living in a five roomed house and farming at Barnsley Farm, Stinchcombe. He was described as a forty-three-year-old farmer, married for fifteen years, with three children of whom two had survived. His wife Louisa was aged thirty-seven-years and born at Slimbridge. Their children included Alfred Henry ,aged ten years, and Norman Francis, aged seven years. Both were at school but Alfred was listed as born at Cam and Norman at Stinchcombe.

Dairy Farmer, Charles H. Woodward, was at ‘The Laurels’, Stinchcombe, with his wife, Louisa, at the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales.

Charles Henry Woodward died in 1940 and his widow in 1958.

According to Richard Barton of Orkney:

‘You ask if Frederick George Woodward had more brothers and sisters. The four that are buried at Berrow, Worcestershire, lived at Rye Court as long as I can remember and then, when they got older, moved to The Oaks. I think there were three more sisters an Edith, Florence and Emily Woodward who lived at Woodfield, Cam. You may be able to check this out. I also think there was another brother. I worked for Dick Wood of Castle Farm, Dursley, for a time. His brother, Eddie, had a farm out Stinchcombe way. The man who worked for him was a Norman Woodward. Dick Wood introduced us and told us we were cousins. I don’t know anything about them as Mother never spoke about them, so that’s another line of enquiry. When I was at Dursley Secondary School there was an Alec, Ken and Mary Woodward, from Cam or Stinchcombe. I was led to believe we were related.’

From Mike Morgan:

‘Last year there was a get-together of “Morgans” in Gloucestershire – defined as descendants of Henry John Morgan and Mary Pickford. They had 12 children, including (a) Alfred Edward, my grandfather and (b) Louisa Kate, who married Charles Henry Woodward on 13 Feb 1896. I believe that Charles Henry was one of 8 children and that his parents were Joseph A and Mary nee Barton. The get-together was a great success and a lot of us hope to repeat it at some stage, hopefully with even greater representation.’

3. JOSEPH WOODWARD, cousin of Edward Percy Barton

Joseph Woodward was born on 23rd September 1869 at North Nibley and was baptised at the parish church on 24th October. He was at home with his family for all the censuses from 1871 until 1911 and from the 1891 census they were living at Berrow.  In the last of these he was described as a thirty-one-year-old farmer’s son who was born in North Nibley.

Dairy Farmers, Joseph and James Woodward, and their two sisters, Mary and Fanny, were at Rye Court, Berrow, at the time of the 1939 Register for England and Wales.

He died at Berrow on 25th March 1955 aged 85 years and is buried in the churchyard there.

Obituary in the Magazine of the Combined Parishes of Berrow and Pendock for May 1955:

‘Joseph Woodward (1869-1955) Berrow has lost a well-known and delightful character through the death of Mr. Joseph Woodward at the age of 85. He was most sincere in all his dealings and always very generous in giving whenever help was asked of him.

Mr. Woodward had lived in Berrow most of his life. First at Rye Court Farm and then the last fourteen years at Oak Farm. For thirty-three years he was Churchwarden, like his father before him, at Berrow Church, and he served under five consecutive Vicars.

He only spent one day in bed through illness during his life. When asked how he managed to look so well, he replied “By having a contented mind.” And certainly this showed in his face. His passing will be a loss to all who knew him and he will be sadly missed in the district. N.F.W.’

The Vicar added in his letter:

‘Whilst the April number was being printed Mr. Woodward passed to the higher life. I met him only a few times, but realised what a sterling character he was and what valued work he did during the years for Berrow church. I have asked one who knew him and his work well to write a short tribute to his memory. We extend to his relatives our warm sympathies.’

4. WILLIAM WOODWARD

William Woodward was born on 2nd March 1871 at North Nibley. He was at home in all the censuses from 1871 until 1911. In the last he was described as a forty-year-old farmer’s son, born at North Nibley.

During the third quarter of 1912 William Woodward married Grace Eleanor W. Pinson in Upton-upon-Severn Registration District. She was born on 27th April 1884. In 1901 Grace was with her family at Hotley How (sp?) Castlemorton. Her father, Charles J. Pinson, was a forty-two-year-old farmer, born at Tenbury, and her mother was named Julia.

Farmer William Woodward and his wife, Grace, were living at Whitings Farm, Berrow, at the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales.

It is possible that William Woodward died within Upton-upon-Severn Registration District during 1945, aged seventy-four-years. A Grace E. Woodward died in Gloucester Registration District during 1954.

 5. JAMES WOODWARD

James Woodward was born on 7th March 1872 at North Nibley and baptised in the parish church on 19th May. He was at home for all the censuses from 1881 until 1911. In the last he was described as a thirty-nine-year-old farmer’s son who was born in North Nibley.

Dairy Farmers, James and Joseph Woodward, and their two sisters, Mary and Fanny, were at Rye Court, Berrow, at the time of the 1939 Register for England and Wales. He died at Ryecourt, Berrow, on 10th September 1940 aged sixty-eight-years and was buried in the churchyard there.

6. JOHN WOODWARD

John Woodward was born on 11th May 1873 at North Nibley and baptised at St Martin’s Church on 20th July. He was at home for the 1881 census and was described as a seven-year-old scholar, born in North Nibley. In the 1891 census he was aged seventeen-years and staying with his aunt, Eliza Sims, at Clark’s Farm, Hardwicke. He was described as a farmer’s son, born in North Nibley. In 1901 he was at home in Berrow, described as a farmer’s son, aged twenty-seven-years and listed as born in North Nibley.

During the second quarter of 1907 John Woodward married Clara Elizabeth Colston within Upton-upon-Severn Registration District. Clara was born on 28th March 1876 within Upton-upon-Severn Registration District. In 1891 she was at home with her family at Holly Bed, Castlemorton. John C. Coleston, her father, was a farmer, who had been born at Birtsmorton, and her mother Sarah, was listed as born at Castlemorton. Clara, who was also born in Castlemorton, was fifteen-years-old.

In 1911 John Woodward and his family were living in eight rooms and farming at The Grove, Pencombe, Stoke Lacy. He was described as born at North Nibley, a thirty-seven-year-old farmer who had been married for three years with one child. His wife, Clara Elizabeth Woodward, was aged thirty-five-years, engaged in dairy work and born at Castlemorton. Their son Alfred John Woodward was aged five months and born at Stoke Lacy. With them was James Richard Munn, a fourteen-year-old servant born in Hereford.

Farmer John Woodward and his wife, Clara, were still at ‘The Grove’ at the the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales. Alfred and Nora, their children, were at home there too.

7. FANNY WOODWARD

Fanny Woodward was born on 31st March 1876 at Huntingford, Wotton-under-Edge. She was baptised at Slimbridge on 11th June 1876 and her parents were recorded in the register as ‘of Wotton-under-Edge.’ She is mentioned in all the census returns from 1881 until 1911 as being at home with her family. In 1911 he occupation was given as engaged in dairy work.

At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales, Fanny and her sister, Mary, were dairy farming at Rye Court, Berrow, with their brothers, Joseph and James Woodward.

She died on 28th February 1952 aged seventy-five-years and was buried at Berrow.

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‘Poppy’ Woodward of Berrow, daughter of Mary Woodward (nee Barton) (1842-1902) and her husband, Joseph Alfred (1842-1924). Probably Fanny (1875-1952) or Mary Woodward (1881-1958)

8. MARY WOODWARD

Mary Woodward was born on 22nd May 1881 at North Nibley and baptised at St Martin’s Church on 25th July. She was at home with her parents on the nights of the 1891 and 1901 censuses and in 1911 her occupation was given as ‘engaged in dairy work.’

At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales, Mary and her sister, Fanny, were dairy farming at Rye Court, Berrow, with their brothers, Joseph and James Woodward.

She died on 15th August 1958 aged seventy-seven-years and was buried at Berrow.


The children of Elizabeth Perrett and James Cookley:

 1. FRANK ERNEST COOKLEY

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Frank Cookley with his boat. By kindness of Hugh Conway Jones

Frank Cookley was born on 12th November 1873 and baptised on 1st February 1874 at Slimbridge. In the 1881 census he was at listed as at home with his family, a seven-year-old scholar, and listed as born at Charlton Kings. In the 1891 census return Frank was still at home and described as a sculptor’s apprentice. His age was given as seventeen years and his place of birth as Charlton Kings. In 1901 he was boarding at 25 Beechfield Road, Aston, Birmingham with George Sayce, a fifty-nine-year-old bricklayer, and his wife, Mary. Frederick was described as a stone carver (Mason), a worker, aged twenty-eight-years, and born in Charlton Kings.

In 1911 Frank Cookley was lodging with Harry Rudge, Innkeeper of the Ship Inn, Framilode. Frank was described as a thirty-seven-year-old, single, Coal Merchant, working from home and born at Cheltenham. Harry Rudge was aged thirty-nine-years, single, and born in Framilode. The house had five rooms.

During the second quarter of 1917 Frank Cookley married Annie Rudge in Cheltenham Registration District. She was born in about 1889 and was the daughter of John Rudge, a mariner, of Framilode and sister of Harry Rudge of the Ship Inn. Their father died before 1901.

 In the 1939 Kelly’s Directory Frank Cookley was listed as a Coal and Coke Merchant of Framilode. He had a vessel on the Gloucester-Sharpness Canal which has been used to illustrate a book on the Working Life of the Canal.

Gloucester Citizen

16 Mar 1925 – Framilode

‘Presentation to the Rector and Mr Hull. There was a large gathering in Framilode School on the occasion of a presentation to the rector (the Rev. E.T. Hull) and Mrs. Hull, who are leaving for Matson. Mr. F. Cookley (churchwarden) was the chair and was supported by Mr. W. Sims, who has been connected with the church over 70 years. Mr. Cookley explained the purpose of the meeting, and said there was a great regret in the parish at their departure and that they would be greatly missed. Mr. Cookley then called upon Mr. Sims to make the presentation…’

Gloucester Journal

4 Jun 1932

NEWS FROM SEVERN

‘…machine used daily for weighing coal at the wharf of Mr. F. Cookley, and although the machine is employed daily, the bird is quite happy. It sits calmly on its nest containing five eggs while Mr. Cookley and his assistants weigh the coal, and it is quite undisturbed…

Gloucester Journal

3 Apr 1937

SAUL PARISH COUNCIL

‘L. Gower, T. Pockett. R. Markey and C. V. Greenway. This was the last meeting of the old Council, and the Clerk (Mr. F. Cookley) presented the parish accounts for examination, and they were approved. The report on the allotments showed several plots…’

Gloucester Journal

30 Oct 1937

SAUL PARISH COUNCIL

‘…fields were discussed. Sir Lionel Darell (Chairrnan of the Parish Council; presided, sapixirted the Parish Clerk (Mr. F’. Cookley), and members of the Parish Council. Sir Lionel said was very glad to see such good number present, and that the Parish Council…’

Gloucester Journal

18 Feb 1939

SAUL FOOTBALL

‘…evacuation scheme, and it was decided to fall in line with the scheme. The Chairman (Sir Lionel Darell) thanked Mr. F. Cookley and Mr. C. Greenway for offering carry out the work, and stressed its importance. is understood that the canvass is proceeding …’

Gloucester Citizen

13 Sep 1946

PUBLIC NOTICES IS HEREBY GIVEN a-‘ to all consumers registered with MR. FRANK COOKLEY, The Coal Wharf, Framilode, Saul, that the business has been sold to Mr. Featherstone, of Cambridge, Glos. Any consumer wishing…

An Annie Cookley died within the second quarter of 1959 aged seventy-one-years in Gloucester Rural Registration District and a Frank E. Cookley died during the first quarter of 1961 aged eighty-seven-years within Gloucester Rural Registration District.

Joan Tucker: Junction Heritage Project

‘It is quite easy to research the histories of the landowner families, the Cambridges, Wiltons, and Teesdales of Whitminster House;  the Cliffords of Frampton; the Martins of Parkfields, which later became Parklands, owned by GCC. Perhaps more recently even the Kirkwoods of Kidnams, and the Society of Merchant Venturers of Bristol, all of whom owned land alongside the Stroudwater canal. But when it comes to such people as Alec Pratt who delivered milk by day and dispensed beer at the Darell Arms by night, and Frank Cookley the parish councillor from Moor Street wharf who delivered coal around the district by horse & cart and then by motor lorry, and the Beesley Brothers from Frampton who did the same later on. They never complained about carrying sacks of coal up our gangplank, through the boat, and depositing it in the little original cabin at the back.

At one time the lives of such people would not have been regarded as important, but today we know that to get an overall picture of what life was like and to help us understand the present and the future of a community, it is necessary to realise how the different strands fitted together, and still do, with, in this case, the Gloucester and Berkeley and Stroudwater canals providing the connecting link.’

2. NORA EMLY COOKLEY

Nora Emly was born on 18th February 1876 and baptised on 25th December 1876, at Slimbridge. In the 1881 census return Nora E. Cookley was aged five years and born at Earlhampstead, Berks. In the 1891 census Nora Emily (Emly on gravestone) was described as at home, aged fifteen years, and born in East Hampstead. In 1901 she was at home and she was described as a twenty-five-year-old school teacher, born in East Hampstead. In 1911 she was still at home and was listed as being a certificated elementary school teacher. She died on 18th May 1925 aged forty-nine-years and is buried at Cheltenham Cemetery with her parents.

3. WILFRED JAMES COOKLEY

Wilfred Cookley was born on 16th October 1877 and baptised on 17th February 1878 at Slimbridge. He died during the second quarter of 1878 in Cheltenham Registration District.

4. PERCY TALBOT COOKLEY

Percy Cookley was born on 15th January 1879 and baptised on 3rd August 1879 at Slimbridge. At the time of the 1881 census, Percy T. Cookley was living at home, aged two years and born in Cheltenham. In the 1891 census Percy Talbot is described as at home, twelve-years-old, a scholar, and born in Cheltenham. In 1901 he was at home, aged twenty-two-years, born in Cheltenham and working as a solicitor’s clerk. Ten years later ,in 1911, he was still at home and holding the same occupation.

Gloucestershire Echo Gloucestershire, England

30 Jul 1910 – E and F Companies, 5th Battalion, Gloucester Regiment

Saturday: Machine gun course of musketry Seven Springs range; gun team attend. Orderly sergeant for *be week. Sergt. Cookley; orderly corporal. Lanoe-Corpl. Bend Notes: 11.) Entries for the battalion rifle meeting must given Saturday morning 10; … 

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Percy Talbot Cookley

Gloucestershire Echo

19 Nov 1915

‘Local War Notes – 3/5th Whist Drive and Dance

Pursuing their policy of catering for the relaxation and amusement of the soldiers under their charge, the C.O. of the 3/5th Gloucester (Col E.B. Jeune) and the adjutant (Capt. F. C. C. Egerton) gave every encouragement to a battalion whist drive promoted by Sergt. Cookley. This was held on Wednesday night, and was followed by an impromptu dance. Sergt. Cookley had the help of very willing party of workers, and the Drill-hall presented a very pretty appearance. The attendance was gratifyingly large.

Welcoming the guests were several of the officers of the 3/5th, also Sergt-Major Tye, the company sergeant majors, Sergt-Instructor Buckle, all the regimental sergeants, most of the corporals, and a large number of privates. Gentlemen were only in a slight preponderance, and about four acted as “ladies.”

Proceedings, once started, worked very rapidly and smoothly, everyone instantaneously obeying Sergt. Cookley’s irrepressible whistle. Later, while Sergt. Cookley and his committee, were checking the scores and singling out the prize-winners the soldiers brought refreshments from the buffet for their partners.

…to whom they were very grateful (applause); and equally so were they to Sergt. Cookley (loud cheers)…’

Sergeant Percy Cookley was the younger son of James and Elizabeth Perrett Cookley. Before the war he was an employee of Ticehurst and Co. Solicitors of Cheltenham and was a long-serving Territorial Soldier who was enlisted there into the 5th (Territorial) Btn. Gloucestershire Regiment in late 1908. He left for France with his battalion on 29th March 1915 (240020421). He was killed in action in France on 21st July 1916, aged 37, in the battle of Pozieres, Somme sector. He was buried in Ovillers Military Cemetery, Plot XIV, Row H, Grave 9. He was one of 40 Cheltonians killed serving with Gloucestershire Regiment at or near Ovillers-la-Boiselle in a week of heavy fighting. There are photographs of him in “The Graphic” of 19th August 1916 and also of him in a group of the 3/5th Gloucesters on the 27th November 1915 (when he was probably acting as an instructor having returned to England). Before the war he lived at Beaufort House, London Road.

Gloucestershire Echo

26 Jul 1916

‘Cheltonian Presumed Killed – Mrs. Cookley, of Beaufort House, London road, Cheltenham, on Wednesday received letter from the chaplain of the Gloucestershire battalion to which her son. Sergt. P. T. Cookley, is attached, saying he is missing and must be presumed killed. Sergt. Cookley was very well known in Cheltenham where for a long time he held a post in the office of Messrs. Ticehurst and Co, solicitors. He was a very keen Territorial in days long antecedent to the war, and in all the social as well as the soldier doings of the Cheltenham companies he took a very active part, for years acting as an M.C. at all the dances, whist drives, etc. organised in connection with the companies. He went on active service at the outbreak of the war, but after a short period at the front was invalided home. He had not long since re-joined the battalion. His old comrades and friends in the town much regret to hear the bad news…a similar communication has been received by the father of Pte. Cyril Crosby who was serving in the same battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment as Sergt. Cookley.’

Gravestone at Cheltenham Cemetery:

‘Also of their youngest son Percy Talbot Cookley, Sergeant 1/5 Killed in action in France on 21st July 1916 aged 37 years’ Also on the Town War Memorial and at Holy Apostles’ Church, Charlton Kings.

 5. IDA PSYCHE COOKLEY

Ida Cookley was born on 10th March 1884 and baptised on 24th August 1884 at Slimbridge. In the 1891 census Ida was at home and her age was given as seven years. In the 1901 census she was aged seventeen years, at home, born in Cheltenham and ‘Mother’s Help’. In 1911 she was listed as still at home with no occupation. She was listed in a 1939 Kelly’s Trade Directory as a shopkeeper of 76 London Road, Cheltenham. Ida probably died in the first quarter of 1953 within the Gloucester City Registration District aged sixty-eight-years.


 

The children of  Eliza and Charles Sims:

  1. ANN DRINKWATER

Ann was born on 6th May 1875 at Slimbridge and she was baptised at St John’s Church on 11th July. The register entry describes her as the daughter of Charles and Eliza Sims, Labourer. The 1891 census return places Ann at home.

On 18th March 1895 Ann married George James Drinkwater iat Hardwicke Parish Church. She was described on the certificate as being nineteen. The bridegroom was shown as aged twenty seven and working as a coal merchant. Both of them were living in Hardwicke at the time and both of their fathers were deceased. The witnesses were Maud Barton and William Drinkwater.

George Drinkwater was the son of James Drinkwater, a coal merchant of Hardwicke. He was born in the second quarter of 1867 in Wheatenhurst Registration District. His eldest brother, William Drinkwater,  born 1854, was married to Ann’s aunt, Fanny Drinkwater.

The parents of William and George James Drinkwater were James and Eliza Drinkwater of Ashleworth. In 1851 James was a twenty-eight-year-old boat owner, born in Ashleworth, and his wife, aged twenty-nine-years, was born in Ashleworth. Ten years later, in 1861, James Drinkwater, a thirty-nine-year-old ‘Master of a Boat,’ was with his boat at Lower Milton, Kidderminster on the night of the census. His wife, Eliza Drinkwater, was described as a boatman’s wife, in the 1861 census and on the night she was at home at Nupend, Ashleworth, with her six-year-old son, William Drinkwater.

In 1871 James and Eliza had moved to Layne (sp?) Farm, Hardwicke. He was described as a forty-eight-year-old coal merchant. Their children included William, aged sixteen; Alfie, aged nine years; Emma, aged six years, and George, aged three years. All the children were born in Ashleworth except for the youngest, George, who was recorded as having been born in Hardwicke.

In 1881 James Drinkwater was back at the Cottage, Nupend, Ashleworth. He was by then aged fifty-nine-years and was described as ‘formerly a coal merchant.’ His new wife, Harriet, was aged fifty-nine-years, and both were born in Ashleworth, With them were his daughter, Emma aged thirteen years, born in Ashleworth, and his youngest son, George J. Drinkwater, aged thirteen years, who was also shown as born in Ashleworth. In 1891 Emma Drinkwater, the sister, was working as a serving maid at Yarkhill Vicarage.

At the time of the 1901 census George James Drinkwater and his wife, Ann, were visitors staying with her widowed mother and grandmother at Clarke’s Farm, Hardwicke. Ann was described as twenty-six-years-old and born in Slimbridge whilst her husband, was described as a thirty-three-years-old, born in Hardwicke and working as a Toolmaker at Kynocks Ammunition Works, which was probably in Birmingham. With them were their two children, Ernest Tom, aged four years, and Albert Sims, aged one year. Both of these grandchildren were born in Birmingham.

(See Fanny Drinkwater in Part I for further Drinkwater Family details)

Julia Trew:

We have been trying to sort out the children and descendants of Eliza Barton/Sims/Powell. Her daughter Annie married George James Drinkwater and they had two children (Albert Sims Drinkwater and Ernest Thomas Drinkwater).

Albert married and lived in the Forest of Dean. He seems to have had 3 children Leonard A, Robert John, and Ernest B Drinkwater. I am wondering whether you have any contacts on this side of the family. It would be nice to make contact with them. Ernest was born 1935, so is probably still alive although I don’t think the others are.

2. MARY LOUISA SIMS

Mary Sims was born on 5th February 1877 and baptised on 8th April 1877 at Slimbridge. Mary died in 1877 at Slimbridge

3. FANNY SIMS

Fanny was born on 12th August 1878 and baptised on 29th September 1878 at Slimbridge where she died in 1885.

4. HENRY CHARLES SIMS

Henry Charles Sims was born on 29th December 1880 and baptised at Slimbridge on 27th February 1881. He was recorded as being ten-years-old and living at home in the 1891 census return. He attended Hardwicke Day School along with his younger brother Alfred John. His sister Annie, born in 1876, may also have attended the school depending upon when the family moved from Slimbridge. An entry in the school logbook for Feb.1st 1889 makes reference to Harry and Fred Sims being absent with mumps. A further entry for 5th April of that year notes that Harry Sims was especially backward in reading due to irregular attendance (his Father had died at the end of February).

On the night of the 1901 census, Fred and Brenda Woodward were farming at Standall Farm, Stinchcombe. Staying with them was Henry C. Sims, listed as a ‘farmer’s cousin’, aged twenty years, and born in Slimbridge.

Harry and his brother Fred moved to Birmingham to work at the bakery set up by their cousin Ernest (Sims) Harding. Harry worked in the bakery and, having married  Hannah Roberts, who was born on 26th December 1877,  in 1907, they had children Hilda and Maurice.

In 1911 the family was living at 59 Flora Road, Hay Mill, Birmingham. Henry was described as a thirty-year-old journeyman baker and his wife, Hannah, was three years older and from Birmingham. They had been married for three years and they had their child, Hilda.

The Register for England and Wales of 1939 lists the family at 421 Yardley Road. Henry was described as ‘Supervisor, Baker Journeyman’ and Hannah as a Housewife. Their son, Maurice, born on 24th August 1916, was working as a managing optician.

Henry Charles Sims of 421 Yardley Road, Birmingham died at Birmingham General Hospital on 16th January 1957 leaving his widow, Hannah.

5. ALFRED JOHN SIMS

Alfred John Sims (known as Fred) was born on 31st May 1883 to Charles and Eliza Sims and baptised on 22nd July 1883 at Slimbridge. He attended the Hardwicke Day School, along with his brother Harry (three years older). His sister, Annie, born in 1876, may also have attended the school depending upon when the family moved to Slimbridge. An entry in the school logbook for Feb 1st 1889 makes reference to Harry and Fred Sims being absent with mumps. A further entry for April 5th of that year notes that Harry Sims was especially backward in reading due to irregular attendance. (note that it was at the end of Feb 1889 that their father, Charles, died).

In the 1891 census return he was shown as living at home, aged seven years, and born in Slimbridge. At the time of the 1901 census we find Alfred John Sims an eighteen-year-old farmer, born in Slimbridge, living with his widowed mother and grandmother at Clarke’s Farm, Hardwicke.

We know that Alfred John Sims joined the Gloucestershire Yeomanry in about 1901 at the age of eighteen. He moved to Birmingham with his brother, Harry, to work at the bakery set up by their cousin, Ernest (Sims) Harding. Alfred looked after the stables and Harry worked in the bakery. The bakery, originally sited in Berkeley Road, moved to Church Road, Yardley. The Bakery stables backed on to 25 Lily Road and the home of Alfred and Lily after they married in 1907.

Emma Leah Ilsley was born on the 28th April 1883 at Clyde Place, Upper Thomas Street, Aston Manor, to Thomas and Emma. She was their third child. At around the age of ten, she moved with her family to Deakins Road, Hay Mills, where she remained until her marriage. From the Bakery premises in Berkeley Road, Alfred Sims could see Emma Leah Ilsley walking from her job at the Slumberland mattress factory, in Hay Mills, to her home in Deakins Road.

Alfred Sims died on 28th January 1946, aged sixty-two years, and was buried at Yardley Cemetery. Apart from a short move to Church Road during the war – after their house was bombed – Alfred and Lily lived in Lily Road all their married life. Emma later moved to Hengham Road, Sheldon, with her daughter Doris and son Bernard.

Letter – Julia Trew to Marian Barton:

‘… I started tracing the family tree on my mother’s side about twenty years ago because we lived near to her mother – Kate Leah (Sims), my nan was the eldest daughter of Alfred John Sims, son of Eliza (Barton). We always believed that the family came from Hardwicke because my nan remembers Eliza (always known to the family as Gloucester Gran) coming from the farm in Hardwicke to visit. She visited Birmingham twice a year to collect dividends from the shares in Harding’s Bakery. It was only a few years ago that I decided to write away for the marriage certificate of Charles Sims and Eliza that we found out they had both been born in Slimbridge. That’s when we started to piece together the family history – fortunately my Nan had a very good memory – it obviously runs in the Barton family. Sadly my Nan died two years ago – she was born in 1913, the same/similar time to you I think. Once my Mother took Nan to visit Slimbridge and see the church where her father and grandparents had been baptised. You won’t believe it – they actually parked right outside your house, what a shame you never met.

Of course Nan’s father, Alfred John Sims, didn’t speak about his family – we understood that when we found the newspaper article about his death – it was a bit gruesome. He looked after the horses for the bakery – Nan said he preferred horses to people! For years they used to receive Christmas hampers from Ernest Harding who lived in a big house, Packwood Grange, in Warwickshire. They didn’t really know the Hardings – just their names – so it will be interesting to hear about Douglas. We understood that Ernest married ‘Miss Tudor’ but we didn’t know more than that. We understood that Ernest was the illegitimate son of Betty Harding Sims and changed his name to Harding, as did his mother and grandmother once his grandfather Robert Harding died. We think that’s where the money to set up the bakery came from (i.e. Ernest’s father) but it might have come from his family’s interests in the Shepherd’s Patch  Hotel and the farm in Hardwicke…’

May Walker:

‘Your letter came as a lovely surprise. I do remember years ago having an aunt Eliza so she must have been your great great grandmother. 

I really didn’t know much about the Harding family. I know my two uncles Bert and Burland worked there and when Uncle Burland died the funeral passed by the works so that the girls in his part could wait outside to see it pass. I think he was in charge of the cakes and pastries. I seem to remember going with my mother to see an elderly lady who lived quite near I’m sure they said she was Mr Harding’s mother. Ernest Harding was a boy living with his mother in Slimbridge I know my grandfather used to keep an eye on him he always played with his boys my uncles and over the years Mr Harding used to come and sit in the kitchen and they would have a chat. We know Douglas the third son he wasn’t very strong and had fits. We were always told to help him if one came when we were together. I don’t remember having much knowledge of  Hedley or Arthur.

‘Relic of another age – Rotting Van gleams again

A horse-drawn van that was discovered rotting beneath an earth mound in a field near Birmingham Airport has been restored to its original condition.

The 1920s van was restored over 12 months by trainees at Redditch and Handsworth Skill Centres.

Now owner, Mr. John Warell has managed to trace one of the van’s original drivers, 92-year-old Mr. George Bailey.

The Hovis van still has much of the original body and frame. Research through surviving employees of Harding Bakery, in Garretts Green, enabled the trainees to restore the yellow and gold paint to an exact replica of the original.

Mr. Warrell, of Mackadown Lane, Tile Cross, has spent £1,600 restoring the van.

Driver Mr. Bailey of Warwick Road, Greet, said: “I remember the company went over to motor vehicles and I took all the vans, horses and harness to market to be sold.”

Picture by John James: Caption – Trainees Tom Costello (left) and Dave Newey with the restored bread van at Redditch Skill Centre: Harding’s Royal Steam Bakery, Yardley. Awarded over 50… Silver & Bronze Medals.’

Jean Hopkins to Julie Trew:

‘Following a recent visit to my cousin May, I have borrowed the letter you wrote to her last month.

Unfortunately I’m not going to be any help regarding the start and progress of Harding’s bakery. I had no idea that it had been started in Berkeley Road – my only knowledge was the bakery in Church Road where my father worked. I don’t even know what year he joined the firm! He was in the First World War, then I seem to think butchery was mentioned as an occupation before moving to Birmingham. He met my mother who was a clerk in the offices at the bakery and they married in 1924.

I wonder if you have a copy of Richard’s family tree – if not I can photocopy one for you if you like. From that I see that my Uncle Bert was married in Hay Mills, Birmingham, in 1912, so I assume he was at Hardings some years before my dad. I’ve never had a very good memory, and although I recall the names of Fred and Harry Sims, until I saw the family tree I wasn’t aware of the relationship. I don’t remember any social visits. One thing has always puzzled me – Charles Sims (your great great grandfather) … would that have been any relation of Ernest Harding?  Arthur Harding was my dad’s boss and as he was a confectioner, I wonder if Arthur ran the cake side and Hedley was in charge of the bread? May remembered the name of the third son Douglas who had fits. My brother emigrated to Canada in 1952, but if I get any thoughts from him I will let you know.

Dad died suddenly in 1957 – mum hadn’t worked (outside the home!) since her marriage, but Arthur asked her to return to accounts, her ability to add up a column of figures was amazing. It could only have been a few years before the firm closed, but whether it was taken over or demolished for the present shopping centre with flats over I couldn’t say. Mum spent a while at another bakery firm before retiring, then she died in 1969.

I thought you might like the enclosed copies of photographs of Hardings – no idea of the year either were taken. The group photo my parents had – now knowing the firm moved I’m wondering if it could have been at the start of the new premises. On the enlarged photocopy I’ve numbered my dad and uncle, mother and her two friends, also Ernest, Hedley and Arthur – not too sure if they’re correct. Have you any thoughts of the Sims brothers?

I’ve recently been in touch with my cousins Tom and George Hall in Slimbridge following a request from my brother for old family photos. Tom sent me a postcard of the Hardings vans – I don’t recognise the setting, so again could it be Berkeley Road?

… Oh, I almost forgot – more family weddings at Yardley Parish Church – My parents, Bert’s son Eric in 1941, and Bill and I in 1953!

Good luck with your research… Jean’

Julia Trew:

‘…Jean sent some very interesting photographs relating to the bakery – one of all of the staff, we think around 1930. It turns out that my great-aunt also has one of these and didn’t think we would be interested in it! Mum is visiting her today and will hopefully be able to find out where Alfred and Harry Sims are on it. The most interesting one though, was probably the one of the bakery vans outside a Harding’s shop. From an old map that I have of Yardley that gives the location of different businesses, we have been able to pinpoint exactly where it was…’


The children of Louisa and James Seymour Merrett:

  1. GEORGE MERRETT

George was born on 8th or 9th June 1878 and baptised at Slimbridge Church on 18th August. His father, Seymour James Merrett was described as a labourer of Slimbridge. On the night of the 1881 census he was at home with his family and listed as aged two years. By 1891 the family was at Dauncey’s Farm, Hinton, Berkeley, and George was listed as twelve-years-old. In the 1901 census he was boarding at Long Eaton in Derbyshire. He was described as a twenty-three-year-old paint holder (Railway) born in Slimbridge, Gloucestershire.

On 16th February 1902 George Merrett married Ellen Emily Bullock at St Laurence’s Church, Long Eaton, Derby. George was described as a twenty-three-year-old signalman of 47 Cross Street, son of James Seymour Merrett, a farmer. Ellen was aged twenty-five, she lived at 50 Wellington Street and was the daughter of Charles Bullock, a signalman. Ellen Emily Bullock was born in June 1876.

In 1911 George Merrett and his family were living in five rooms at 246 Wellington Street, Long Eaton, Derbyshire. He was described as a thirty-three-year-old Signalman on the Midland Railway and born at Slimbridge. His wife, Emily Ellen Merrett, was aged thirty-four-years and born at Breaston, Derbyshire. They had been married for nine years and had four children all of whom were still alive. These children were at home on the night of the census namely, Joseph Seymour Merrett, aged eight years; Ellen Louisa, aged seven years; Alice Lilian, aged four years and Charles Frederick Merrett, aged two years. All four children were born at Long Eaton.

George and Emily Merrett were living at 8 College Street, Long Eaton, with their children, Elsie and Stanley, at the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales. He was described as an L.M.S. Railway Signalman.

2. ALBERT MERRETT

Albert was baptised at Berkeley on 10th August 1879 and buried there on 3rd June 1880

3. JAMES MERRETT, cousin of Edward Percy Barton

James was baptised at Berkeley on 15th August 1880. He was described as nine-months-old and born in Berkeley in the 1881 census. He was buried on 13th August 1884 at Berkeley.

4. MARY MERRETT

Mary was baptised at Berkeley on 13th November 1881 and buried there on 3rd March 1883.

5. WILLIAM MERRETT

William Merrett was baptised on 19th November 1882 at Berkeley when the family were living at Hook Street. He was buried on 14th March 1883 at Berkeley.

6. MARGARET MERRETT

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Left to right back row: Evelyn Walker, Alice Merrett (1887- ), Ada Merrett (1887- ), May Walker and seated Margaret Merrett, (1884-1959). The Merretts are daughters of Great II Aunt Louisa (nee Barton) and James Seymour Merrett

Margaret was born and baptised at Berkeley on 18th November 1884. In the 1891 census she was at home, aged six years and born in Berkeley. In 1901 Margaret and Ada were living at Brentry Hill, Look Out Field, Westbury-on-Trym with their blind uncle, Thomas Miles, an eighty-five-year-old widower, who was living from his own means, and born in Henbury. Margaret was described as aged sixteen years and Ada aged thirteen years. Both were born in Berkeley.

Twenty years earlier in 1881 Thomas and Mary Miles were living at Henbury Hill and Thomas was described as sixty-four-year-old gardener in charge of the house. His wife Mary was aged sixty-seven-years and born at Berkeley. The 1871 census shows that Thomas Miles was married to Mary Merrett who was described then as a fifty-seven-year-old charwoman, born in Berkeley. Their wedding actually took place at Westbury-on-Trym on 15th February 1853. Mary Merrett was baptised on 6th January 1814 at Berkeley, the daughter of William and Hannah Merrett, making her an older sister of Joseph Merrett and the great aunt, rather than the aunt, of Margaret and Ada Merrett.

In 1911 Margaret Merret (sic) was employed as a domestic help at Wortley Farm, West Wood, Charlton Abbots, Andoversford. Her employer was a Slimbridge born farmer Edward Phillimore Watts and his Dursley born wife, Sarah Annie. Margaret was described as twenty-six-years-old, single and born at Berkeley. The farm house had nine rooms and four other members of the Watts family were dwelling there.

At the time of the 1939 Register for England and Wales, Margaret was staying with her sister, Millicent Steel and her family at Whitehall Farm, Churchend, Slimbridge.

Margaret Merrett lived at 270 London Road, Gloucester but died at Whitehall Farm, Slimbridge, aged seventy-four-years. She was buried in the village on 6th October 1959.

7. FREDERICK MERRETT

Frederick, a twin, was baptised on 3rd September 1885 at Berkeley and buried there on 9th September aged five days.

8. FANNY MERRETT, cousin of Edward Percy Barton

Fanny, a twin, was baptised on 3rd September 1885 at Berkeley and buried there on 9th September aged four days.

9. ADA MERRETT, cousin of Edward Percy Barton

Ada, a twin, was born on 22nd July 1887 and baptised on 4th September at Berkeley Church. At the time of the 1891 census she was at home, aged four years.

In 1901 Margaret and Ada were living at Brentry Hill, Look Out Field, Westbury-on-Trym with their blind uncle, Thomas Miles, an eighty-five-year-old widower, born in Henbury. Margaret was described as aged sixteen years and Ada aged thirteen years. Both were born in Berkeley.

In 1911 Ada was employed as a maid at an apartment house called Sea Villa, Bath Road, Bournemouth. Ada was described as a twenty-three-year-old single domestic servant, born at Purton in Gloucestershire. Her employer was Harriett Theodora Elmslie, a seventy-one-year-old widow, described as a lady of private means with no occupation and born at Chesterton, Oxfordshire. Also in residence were her daughter and her sick nurse.

At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales, Ada was living in Gloucester with two other women. She was a member of the St John’s Nursing Corp.

Ada Merrett and her twin sister Alice lived in Gloucester and both survived to a great age. Both died in 1976 at Sceats Memorial Eventide Home at Kenilworth Avenue, Gloucester, Alice on 14th April and Ada on 11th September.

10. ALICE MERRETT

Alice, a twin, was born on 22nd July 1887 and baptised on 4th September at Berkeley Church. She was at home aged four years and born in Berkeley on the night of the 1891 census. In 1901 she was at home and aged thirteen and listed as born in Berkeley.

In 1911 Alice was helping the Humphries family at Whitehall Farm, Brockhampton, Andoversford. Her employer was Frank Ernest Humphries and his wife Sarah Alice. They had three children. Alice was described as a twenty-three-year-old single domestic servant, born at Berkeley, Gloucestershire.

At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales, Alice was working as a housekeeper for Charles Keen, a retired Farmer of Tuffley.

Ada Merrett and her twin sister Alice lived in Gloucester and both survived to a great age. Both died in 1976 at Sceats Memorial Eventide Home at Kenilworth Avenue, Gloucester, Alice on 14th April and Ada on 11th September.

11. MILLICENT STEEL, cousin of Edward Percy Barton

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Millicent Steel (nee Merrett), daughter of Great II Aunt Louisa (nee Barton) and James Seymour Merrett, her husband Lionel Steel and his dog, with Miss Shawyer (sp?). Alice is probably the lady on the left.

Millicent was born on 15th August 1890 and baptised on 5th October at Berkeley. At the time of the 1891 census she was listed as being at home with her family, aged eight months, and born in Berkeley. In 1901 she was still living at home.

In 1911 Millicent Merrett was residing at ‘The Cedars,’ 8 Clevedon Road, Weston-super-Mare, and employed as help for a widow, Jessie Watts, and her thirteen-year-old son. Millicent was described as single, twenty-one-years-old, and born at Purton, Glos. ‘The Cedars’ had five rooms and a Mary Yeld was also boarding with them.

Millicent married Lionel Robert Steel, a thirty-two-year-old baker of Cam, on 29th October 1919 at Slimbridge Parish Church. Lionel was born on 10th August 1887.

Later the Steels moved to Whitehall Farm, Slimbridge, where they were living at the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales. Lionel was listed as a baker and confectioner, working on his own account. Their sons Mark and David were both at home.

Millicent died on 13th January 1969 aged seventy-eight-years and Lionel Steel died on 25th February 1974 aged eighty-six- years. Lionel and Millicent had four children of whom two died in infancy.

12. EDWARD MERRETT

Edward Merrett was born on 13th October 1893 and baptised at Slimbridge on 19th December 1893. An Edward Merrett died during the second quarter of 1894 in Wheatenhurst Registration District. His mother died during the following year.


 

The children of William and Ellen Barton:

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This photograph of Great Grandfather William Barton (1854-1936), his wife Ellen (nee Pick) (1857-1930) and ten of their children outside the Forge in about 1895. Note that the windows have been changed since 1884.
Left to right back row: Elsie, Frank William, Fanny
Middle row: William, Edward Percy, Ellen, Mabel, Maud, Henry John
Front row: Albert Edgar, Morris George, Burland Oswald

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This photograph of Great Grandfather William Barton (1854-1936), his wife Ellen (nee Pick) (1857-1930) and twelve of their children outside the ‘Wedding Shed’ at the rear of the Forge in about 1901.
Left to right back row: Henry John, Fanny, Frank William, Elsie
Middle row: Maud, Morris George, William, Edward Percy, Ellen, Maud, Albert Edgar, Burland Oswald
Front row: Winifred Annie, Nora Ellen

MAUD WALKER, Great Aunt

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Photograph of Maud Walker (nee Barton) (1877-1955) and Frank William Barton (1879-1965) from about 1881.

Maud Barton was born on 4th September 1877 at Slimbridge the eldest child of William and Ellen Barton and she was baptised on 14th October 1877 in the Parish Church. In the 1881 census she was at home, aged three years and born in Slimbridge. In 1891 she was at home and aged thirteen years.

In the 1901 census Maud was a twenty-three-year-old housemaid working for Rev. Henry Hededen at Lower Oddington. She was described as born in Slimbridge.

On 5th April 1904 at Slimbridge she married William Thomas Walker of Upton Pyne, Devon, the twenty-six-year-old son of John Walker, a carpenter. William was described on the wedding certificate as a butler.

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Great Aunt Maud Barton (1877-1955) with her husband William Thomas Walker (1878c-1955) and their first child William Leonard Walker (1906c-1994), possibly on the occasion of his baptism.

In 1911 they were living in six rooms at 44 Hayward Road, Barton Hill, Bristol. He was described as a thirty-three-year-old coal dealer (retail), working on his own account. He was born in Birmingham and had been married for six years and had three children. His wife, Maude (sic) was aged thirty-three and was born at Slimbridge. Their children included William Leonard aged six and born in Portsmouth; Evelyn Maude (sic), aged two and born at King’s Somborne, Hampshire and Ellen May aged two and born at King’s Somborne.

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Great Aunt Maud Barton (1877-1955) with her husband William Thomas Walker (1878c-1955) and their children William Leonard Walker (1906c-1994), Evelyn Maud (1908-1997) and Ellen May (1908-2006) possibly on the occasion of the baptism of the twins. Original May Walker

Later the family moved to Birmingham where William Walker worked as a coal merchant. They had three children, William Leonard, Evelyn Maud and Ellen May. Both Maud and William died in 1955. Maud died aged seventy-seven-years and was of Raddleham, Birmingham. She was cremated at Selly Oak and her ashes were buried at Slimbridge on 19th February 1955.

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Marriage of Great Aunt Maud Barton (1877-1955) and William Thomas Walker !878c-1955) on 5th April 1904 in the garden of the Forge at Slimbridge.
Left to right: Ellen Barton (Great Grandmother), Mr. Judge, Fanny Barton, William Thomas Walker, Maud Barton, Elsie Mary Barton and William Barton (Great Grandfather)

Newspaper 1904:

‘Wedding at Slimbridge – A pretty wedding was solemnised at St John the Evangelist’s Church, Slimbridge, on Tuesday last, the contracting parties being Mr William Walker, of Upton Pynes, Exeter, and Miss Maud Barton, eldest daughter of Mr William Barton, of Slimbridge. The Rector, the Rev J.O.H. Carter, officiated at the ceremony. Two hymns were sung, viz., “The voice that breathed o’er Eden,” and “O perfect love.” Miss Maud Lord presided at the organ.

The bride, who was given away by her father, looked charming in a dress of cream crepe dechine, trimmed with white silk and orange blossom. She wore a gold ring, and carried a bouquet of white flowers – both gifts of the bridegroom. The bridesmaids, Misses Fanny and Elsie Barton (sisters of the bride) were attired in blue cloth dresses, trimmed with white silk, with black fancy straw hats, and each wore a gold brooch and carried a bouquet, the gifts of the bridegroom. The bridegroom was attended by Mr Judge, of London, who acted as “best man”. After the ceremony, a reception was held in the residence of the bride’s parents, and Mr and Mrs Walker left later for Weston-super-Mare. The bride’s going-away costume consisted of a tailor-made coat and skirt, with hat to match. The presents numbered over 70. Mr and Mrs Walker’s future home will be at Portsmouth.’

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Marriage of Great Aunt Maud Barton (1877-1955) and William Thomas Walker (1878c-1955) on 5th April 1904 in the garden of the Forge at Slimbridge.
Back Row: Mabel Barton (?), -, James Walkley, Nora Walkley, Jack Taylor, Ann Taylor, Henry John Barton (?)
Middle Row: Albert Barton (?), -, -, Mr. Judge, Fanny Barton, William Walker, Maud Barton, Elsie Mary Barton, -, -.
Front Row: -, -, Eliza Powell, Edward Percy Barton, Burland Barton, Nora Barton, Winifred Barton, Morris Barton, William Barton, Ellen Barton, Fanny Drinkwater.

Postcard 1st October 1909:

To Mrs Walker, The Cottages, Compton, Nr Stockbridge, Hants. Dear M,

Hope you are all well. Mother will write soon. Love to all, Nora.’

Newspaper 1933:

‘Mr William Barton, of Slimbridge, with his daughter, Mrs Walker, Mr Walker (grandson) and Master Dennis Walker (great-grandson)’

Newspaper 1954:

‘Golden Wedding – Walker-Barton – At Slimbridge Church, April 5th 1904, William Walker to Maud Barton. Present address 62, Springfield Road, Moseley, Birmingham 13’

May Walker:

‘Your letter came as a lovely surprise. I do remember years ago having an aunt Eliza so she must have been your great great grandmother. I am now 93 years old so I think I must be the oldest of the family. I had a brother three years older and a twin sister both of them have died – my brother in ’97 and my sister in ’94 and some thought my sister and I would not live we were skinny little things born a short while too soon when my mother thought the fire wanted some paraffin and nearly set the room on fire. I shouldn’t have lasted through the night they were quite sure but I’m still here years after.

My father was for many years a top butler in the homes of the best families. The last one was an earl. They lived in the married quarters on the estate. Then he decided to work for himself and he had different jobs. When the first war came he had to go into munitions – we lived in Bristol then. We came to Birmingham when there was work and rented a house in a district called Sparkhill. Then he bought a house in Springfield Road further up to where I live now. My brother married and went to live in Stratford and we stayed on at No. 62. Neither of us married. Then in 1955 my father died only 5 months after my mother. We stayed on there together. 

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From left to right back row: Great Aunt Maud Barton (1877-1955) with her sister Mabel Louise Barton (1887-1946).
Front row: William Leonard Walker (1906c-1994), Denis William Barton (1932-) and Ivy Walker (nee Luckett).

I often think about Slimbridge and wish I could visit it. We lived there for some time and I used to love going into the Forge. They let me pump up the fire and I used to think I was very clever and sometimes the horses would be a bit frisky while being shod and it was often quite hard to keep them still and very exciting for me. I can feel myself walking up the path to the orchard. When you opened the iron gate there was always a special sound when the weight on it dropped and some years ago when I walked that way the sound had gone – I felt very sad.

2. FRANK WILLIAM BARTON, Great Uncle

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Frank William Barton

Frank Barton was born on 25th October 1879 and baptised on 7th December 1879 at Slimbridge, the eldest son of William and Ellen Barton. He was at home and aged eleven years at the time of the 1891 census. He joined the Royal Gloucestershire Hussars soon after the outbreak of the Second Boer War and when he returned home he received a hero’s welcome. In 1902 he and his brother Harry were bell-ringers at Slimbridge.

He was entitled to the Queen’s South Africa Medal under the Army Order 233 issued on 1st October 1902. He was described as Shoeing Smith 5528 F.W. Barton in the 3rd Company of the Infantry Yeomanry and he was also entitled to the date clasp South Africa 1901.

Before the First World War he emigrated and worked on a Canadian Cattle Ranch. In the Canadian Passenger Lists there is record of No 40857 Frank W. Barton, aged thirty years, on 12th June 1909, travelling on the Tunisian from Liverpool to Quebec with £25 in his pocket. He was engaged in farming, C of E. and was heading for Pincher Creek, Alberta. Pincher Creek was near Fort Macleod, south of Calgary.

Pincher Creek: ‘These pinchers depict how we got our name …. The pinchers (a farrier’s tool for trimming a horse’s hooves) were found on the creek bank by a group of prospectors in 1868 and they dubbed the Town, Pincher Creek. Situated in the heart of the Rocky Mountains, Pincher Creek is a spectacular mountain community that today offers everything from skiing to rock climbing, kayaking to fly fishing all year long.

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On 9th February 1915 Frank William Barton was attested as a soldier in the Canadian Over-Seas Expeditionary Forces at Macleod taking his oaths before C.W. Jones J.P. He was described as born on 25th October 1880 (sic) and born at Slimbridge, Stonehouse, Gloucestershire. His nearest kin was given as his father W. Barton and Frank was listed as an unmarried Farrier. He said that he had spent ten years in the Gloucester Troop Yeomanry and of that had had fifteen months active service in South Africa.

Physically he was described as Church of England, 5’9 ½ ” tall, with fair complexion, blue eyes, dark brown hair,  with a 38 inch chest when fully expanded with a 4 ½ inch range of expansion. His Medical examination was conducted by W.W. Milburn at Macleod and he was assessed as fit for service in the Expeditionary Forces.

Frank served with the Canadian Cavalry in France during World War I.

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Frank William Barton married Ada Maud Lord in Dursley Registration District between July and September 1916. She was born on 10th February 1875 at Slimbridge and baptised at Slimbridge on 23rd May. In the 1881 census she was living with her family at Camplepit, close to Churchend, Slimbridge. Her father was Cornelius Lord a thirty-six-year-old farmer and dealer of sixteen acres, who employed one man. Her mother was Mary Emma was a native of Stoke Gifford and her siblings included Kate E., Frederick H, Florence Annie, Ethel Mary and Margaret E. Ada Maud was described as aged six years old and born at Slimbridge. In 1891 Cornelius Lord was farming at Herns Farm (sic) and Maud was described as a sixteen-year-old School Monitress. In 1901 Cornelius Lord was a butcher of Gossington (like his own father James Lord before him (1851 census)) and Ada Maud was living at home with the family and described as a twenty-six-year-old Daily Governess in the School. Cornelius Lord seems to have died in the second quarter of 1916 shortly before his daughter married Frank Barton. Cornelius’s younger brother Farmer George Lord (1856-) of Green Farm, Tumpy Green, served in the Royal Gloucestershire Hussars (Royal Gloucestershire Yeomanry Cavalry) in 1890 and the Muster Roll for 1893 of the Berkeley Troop includes his name (See Dursley & Cam by David E. Evans 1981, pages 10 and 11).

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Rollo Clifford: The Royal Gloucestershire Hussars, page 45:

Howard Lord (Ada Maud’s brother) served in B Squadron of the Royal Gloucestershire Hussars which had one Berkeley Troop at that time. The Lords farmed at Hartsgrove Farm, Wanswell, near Berkeley. Trooper Lord sailed with the Regiment from England on 9th April 1915 and served right through, taking part in the entry into Aleppo, Syria, in 1918. His son runs the Berkeley Arms Pub and farms at Purton.

Again in the Canadian Passenger List for 28th June 1919 we find a Frank W. Barton travelling on the Saturnia from Glasgow to Quebec. He was described as Number 55 22 53 Corporal in the CRCR Regt, RCD Unit, 13 CWR, who had a wife as his dependent, was C of E. and was heading for McLeod. On 3rd September 1919 No 50, Frank W. Barton, a farmer of Tillsdown, Dursley, aged thirty-nine-years, travelled from Montreal to Glasgow on the Corsican – Steamship Line the Canadian Pacific Ocean Services Ltd.

Sometime after the First World War Frank returned home and set up a milk round. He lived at Tilsdown, Dursley.

He was Joint Executor of his father’s will of 1927 and was described as a Milk Retailer of Tilsdown then and in the sale papers for the Forge in 1936. L.R. Steel, Baker of Slimbridge witnessed his signature on a Conveyance.

According to probate records his father William Barton of Slimbridge died on 17th October 1936 and probate was granted at Gloucester on 1st December 1936 to Frank William Barton, milk retailer and Burland Oswald Barton, baker. Effects were valued at £578-17-0d.

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Ada Maud died on 21st March 1951 at Tilsdown. Her niece, Vera Gunter, says that she was organist at Stinchcombe Parish Church and that she used to ride side saddle. She apparently died as a result of a hunting accident. She also says that Frank died as a result of a broken neck resulting from a hunting accident too.

 Frank William Barton died on 15th December 1965, aged 86 years, and was buried on 20th December in Dursley Cemetery.

When the Forge was cleared in 2008 Vera Gunter took away a triangular metal gong which had belonged to Frank Barton (perhaps he made it). He kept it as a memento of his war service and it then went to Narles Farm. George Barton must have taken it to the Forge. It is now at Cowmeadow Farm, English Bicknor.

Newspaper Articles from 1902:

‘Enthusiastic Reception at Berkeley – Triumphal Progress from Berkeley Road Station.

Last (Friday) evening the Berkeley contingent of the Gloucestershire Imperial Yeomanry received a hearty welcome on arriving home.

As our readers are well aware, immediately it became known that the local men were on their way back from south Africa, an influential committee was formed at Berkeley to arrange to give them a reception worthy of the occasion. It consisted of Mr Peter, Mr W. Legge, Dr Awdry, Mr G. Clark, Mr W. Harding, Mr R. Bailey, Mr W. Mackintosh, Mr G. Griffiths, Mr R. G.Turner and Mr C.A. Arkell.

Mr Mackintosh accepted the position of hon. Secretary, and an appeal which was made speedily resulted in no less than £70 being subscribed for the purpose of doing honour to the men who had done such good service in the nation’s time of need.

Last night’s proceedings were a sequel to an interesting scene witnessed at Berkeley Road on 8th January 1900.

On this date nine local men were given a hearty send-off to the war. Of the number who left these shores soon after, four have died in their country’s service, one was invalided home, another reached Wotton-under-Edge last week, and the remainder had a hearty welcome back to the fruitful Berkeley Valle last evening.

The names of the returned Yeoman are – Sergeant –Major B.W. Neale, Berkeley, Trooper R. Neale, Berkeley, Shoeingsmith Barton, Slimbridge. The first two young fellows are brothers and the interesting letters of the Sergeant-Major, published in the Gazette from time to time, have been read with the greatest avidity by their many friends.

Long before the arrival of the train, due at Berkeley Road at-3, a large crowd had gathered to meet the heroes. A number had come in by means of vehicles, which were gaily decorated with the Union Jack, others came on cycles, while a number made their way on foot. Scarcely had the khaki-clad men time to alight on the platform than they were besieged with a large crowd of riends, and a deal of hand shaking and embracing took place, amid much -.

The Dursley Volunteer Band struck up “See the Conquering Hero Comes,” and the men were shouldered over the bridge, where the hand shaking was renewed. A halt was made before leaving the station, the band playing “Should old acquaintance be forgot.” A procession was then formed, consisting of vehicles, of which there were about a dozen, cyclists, and pedestrians, and proceeded to Berkeley. Along the road they were eagerly saluted, and flags were displayed at almost every house.

On reaching Berkeley they were met by a very large throng who heartily cheered. A large number of school children were assembled at the school, each waving a Union Jack. The town was freely decorated with flags, bunting etc., and bore a most striking aspect. Almost every window was filled with onlookers and pocket handkerchiefs were freely waved. On the arrival at the market place a halt was made, and several short speeches were delivered amid much rejoicing and many hurrahs.

Alderman Bailey said, to have such men in their midst was an honour. They had brought the Yeomanry of the country into more prominence than had ever been done previously. They had fought well for their King and country, and he felt sure it would be impossible for any words of his to describe what they had gone through (hear, hear). It was impossible for him to tell what they had done. Still, he was proud to see them back home again.

Mr William Legge said he had been deputed to say a few words of welcome to those who had gone out to fight for King and country and had done so in such a splendid manner. They had responded to the call made when the Empire was in danger, and had gone out and braved the dangers of that great country. They had encountered hardships which were not known of at home. One had been able to read of treking 3,700 miles, and for days together being without hadly any food or drink. They had also been under fire for 65 days, which was enough to upset any man’s nerves. They had done honour to their country. The Yeomanry were now looked upon as the finest force in the Empire. He hoped their future would be a prosperous one on their return to civil employment.

Dr Awdry added a few words.

Brief responses having been given, an adjournment was made to the “Berkeley Arms”, where the heroes were supplied with refreshments.

Alderman Bailey proposed the toast of the Gloucester Yeomanry, coupling with the toast the names of the returned Yeomen, and he also made touching reference to the absent ones, some of whom he much regretted to say, would never return.

The toast met with hearty response.’

And another:

‘Gloucestershire Imperial Yeomanry – Presentation to the Berkeley Troop – As a result of the local subscription some £70 was subscribed and at a luncheon on Tuesday at the Berkeley Arms Hotel the returned members of the Berkeley troop were each presented with a silver tankard, with suitable inscription viz., Sergeant-Major B.W. Neale, Quartermaster-Sergeant Victor C. Young, Lance-Corporal Toulmin, Shoeing-smith Barton, Troopers R. Neale, A. Laver, M.G.-ton, A.E. Morgan, F. Jones, and King (the two latter being unavoidably absent). Lord Fitzhardinge presided, the vice-chair being occupied by Mr T.B. Croome, and the attendance numbered about 60. His lordship proposed “The King” following which Mr W. Legge gave “The Bishop and Clergy and Ministers of all Denominations.” The Rev. Canon Stackhouse responded. Mr C. Scott proposed “The Navy, Army, and Reserved Forces,” to which Sergeant John Cornock replied. Lord Fitzhardinge then proposed “Our Guests,” and said that everybody was delighted to see them back again, looking so fit and well, and if they were a fair sample of the Imperial Yeomanry he did not wonder they had done so well as everybody said they had, it being admitted from all quarters that the Imperial Yeomanry had saved the situation. He then presented the cups to the men, but asked them to leave them to have the inscriptions put on. Sergeant-Major Neale and Quartermaster-Sergeant Young returned tanks on behalf of themselves and their comrades. Mr T. B.Croome proposed the health of Lord and Lady Fitzhardinge, to which his lordship replied. Mr Croome responding. Mr J. Peter gave the health of the hon. Sec. of the fund. Mr W. Mackintosh, who acknowledged the toast. Quartermaster-Sergeant V. Young proposed “The Old Gloucestershire Hussars,” to which Sergeants Martin, Pearce and G. Adams responded.’

Mike Morgan re above: Trooper A E Morgan – Alfred Edward Morgan, my grandfather. Also listed on p.27.

Decorated by the King:

The King held an investiture at St James’s Palace on Wednesday when the following, among others, were invested with the insignia of the Order into which they have been admitted. The names of the Gloucestershire Yeomen included the forty selected from the 3rd Company of the 1st Battalion to receive their medals at the hands of the King yesterday were:-

S.Smith F.W. Barton, Slimbridge.

Boer World War Postcard (Edward VII stamp):

‘Salisbury Plain to Miss E. Barton, Braemar, Bath Road, Worcester

Dear E,

I am enjoying myself very much. I have just been to Andover, about 6 miles from camp. There is not much to see there. I hope your hand is better. I will tell all news when I return. Love from F.(???)

 This is of the Gloucesters – not found your brother yet.’

 Notice in the Church at Slimbridge:

‘Notice – The Rector, Rev C.H. Ridding, has been pleased to accept the services of the under-mentioned Bell-ringers for St John the Evangelist’s Church, Slymbridge, during the year 1902 – Messrs. Frank Barton, Harry Barton, Tom Hill, Garnel Hill, Emmanuel Hobbs, Henry Hurd, Fred Pain. Notice – No persons (except those to whom leave has been given) may enter the Belfry without the consent of the Rector. Rev. C.H. Ridding’

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Obituary Notice

‘Mrs A.M. Barton at Upper Cam – The funeral took place at Upper Cam Parish Church on Tuesday of Mrs Ada Maud Barton, whose death took place after a long illness at Tilsdown, Dursley, on March 21st. The service was conducted by the Rev. Dr. T.A. Ryder, and the organist was Mr Malpass.

Family mourners: Mr F.W. Barton (husband), Mr and Mrs H. Lord (brother and sister-in-law), Mrs E. Anstey (sister), Jack and Margery (nephew and niece) Westerleigh, Mr and Mrs T.W. Hawker, Witney (brother-in-law and sister), Miss E. Lord, Cheltenham (sister), Mrs B. Parslow, Berkeley (sister), Mr Bert Barton and son, Birmingham (brother-in-law and nephew), Mr Burland Barton, Birmingham (brother-in-law), Mrs Frank Hall (sister-in-law), Slimbridge, and Mr F. Hall, Mrs George Marsh, Worcester (sister-in-law) and Mr G. Marsh, Mrs J. Johnson, Pucklechurch (niece), and Mr Johnson, Mrs D. Allen, Stroud (niece) and Mr Allen, Mrs H. Biddle, Loughborough,(niece) and Mr Biddle, Mr T. Hall, Slimbridge (nephew), Mr J. Werrett (friend). Mrs F. Stevens was unable to be present.

Four nephews, Messrs Tony and Ted Lord and Stanley and Donald Hawker, acted as bearers.’

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The Gazette: Cameograph (1)

‘Mr Frank Barton of Tilsdown, Dursley, who at 80 years of age still rides to hounds with the Berkeley. “I’ve been riding all my life”, he said this week, “I first rode with the Berkeley when I was 13 and I hope to be at the Kennels meet this coming Saturday.”

Frank Barton was born at Slimbridge, and while still in his teens he went with the Royal Gloucestershire Hussars to South Africa shortly after the Boer War broke out. After the end of the war he had a spell on a Canadian cattle ranch, and when war was declared on August 4th 1914, it was not long before he was in France with a Canadian cavalry regiment.

After World War I he returned home and started a milk round which he has continued ever since. But no motor delivery van for him – he is far too much attached to his pony, Brownie, and to his faithful Dalmatian, Annabelle.’

The Gazette – 1960’s

‘Cup Winner – Mr F. Barton driving the entry of Mr S. Hodgson, winner of the cup offered at Dursley Horse Show and Gymkhana. This was Mr Hodgson’s 30th award to date from 1943.’

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Enter a caption

Obituary in the Gazette December 1965:

Mr F.W. Barton of Dursley – The funeral service of Mr Frank William Barton (86) of  Tilsdown, Dursley, whose death was reported in last week’s Gazette, was held at Slimbridge Parish Church on Monday. The service was conducted by Canon W. Thomas, and the lesson was read by Mr R.A. Davis.

Mr Barton, who died on December 15th, was a well-known figure at the Berkeley Hunt meets.

Family mourners: Mr E.P.Barton (brother); Mrs Norah (sic) Marsh (sister); Mrs Doris Bootman (niece), (rep.Mrs Elsie Rush (sister) and Mr j. Rush); Mr Harry Barton (nephew 9rep. Mr Albert Barton (brother)); Misses Evie and May Walker (nieces); Miss Marion (sic) Barton (niece) rep. Mrs Vera Gunter and Mr R.D. Gunter); Mr Brian Barton (nephew); Miss Elsie Barton (cousin).

The bearers were Mr W.J. Barton, Mr E.G. Barton, Mr T. Hall and Mr G. Hall (nephews).

General Mourners: Mr and Mrs J. Johnson, Mr J. Anstey, Mr E. Lord (nephew) also rep. Mrs Lord; Mr J. Anstey (nephew); Mr and Mrs P. Cullimore (niece); Mr D. Steel; Mr J. Prout; Mr W. Griffiths; Mr and Mrs L. Shaw; Mr H.C. Wood; Mr M.E. Neale; Major J. Berkeley, rep. Captain R.G. Berkeley; Mrs A. Robathan rep. Mr Crossman; Mr M.F. Kemp rep. Mr and Mrs J. Angell-James; Mr R. Harding; Mr A. Harding rep. M. Harding; Captain H.J. Baldwin, rep. Berkeley Estate; Mr and Mrs A. Preece; Mr H.J. Haines rep. Mr Lionel Mayo; Mr J. Exell; Mr H.T. Brown; Mr H.C. Tocknell, Mr F.H. Biddle rep. Hugh and Peggy; Mr W. Noad; Mr Reg Holloway rep Mrs Holloway and Bridget and Mr George Turrell and family; Mr C. Lovell rep the Royal Gloucestershire Hussars.

Mr A. Lord, Mrs H. Lord (rep. Mr H. Lord), Mr E. Lord, Mr and Mrs P. Cullimore, Mr and Mrs l. Steels (rep. Miss Cox and Mr E. Cox), Mr E. Wood, Mr and Mrs M.F. Kemp, Captain and Mrs Bell, Mrs P. Neale, Mr and Mrs F.L. Cooke, Mr F.C. Penley, Mr J. Rymer, Mr T. Langley ( rep Mr J. Smith), Mr J. Gibbs, Mr and Mrs T. Phillips (rep. Mr C. Pope), Miss Bowlby (rep. Mrs Mildmay and Miss B. Mildmay), Mr John Daniell (Rep. Mr and Mrs T. Pullin), Brigadier and Mrs K. Dunn, Mr N. Neale, Mr H. Cullimore, Mrs Thomas.

Unable to attend: Mr Don Hawkes (nephew), Mr and Mrs Nelson Allen, Miss G. Gasper, Mr and Mrs R. Curry, Mr Godfrey Morgan

Floral Tributes: Percy, Florrie and family; Nieces and Nephews (Westerleigh) and Marjorie; George, Diana and family; Freda Howard and all the family; The Berkeley Hunt; Tom, Marjorie and family and Nora; All Old Comrades of the Regiment, Royal Glos. Hussars Yeomanry Comrades Association; Brian and Richard (nephews) and Netta and Morris; Captain R.G.W. Berkeley and Major R.J.C. Berkeley; Mr and Mrs J.M. Hale and Mrs E.E. Hale; Tom, Peggy and Phyllis; Len, Evie and May, Jan and Joan; The Neales, Mrs Roby.

Funeral arrangements were carried out by L.W. Clutterbuck (Funeral Director), High Street, Cam.

From ‘The Royal Gloucestershire Hussars’ by Rollo Clifford:

‘Sergeant Frank Barton was the son of ‘Judge’ Barton, a master blacksmith with a forge at Slimbridge. Frank was one of six boys and seven girls. Two of his brothers, Morris and Burland, also joined up in the Royal Gloucestershire Hussars in 1915, Frank having already spent his 21st birthday with the Imperial Yeomanry in South Africa’

‘In the 1930s and 40s, Frank Barton ran a milk round in the Dursley area. He was a familiar sight in his pony and trap setting out from his Tilsdown home. He was still following the Berkeley Hounds on a horse up to his death in his eighties.’

From Doris Bootman:

‘In mother’s generation  Frank, the oldest son, was I think married in Canada to Maud Lord. Her family had emigrated from the Slimbridge district somewhere. They had no children but adopted a nephew of her’s, John, who was killed in the ’39 – ’45 War’

‘My uncle Frank Barton was in the Boer War then he went out to Canada following the Lords who had emigrated. He came back to fight in the ’14-’18 War. He and Aunt Maud (we always called her thin Aunt Maud to distinguish her from Aunt Maud Barton who was fat!) had no children but adopted John Lord. I think he was a nephew of Aunt Maud and he was killed in the last war.’

3. FANNY BARTON, Great Aunt

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Fanny Barton was born on 22nd August 1881 and baptised on 2nd October 1881, the third child of William and Ellen Barton of Slimbridge. At the time of the 1891 census she was at home and aged nine years. In the 1901 census Fanny was working as a housemaid for Eliza Beale of Hyde Court, Minchinhampton. She was described as nineteen-years-old and born in Slimbridge.

In 1911 Fanny was working at twenty-roomed 14 Augustus Road, Edgbaston. She was described as a twenty-nine-year-old single, parlour maid (domestic), one of five domestic staff working for John Eliot Howard Lloyd, a chemical manufacturer. Also in residence was Stroud-born Rose Young, a thirty-nine-year-old cook.

She died on 22nd April 1943 aged 61 years and was buried at Slimbridge on 26th April.

Gravestone inscription:

‘In loving memory of Fanny Barton died 22nd April 1943 Aged 61 years – ‘Love’s Greatest Gift, Remembrance’ Also in loving memory of Mabel Louisa Barton passed away October 9th 1946 aged 58 years – ‘Resting in God’s Keeping’.

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Fanny Barton 1881-1943. On the reverse, ‘To Maud & Will with love from Fan Xmas 1919.

Obituary:

‘Miss Fanny Barton, at Slimbridge. We regret to report the death on April 22nd, following a lengthy illness, of Miss Fanny Barton second daughter of the late Mr and Mrs William Barton of Slimbridge. Miss Barton had resided for some two years at Malthouse Farm, Slimbridge. A large number of relatives and friends gathered at the Parish Church on Monday when the funeral took place. The Rev. W.H. Thomas officiated, and Mrs Thomas was at the organ.

The following relatives were present: Messrs Frank, Bert, Percy, Morris and Burland Barton (brothers), Mesdames M. Walker, E. Rush, W. Hall and the Misses Mabel and Norah Barton (sisters), Mr F. Hall (brother-in-law), Mrs P. Barton (sister-in-law), Messrs T. and G. Hall (nephews), Misses E. Walker, M. Barton, and D. Rush (nieces), Miss Merrett and Mrs Steele (cousins).

Others present were Messrs. E.J. Hill, T. Richards, Mesdames Wood, Thomas, Cornock, cuff, Brown, G. Tudor, C. Hill, Hunt, Nurse Duffy, the Misses D. and C. Moss, A. Tudor, Thomas, H. Pearce, Herbert.

The bearers were Messrs J. Shipp, G. Morgan, F. Pain and T.G. Pegler, and the arrangements were carried out by Mr W.H. Stone, of Cambridge.

Floral tributes: Maud and Frank; Maud, Will and family; Elsie, Jack and family; Bert and family; Morris, Muriel and family; Burland, Lily and family; Winnie, Frank and children; Mabel and Nora; Mr E. Harding and Sons; Mr Moss and family; all at Churchend Farm; Her friend Rose; Miss Workman (Worcester), Mr Morris (Worcester); Mrs Knott (Worcester); Me and Mrs Hunt and Cynthia; Mr and Mrs Evi Thornhill; Elsie (Chalford).’

4. ELSIE MARY RUSH, Great Aunt

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Elsie Mary Barton was born on 29th April 1883 and baptised on 24th June 1883 at Slimbridge. She was for a time at Braemar, Bath Road, Worcester. On the night of the 1891 census she was at home and aged seven years. In the 1901 census she was at home and aged seventeen years.

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In 1911 Elsie Mary Barton was working as a servant for Arthur Culpin, an Engineer and Tim Makers’ toolmaker and widower at his eight-roomed home, 96 Bath Road, Worcester. His stepson Arthur John Neale was living with him, a photographer (china work). Elsie Mary was described as a twenty-seven-year-old general servant born in Slimbridge. Also staying as a visitor was her thirteen-year-old sister Winifred who was born in Slimbridge.

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Wedding of Great Aunt Elsie Mary (1883-1967) to John Rush on 8th April 1912 at Slimbridge Parish Church.
Left to right, Back Row: Percy Barton, Morris George Barton, Burland Oswald Barton, Seymour Merrett, Albert Edgar Barton, William Walker, -.
Middle Row: Winifred Barton, Florence Noad, Fanny Barton, Mary Elizabeth Rush (sister of groom), Kenneth Rush (brother of groom) best man, Mabel Barton, Maud Walker, Gt Gt Aunt Fanny Drinkwater, Gt Gt Aunt Eliza Powell.
Front Row: Nora Ellen Barton, Mr and Mrs Rush, John Rush, Elsie Mary Barton, Ellen Barton, William Barton, Sarah Merrett .
In front: Leonard Walker
Taken in front of the Wedding Shed in the Forge Orchard.

On 8th April 1912, she married John Samuel Rush at Slimbridge Parish Church. He was a machine operator the same as his father, John Thomas Rush. Jack and Elsie settled in Wolverhampton and had two children, Wilfred and Doris. Elsie died on 6th October 1967 aged 84 years and Jack died on 2nd November 1973 aged 91 years. Both were buried at Slimbridge.

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Great Aunt Elsie Mary Rush (1883-1967) with Great Aunt Mabel Louise Barton (1887-1946) in the garden of the Calpins House, ‘Braemar’, Bath Road, Worcester.

In 1915 Jack and Elsie were living at 93 Bruford Road, Wolverhampton.

Newspaper 1912:

‘A pretty wedding took place at St John the Evangelist Church, Slymbridge, on Easter Monday, the Rev J.O.H. Carter (Rector) officiating. The contracting parties were Miss Elsie Mary Barton, third daughter of Mr William Barton, and Mr John Samuel Rush, second son of Mr John Thomas Rush, of Northampton. The bride was given away by her father, and was attended by two bridesmaids, Miss Mabel Louise Barton, sister of the bride, and Miss Mary Elizabeth Rush, sister of the bridegroom. Mr Kenneth Rush, brother of the bridegroom, carried out the duties of best man. Both the bride and bridegroom were the recipient of a large number of presents.’

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Great Aunt Elsie Mary Rush (1883-1967) with members of the family at the Forge, Slimbridge.
 Left to right, Back Row: Great Uncle Jack Rush, Great Aunt Elsie Mary Rush, Great Aunt Mabel Louise Barton, Mrs. Smith (?), Great Aunt Nora Ellen Barton, Wilfred Rush. Middle Row: -, Marian Florence Barton. Front Row: Doris Rush

Obituary 1967:

‘Mrs E. Rush, Late of Slimbridge. The interment took place at Slimbridge Parish Church on October 14th of Mrs Elsie Rush, a daughter of the late Mr and Mrs William Barton of Slimbridge.

Cremation had previously taken place at Wolverhampton, where Mrs Rush had lived since her marriage.

The Rev J. Bickley officiated at a short church service, when the ashes were placed in the family grave. The bearer was Mr Jack Barton, a nephew.

Mourners included: Mr J.S. Rush (husband); Mr and Mrs A.W. Rush (son and daughter-in-law); Mr and Mrs H. Bootman (daughter and son-in-law); Mrs N. Marsh (sister); Mr E.P. Barton (brother); Mr Maurice Rush (grandson); Miss M. Barton, Mrs V. Gunter (nieces); Messrs Brian and George Barton, Tom and George Hall (nephews); Mrs L. Steele and Miss A. Merrett (cousins); Mrs L. Goodrich, Mr G Goodrich and Mrs Bagby (friends).’

Reminiscences of her Grandparents and Slimbridge by Doris Bootman, daughter of Elsie Barton:

‘I don’t remember the first time I came to my grandparents but I was always reminded that when I was 2 I put my tongue out at my granddad – quite reprehensible behaviour 80 years ago. However, we continued to come once a year or more, at first, Mother, my brother Wilfrid and myself – my father never had a whole weeks holiday until after the Second World War. As Wilfrid grew older he stayed at home with Dad but it may not have been his choice. As for me, with cousins next door to the Forge it was a perfect holiday. I was happy too with the jobs I collected – in the morning I fetched milk from Malthouse Farm, we had breakfast, then I went up the garden to the orchard with Grandad. On the first day I had to count the fowl as Grandad slowly let them out of the fowl house. The first job in August though was to pick up all the fallen apples before the pigs and fowl were let out. There were mostly white Wyandoltes (sp?) but a few ‘Indian Game’ from eggs given to him. Regular jobs for me included weeding in the front or back garden – elevensies was always a mug of cider at the end of a row. Also with my own small axe I provided a constant supply of sticks to boil the kettle – hung over the grate – for afternoon tea. One of my early vivid memories is of me yelling on the grass because Uncle Percy’s sow was snuffling me after I had fallen off the gate between the two orchards. Grandad took me in his pony and trap to the Doctor who put a wooden splint on my broken wrist and gave me a penny to go on the horses at the Fair.

As I grew up I spent a lot of time with my cousin Marian when not being involved in hay-making harvesting or other jobs, we walked parts of the countryside. We went to Whiteway Colony. (I was) particularly pleased to get there because it was off the only map we had! We found the monument in Nibley to the very first man who translated the Bible into English. We went to Sharpness along the tow-path, earlier there had been a boat to Gloucester but that stopped. It was fascinating going round the Docks, ships from Scandinavia and Russia with cargoes of wood. Up the hill too was a playground overlooking the junction of the river and the canal.

We went often to the New Grounds – given homemade lemonade and cake by Mrs Bowditch before we paddled, sometimes riskily because of the gullies or went on the breakwater. There were many, many shorter walks sometimes in the evening getting a lift back from our cousin Mark Steele, returning from his bakery in Cam. We went in the ‘Dickie’ seat.

Days were busy not Sundays though only the animals were fed. After the midday meal Grandad fetched the family Bible and read himself a chapter – when Grandma was bed ridden he took the Bible upstairs and read with her.

I remember at least one Christmas at Slimbridge Grandad played Nap with me by the light of the oil lamp. There was a New Year’s Eve Party at the White Lion in Cambridge run by two sisters – Doris and ‘Chick’ Moss. I remember we walked home through the fields while the bells were still ringing out.

Grandad’s cottage was against the Forge which had wide doors open to the road. Grandad had really retired but, at least once, I had to jump up and down with the arm to keep the fire going in the hearth. Outside was the big grind-stone for sharpening scythes and sickles – it seemed a long job turning the handle.

There was quite a big living room in the (cottage) with an iron grate and oven as well as a big long oven. Grandad had made for Grandma to bake all the bread she had to make for all the family – six boys and six girls over the years.

The Pump in the Scullery brought water from the well but for washing ourselves we fetched a pan of water from the barrel of rainwater outside the back shed. My mother said that she remembered the door being cut through  – previously as with many country cottages there had only been one door. There was also a little room, always clean and tidy and only used on special occasions.

My mother went to Grandad’s during the illness of Grandma and later Grandad so that her sister at home could have a month’s holiday but in Worcester. So we were always there in August and picked the orchard fruit trees.’

5. HENRY JOHN BARTON, Great Uncle

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Believed to be a photograph of Great Uncle Henry John Barton (1885-1911)

Harry Barton was born on 19th September 1885 and baptised on 25th October 1885 at Slimbridge, second son of William and Ellen Barton. On the night of the 1891 census he was at home aged five years. In the 1901 census he was at home aged fifteen years and working as a blacksmith’s son. He worked in the Forge with his father and belonged to the bell-ringing team. Tragically he died at the age of 25 years on 14th February 1911 and was buried in the churchyard.

Letters from Percy Barton to Florence Noad:

‘Oct.9th 1910…Harry is having a holiday at Nottingham he went last Thursday and is bringing his young lady back with him she lives at Dursley but has had a diseased bone in her finger which came from a needle running in it, so she has been staying with her married sister.’

‘Jan 15th 1911… We have Henry in bed with a very bad cold he seems to be got weak and run down we had the Doctor to him Friday and he has been again today he said when he gets better he must go for a change so I don’t expect he will do any work for a bit. Father is very pleased my arm is got alright as he said he don’t know what he should have done if both of us was laid up together. …’

‘Jan 29th 1911…I fully made up my mind to come and see you before now but as Harry gets no better I shall have to give up all thoughts of having a week end for a while. I am so pleased you came up when you did. Harry stayed in bed for a whole week and never spoke of getting up. He got up one day in the week and as been out for several short walks with Walter Thomas. Some time ago we were shoeing a very awkward horse and Harry got thrown against the doors. Whether it is from that or an influenza cold we don’t know but the Dr. said his brain was effected and let him go on ever so well he would not be fit for work for six or perhaps twelve months. It is making an extra bit of work for me and a big trial for us all as the Dr. told us he was not safe to be left by himself. We have Mabel coming home next Saturday and I am sure Mother will be pleased to see her come, as it is more than ones work to be looking after Harry.’

‘Feb 10th 1911…Many thanks for your letter which I am always so pleased to receive. Sorry I have not answered it before but since last writing to you we have had a very sad trial Harry got worse last Monday week and we sent for Mabel to come as soon as possible so she came home on the Tuesday. Well he still got worse and Dr. Brewis said he was out of his mind and ought to be put away at some Asylum but we would not think of doing anything like that and asked him if he thought a Specialist could do any good but he said it would be like throwing money away to have one as he was sure all he wanted was mental doctoring and nursing. Anyway Mother said she was not satisfied & asked if he would meet Dr Robert he agreed to that so they both came last Saturday & Dr Roberts was in the same opinion that he ought to be put away & they told us we should not be doing our duty if we did not do it so then we thought we had better & fixed on taking him to Gloucester Asylum Wednesday this we did. Walter Thomas & myself went with him in a fly. On the Tuesday night before he seemed in awful pain & said he should soon be dead so the same morning we took him we sent for the Dr to see if he was fit to be taken. He again sounded him and said the sooner he was there the better it would be for him but he seemed to me like anyone took for death. He did not speak all the way there & when he was there they bathed him and put him to bed & this morning we had a letter saying he passed a very quiet night and died 5.30 next morning from Syncope & Melancholia. We are all awfully upset to think we sent him away just at the very last but we went by the Dr’s orders but neither of them knew his complaint. Mr Workman is making the coffin and going to fetch him from Gloucester tomorrow and the funeral we have fixed for Tuesday. I will now close as it is getting late, with my fondest love to you…’

‘Feb 26th 1911 (black edged envelopes begin)… Poor Harry’s young lady and her sister came down last Sunday. She looks awfully ill and worried. She seems like one lost and keeps saying how she shall miss him. It is really very hard for her as Harry had been going to see her for more than six years, so I don’t wonder at her missing him. I told her it was very hard to think it now but she must try and think that he is much better off now where he is. …’

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Obituary Card for Great Uncle Henry John Barton (1885-1911): 
‘In Loving Memory of Harry, beloved son of William and Ellen Barton, who departed this life February 9th 1911 aged 25 years. Interred at Slymbridge Churchyard February 14th, 1911.
We shall miss thee a thousand turns
Along life’s weary track;
Not a sorrow nor a joy
But we long to call thee back;
Yearn for thy true and loving heart,
And thy bright smile to see –
For many good and true are left,
But none are quite like thee.

The Citizen, Thursday February 16th 1911:

‘The funeral of Mr. Henry John Barton, son  of Mr. and Mrs. William Barton, who died on Thursday in last week, took place at Slimbridge Church on Tuesday. The Deceased was only 25 years of age and enjoyed the best of health until four weeks ago he was stricken with influenza.

Mr. Barton was very popular amongst a large circle of friends, and the greatest sympathy is felt for his family in their bereavement. The service was conducted by the Rector, the Rev. J.O.H.Carter.

In addition to relatives, the following were amongst those who attended: Messrs. C. Allen, T. Hawkins, F. Harris, S.Smith, L.Smith, T. Viney, A.E. Nicholls, D. Moss, H. Rudge, L. Workman, Walkley and others.

Amongst the floral tributes sent were those from His mother, sisters and brothers; Miss M. Vinlon (sic), (Dursley), Elsie and Jack, aunt, cousins and R.A. Pearce (Cheltenham), W. Thomas, Aunt Eliza, Florrie, Mr. A.J. Neale (Worcester), the employees of the Royal Steam Bakery, Yardley, a friend, his Slimbridge friends T. and A. Hawkins, Maud and Will, Lily and Jack Goodrich, Mr. and Mrs. E. Workman and family, Mr. H.J. and Miss L. Morgan, and Millie and Maud.

The coffin was of elm, with brass fittings and the following inscription: ‘Henry John Barton, died February 9th 1911 aged 25 years.’  And the funeral arrangements were carried out by Messrs. Workman and Son. The four bearers were the deceased’s two cousins, Messrs. Joseph Woodward of Berrow. And Frank Cookley of Framilode and his two lifelong friends Walter Thomas and Jack Goodrich.

Obituary:

‘Funeral of Mr Henry John Barton, of Slimbridge – The sad death of Mr Henry John Barton, more familiarly known as Harry amongst his many friends and acquaintances, has caused deepest sympathy and regret to be extended to Mr and Mrs William Barton and their family in the bereavement.

The deceased, who was only 25 years of age, enjoyed the best of health until about four weeks ago when he was stricken by a severe attack of melancholia, the result of influenza, and finally, on Thursday 9th February, was taken with syncpe, from which he never recovered. He was of a cheery disposition, with a kind greeting for everyone, and always ready and willing to do anyone a kindness. He will be greatly missed in Slimbridge and the district.

The funeral took place on Tuesday last at Slimbridge Church, the service being conducted by the Rector, the Rev J.O.H. Carter. The coffin was of elm with brass fittings and bore the following inscription: “Henry John Barton, died February 9th, 1911, aged 25 years.” The funeral arrangements were carried out by Messrs. Workman and Son.

The chief mourners were: Mr and Mrs W. Barton (father and mother), Misses F., E. M., and M.L. Barton (sisters), Messrs A.E., E.P.,M.G.,and B.O. Barton (brothers), Mr and Mrs W. Walker (brother-in-law and sister), Mr and Mrs H. Barton (uncle and aunt), Mrs Powell (aunt), Mr S. Merrett (uncle), Mr W. Drinkwater (uncle), Mr F. and Mr C. Woodward (cousins), Mr P.T. Cookley (cousin).

The four bearers were the deceased’s two cousins, Mr Joseph Woodward, of Berrow and Mr Frank Cookley, of Framilode, and two life-long friends, Mr Walter Thomas and Mr Jack Goodrich. In addition to the many relatives present the following, amongst others, attended at the graveside to pay respects to their departed friend: Messrs. C. Allen, T. Hawkins, F. Harris, J.L. Smith, L. Smith, T. Viney, A.E. Viney, B. Smith, M. Pearce, N. Cornock, W. Nicholls, D. Moss, H. Rudge, E. Workman, – Walkley, etc.

The wreaths, which were very beautiful, were sent by the following: From his sorrowing Mother and Father; In loving memory of dear Harry from Millie and Maud (Dursley); With deepest love and affection from Maud and Will (Bristol); In ever loving memory of dear Harry from Sisters and Brothers; In loving memory of dear Harry from Elsie and Jack; with loving sympathy from dear Aunt Eliza (Hardwicke); With loving and sincere sympathy from Uncle Harry and Family (Moreton Valence); With deepest regret from Aunt, Cousins and R.A. Pearce, (Cheltenham); With heartfelt sympathy from his devoted friend W. Thomas; with deepest sympathy from Lilly and Jack Goodrich; With deepest sympathy from T. and A. Hawkins (The Hurns); With deepest sympathy from Florrie (Clifton); With heartfelt sympathy from Mrs H.J. and Miss L. Morgan; With deepest sympathy from all at Longaston; With deepest sympathy and affectionate remembrance from his Slimbridge Friends; With deepest sympathy from A Friend (Edgbaston); With deepest sympathy from Mr and Mrs E. Workman and Family (Coaley); With deepest sympathy from the Employees at Harding’s Royal Steam Bakery (Yardley).

The subscribers to the wreath sent by his Slimbridge Friends were: Messrs. A.E. Morgan, F. Hawkins, T. Hill, J. Hill, W. Pain, C. Pain, A.H. Smith, J. Shipp, T.E. Pearce, F. Hall, F. Burnett, H. White, A.E. Viney, F.C. Harris, N. Hawkins, G. Hill, W. Gazard, A. Pain, J.L. Smith, L. Peake, D. Moss, E. Pearce, H.T. Tocknell, W. Collard, J. Roberts, etc.

Heartfelt and deep condolence is felt for the deceased’s fiancée, Miss M. Vinton, of Dursley, to whom he became engaged about three months ago. The beautiful wreath which Miss Vinton sent as a last token of affection was inscribed as follows: “Sleep on beloved one, sleep and take thy rest, Lay down thy head upon thy Saviour’s breast, We loved thee much, but Jesus loves thee best, Sleep on and rest.”’

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6. MABEL LOUISE BARTON, Great Aunt

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Mabel Barton was born on 8th November 1887 (Family Bible 9th) and baptised on 18th December 1887 at Slimbridge, the fourth daughter of William and Ellen Barton. On the night of the 1891 census she was aged three years and at home. In the 1901 census she was at home and aged thirteen years. She lived in Worcester where she ran a sweetshop.

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At the time of the 1911 census William Barton was a fifty-six-year-old blacksmith working on his own account and born in Slimbridge. He was father of thirteen children of whom eleven were still living. Ellen was aged fifty-three-years and born in Purton. Children at home included Mabel aged twenty-three years.

She died on 9th October 1946 aged 58 years. She was buried in Slimbridge churchyard on 14th October.

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Obituary Notice 1946:

‘Miss Mabel L. Barton at Slimbridge. Miss Mabel L. Barton died in her fifty ninth year at Worcester on October 9th. A service was carried out at St Paul’s Church, Worcester, conducted by Rev F. Bott followed by cremation at Cheltenham. The ashes were conveyed to Slimbridge and interred after a short service conducted by Rev W.H. Thomas assisted by Rev F. Bott. With Mrs Thomas at the organ.

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Mourners were: Miss N. Barton, Mrs Walker, Mrs Rush, Mrs Hall (sisters); Messrs Frank, Bert, Percy, Morris and Burland Barton (brothers) Mrs P. Barton and Mr F. Hall (brother-in-law and sister-in-law); Misses E and M. Walker, M. Barton, J Barton and Messrs H. and E. Barton and T. and G. Hall (nephews and nieces); Mr and Mrs J. Taylor and Miss E. Barton (cousins); Mrs Wiggal (Worcester), Nurse Duffy, Miss G. Pearce, Mrs Workman, Mrs Howes, Mrs Cashmore and Mrs Thornhill.

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Floral Tributes: Nora, Maud, Will and family; Elsie, Jack and family; Winnie, Frank and family; Frank and Maud; Bert, family and Sophie; Percy, Florie (sic) and family; Morris and family; Leonard, Doris and family; Nora; All at Thorneycroft; Helena and family (Stonehouse); Mr and Mrs John Morris; Mr and Mrs Wagstaff and Mrs Brayham; Mr and Mrs Moreton and john; Miss Workman; Mr and Mrs Longton Davies; Ann; C. Knott; Mr and Mrs Brock and sons; Probert family; Kitty, Harry and Doreen; Mrs Hudson and family; D. Austin; Miss Hickman and Miss Annis; Mr and Mrs Stevens and Miss Lea; N Burbridge; Mr and Mrs A.E. Gordon and family; Bob and Bill; W. Shepherd; Mr D. Moss and family; Rev D. and Mrs Beard and family; Jack and Gladys; Beat and Chick; Mr and Mrs Currell and Miss Dunsford; G. Marsh; Ann Smallman; Mary Kendrick; Jack and Annie.

The funeral arrangements were carried out by Messrs H. and R. Clifford, Worcester.’

7. ALBERT EDGAR BARTON, Great Uncle

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Bert Barton was born on 21st September 1889 (Family Bible 21st) and baptised on 27th October 1889 at Slimbridge, the third son of William and Ellen Barton. On the night of the 1891 census he was at home and aged one year. In the 1901 census he was at home and aged eleven years.

In 1911 Bert Barton, aged twenty-one, was boarding with the Ross family at 109, Coventry Road, Hay Mills, Birmingham. He was described as a single baker, born in Slimbridge. Brothers Angus and Joseph Ross were both bakers too.

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His aunt, Eliza, was married to Charles Sims of Hardwicke. He had a nephew, Ernest, who founded Harding’s Royal Steam Bakery of Yardley, Birmingham. His mother, Betty Harding Sims, joined Ernest in the business and also his cousins Alfred John and Harry Sims, Alfred looked after the stables and Harry worked in the bakery. The bakery was originally sited in Berkeley Road but moved to Church Road. Alfred and Harry were the sons of Aunt Eliza so they were also cousins of Bert Barton. Bert joined the bakery and was later joined by his brother Burland.

Albert married Mary Marian Cooper on 26th December 1912.

Wedding:

‘Slimbridge – A pretty and interesting wedding took place at St Cyprian’s Church, Hay Mills, Birmingham on December 26th. The happy couple were Mr Albert Edgar Barton, third son of Mr and Mrs William Barton, of Slymbridge, Gloucestershire, and Mary Marian Cooper, third daughter of Mr Charles Cooper, of Small Heath, Birmingham. The service was conducted by the Rev Mr Saywell. The bridegroom was attended by Mr Percy Barton (brother). Miss Winnie Cooper (sister of the bride), and Miss Mabel Barton (sister of the Bridegroom) were the bridesmaids. After the ceremony a reception was held at the residence of the bride’s father where a large number of relatives and friends assembled. The happy pair were the recipients of numerous handsome and useful presents. Mr and Mrs Barton will take up their residence at 41 Holder Road, South Yardley.’

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In 1939 a register for Hay Mills gives the following details:

4 Gladys Road, Hay Mills, Birmingham

Albert E. Barton, born 21-9-1889, Married, foreman Baker and Confectioner

Mary M. Barton, born 3-2-1886, Married, Unpaid domestic duties

Gwynneth M. Barton (added – Parker), born 1-9-1917, Single, Clerk and Copy Typist for Corporation, Birmingham

Mary Marian died on Christmas Eve 1941 aged 55 years, and Albert Edgar died in 1969 aged 80 years.

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Funeral:

‘On the 24th inst at 4, Gladys Road, South Yardley, Mary Marion (sic), dearly beloved wife of Albert Edgar, and loving mother of Harry, Gwen, and Eric, passed very suddenly in her 56th year. Funeral Service at Hay Mills Congregational Church, Tuesday, December 30th, at 10.45am followed by cremation at Perry Barr at 11.30am.’

Letters from Percy Barton to Florence Noad:

‘June 24th 1912… Bert is bringing his young lady home next Sunday week for a week’s holiday. I wish it was us two having another week together but I hope to have a trip to Ilfracombe this time with you…’

‘July 7th 1912…Burland drove to the Patch to meet Bert & his girl Miss Cooper. They had been to Gloucester & they came back almost soaked. We could hardly believe that it rained so at the Patch. The lightening & thunder yesterday afternoon was awful. I never did see such a flash before & then such a crash it fairly shook everything, it struck through the Church wall just by the lightening conductor & scattered the mortar from one side to the other & the side facing Uncle’s field down the road was struck at the foundation in four places under each water spout & pieces of stone drove 13 yds. Mabel, Bert & Miss Cooper went to Ilfracombe last Monday. I am looking forward for our trip. They have gone back tonight. I should prefer the young lady he brought down the first time. This one is so awful quiet & looks old he says she is twenty five but I said an old one. She looks quite thirty. She was awful bad on the boat after they left Weston & all the way coming back. I hope you will be a better sailor than that.’

‘Dec 8th 1912… No doubt you will be surprised to hear that I am going to Birmingham this Christmas we had a letter from Bert saying he was going to be married & he wants me to go as best man. I did not think he would be before us as they have not been going together so long as we have, but he said she was not willing to be married next year as it is 1913 & he thought to wait till 1914 would be too long so they have decided to finish it off in 1912. I wish it was us instead but I am quite content to wait & as it is your Father’s wish we had best not be in a hurry.’

‘Dec 12th 1912…I am writing a few lines to ask you if you could come to Birmingham with us. We had a letter from Bert’s young lady saying they should be very pleased to see you. Do try & come dear. We shall go Christmas night by the mail so if you could come up by it & you could get back the day after Boxing Day that is if you could not stay longer. Ask the Mrs she will let you. I can’t stay to write more so will close hoping to hear from you soon & that you will be able to come.’

‘Dec 24th 1912… I shall be very glad when my outing is over. I am not looking forward to a very enjoyable time. I would much rather come & see you. I am quite tired of shoeing today but have two more hunters to shoe… Will write to you when at Brum.’

‘Dec 27th 1912…My dearest Florrie, I am once more landed home after a very nice holiday. I do wish you could have been with me. I was very pleased when I got home to find your most welcome letter also the cards which I must thank you for & all good wishes. I was more than pleased to hear you are got better. I have had you in my thoughts a lot since I had your letter saying you were ill & dearest I wished I could have seen you. The Wedding it went off well the Vicar was splendid he gave a splendid address. When they were kneeling at the Altar he said that they must remember two hearts one beat & two minds one thought & that it was not the rich that were the happiest. It was really splendid what he said. I ably carried out my duties & have now learnt it all. I shall be most pleased dearest when it comes to our lot which I hope won’t be very long. There was a good party at the wedding breakfast & after of course we drank their health & congratulated them & I was called upon to speak being the best man. They were all strangers to me so I could not say what I thought of so I wished them long life, happiness, prosperity & a good family then they all had a good laugh & hear, hear. I had a good mind to say but they seemed a serious lot. ‘Here’s luck to the cock that treadeth the hen, he flappeth his wings then is ready again. Here’s luck to the hen that never refuses to let the cock tread her when ever he chooses.’ I hope it won’t disgust you dearest don’t tell the other girls. I wrote a card to when at Brum but came off in such a hurry I forgot to post it, perhaps Bert might see it & send it on. I went to do a bit of shopping this morning. I have got you an umbrella. I hope you will like it – hey will send it from the shop. Perhaps you might have had it before you get this. I bought for a wedding present from us a dozen knives that was what they were in want of & I am to thank you very much indeed from Bert & Marion. They said perhaps you would not mind if they did not write to you. If I would thank you, they were very much disappointed about you not being able to come & sorry to hear you have been ill. We are to be sure to spend a holiday with them they have a most comfortable home & Fan said she had a bed for you with her.’

 Julia Trew to Marian Barton:

‘… I started tracing the family tree on my mother’s side about twenty years ago because we lived near to her mother – Kate Leah (Sims), my nan was the eldest daughter of Alfred John Sims, son of Eliza (Barton). We always believed that the family came from Hardwicke because my nan remembers Eliza (always known to the family as Gloucester Gran) coming from the farm in Hardwicke to visit. She visited Birmingham twice a year to collect dividends from the shares in Harding’s Bakery. It was only a few years ago that I decided to write away for the marriage certificate of Charles Sims and Eliza that we found out they had both been born in Slimbridge. That’s when we started to piece together the family history – fortunately my Nan had a very good memory – it obviously runs in the Barton family. Sadly my Nan died two years ago – she was born in 1913, the same/similar time to you I think. Once my Mother took Nan to visit Slimbridge and see the church where her father and grandparents had been baptised. You won’t believe it – they actually parked right outside your house, what a shame you never met.

Of course Nan’s father, Alfred John Sims, didn’t speak about his family – we understood that when we found the newspaper article about his death – it was a bit gruesome. He looked after the horses for the bakery – Nan said he preferred horses to people! For years they used to receive Christmas hampers from Ernest Harding who lived in a big house, Packwood Grange, in Warwickshire. They didn’t really know the Hardings – just their names – so it will be interesting to hear about Douglas. We understood that Ernest married ‘Miss Tudor’ but we didn’t know more than that. We understood that Ernest was the illegitimate son of Betty Harding Sims and changed his name to Harding, as did his mother and grandmother once his grandfather Robert Harding died. We think that’s where the money to set up the bakery came from (i.e. Ernest’s father) but it might have come from his family’s interests in the Shepherd’s Patch  Hotel and the farm in Hardwicke…’

May Walker to Julie Trew:

‘Your letter came as a lovely surprise. I do remember years ago having an aunt Eliza so she must have been your great great grandmother. I am now 93 years old so I think I must be the oldest of the family. I had a brother three years older and a twin sister both of them have died – my brother in ’97 and my sister in ’94 and some thought my sister and I would not live we were skinny little things born a short while too soon when my mother thought the fire wanted some paraffin and nearly set the room on fire. I shouldn’t have lasted through the night they were quite sure but I’m still here years after.

I really didn’t know much about the Harding family. I know my two uncles Bert and Burland worked there and when Uncle Burland died the funeral passed by the works so that the girls in his part could wait outside to see it pass. I think he was in charge of the cakes and pastries. I seem to remember going with my mother to see an elderly lady who lived quite near I’m sure they said she was Mr Harding’s mother. Ernest Harding was a boy living with his mother in Slimbridge I know my grandfather used to keep an eye on him he always played with his boys my uncles and over the years Mr Harding used to come and sit in the kitchen and they would have a chat. We know Douglas the third son he wasn’t very strong and had fits. We were always told to help him if one came when we were together. I don’t remember having much knowledge of  Hedley or Arthur.

‘Relic of another age – Rotting Van gleams again

A horse-drawn van that was discovered rotting beneath an earth mound in a field near Birmingham Airport has been restored to its original condition.

The 1920s van was restored over 12 months by trainees at Redditch and Handsworth Skill Centres.

Now owner, Mr. John Warell has managed to trace one of the van’s original drivers, 92-year-old Mr. George Bailey.

The Hovis van still has much of the original body and frame. Research through surviving employees of Harding Bakery, in Garretts Green, enabled the trainees to restore the yellow and gold paint to an exact replica of the original.

Mr. Warrell, of Mackadown Lane, Tile Cross, has spent £1,600 restoring the van.

Driver Mr. Bailey of Warwick Road, Greet, said: “I remember the company went over to motor vehicles and I took all the vans, horses and harness to market to be sold.”

Picture by John James: Caption – Trainees Tom Costello (left) and Dave Newey with the restored bread van at Redditch Skill Centre: Harding’s Royal Steam Bakery, Yardley. Awarded over 50… Silver & Bronze Medals.’

Jean Hopkins to Julie Trew:

‘Following a recent visit to my cousin May, I have borrowed the letter you wrote to her last month.

Unfortunately I’m not going to be any help regarding the start and progress of Harding’s bakery. I had no idea that it had been started in Berkeley Road – my only knowledge was the bakery in Church Road where my father worked. I don’t even know what year he joined the firm! He was in the First World War, then I seem to think butchery was mentioned as an occupation before moving to Birmingham. He met my mother who was a clerk in the offices at the bakery and they married in 1924.

I wonder if you have a copy of Richard’s family tree – if not I can photocopy one for you if you like. From that I see that my Uncle Bert was married in Hay Mills, Birmingham, in 1912, so I assume he was at Hardings some years before my dad. I’ve never had a very good memory, and although I recall the names of Fred and Harry Sims, until I saw the family tree I wasn’t aware of the relationship. I don’t remember any social visits. One thing has always puzzled me – Charles Sims (your great great grandfather) … would that have been any relation of Ernest Harding?  Arthur Harding was my dad’s boss and as he was a confectioner, I wonder if Arthur ran the cake side and Hedley was in charge of the bread? May remembered the name of the third son Douglas who had fits. My brother emigrated to Canada in 1952, but if I get any thoughts from him I will let you know.

Dad died suddenly in 1957 – mum hadn’t worked (outside the home!) since her marriage, but Arthur asked her to return to accounts, her ability to add up a column of figures was amazing. It could only have been a few years before the firm closed, but whether it was taken over or demolished for the present shopping centre with flats over I couldn’t say. Mum spent a while at another bakery firm before retiring, then she died in 1969.

I thought you might like the enclosed copies of photographs of Hardings – no idea of the year either were taken. The group photo my parents had – now knowing the firm moved I’m wondering if it could have been at the start of the new premises. On the enlarged photocopy I’venumbered my dad and uncle, mother and her two friends, also Ernest, Hedley and Arthur – not too sure if they’re correct. Have you any thoughts of the Sims brothers?

I’ve recently been in touch with my cousins Tom and George Hall in Slimbridge following a request from my brother for old family photos. Tom sent me a postcard of the Hardings vans – I don’t recognise the setting, so again could it be Berkeley Road?

… Oh, I almost forgot – more family weddings at Yardley Parish Church – My parents, Bert’s son Eric in 1941, and Bill and I in 1953!

Good luck with your research… Jean’

Julia Trew:

I think I told you that May Walker had been in touch – her letter is copied here. Also Jean Hopkins wrote and last week, I had a letter from Morag Barton. Morag said she didn’t know much but they do have a family bible from Bert Barton, I Don’t know if it goes back beyond him or starts with him and his wife. Anyway, as you will see, I will ring Morag and arrange to go down – we might be able to get photocopies of any entries. Bert Barton was the Production Manager at Harding’s Bakery and they have his production books – again which we can have a look at.

Jean sent some very interesting photographs relating to the bakery – one of all of the staff, we think around 1930. It turns out that my great-aunt also has one of these and didn’t think we would be interested in it! Mum is visiting her today and will hopefully be able to find out where Alfred and Harry Sims are on it. The most interesting one though, was probably the one of the bakery vans outside a Harding’s shop. From an old map that I have of Yardley that gives the location of different businesses, we have been able to pinpoint exactly where it was.’

8. EDWARD PERCY BARTON, Grandfather

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Edward Percy Barton was born on 30th April 1891. He was the fourth son of William and Ellen Barton. He was educated at the old Slimbridge Parochial School (the Church School opposite St John’s) where he sat next to Florence Noad who used to do his Maths homework and was to become his wife. Their teacher was Miss Thuza Pick who held the post of Head Teacher at Slimbridge as early as February 1877.

He worked for his father who was the village blacksmith and he also worked with his brother Harry until he died in 1911 aged 25 years. As a young man Percy was a bell-ringer and he kept pigs and fowl. From September 1910 he cycled down to Bristol to see Florence who was in service in Clifton.

At the time of the 1911 census William Barton was a fifty-six-year-old blacksmith working on his own account and born in Slimbridge. He was father of thirteen children of whom eleven were still living. Ellen was aged fifty-three-years and born in Purton. Children at home included Mabel aged twenty-three and sons Percy aged nineteen, Maurice aged seventeen, Burland aged fifteen who were all working and Nora aged ten years who was still at school. The Forge had five rooms.

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On 21st August 1913 Percy eventually married Florence at the Church of St John the Evangelist, Slimbridge and the newly weds moved into the cottage next to the Forge at Churchend which his father purchased for £260. On the marriage certificate Edward Percy was described as a blacksmith, son of William Barton, blacksmith. Florence was described as a domestic servant the daughter of John Noad a wheelwright.

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Dursley Gazette 23rd August 1913:

 ‘An interesting wedding at St John the Evangelist’s Church, Slimbridge, on Thursday last. The contracting parties were Mr. Edward Percy Barton (4th son of Mr. And Mrs. William Barton of Slimbridge) and Miss Florence Noad (2nd daughter of Mr. And Mrs. John Noad of Gossington. The service was conducted by Rev. J.O.H. Carter M.A. Rector. The Bride was given away by her father. Miss Mary Noad (sister of bride) and Miss Winifred Barton (sister of bridegroom) acted as bridesmaids. Mr. Maurice (sic) Barton (brother of the bridegroom) carried out the duties of best man… A merry peal of bells rang out as they left… Numerous and useful presents.’

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Percy was a master shoeing-smith or farrier and blacksmith and farmed in a small way, keeping sheep, pigs and one or two cows. On 8th October 1924 he was accepted as a tenant of the Sharpness New Docks and Gloucester and Birmingham Navigation Company for twelve acres of land at Shepherd’s Patch extending from Patch Bridge to Gilgal Brook and also land enclosed by the new Kingston Rhine at a rental of £5 per annum. Percy also purchased land and buildings adjoining the Gloucester and Berkeley Canal as well as an orchard at Kingston. On 26th May 1926 he purchased ‘The Tyning’ at Churchend a field consisting of 4.325 acres. From 9th April 1927 Percy took on the tenancy of Narles Farm, Cambridge.

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In 1974 the farm was leased from Cory’s Cam Estate at £162.50 per half year. A further field was leased from the Berkeley Estates Co and this was sold to Mr. T.A.V. Scadding in January 1945. He also leased the Gravel Pit Field, which was sold on 6th September 1955 by Slimbridge Parish Council. On 26th January 1960 some of Scadding’s land was compulsorily purchased for the realigning of the A38, between Gossington and Cambridge. In November/December 1960 land and buildings were purchased at the Patch by auction for £2220 from the executors of the late Mr. R.S. Timbrell. In 1962 an agreement was signed between British Transport Commission and the Bartons for 17.25 acres of land between Patch Bridge and a point near Purton Schools, forming offside bank of their Gloucester-Sharpness Canal for £26 per annum.

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He became associated with the Gay Nineties.

Florence Barton died on 21st April 1968 at Standish Hospital, Standish. She was aged seventy-six-years and described on the death certificate as ‘of Narles Farm, Cambridge, Slimbridge, Dursley, the wife of Edward Percy Barton a farmer’. The cause of death was given as 1a Pulmonary Oedena and b Congestive heart failure and this was certified by M. Drabb MD. The informant was W.J. Barton, Son, of Little Gables, Fewster Road, Nailsworth and the registration took place on 22nd April 1968 the registrar being P.F.M. Cottam. Florence was buried at Slimbridge but the details are not recorded in the burial register!

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Percy Barton with his son George

Percy died on 20th January 1977 at Berkeley Hospital and was buried on 26th January at Slimbridge Church. The cause of death was given as Myrocardial degeneration and Arteriosclerosis.

Gravestone inscription:

‘In loving memory of Florence Barton 1891 – 1967 (sic) Edward Percy Barton 1891 – 1977’

Letter from Percy Barton to Florence Noad re their engagement:

‘Receipt: Telephone 2402X4, Established 1879, Pleasance & Harper, Goldsmiths & Silversmiths, 4 Wine Street, Bristol. Mr Barton Nov 1912 Dia S/S Gipsy Ring £5-5-0d Rec’d with thanks 30th November 1912 pp P.& H.’

‘Dec 8th 1912…My dearest Florrie, Many thanks for your letter, which I was most pleased to receive. I am very glad your ring was done to your satisfaction and that you like it. I shall be very pleased when the time comes for me to get the other one. Do you think if we wait till 1914 would that suit you providing I find a suitable place or would that be too long for you to wait…’

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Sale Particulars for the Cottage next to the Forge 1913:

‘Slimbridge, Gloucestershire. Luce, Young & Alpass Are instructed to sell by auction (subject to conditions), at the White Lion, Cambridge, on Friday 20th June, 1913, at 6 o’clock p.m., All that valuable freehold cottage, garden and orchard with pigstye (sic), situate at Slimbridge, Glos., lately occupied by Mr G. Nicholls, deceased. The Orchard is well stocked with Fruit Trees. The Garden is productive and there is a supply of Water on the premises. To view apply to Mr. S. Merrett, Slimbridge, and for further particulars to the Auctioneers, Berkeley and Thornbury or to Messrs. Wood & Awdry, Solicitors, Chippenham.’

Letter from Percy Barton to Florence Noad:

‘June 22nd 1913…Many thanks for your letter which I am always most pleased to receive. You may guess I wish I was going to be with you today but no such luck. I am very much looking forward for the time to come for your holiday. I am sure we have happier times together every time we meet. Fancy you starting your house linen do you begin to think dearest that you will soon require it. Well dearest if you have not already heard you will be surprised to hear I have got a house. Father bought George Nicholl’s property Friday it cost £260 we have Harry Hurd to thank for the last £60 he came over Monday & Father asked him if he was going in for it & he said he did not think so as he said it would be worth much more to us than anyone else & in the finish he was the very one to run against us. I shall never think but very little of him now. Dearest you will be able to have some fowls & flower borders & I shall be able to keep a pig so when next year comes I think if you are willing we shall be able to make a start. I have been ringing this morning . Arthur went to Wickwar ringing yesterday we are very busy so I could not get off. I started mowing my new orchard last night…’

9. MORRIS GEORGE BARTON, Great Uncle

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Great Uncle Morris George Barton (1893-1965) with his brother Burland Oswald Barton (1895-1957) Both in the uniform of the Royal Gloucestershire Hussars. Sent from Alexandria

Morris Barton was born on 7th October 1893 and baptised on 5th November 1893 at Slimbridge, the fifth son of William and Ellen Barton. In the 1901 census he was at home aged seven years. He worked with his father and became a blacksmith. During the First World War he was a Farrier Sergeant (blacksmith) with the Gloucestershire Cavalry Regiment in the Middle East. Later he married his first cousin’s daughter, Muriel Mary Woodward. Muriel was born on 27th June 1899 and her parents were Frederick George and Brenda Woodward, of Standall Farm, Stinchcombe. Muriel Woodward was the youngest daughter of a first cousin of Morris and they had two children Richard Joseph and William Brian Barton.

At the time of the 1911 census William Barton was a fifty-six-year-old blacksmith working on his own account and born in Slimbridge. He was father of thirteen children of whom eleven were still living. Ellen was aged fifty-three-years and born in Purton. Children at home included Maurice (sic) aged seventeen. The Forge had five rooms.

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Morris and Muriel settled in Owlpen. In the 1939 Kelly’s Directory we find listed Morris G. Barton, Farmer of Summerfield, Owlpen. They seem to have finished farming there in 1939 and Morris later worked for Mawdsleys of Dursley. A 1939 Register describes him as a Cattleman of Blacknest, Uley and his wife, Muriel, was doing unpaid domestic duties.

Muriel died on 4th July 1965 and Morris followed her by his own hand on 7th August in the same year. Both are buried in Owlpen churchyard.

Letters from the War: ‘8th October 1914

‘My dear Maud, Just a note to thank you very much for the pocket handkerchiefs. They are first rate. They won’t show the dirt. What lovely weather we are having quite sharp frost this morning. We feel it pretty cold on the course. It is very open. Well this is a photo which was taken in front of the shop where we are working. This is the party I am along with. Fondest love to all, Morris’

And another:

Berkeley Troop, 2204 R.G.H., Sidestrand, Nr Cromer, Norfolk, (Friday)

My dear Elsie and Jack, Just a line to let you know I am getting on alright. You will see by the address we have had another move. It’s a very quiet place, we are billeted in private houses. I have a very good lodge at a cottage. The old girl looks after down right all. Burland is at Cromer, about 4 miles from here. He is attached to A Squadron. I had a letter from Mabel and Nora the other day. They said A Noad have enlisted. He passed the Dr last week. I think he has joined as a carpenter and fancy saint Mary is going to service. Don’t you think it will do her good. It will take the swank out of her a little. Please excuse card as I haven’t time for letter writing. What do you think of the photo. I had it taken at Glos a fortnight ago when I was on leave. Well I must now close. Hoping you are all quite well as it leave me at present. With lots of love, Morris.’

And another:

2204 Berkeley Troop, B Squadron RGHY, Sidestrand, Nr Cromer, Norfolk, (Thursday),

‘My dear Maud & Will, Just a line to let you know I am getting on alright. It is very quiet up here and very cold. We are close alongside the sea coast. Burland is at Cromer. It’s about 5 miles from here. I went over there last Saturday. He is quite well, he haven’t (sic) his uniform yet. I had a letter from Elsie the other day. She wanted to know if B and I was going home for Christmas, if so she said she would come down instead of going to Northampton with Jack. I don’t know yet if I shall get down for Christmas or the New Year. We are supposed to have a week. Well what do you think of my photo. I had it taken at Gloucester the last leave I had. Have you heard Arthur Noad, Joe and Fred Wherrett have joined now. Received (?). Not much news to tell you. I must now close hoping you are all quite well. With love, Morris’

And another:

Chatby Camp, Alexandria (22nd May 1915)

‘Dear Elsie, Just a PC to let you know I am quite well. Hope you and Jack and the boy are the same. This is a group taken roughly the other night. I think it would have been clearer if it hadn’t been so dark. No doubt you can recognise some of them With love Morris’

And another:

Alexandria 6th Sept 1915

‘My dear Maud, Just a line to let you know that we are both quite well…

(too faded to make out but similar content to the next one…)

And another: ‘Alexandria, 6th September 1915.

‘My dear Elsie and Jack, I hope you are all quite well as it is leave for us both at present. What do you think of this card/ We had it taken together so thought you would like one. No doubt you have heard before this that our 2nd Mounted Division is turned into Infantry. They left here about 2 weeks ago. They went up to the – . They have been in action and several have come back wounded but have very few casualties. We have all been inoculated again against cholera.

I have just sent Maud a card, fancy her dining at Moorend. I told her I think Len is just come to the right school Now to – something. Your loving brother, Morris’

On the back of a photograph:

‘Standing left to right D. Turner, R Yarnold, R. Hulbert, H. Organ, H. Cullimore, E. Miller, M.G. Barton, H. Lord.’

From The Royal Gloucestershire Hussars by Rollo Clifford

‘Four yeoman in the Middle-East, back row from left to right: Cpl Charlie Mayo and Tpr J.F. Edwards. Front: Cpl J (sic) Barton and Cpl Horace Smith…’

10. BURLAND OSWALD BARTON, Great Uncle

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Burland Barton was born on 2nd September 1895 and baptised on 3rd November 1895 at Slimbridge, the sixth son of William and Ellen Barton. In the 1901 census he was at home and aged five years.

At the time of the 1911 census William Barton was a fifty-six-year-old blacksmith working on his own account and born in Slimbridge. He was father of thirteen children of whom eleven were still living. Ellen was aged fifty-three-years and born in Purton. Children at home included Burland aged fifteen. The Forge had five rooms.

During the First World War he volunteered and joined the Royal Gloucestershire Hussars and served with his brothers Morris and Frank. He was photographed in uniform by Christmas 1914. He reached the rank of Regimental Sergeant Major and gained the Military Medal and D.C.M..

He married Lily Florence Deeley on 2nd June 1924 at Yardley Parish Church. She was born on 3rd August 1899. Burland worked at Harding’s Royal Steam Bakery at Yardley in Birmingham.

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Burland and Lily

He was Joint Executor of his father’s will of 1927 and was described as a Baker of  130 Stuarts Road, Fordley, Birmingham, then and in the sale papers for the Forge in 1936. A Harding, Baker & Confectioner, of the Royal Steam Bakery, Yardley, Birmingham witnessed his signature on a Conveyance.

According to probate records his father William Barton of Slimbridge died on 17th October 1936 and probate was granted at Gloucester on 1st December 1936 to Frank William Barton, milk retailer and Burland Oswald Barton, baker. Effects were valued at £578-17-0d.

They had two children, Bernard and Jean. Burland Barton died on 28th May 1957 and Lily died on 20th June 1969.

Jean Hopkins wrote to Julie Trew in 2002:

‘Following a recent visit to my cousin May, I have borrowed the letter you wrote to her last month.

Unfortunately I’m not going to be any help regarding the start and progress of Harding’s bakery. I had no idea that it had been started in Berkeley Road – my only knowledge was the bakery in Church Road where my father worked. I don’t even know what year he joined the firm! He was in the First World War, then I seem to think butchery was mentioned as an occupation before moving to Birmingham. He met my mother who was a clerk in the offices at the bakery and they married in 1924.

I wonder if you have a copy of Richard’s family tree – if not I can photocopy one for you if you like. From that I see that my Uncle Bert was married in Hay Mills, Birmingham, in 1912, so I assume he was at Hardings some years before my dad. I’ve never had a very good memory, and although I recall the names of Fred and Harry Sims, until I saw the family tree I wasn’t aware of the relationship. I don’t remember any social visits. One thing has always puzzled me – Charles Sims (your great great grandfather) … would that have been any relation of Ernest Harding?  Arthur Harding was my dad’s boss and as he was a confectioner, I wonder if Arthur ran the cake side and Hedley was in charge of the bread? May remembered the name of the third son Douglas who had fits. My brother emigrated to Canada in 1952, but if I get any thoughts from him I will let you know.

Dad died suddenly in 1957 – mum hadn’t worked (outside the home!) since her marriage, but Arthur asked her to return to accounts, her ability to add up a column of figures was amazing. It could only have been a few years before the firm closed, but whether it was taken over or demolished for the present shopping centre with flats over I couldn’t say. Mum spent a while at another bakery firm before retiring, then she died in 1969.

I thought you might like the enclosed copies of photographs of Hardings – no idea of the year either were taken. The group photo my parents had – now knowing the firm moved I’m wondering if it could have been at the start of the new premises. On the enlarged photocopy I’venumbered my dad and uncle, mother and her two friends, also Ernest, Hedley and Arthur – not too sure if they’re correct. Have you any thoughts of the Sims brothers?

I’ve recently been in touch with my cousins Tom and George Hall in Slimbridge following a request from my brother for old family photos. Tom sent me a postcard of the Hardings vans – I don’t recognise the setting, so again could it be Berkeley Road?

… Oh, I almost forgot – more family weddings at Yardley Parish Church – My parents, Bert’s son Eric in 1941, and Bill and I in 1953!

Good luck with your research… Jean’

Julia Trew:

I think I told you that May Walker had been in touch – her letter is copied here. Also Jean Hopkins wrote and last week, I had a letter from Morag Barton. Morag said she didn’t know much but they do have a family bible from Bert Barton, I Don’t know if it goes back beyond him or starts with him and his wife. Anyway, as you will see, I will ring Morag and arrange to go down – we might be able to get photocopies of any entries. Bert Barton was the Production Manager at Harding’s Bakery and they have his production books – again which we can have a look at.

Jean sent some very interesting photographs relating to the bakery – one of all of the staff, we think around 1930. It turns out that my great-aunt also has one of these and didn’t think we would be interested in it! Mum is visiting her today and will hopefully be able to find out where Alfred and Harry Sims are on it. The most interesting one though, was probably the one of the bakery vans outside a Harding’s shop. From an old map that I have of Yardley that gives the location of different businesses, we have been able to pinpoint exactly where it was.

Best wishes, Julia’

Jean Hopkins:

‘I don’t know what he remembers Dad telling us as children about his time in the First World War. I just know he volunteered at the beginning and always said he got to RSM through “dead men’s shoes”. He won the M.M.’

Letter from Julia Trew to Marian Barton:

‘… I started tracing the family tree on my mother’s side about twenty years ago because we lived near to her mother – Kate Leah (Sims), my nan was the eldest daughter of Alfred John Sims, son of Eliza (Barton). We always believed that the family came from Hardwicke because my nan remembers Eliza (always known to the family as Gloucester Gran) coming from the farm in Hardwicke to visit. She visited Birmingham twice a year to collect dividends from the shares in Harding’s Bakery. It was only a few years ago that I decided to write away for the marriage certificate of Charles Sims and Eliza that we found out they had both been born in Slimbridge. That’s when we started to piece together the family history – fortunately my Nan had a very good memory – it obviously runs in the Barton family. Sadly my Nan died two years ago – she was born in 1913, the same/similar time to you I think. Once my Mother took Nan to visit Slimbridge and see the church where her father and grandparents had been baptised. You won’t believe it – they actually parked right outside your house, what a shame you never met.

Of course Nan’s father, Alfred John Sims, didn’t speak about his family – we understood that when we found the newspaper article about his death – it was a bit gruesome. He looked after the horses for the bakery – Nan said he preferred horses to people! For years they used to receive Christmas hampers from Ernest Harding who lived in a big house, Packwood Grange, in Warwickshire. They didn’t really know the Hardings – just their names – so it will be interesting to hear about Douglas. We understood that Ernest married ‘Miss Tudor’ but we didn’t know more than that. We understood that Ernest was the illegitimate son of Betty Harding Sims and changed his name to Harding, as did his mother and grandmother once his grandfather Robert Harding died. We think that’s where the money to set up the bakery came from (i.e. Ernest’s father) but it might have come from his family’s interests in the Shepherd’s Patch  Hotel and the farm in Hardwicke…’

May Walker wrote to Julie Trew in 2001:

‘Your letter came as a lovely surprise. I do remember years ago having an aunt Eliza so she must have been your great great grandmother. I am now 93 years old so I think I must be the oldest of the family. I had a brother three years older and a twin sister both of them have died – my brother in ’97 and my sister in ’94 and some thought my sister and I would not live we were skinny little things born a short while too soon when my mother thought the fire wanted some paraffin and nearly set the room on fire. I shouldn’t have lasted through the night they were quite sure but I’m still here years after.

I really didn’t know much about the Harding family. I know my two uncles Bert and Burland worked there and when Uncle Burland died the funeral passed by the works so that the girls in his part could wait outside to see it pass. I think he was in charge of the cakes and pastries. I seem to remember going with my mother to see an elderly lady who lived quite near I’m sure they said she was Mr Harding’s mother. Ernest Harding was a boy living with his mother in Slimbridge I know my grandfather used to keep an eye on him he always played with his boys my uncles and over the years Mr Harding used to come and sit in the kitchen and they would have a chat. We know Douglas the third son he wasn’t very strong and had fits. We were always told to help him if one came when we were together. I don’t remember having much knowledge of  Hedley or Arthur.

From the Royal Gloucestershire Hussars by Rollo Clifford:

‘Bathing in the Mediterranean during a spell out of the firing line. The group includes Sgt. Mullaney, Tpr I. Bowen, Cpl Barton.’

‘Cpl Burland Barton in the cook house at Mena. He was later to win the MM and the DCM. ‘Wooden huts were erected in Mena Camp and were first used for the Christmas Day dinner in 1915. They were very welcome providing shelter from the glare and heat of the sun’

‘The ambush party, October 1917, Lt. Robert Wilson, seated centre (author of the recent Palestine 1917) led this fighting patrol to Hill 720 near Gaza. For this action he received the MC; his trooper sergeant, Sgt. Burland Barton, and Troop Corporal Lane were both awarded the MM. Burland Barton is standing behind his troop leader.’

On the back of old photographs

‘Alexandria 8th June 1917’

‘A Squadron Sergeants, 20th September 1917: Sgt Bowl, Sgt Barton, Sgt Lewis, SSM Smart DCM, Sgt Roberts.’

  1. WINIFRED ANNIE HALL, Great Aunt

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Winifred Barton was born on 25th November 1897 and baptised on 16th January 1898 at Slimbridge, the fifth daughter of William and Ellen Barton. In 1901 census she was at home and aged three years.

7 Barton IV Gt 9 3 7 11 bIn 1911 Elsie Mary Barton was working as a servant for Arthur Culpin, an Engineer and Tim Makers’ toolmaker and widower at his eight-roomed home, 96 Bath Road, Worcester. His stepson Arthur John Neale was living with him, a photographer (china work) Elsie Mary was described as a twenty-seven-year-old general servant born in Slimbridge. Also staying as a visitor was her thirteen-year-old sister Winifred who was born in Slimbridge.

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Winifred married 37-year-old Frank Hall on 4th June 1928 at Slimbridge Parish Church. He was a farmer of Malthouse Farm, Slimbridge, born on 31st December 1890, the son of Thomas Hall, a farmer. They had three children, Tom, George and Nora. Winifred died on 8th December 1954 aged fifty-seven years and Frank died on 24th March 1960, aged sixty-nine years and they are both buried at Slimbridge.

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Frank Hall

Obituary 1954:

‘Mrs W.A. Hall, at Slimbridge. The funeral took place at Slimbridge Parish Church on Saturday of Mrs Winifred Annie Hall, of Malt House Farm, Slimbridge, who died suddenly on December 8th. The service was conducted by Canon W.H. Thomas and Mrs Thomas was organist.

Family mourners present were: Mr F. Hall (widower), Messrs T. and G. Hall (sons), Mrs Maud Walker, Mrs Elsie Rush, Mrs Nora Marsh (sisters), Mr Frank Barton, Mr Bert Barton, Mr Percy Barton and Mr Burland Barton (brothers), Mrs Maurice Barton, Mrs P. Barton, Mrs A.W. Ha,, (sisters-in-law), Mr Will Walker, Mr Jack Rush, Mr George Marsh (brothers-in-law), Mrs T.W. Hall (daughter-in-law), Mr and Mrs L. Steele rep. The Misses Merrett), Messrs Mark and David Steele, Mr Harry Barton, Mr Peter Barton, Miss E. Barton, Mr and Mrs P. Hall (cousins), Miss Marion (sic) Barton, Mrs K.W. Hall, Mrs J. Barton (nieces) and Miss Diana Haine.

Unable to attend were Miss Nora Hall (daughter), Mr Maurice Barton (sic) (brother), Mrs R. Gunter (niece), and Mr A.W. Hall (brother-in-law).

Apologies for absence were received from Miss Margaret Merrett and Mrs Irene Brooks.

Four nephews, Messrs. K.W. Hall, H. Barton, G. Barton and J. Barton were bearers.

Others present included: Mr R.M. Malpass, Mr and Mrs A.E. Tudor, Mr and Mrs Gilbert Tudor, Miss Davis, Miss Duffey, Mr and Mrs Goodrich, Mr T. Pegler, Mr S.G. Harris (rep Mr E. Dash), Mr C. Phillimore, Mrs K. Pegler, Mrs F. Pain (re Mr Pain), Mr L. Cox (rep Mr Tom Richards), Mrs Cobb, Mr G. Blandford, Mrs A.E. Cooper, Mr L.A. Heaven, Mrs F. Fryer, Mrs Workman (rep Mr R.C. Workman and Mrs D. Howes), Mrs Tudor (rep Mr W. Smith), Mr H.C. Tocknell, Mr and Mrs C. Pain, Mr C.E. Nelmes, Miss Pearce, Mr and Mrs H. Hobbs, Mr and Mrs R. Daw, Mr S. Elliott, Mr and Mrs R. Allen.

Mr and Mrs S. Timbrell, Mr N. Cornock, Mr W. Daniells, Mr E. Pegler, Mrs Maden, Mr and Mrs W. Noad, Mrs P. Pegler, Miss H. Pearce, Mr C. Poultney, Mr L. Williams, PC A. Aston, Mr C.T. Hawkins, Mr W. Allen, Mrs Johnson (also rep the Severn Wildfowl Trust), Mr and Mrs Joyce (rep B.A. Bollen Ltd), Mr and Mrs H. Haine, Mr A.B. James, P/Sgt and Mrs N.J. Gibson, Mr and Mrs J. Tudor, Mr and Mrs J. Moss, Mrs Wherrett, Mr Joe Wherrett, Mr and Mrs G. Cullimore, Mr B.V. Prout (also rep Mrs Prout and Mr C.J. Prout), Mr and Mrs O.W. Fisher, Capt H.J. Baldwin (rep Capt R.G.W. Berkeley and the Berkeley Estate), Mr and Mrs F. Tarr, Miss Barbara Tarr (rep Dursley YFC), Mr and Mrs W.H. Evans, Mrs A. May, Miss E. May, Mrs Woodward, Mrs E. Lord, Miss D. Thomas, Mr And Mrs T.E. Merredith, Mr R.J. Hawkins, Miss Cox (rep Mr R. Cox), Mr Jack Terrett and Mr and Mrs M. Withers), Mrs W.A. Smith (rep Mr M.A. Smith), and others.

Floral tributes – Husband, George and Nora, Tom and Marjorie; Nora and George (Worcester); Maud, Will and family; Elsie, Jack and family; Brother Frank; Bert and Family; Burland and family; Percy, Florie, Marion, George, Norman and Muriel; Morris, Muriel and Brian; Will, Queenie and family; Percy and Kate; Harry, Amy and Terry; Ivy and George; Vera and Dick; Jack and Claire; Lionel, Millie, Mark and David; Mr and Mrs Pinfield; Mr and Mrs Tudor and Eileen (Eastington); Mr and Mrs Allen and Elliott and family; Mr and Mrs Duncan James; Mrs Shipp and family; Mr and Mrs Gilbert Tudor and family; Canon, Mrs and Miss Thomas; Mrs Fryer; Mrs Milsom and Mrs Banks; J. and K. Haine; G. and H. Pearce; Mr and Mrs Tarr and family; Roses Farm, Gossington; Doris, Chick and Reg; Mr and Mrs C.W. Fisher; Mr and Mrs Noad and family; Slimbridge Fruit, Flower and Vegetable Committee; Conservative Association; The Staff, Wildfowl Trust; Mr and Mrs Peter Scott; P. and A. Aston and family; Mr and Mrs H.J. Haine and Diana; Dursley YFC; Directors and Staff V.A. Bollen; Mr and Mrs Gibson and family; Mr and Mrs S. Timbrell and family.

The arrangements were carried out by Mr T. Major of Coaley.’

12. WILFRED JAMES BARTON, Infant Great Uncle

Wilfred was born on 11th September 1899 (12th in Family Bible) and baptised on 19th November 1899 at Slimbridge, the youngest son of William and Ellen Barton, and he died on 11th March 1900.

13. NORA ELLEN MARSH, Great Aunt

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Nora was born on 28th March 1901 (November Family Bible) and baptised on 12th May 1901 at Slimbridge, the youngest child of William and Ellen Barton.

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At the time of the 1911 census William Barton was a fifty-six-year-old blacksmith working on his own account and born in Slimbridge. He was father of thirteen children of whom eleven were still living. Ellen was aged fifty-three-years and born in Purton. Children at home included Nora aged ten years who was still at school. The Forge had five rooms.

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Her mother, Ellen Barton, died on 13th March 1930 at The Forge, Slimbridge and the informant was N.E. Barton, daughter, of  The Forge, Slimbridge. Her father, William Barton, died on 17th October 1936 at The Forge, Slimbridge and the informant was again N.E. Barton, daughter of the Forge, Slimbridge, who was present at death.

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She lived in Worcester with her sister Mabel until her death in 1946. On 28th August 1948 Nora married George Marsh at Slimbridge, a widower. George was a Pharmacist of Claines in Worcester and the son of John Marsh, a deceased clogmaker. They lived at “Fairhaven”, 438 Ombersley Road, Bevere, Worcester. Nora died in a nursing home in Droitwich during the 1980s.

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George Marsh

Wedding card:

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Nora Ellen Barton – With Mr. & Mrs. G. Marsh’s Compliments. “Fairhaven”, 438 Ombersley Road, Bevere, Worcester. August 28th 1948.


 

The children of Fanny and William Drinkwater:

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A Drinkwater Wedding

  1. ANNIE ETHEL TAYLOR

Annie Ethel Drinkwater was born on 29th August 1878 and baptised at Hardwicke on 13th October 1878. She was entered in the parish register as the daughter of Coal Merchant, William Drinkwater, and his wife, Fanny, of ‘The Stank.’ In 1881 she was at home with her family and aged two years. She was at still at home on the nights of the 1891 and 1901 censuses.

On 31st July 1906 Annie married Ernest Edward Taylor at Hardwicke Parish Church. He was described in the register as a twenty-eight-year-old Coal Merchant of Hardwicke, the son of William Taylor, a labourer. Annie was the same age as her husband and she was described as the daughter of William Drinkwater, a Hay Merchant. The witnesses were William and Fanny Drinkwater, her parents, and James Walkley. Ernst Edward Taylor was born on 7th September 1876.

In 1911 the couple was living in a house with five rooms at Hardwicke situated at the Coal Wharf next to Fairview House, the home of Annie’s parents. Ernest E. Taylor was listed as a thirty-two-year-old coal merchant, born at Harescombe, and working at home on his own account. His wife, Annie E. Taylor, was thirty-one-years-old and she had been married for four years and the couple had had no children.

At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales, Ernest and Annie Taylor were living at Coal Wharf House and Ernest was described as a Farmer and Coal Merchant.

2. WILLIAM JAMES DRINKWATER

William James Drinkwater was born on 26th September 1879 and baptised at Hardwicke on 30th November. His parents were William Drinkwater, a Coal Merchant, and his wife, Fanny, of Stank Bridge. At the time of the 1881 census he was aged one year and at home. He was at home, aged eleven years, in the 1891 census return. In 1901 he was still at home, aged twenty-one-years, and he was working as an assistant in the coal business.

On 1st November 1905 William James Drinkwater married Kate Boulton at Hardwicke Parish Church. William was described as twenty-six-year-old Coal Merchant of Hardwicke, son of William Drinkwater, a Coal Merchant. Kate was thirty-one, from Saul, and the daughter of William Boulton, a Policeman. The witnesses were Harry Rudge and Nora Emily Drinkwater. Kate was born on 26th January 1874.

In 1911 William Drinkwater was living in a house with seven rooms at the Passage, Framilode. He was listed as a thirty-two-year-old coal merchant and employer, born at Hardwicke. His wife, Kate, was aged thirty-seven-years and they had been married for six years and had three children. Kate was described as born at Pucklechurch. Their children included Ronald, aged five years; Vera, aged three years and Olive, aged eight months, and all three were born at Framilode.

At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales William and Kate were living at Moor Street, Saul, and he was working as a General Labourer in a Leather Board Mill.

The ashes of ninety-year-old William James Drinkwater, of Perrymead, Perry Way, Frampton-on-Severn, were interred at Saul on 30th July 1970.

3. CHARLES BARTON DRINKWATER

Charles was born on 13th August 1881 and baptised at Hardwicke on 11th September. He was at home, aged nine years, on the night of the 1891 census return. He was not at home in 1901 and may have been in Bromley, Essex, working on the railways.

On 15th November 1905 Charles Barton Drinkwater married Elizabeth Mary Ryder at Elmore Parish Church. Charles was described in the register as a twenty-four-year-old Hay Merchant of Hardwicke, son of William Drinkwater, a Hay Merchant. Elizabeth was aged twenty and the daughter of Edwin R. Ryder, a Farmer of Elmore. Elizabeth was born 12th May 1886.

In 1906, at the time of the baptism of his daughter, Doris Gertrude, Charles was a haulier of Hardwicke.

In 1911 Charles Drinkwater was farming at Haywicks, Hardwicke, which had a house with six rooms. He was described as twenty-nine-years-old and born at Hardwicke. His wife, (Elizabeth) Mary was aged twenty-five and born at Elmore. By then the couple had been married for five years and had four children. These children included Doris, aged five years; Ena, aged four years; Gilbert, aged two and Victor, aged six months. All the children were born in Hardwicke.

At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales, Charles and Elizabeth were living at 26 St Aldwyn’s Road, Gloucester. He was working as a Grave Digger.

Charles died on 2nd July 1969 and Elizabeth on 16th August 1976.

4. NORAH EMILY WALKLEY

Norah Emily Drinkwater was born on 9th December 1883 and baptised at Hardwicke on 3rd February 1884. Her father was William Drinkwater, a Coal Merchant of Stank Bridge, and her mother was Fanny. Norah was at home, aged seven years, at the time of the 1891 census. In 1901 she was aged seventeen years and still at home.

Norah Emily Drinkwater married James Edward Walkley of Elm Villa, Hardwicke, on 10th April 1907. James was described on the certificate as a thirty-two-year-old ‘Land master’, son of James Walkley, a deceased butcher. Norah was aged twenty-three and her father was incorrectly given as James Drinkwater, Hay Merchant. James was born on 18th November 1874.

At the time of the 1939 Register for England and Wales, James and Norah were farming at Madams End. With them was their son Stewart, who was born in 1909, and was assisting his father in dairy farming. James was a Special Constable and Stewart was an ARP Warden.

Norah Walkley died during 1943.

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Marriage of Norah Emily Drinkwater and James Walkley. Photograph outside Fairview House, Hardwicke
Left to Right, Back Row: -, -, -, Great Grandmother Ellen Barton, Great II Aunt Eliza Powell, Ann Taylor, Jack Taylor.
Middle Row: -, Clara Drinkwater, -, Gertrude Drinkwater, Norah Emily Drinkwater, James Walkley, -, -, –
Front Row: William Drinkwater, Fanny Drinkwater, -,-, Great Grandfather William Barton, -,-

In 1911 the family was living at Jessamine Cottage, Hardwicke. James was described as a labour master, aged thirty-six-years, and born at Horsley. Norah was aged twenty-six-years, married for four years, and born at Hardwicke. Their son Stuart was aged one year and born at Hardwicke. Boarding with them was Daniel King, a thirty-one-year-old market gardener, born at Berkeley.

She died on 16th September 1945 aged fifty-nine-years and her husband died in 1947 aged seventy-three-years.

Newspaper:

‘Walkley – Nora E. , dearly loved wife of James E. Walkley, Madams End Farm, Hardwicke at Royal Infirmary (suddenly). September 16, 1943. funeral Hardwicke Church, Monday 20th, 3 o’clock.’

Voices of Quedgeley and Hardwicke by Sandra Ashenford, 2002, page 60:

‘ Mr Walkley was land-master at the school and he used to tell the tale of taking down two boys out into the fields to put them to work to dig a ditch out and trim the banks up. They started work and he went to do some other job and supervise something else. Later on he came back  and found no boys, only two spades. Eventually the Reformatory closed and Mr. Walkley took Madam’s End Farm and went farming on his own. He used to tell the tale of milking one afternoon, just as usual, whe all of a sudden a voice said ‘Good afternoon M Walkley’ and he looked round. There was a soldier stood there, a man of the Artillery. Smart looking chap, he was, with a cane under his arm, spurs on and all that, and he was clean and tidy. Mr Walkley said ‘Good afternoon, I don’t know you’.

‘No, I don’t suppose you do sir, but I know you, oh yes’, replied the soldier. ‘Do you remember taking two boys out into a field and putting them to dig a ditch at the old Reformatory School?’ ‘I do’, Mr Walkley answered. ‘What did you find when you came back?’ asked the soldier. ‘I found two spades but I never saw the boys again’. ‘No’, said the soldier. ‘I was one of those boys’. He had run away you see, and he made good…’

5. CLARA MAUD GRAY

7 Barton IV Gt 9 3 8 5 a

Clara Maud Drinkwater was born on 8th January 1886 and baptised at Hardwicke on 4th April 1886. She was at home with her family, aged six years, on the night of  the 1891 census. In 1901 she was still at home, now aged sixteen years. In 1911 Clara was at home, aged twenty-six-years. She nursed in India before moving to Acton, in London, where she married James Percy Gray, a chemist, in December 1925. James was born on 2nd October 1895 and he was brought up in Shepherd’s Bush.

At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales, James and Clara were living at 7 Forest Drive, Epping. James was working as a Pharmacist.

Clara died at Daw Vale Home for the Elderly, Dawlish, on 21st April 1984, aged ninety-eight.

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Daughter of Great II Aunt Fanny Drinkwater – Clara Maud Gray (nee Drinkwater) (1886-1984). She nursed in India before marrying John Gray, a chemist of London. Here she is in India.

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Daughter of Great II Aunt Fanny Drinkwater – Clara Maud Gray (nee Drinkwater) (1885-1984) with her sister Gertrude Cottle (nee Drinkwater) (1888-).

6. GERTRUDE ALICE COTTLE

Gertrude Alice was born on 24th July 1888 and baptised at Hardwicke on 8th October. She was at home with her family, aged two years, at the time of the 1891 census and in 1901 she was still at home

She married Francis James Cottle (1890-) in 1909

In the census return for 1911 we find the Cottles living at 54 The Drive, Loughton in Essex. Francis was described as a twenty-one-year-old  Commercial Traveller in the Timber Trade, born at Saul and Gertrude as twenty-two and from Hardwicke. They had been married for one year and had their daughter, Eileen, aged one month.

Back in 1901 Francis Cottle was at home with his family at the Cross, Saul. His father Lawrence H. Cottle (1855-1915) was a ship’s carpenter and Francis’s elder brother, Edwin H. Cottle (1881-), was a stoker on a steamer. At the time of the census Francis was an eleven-year-old scholar, born at Saul. His mother, Mary Cottle, lived from 1854 until 1915 and an elder brother, Francis M. Cottle, died in 1888 aged ten years.

In 1911 Francis and Gertrude Cottle were living in five rooms at 54 The Drive, Loughton, Essex. Francis was described as a twenty-one-year-old commercial traveller in the timber trade and born at Saul. His wife Gertrude was aged twenty-two-years and born at Hardwicke. They had been married for one year and had a child, namely Eileen who was aged one month and born at Loughton.

Gertrude died at Daw Vale Home for the Elderly, Dawlish, on 30th May 1982, aged ninety-three-years.


The children of David and Laura Barton:

  1. HAROLD BARTON 

Harold Barton was born on 10th February 1888 at Purton and baptised at Slimbridge on 6th May 1888. His parents were recorded as David and Laura Barton and his father was described as a Blacksmith. In 1891 he was at home aged five years and described as born at Purton. It would seem that he was not at home with his parents at the time of the 1901 census. In 1911 he was serving as a Gunner in the Royal Horse Artillery. He was described as twenty-three-years-old, single, and born at Purton, Berkeley. He was in Y Battery at Mhow in Central India under the command of Major R. Wheatley. His son Anthony says he spent some six years in India and spoke of him and his brother swapping numbers so that they could stay together in service.

The military cantonment was founded in 1818 by Sir John Malcolm and is located in the Malwa Plateau. It was established as a result of the Treaty of Mandsour signed by the British Government and the erstwhile Holkar king. Today the College of Combat, Infantry School and MCTE are the three institutions situated within the cantonment.

During the First World War Harold Barton was shot in the knee during the Dardanelles campaign.

He married Margaret Hilda Cook at St Paul’s Church, Gloucester, on 26th December 1920. He was described as a thirty-two-year-old bachelor of 35 Victory Road, working at the wagon works. His father was David Barton, a corporation employee (sp?). Margaret was aged twenty-eight, a spinster, of 23 Ducie Street, working at the Match Factory. She was the daughter of Charles James Cook, labourer. Both bride and bridegroom signed their names and the witnesses were C.J. Cook, V.M. Stroud and E.W.Hayward.

Margaret was born in Painswick on 2nd September 1892. They lived in Beaufort Road, Robinswood, Gloucester, and he worked for various timber merchants hauling timber. Margaret died in 1961 and Harold died in Gloucester in 1967.

2. STANLEY BARTON

According to railway records, Stanley was born on 25th October 1889 and baptised at All Saints’ Church on 4th December. His parents were recorded as Blacksmith, David Barton, and his wife, Laura, of 3 Ryecroft Street. In 1891 Stanley was at home with his parents aged one year and born in Gloucester. He was described as eleven-years-old and living with his family at 6 Stephen’s Court, Gloucester, in the 1901 census return.

He enlisted in the Swindon Division of the Great Western Railway on 31st July 1906 but resigned on 28th December 1907.

In 1911 he was serving in the Royal Horse Artillery in 1 Cavalry Brigade at Wellington Lines, Aldershot, under the command of Brigadier General C. J. Mc. M. Kavanagh. He was shown as a twenty-two-year-old Gunner born in Gloucester.

 

Stanley Barton probably emigrated to Australia in 1923 and married Elizabeth. later enlisted in the Australian Forces at Coolangatta, Queensland, for service during the Second World War.

In 1958 Stanley and Elizabeth Barton were living at Shark’s Bay, Coolangatta, and Stanley was working as a Greenkeeper.

3. CYRIL EDWARD BARTON

Cyril Edward Barton was born on 1st February 1891 at Gloucester and baptised at All Saints’ Church on 25th February. His parents, Blacksmith, David Barton, and his wife, Laura, were living at 3 Ryecroft Street. In the 1891 census return Cyril was listed as at home with his parents, aged two months, and born in Gloucester. Cyril was described as ten-years-old and living with his family at 6 Stephen’s Court, Gloucester, in the 1901 census return.

Gloucester Citizen Gloucestershire, England

10 Mar 1905

GLOUCESTER POLICE COURT

‘Victor Thorpe, Priory-road, Henry Thomas, Albert Wright, Charles Pates, all of Quay-street, and Cyril Barton, of Quay-court, were summoned for obstructing the footpath in Westgate-street on March 2nd. It was stated in evidence that the boys in the neighbourhood were somewhat unruly, and one of the defendants put forward as an excuse that they were training for the Deacon-street Juniors, but were not allowed in the school grounds by the caretaker. The boys were ordered to pay costs.’

On the night of the 1911 census Laura Barton was living at 7 Barbican Place, Barbican Road, Gloucester. This property had three rooms. She was described as a fifty-one-year-old woman, married for twenty-four-years with seven children, six of whom were still living. She was a dressmaker, working at home on her own account, and born in Slimbridge. Living with her was her son, Cyril E. Barton, aged twenty-years, single, working as an engine cleaner and born in Gloucester.  Other children included Victor and Louisa.

Cyril joined the Great Western Railways on 3rd March 1908 and later became a Fireman and finally, an Engine Driver. He worked in Gloucester and Cheltenham before ‘joining the colours’

During the First World War Cyril enlisted in the 5th Gloucestershire Regiment on 15th June 1915 at Cheltenham. He gave his address as being 3 New Street Terrace, Cheltenham. He left on 30th May 1916 but spent from 17th May until 7th May in a hospital at Bedford suffering from Gonorrhoea. He then joined the Railway Operating Royal Engineers on 31st May 1916 at Windmill Hill Camp, Andover – No 175013. The enlistment papers of 1916 describe his next as kin as being his mother, Laura Barton, of 7 Barbican Way, Gloucester (why not his father?) Cyril was then single, aged twenty-five-years and four months, born Gloucester and his work was described as ’Fireman – Locomotive’. He was 5’ 8” in height and had a tattoo on his right forearm “Clasped Hands”.

According to Army records Cyril was posted Sapper and then promoted to Corporal in 1917 and A/Sergt on 3rd March 1919. In 1919 he gave his address as 35 Victory Road, Tredworth, Gloucester.

On 23rd February 1919 Cyril and Corporal Fletcher were returning along Boulevard Sadi Caronot, Soquence, when they were assaulted by three colonial soldiers – apparently with the sole intent of robbing them. Cyril was slightly injured in the face and suffered from shock.

‘Sir, when proceeding to camp in company with Corpl Fletcher we were attacked by three soldiers dressed as Australians. I was relieved of my paybook, wallet, wrist watch and money – about 45 Francs, after being knocked out. I remember nothing further till I was roused in No 40 Stationary Hospital. Time about 21.00hours.’

Cyril returned to the Great Western Railway on 26th March 1919 following his demobilisation. He then served in Swansea and Cardiff.

At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales, Cyril Barton, a single man, was living at 46 Ninian Park Road, Cardiff, and working as an Engine Driver for the Great Western Railway. He died in Cardiff on 20th April 1946.

4. OSCAR BARTON

Oscar Barton was baptised at All Saints’ Church, Gloucester on 21st April 1892. At that time the family was living at 3 Ryecroft Street, Gloucester. Oscar died during the first year of his life.

5. FRANCES MYRTLE DYER 

Frances Myrtle Barton was born in about 1893 at Nailsworth. On 8th October 1893 she was baptised at St Martin’s Church, Horsley by Reverend R. Pidcock. Her parents were recorded in the register as David and Laura Barton of the Steps, Nailsworth. She was described as seven-years-old and living with her family at 6 Stephen’s Court, Gloucester, in the 1901 census return.

Frances Myrtle Barton married William Groves Dyer (1892-1957) at St Nicholas’s Church, Gloucester, on 1st July 1916. The marriage register records that William Dyer was a twenty-four-year-old bachelor, a Bottlemaker, of 1. Barbican Place, son of Albert Dyer, deceased, a plasterer. Frances Barton, a twenty-three-year-old spinster, of 7 Barbican Place, was the daughter of David Barton, a blacksmith. Both signed their names and the witnesses were Thomas Henry Price and Sarah Louisa Barton. William Dyer was born on 1st January 1892.

At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales, William and Frances were living at 31 Victory Road, Gloucester. William was engaged as a ‘Boiler maker – Heavy Work’ Their sons were living with the, namely, Ivor, an eighteen-year-old Painter and Decorator and Kenneth, a twenty-one-year-old Tyre Borer (Heavy Work) at the Railway Carriage and Wagon Works.

Frances Dyer died in Gloucester during 1955 aged sixty- one-years and her husband died in the following year, aged sixty-five.

6. VICTOR WILLOUGHBY BARTON

Victor Willoughby Barton was born on 8th June 1896 at Nailsworth. On 12th July 1896 he was baptised by the Rev. G.M. Scott at All Saints’ Church, Shortwood, His parents were recorded in the baptismal register as David and Laura Barton and his father was a Blacksmith of Shortwood.

Victor was described as four-years-old and living with his family at 6 Stephen’s Green, Gloucester, in the 1901 census return.

In the 1911 census Laura Barton was living in a three-roomed property at 7 Barbican Place, Barbican Road, Gloucester. She was described as a fifty-one-year-old woman, married for twenty-four-years with seven children six of whom were still living. She was a dressmaker working on her own account at home having been born in Slimbridge. Living with her were her children Cyril E. Barton, Louisa and Victor W. Barton a fourteen-year-old, apprentice moulder, born in Nailsworth.

7 Barton IV Gt 9 3 9 5 b.jpg

Roll of Honour portrait of 10818 Private Victor Willoughby Barton. 7th Battalion, The Gloucestershire Regiment. 1917.
Victor Willoughby Barton – son of Great II Uncle David Barton. With thanks to the Soldiers of Gloucestershire Collection. Roll of Honour Private Victor Willoughby Barton 10818, 7th Glos K & G, age 20 years.

Victor Barton enlisted and served as a Private in the 7th Battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment from 1917 until he was discharged on 17th December 1919. He then worked on the Railway and was living, from 1925 to 1927, at 35 Victory Road, Gloucester, and, from 1927 until about 1955, at 47 Clegram Street. 

During the second quarter of 1922, Victor Barton married Violet M. Stroud in Gloucester Registration District and they had a son Roy. Violet Minnie was born on 25th August 1899 and she died in 1946. She was the daughter of Harry Albert E. Stroud (1877-1947) and his wife, Emily, nee Langford (1878-1963). In 1901 the Strouds were living with Violet’s forty-year-old widowed grandmother, Eliza Langford, at 2.Guildew Terrace, off Hare Lane, Gloucester. Violet’s father was an engine fitter’s labourer and her mother was a box filler in a Match works. Emily was aged one year and, like all the members of her family, she was born in Gloucester.

At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales, Victor and Violet Barton were living at 47 Clegram Road, Gloucester. Victor was working as a Labourer (Heavy Worker), with the Railway Engineering and Maintenance Staff, and he was also a member of the A.R.P. Decontamination Squad.

Victor married his second wife, Edith M. Harrison, during the second quarter of 1950 in the City of Gloucester Registration District. She was seventy-eight-years-old during the 1980’s, and living at Serena, The Land, Coalpit Heath. Victor died during 1979 in Bristol Registration District.

Gloucester Citizen Gloucestershire, England

15 Nov 1912

Gloucester City Petty Sessions

‘Friday – Before Messrs A. Slater (in the chair) …Frank Bendall, 128, Melbourne-street. Victor Barton, 7, Barbican-place and Ralph Stephens, 23, Melbourne-street, youths, were summoned for letting off fireworks the public street, on November 5th.—Barton admitted the offence, and the others, while admitting possession of some fireworks, denied that they let them off. Pc. Harding and Ruck stated that they were on duty at 8pm in plain clothes in Hare-lane when they saw all three defendants letting off Chinese crackers and throwing them down behind pedestrians. In reply to the Chairman the Deputy Chief Constable (Mr. W. Harrison) said boys could let off fireworks in the Park and also in the Recreation Ground. Mr. Harrison added that their Worships would recognise that this was the 5th November. It was the first appearance of these youths and he did not wish to press the case in any way against them. The Bench discharged them with a caution.’

Roll of Honour portrait of 10818 Private Victor Willoughby Barton. 7th Battalion, The Gloucestershire Regiment. 1917. Aged 20 years.

Gloucester Citizen Gloucestershire, England

16 May 1946

DEATHS – BARTON—May 14th, the Royal Infirmary. Violet Minnie, dearly beloved wife of Victor Willoughby Barton, of 47. Clegram Road, aged 46 years. Funeral service St. Stephen’s Church on Saturday at 10.0 Cremation to follow at Cheltenham Crematorium. Donations

7. SARAH LOUISA STOKES

Sarah Louisa Barton was born on 16th August 1898 at Longridge, Painswick, and she was baptised at Sheepscombe Parish Church on 23rd September by the Vicar. She was described in the register as the daughter of David and Laura Barton and her father was a blacksmith of Langridge.

In the 1901 census she was described as two-years-old and living with her family at 6 Stephen’s Court, Gloucester. In the 1911 census her mother, Laura Barton, was living in a three-roomed property at 7 Barbican Place, Barbican Road, Gloucester. She was described as a fifty-one-year-old woman, married for twenty-four-years with seven children six of whom were still living. She was working at home as a dressmaker and was born in Slimbridge. Living with her were her children Cyril, Victor and Louisa, a twelve-year-old school girl, born in Painswick.

On 22nd February 1922 Sarah Louisa married Albert Edward. Stokes at St Paul’s Church, Gloucester. He was described as a twenty-three-year-old bachelor, a labourer, of 1 Mount Gardens, Mount Street, Gloucester, son of Henry Stokes, a labourer. She was recorded in the register as a twenty-three-year-old spinster, a factory hand, of 35 Victory Road, Gloucester, daughter of David Barton, a labourer. Both signed their names and the witnesses were Victor Willoughby Barton and Florence Myrtle Dyer. Albert Stokes was born on 2nd February 1899.

In 1911 Albert Edward Stokes, the son of Helen and Ellen Stokes (nee Davis), was living at 12 Clare Street, Gloucester.

At the time of the 1939 Register for England and Wales, Albert and Louisa were living at 17 Church Way, Gloucester. Albert was working as a Timber Porter at the Docks. With them were their children, Denis, Pearl, Brian and Peter.

Albert Edward Stokes died on 13th September 1961, at Salterley Grange Hospital, Leckhampton, Cheltenham. Sarah Louisa died in 1992, aged ninety-four-years.

Anthony Taylor:

Hi Richard,

Sorry for not replying sooner, but I have been busily looking through your research notes, which I found very interesting, and I must congratulate you on your attention to detail, it must have taken hours to compile.

I live in Manchester, but my Grandma was born in Gloucester and I remember fondly having many holidays there as a child, so a lot of the memories recounted by people in your notes brought a lot of it back to me.

Sarah Louise married my Grandpa’s brother Albert Edward, and had children Walter, Dennis, Pearl, Joyce, Brian and Peter. I have recently been in touch with Peter and had very interesting conversations, picking up a lot of information in the process.


 

The children of Henry and Fanny Kate Barton:

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Great II Uncle Henry Barton (1861-1946) with his wife, Fanny Kate (nee Boulton) (1867-1943), and sons Harry Reginald Barton  (1895-1960) and Percy Willoughby Barton (1898-)

1. FLORENCE ANNIE TARR

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Great II Uncle Henry Barton (1861-1946) with his daughter Florence Tarr, granddaughter Peggy and great grandson Christopher

 

Florence Annie Barton was born on 23rd July 1890 and baptised at Moreton Valence Church on 24th August 1890. Her parents were described in the register as Henry and Fanny Kate Barton, Hay and Coal Dealers of Castle House. Florence was listed as eight-months-old and born in Standish, in the 1891 census return. In 1901 she was still at home with her family.

Florence or ‘Poppy’ as she was often known, married Stanley George Hardy Purnell on 10th April 1916 at Moreton Valence Parish Church. He was described as a twenty-five-year-old Second Lieutenant in the Northumberland Fusiliers, of Shipwick, the son of Francis William Purnell, an Independent Gentleman. Florence was the twenty-five-year-old daughter of Henry Barton, a Farmer. The witnesses were Henry and Fanny Kate Barton and their son, Percy Willoughby Barton.

Stanley Purnell or ‘Pat’ was born on 10th December 1890 and baptised at Holy Trinity, Stapleton, Bristol, on 3rd December 1905. His parents were William Francis and Georgina Purnell and his father was a Wholesale Sweet Merchant of 565 Stapleton Road. Stanley was a younger brother of Mabel and Ida and older brother of Medora and Dorcas. He attended Bristol Grammar School from 1906 until commencing employment with Parr’s Bank in 1909. He was working at their Bath Branch when he enlisted.

The young couple set up home at Elmgrove Road, Fishponds, but Temporary Second Lieutenant, Stanley George Hardy Purnell, of the Northumberland Fusiliers 21st  (Tyneside Scottish – Service) Battalion, was killed in action in France on 5th June 1917. His body lies at the Arras Memorial at Faubourg-D´Amiens Cemetery.

On 9th June 1919, the young widow, Florence Purnell, married George Frederick Tarr at St Mary’s Parish Church in Cheltenham. George was described on the certificate as a thirty-five-year-old Pork Butcher of 157 High Street, Cheltenham. His father, George Squire Tarr, was a deceased Pork Butcher. Florence , aged twenty-eight, of Green Farm, Moreton Valence, was described as the daughter of Henry Barton, a Farmer. George Tarr was born on 20th October 1883.

Cheltenham Chronicle Gloucestershire, England

2 Nov 1935

TARR & SON High-class Pork Purveyors In reviewing the activities of these well-known Pork Butchers 151 High-street one wonders who first thought of roast pork— whose nostrils first thought of a roasting piglet—who first applied a tentative tongue a brown

At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales, George and Florence Tarr were living at 247 Prestbury Road. He was described as a Master Pork Butcher and Bacon Curer and his wife as an ‘Air Raid Warden – Canteen Work Y.M.C.A.’

George died in 1957 and his widow, Florence, who was still living at 247 Prestbury Road, died on 20th August 1961, at Cheltenham General Hospital.

2. ELSIE LOUISE BARTON, cousin of Edward Percy Barton

Elsie Louise Barton was born on 21st June 1892 and baptised on 31st July at Moreton Valence. Her parents were described in the register as Henry and Fanny Kate Barton of Castle House, Hay and Coal Merchants. In the 1901 census she was at home and described as eight-years-old and born in Standish. Ten years later she was still at home and engaged in dairy work.

At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales, Elsie was living at Yew Tree Farm with her parents.

Later Elsie lived at Yew Tree Farm, Moreton Valence, where she died, aged seventy-five,  on 17th November 1967. She was buried in the churchyard on 22nd November.

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Daughters of Great II Uncle Henry Barton – Elsie Louise Barton (1892-1967) with her sister Florence (Poppy) Tarr (nee Barton) (1890-)
Left to Right: a friend, Florence (standing), Elsie Louise

3. HARRY REGINALD BARTON

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Harry Reginald Barton

Harry was born on 12th December 1894 and baptised at Moreton Valance on 27th January 1895. His parents, Henry and Fanny Kate Barton, were farming at Green Farm, Moreton Valence.

In the 1901 census Harry was at home with his family and described as a five-year-old, born in Moreton Valence. Ten years later he was at home an with his family and working on the farm.

Harry married Ida Maud Vaisey on 10th March 1926 t Leonard Stanley Church. He was described on the certificate as a thirty-one-year-old Farmer from Moreton Valence, son of Henry Barton, Farmer. His bride, aged twenty-seven, was from Leonard Stanley, the daughter of Henry Esau Vaisey, a butcher. Ida was born on 20th March 1898.

They farmed Manor Farm, Moreton Valence and had two children, Peter Henry Barton and Kate.  At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales, Harry and Ida were dairy farming at Manor Farm, Moreton Valence, and their children, Kathleen and Peter, were at school.

According to an account in the Gloucestershire Chronicle, dated 12th November 1926, Harry Barton was best man at the wedding at Haresfield of Elinor Ely of Parksend Farm.

Harry died on 1st January 1960, aged sixty-five-years. His widow, Ida Maud Barton, lived in Churchdown and then moved to a care home at Standish before her death, on 17th December 1995, She was buried at St Stephen’s Church, Moreton Valence.

4. PERCY WILLOUGHBY BARTON

Percy Willoughby Barton was born during the second quarter of 1896 in Wheatenhurst Registration District and baptised at Moreton Valence Church on 24th May 1896. His parents were described in the register as Henry and Fanny Kate Barton of Green Farm.

In the 1901 census he was listed as at home with his family and he was described as four-years-old and born in Moreton Valence. Ten years later he was at home and working on the farm.

During the First World War Percy served as a Private in the Leicestershire Yeomanry, the Royal Warwickshire Regiment and the Tank Corps.

On 17th May 1922 Percy Willoughby Barton married Daisy Victoria Lloyd Hurcombe at Cainscross Parish Church. Percy was described as a twenty-six-year-old Farmer of Moreton Valence, son of Henry Barton, a Farmer. Daisy was aged twenty-one, from Cainscross, and the daughter of George Hurcombe, a Wood Turner. Daisy was born on 24th February 1901.

Percy and Daisy farmed at Green Farm, Moreton Valence, until 1932 and they had a child, Irene,  in 1922. Percy and Daisy parted and they both later re-married.

At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales, Daisy was living with her father at 2, The Laurels, Cainscross. She was working as a Remington Operator and Book-Keeper. Her daughter, Irene, born on 23rd October 1922, was doing clerical work at a Wholesale Clothier’s.

Daisy married Alfred J. Williams in 1951.

Gloucestershire Echo, Saturday 23rd November 1929:

Sequel to Corporation ‘Bus Collision – A summons for driving to the danger of the public against Percy W. Barton, of Green Farm, Moreton Valance, following a collision with a Corporation ‘bus coming out of the Depot. Bristol-road, was at Gloucester City Police Court on Friday dismissed without evidence for the defence being called. Mr. G. Trevor Wellington defended and had submitted that the ‘bus had admittedly been signalled out of the depot by a conductor, who had not ascertained whether any traffic was approaching and that the defendant’s brakes refused to function and caused a skid on the greasy road.

Gloucester Journal, June 20th 1931:

Farmhouse Fire at Moreton Valance – Completely Gutted – Brigade Exhausts Water Supply.

A half-timbered farmhouse, the Green Farm, Moreton Valance, the home of Mr and Mrs Percy Barton, was completely gutted by fire, on Thursday, despite the continued efforts for over four hours by Gloucester Brigade to subdue the outbreak. Fortunately neither of the occupants were at any time in danger and the frenzied work of neighbours enabled some of the furniture to be saved.       

The roof of the building was half of slate and half of thatch, and it is presumed that a spark from a wood fire in the back kitchen was responsible for the outbreak.

Smoke from Roof – Mr Percy Barton, who is a member of a well-known family in the district – his father Mr Henry Barton living at Yew Trees and his brother, Mr Harry Barton, at Manor Farm, gave a “Citizen” reporter a graphic story of the early events. Mr Barton said that Mr Jo Chamberlain, he was in the back kitchen shortly after 8pm last night. His wife was visiting her sister-in-law at the Manor Farm which is about half-a-mile further along the lane, and their child, a little girl of about seven,was staying with friends at Cainscross.   

Mr Barton had occasion to leave the back kitchen to go to a small room on the outside of the premises, s, and on returning was amazed to see a lot of smoke coming from the roof of the building at the end nearest to the main  Bristol road and over one of the bedrooms.

Beaten Back by Flames – With all haste he ran upstairs to the bedrooms and opened the door. He could not enter because he was met with a mass of flames. Almost at the same time his wife, brother and sister-in-law saw the smoke while they were at Manor Farm, and they at once ran to Green Farm, Mrs Harry Barton hurrying on down the long lane to Moreton Valance post office to telephone to the Gloucester Corporation Fire Brigade, and P.S. Hawkins, at Whitminster, who was very quickly on the scene.

Neighbours Help – Meanwhile the Bartons, assisted by Mr. T.R. Murrell, Mr Silvey, Mr. C.A. Ellis and other neighbours were doing their utmost to save the furniture from destruction. Fanned by a strong wind the fire quickly spread, particularly along the thatched roof and in a short time it had a firm grip of the building – so much so that it prevented the helpers from carrying on with the salvaging of the furniture.

The Gloucester Fire Brigade received the call at 9.10 and an engine, in charge of Superintendent A. Windebank with a complement of men, covered the six odd miles to Moreton Valance, with all speed. Across the lane from the house they found a large pool of water and here the motor pump was put into operation.

Burning Furiously – By this time, the old building was burning furiously, the flames leaping many feet into the air from the roof and dense clouds billowing about. The firemen had a difficult task in removing a portion of the slate to get at the burning beams. The Brigade appeared to be beginning to check the flames when they met with a decided set-back. The water supply from the pond failed, and there was a delay while the engine was taken about half a mile further along the lane to a pond at the Manor Farm.

Water Supply Trouble – This entailed the running up of a long length of hose to the burning farmhouse, so that when the firemen were again able to get water to bear on the outbreak, it had again assumed big proportions for the wind took the flames ever deeper into the thick thatch. For half-an-hour or more, the pump rendered yeoman service until it was evident that only liquid mud was being thrown on to the fire. Yet a third pond was requisitioned, but by this time, some three hours after the outbreak had been first noticed, it was evident that there was no possibility of saving the building from complete destruction.

Could Not be Used – What a few hours before had been a happy homestead, the centre of a sixty acre farm, was nothing but four walls, and the Fire Brigade returned to Gloucester at 2.35pm after a night of gallant endeavour. By the irony of fate, what was probably the best supply of water was not available to the Brigade. At the back of the house is an exceedingly large pond, but as there is no means of access by which the heavy engine could be taken to get near enough for pumping purposes, this supply perforce had to be left.

When day-light came, the building was still smouldering, and the house presented a picture of absolute desolation. Near the house is a range of farm buildings, and owing to the direction and strength of the wind, these for a time were in danger of being involved. Superintendent Windebank, however, concentrated a number of hoses between the affected house and the buildings, and so obviated the possibility of further damage.

A Local Owner – During the height of the fire, Mrs Burton (sic) remembered that a quantity of her jewellery had been inside her burning home, and it is feared that this would be destroyed by the flames. When part of the roof fell in, a great shower of sparks and flames went up, and one of the firemen had a narrow escape when a blazing beam fell outwards, and hit the ground near him with a crash.

It is understood that the property which is owned by Mrs White of Parkstone, Upton Lane, Barnwood, is covered by insurance as were also the contents. It is believed that the damage will run into four figures.’        

5. WILLIAM JOHN BARTON

William John Barton was born during the first quarter of 1898 in Wheatenhurst Registration District and baptised at Moreton Valence Church on 10th April 1898. His parents were described as Henry and Fanny Kate Barton of Green Farm. William drowned in a pond during the first quarter of 1899.

 

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