btsarnia

A tribute to the life and work of Brian Torode

Anthony Barton (1790-1834), alias Aaron Barton, native of the Vale of Berkeley, Gloucestershire, and later of Charleston, South Carolina

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Detail from ‘Affray in Catgrove Wood’ by the celebrated artist Henry Cobould (Berkeley Castle Collection). Photograph by kind permission of the Late Edwin Ford of Rockhampton

Anthony Barton (1790-1834), alias Aaron Barton, native

of the Vale of Berkeley, Gloucestershire, and later of Charleston, South Carolina

By Richard Barton and Richard Byrd (with thanks to William Baynard Barton and the late Edwin J. Ford)

Anthony Barton was the son of Richard Barton, a farmer of Starvall Farm, North Nibley, Gloucestershire, England. His mother was Hannah, nee Watts. Anthony was baptized at North Nibley on 14th March 1790. He married Maria Ford on 2nd December 1809 at the Church of St Philip and St Jacob in the City of Bristol. The witnesses at the wedding were George and Elizabeth Barton. It is possible that Maria was the daughter of William Ford and Sarah his wife whose daughter Maria was baptised at Tortworth on 18th April 1787. Before their marriage the couple had witnessed the wedding of James Stinchcombe and Matilda Ford on 27th May 1809 at Stone. Anthony and Maria had three children who were born and baptised in Gloucestershire – Anthony and Maria had four children who were born and baptised in Gloucestershire – William Ford Barton was baptised on 29th May 1812 (born 25th April 1811 according to the Register), George on 3rd March 1813, Sarah on 14th April 1814 and Hannah on 31st October 1815 all at Thornbury. Their father, Anthony, was described as a Farmer, late of North Nibley in 1812, as a Farmer of Moreton, Thornbury, in 1813, as a Pig Butcher of Moreton in April 1814 and as a Carpenter of Moreton in 1815.

 

A further reference to Anthony Barton comes in October 1815 when he witnessed his sister Harriet Barton’s marriage to Henry Sheppard in Bristol.

 On Thursday 18th January 1816 Anthony Barton was one of the young men who accompanied John Allen on a poaching expedition to Catgrove Wood where Thomas Clarke, Colonel Berkeley’s park keeper with nine other keepers were concealed. Inevitably, a clash occurred. The poachers formed into a double line and advanced slowly towards the keepers.  When some fifteen yards away, a shot was fired and then another, allegedly by John Penny, which hit and instantly killed William.

The poachers advanced in good order past their opponents towards Bowling Green leaving William Ingram dead and six or seven wounded. Hearing the shots, other keepers arrived on the scene but were too late to pursue the poachers who pressed on past Rockhampton Church towards Morton. According to Greenaway John Penny had significantly remarked “Now Tom Till’s debt is paid”.

Anthony Barton escaped. In the evidence we find:

William Greenaway said ‘Allen said to (Henry Reeves)  him, “Henry will you go? Your brother John and Anthony Barton are going.” … (William Greenaway) I  met Barton and Reeves there. They had two guns. There was some black on Barton’s face…We went on to Catgrove. Barton said, as we were going along, pretty loud, “If any of our party runs, I will blow his leg or arm off.” This was after some one had said that the keepers had been seen.’

Elizabeth Nelmes: “I saw Anthony Barton there that night”


Newspaper article ‘The Great Poaching Affray at Berkeley’-August 21st 1909:

                                                         

‘Earl Fitzhardinge had a picture painted of the encounter between the poachers and keepers, which for many years hung in what was, I think, called the breakfast-room of Berkeley Castle, but the late Lord Fitzhardinge had it taken down from the wall and removed out of sight.’

The late Bryan Barton of Starvale Farm, Sodbury Common, Gloucestershire, understood, from family tradition, that Anthony Barton got under a gate and hid in a wet ditch. He then made his way to Bristol where he  took a boat to the United States.

On 8th January 1819 Henry Barton made a will leaving part of his estate to his nephew, William Ford Barton, the son of his brother Anthony Barton.

                                                                                                                                                                    As has been shown, Anthony Barton was born in 1790 in Gloucestershire but he died with the name of Aaron Barton, sometime between 13th and 20th April 1834, in Charleston, South Carolina. It would also seem that his first wife Maria (nee Ford) died on 26th February 1825. From this point all the evidence for Anthony, Maria and their family comes from research in the United States of America.

Richard Byrd takes up the story:

‘As you may or may not be aware, there is a bit of confusion surrounding Anthony Barton from Thornbury, England, who immigrated to Charleston, SC. In my research, I have been unable to find any record of an Anthony Barton married to a Maria Ford in Charleston. I have, however, uncovered a Maria Barton gravestone which indicates that she was married to an Aaron Barton.  The Gravestone location is at The Cathedral Church of St Luke and St Paul, 126 Coming Street, Charleston, South Carolina.

The gravestone reads as follows:

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 ‘Sacred to the Memory of Maria Barton, consort of Aaron Barton who departed this life on the 26th of February 1825. A native of Wickwar, Gloucestershire, England. She has left a husband and five children to lament their irreparable loss. One who was a loving wife, one who was a mother, one who was a friendly neighbour, now in silence rested here.’

According to the “Return of Death within the City of Charleston”, Maria Barton, female, white, aged thirty-six, died of Dropsy and was buried at St Paul’s. Her attended physicians were Frost &Dickson. According to this record she died on February 27th 1825.  Following on this lead, I found in the “Returns of Deaths within the City of Charleston” where a Aaron Barton, male, white, aged forty three, died of consumption and was buried at St Philip’s. According to this record, he died between the 13th and 20th April 1834. The records of St Philip’s Episcopal Church, 142 Church Street, Charleston, includes the following grave W547 Barton A. (Carpenter). This grave is probably unmarked. Other information that I have uncovered includes the returns of the 1820 and 1830 censuses where a household of Aaron Barton is listed in the Charleston District. Trade Directories include details of an Aaron Barton, Carpenter of 20 Wall Street in 1825 and an Aaron Barton of 10 St Philip Street in 1830/31. In 1835/6 there is a Jane Barton, widow, at 8 Pitt Street and in 1837/8 at 9 Pitt Street. There are later entries for A.J. Barton, a clerk, and A.G. Barton a Carpenter in later directories of the 1850’s which are probably Aaron’s sons.

Other evidence is found in ‘South Carolina Naturalizations 1783-1850’ compiled by Brent H. Holcomb. Here we find an Aaron Barton who gives notice of intention on 3rd October 1831.

This Aaron apparently remarried after Maria’s death in 1825.

Aaron Barton married Jean (Jane) Livel, a widow, and the marriage settlement was dated 7th June 1827, both of Charleston. They would seem to have had a child, Aaron J. Barton who was born on 2nd March 1829 (gravestone).  Aaron’s earlier children included the three born in England and then two born in the United States – Elizabeth Barton, born 21st November 1818 (gravestone) and Anthony G. Barton who was born on 3rd December 1822 (gravestone). Elizabeth, the daughter of a deceased Aaron Barton was married in October 1836 – ‘Married on Tuesday evening 18th inst., by the Rev. Mr. Trapier, Mr J.F. Alderson, of Iberville, La., to Miss Elizabeth Mary, youngest daughter of the late Aaron Barton of this city’

In August 1834, two months after Aaron Barton’s death, his widow, Jane, placed her twelve-year-old step son, Anthony, in the Charleston Orphan House.


 

Starvall to Starwall

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Starwall Plantation

In 1869, on January 6th, Starwall Plantation was purchased by Dr. William Samuel Barton, grandson of Anthony Barton, from Henry N. Snell. This became the Barton home place. The back part of the farm was later purchased from David W. Snell in 1878. Not only do we have this link between Starvall Farm at North Nibley and Starwall Plantation at Orangeburg but in the home of a descendant, Dr William Baynard Barton  Jnr. of Marion Virginia, were two framed paintings. The one was of North Nibley Parish Church with Richard Barton’s gravestone in the foreground. The other was of ‘Starwall Farm House (sic), North Nibley, England’ Both were drawn in about 1920 from photographs taken by the youngest daughter of Augustus Barton of Starvall Farm, North Nibley.

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Starvall Farm, North Nibley

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St Martin’s Church, North Nibley

Dr. William Samuel Barton, (1838-1919), son of  William Ford Barton, visited Europe in 1900 and visited Barton family members in Gloucestershire. A Miss Georgia Hadley, a guest of the English Bartons, returned with him, and lived at Starwall farm for a while, and married Dr. W.S. Barton’s youngest son, Leon Samuel Clay Barton in January 1901.

The late Bryan Barton of Starvale Farm, Sodbury Common, recalled that a cousin of his father was Gilbert King, son of Kate King of Walgaston Farm. He lived in Henbury. It was he who visited Barton relatives at Petty France at the age of fifteen. Here he met Dr.William S. Barton on his visit from North Carolina. The adults excluded him from their conversation but he remembered that the doctor had lost his arm and that he had fought in the American Civil War.

Interestingly, later generations of the Bartons of Carolina had clearly gained the impression that their English forbears had lived at North Nibley since the beginning of the sixteenth century and that Starvall had been the home of the Bartons for 200 years. Also they seemed to know nothing of the Berkeley Poaching Affray and the part that it had played in their family’s history.


 

Information gathered  by Richard Byrd about his ancestor,  Anthony/Aaron Barton:

 

1820 Census, Charleston District, SC

Aaron Barton – oldest male 26-45 yrs

 

Charleston, SC City Directories

1822

Barton, Aaron, Grocer, 26 Archdale St.

1825

Barton, Aaron, Carpenter, 20 Wall St.

 

South Carolina Marriages Vol. V 1749-1853 Implied in SC Marriage Settlements

Barton, Aaron                    Jean (Jane) Livel (widow)  Settlement 7 June 1827 (both of Charleston)

 

1830 Census, Charleston District, SC

Aaron Barton –  oldest male 40-50

 

Charleston, SC City Directory

1830-31

Barton, Aaron, Carpenter, 10 St. Philip St.

 

South Carolina Naturalizations 1783-1850

Charleston

Barton, Aaron    3 Oct. 1831           Notice of Intention

 

Charleston Health Department Death Records

Aaron Barton  male  white  43yrs  April 13-20, 1834. Place of Interment:  St. Philips

 

St. Philip’s Church Cemetery Records

W547  Barton, A. carpenter

 

Marriage And Death Notices From The Charleston Observer, 1827-1845

Issue of October 29, 1836

Married on Tuesday evening 18th inst., by the Rev. Mr. Trapier, Mr. J. F. Alderson, of Iberville, La., to Miss Elizabeth Mary, youngest daughter of the late Aaron Barton of this City.

 

History And Records Of The Charleston Orphan House, 1790-1860

Barton, Anthony.  Admitted August 14, 1834 aged twelve years by Jane Barton, unknown.  Indentured to John W. Hodges as a merchant March 16, 1837. Indentures expired August 14, 1843.  (n-64)

Charleston, SC City Directories

1835-36

Barton, Jane, Widow, 8 Pitt St.

 

1837-38

Barton, Jane, 9 Pitt St. SC

Barton, & Pregnal, Sashmakers, 16 Tradd St.


 

 

Story line from: THE GREAT BERKELEY POACHING AFFRAY OF 18th JANUARY 1816.

by Edwin J. Ford:

On the night of 18 January 1816, one John Allen, and a group of other young men from the Thornbury district gathered at his house to prepare to mount a ‘poaching’ expedition on the estate of Colonel Berkeley, at Berkeley Castle.

Pursuit of game was the least of their concerns; they were ‘up in arms’ – payback for the slights they’d received as a result of actions of the landed gentry was long overdue. The previous year, a man named Thomas Till had been killed by the discharge of a ‘spring gun’ on the estate of Lord Ducie, one of the chief landholders of the district, and he, and his fellow landowners were greatly resented. Colonel Berkeley was no exception, and his estate was considered a viable target of their concern.

Such is the price to be paid by political activists, whether intentionally so or otherwise! The setting of such a gun was not made illegal by statute until 1827, more than 10 years later.

With hindsight it is difficult to imagine how they expected to emerge from the expedition unscathed, as they went armed with guns, and Allen had the foresight to plan should any of them get ‘caught’. He had requested a friend of his, William Adams Brodribb, who was an attorney living nearby in Lower Moreton, to join them ‘on business’. Brodribb arrived about 10 p.m. with two other men, a Dr Keene and Mr Hasell, another attorney – both men were relatives of Brodribb. Brodribb was requested to swear each of the men present to an oath of secrecy, and that they would not ‘peach’ should they be apprehended during the expedition. He produced a book, upon which all the men swore – such oaths were taken very seriously at the time, and all the men believed they were swearing upon a Bible.

The scene was therefore set – these men ‘blackened up’, and about eleven o’clock, set out into the proverbial “bright and shiny” – a frosty moonlit night. Unfortunately, it would appear that they had been “set up” – Colonel Berkeley’s park keeper, Thomas CLARKE, with nine other keepers, were waiting for them. Inevitably, a clash occurred. When the poachers realized their dilemma, they decided attack was the best form of defense, and formed a double line, advancing on the keepers. When some fifteen yards apart someone fired a gun, allegedly the poacher John PENNY. One of the keepers, William INGRAM, was hit and killed instantly. The gamekeepers were armed only with sticks, but other guns were then fired, and six or seven of the gamekeepers were wounded in the confusion that followed.

The outcome was that most of those involved in the affray were apprehended during the following weeks; however four of the men fled the country that night, one escaping to Ireland (William Collins), one to the United States of America (Anthony BARTON) and two to the West Indies. Two were subsequently released after capture, and nine others were tried and transported to Australia for life; the remaining two poachers, John ALLEN and John PENNY were hung for their respective parts in the crime.

Brodribb was also convicted for administering an unlawful oath to the participants, although he hadn’t been on the poaching trip himself.

In his defense he said that the book he produced for the poachers to swear upon was in fact a ‘Young Man’s Best Companion’, not a Bible. Therefore it was not a true oath. This defense was not accepted, since the belief of the young men was that they were swearing on a Bible.

The poachers who were apprehended and the dates of their admittance to Gloucester Jail were as follows:

Name

Age

Residence

Committal

John Allen

28

Thornbury

22 Jan 1816

John Burley

19

Moreton

28 Jan 1816

Benjamin Collins

33

Littleton

27 Jan 1816

Thomas Collins

30

Littleton

27 Jan 1816

William Greenaway

27

Moreton

1 Feb 1816

Robert Groves

19

Thornbury

8 Feb 1816

James Jenkins

21

Thornbury

27 Jan 1816

Daniel Long

23

Hill

27 Jan 1816

Thomas Morgan

19

Thornbury

27 Jan 1816

John Penny

25

Littleton

29 Jan 1816

William Penny

30

Littleton

27 Jan 1816

John Reeves

28

Thornbury

27 Jan 1816

James Roach

24

Thornbury

27 Jan 1816

All were tried at the Lent Assizes on 3rd April 1816 for the murder, and for aiding and abetting in the murder of William Ingram, a gamekeeper of Colonel Berkeley, the sentence for which was death. John Allen and John Penny were to be executed; for the rest sentencing was held over until 20 May when it was commuted to transportation for life. All except William Greenaway and Benjamin Collins were transferred during May and June 1816 to the Prison Hulk Justitia moored at Woolwich in the Thames Estuary, and transported subsequently to Sydney, on the Sir William Bensley, and thence to Hobart, Tasmania (then known as Van Diemen’s Land – VDL).

William Greenaway made a full confession and was admitted evidence for the Crown in return for his life and the life of his step-son John Burley. This was conditional on John Burley also making a full confession which he refused to do; his conviction was therefore sustained and he was sent to Hobart with the other men. Benjamin Collins was locked up initially, but later released,

Amongst others known to have been involved, and who escaped were brothers John and Thomas Hayward, sons of a Moreton farmer, believed to have sailed for America, William Collins (a brother of Benjamin and Thomas) and Anthony BARTON (who had lived with John Reeve’s family) who also went to America.

William Collins had escaped to Ireland, but returned to the area as an old man, to tell of the terrible grief he caused his parents, and his deep regret of the whole incident. He said: “how my father and mother suspected I was there, and the painful scene that followed my admission of the truth. But that same night my father drove me to Bristol, and from thence I took my passage on board a vessel bound to Ireland, where I remained for many years.”


 

From the late Edwin J. Ford:

 

THE GREAT BERKELEY POACHING AFFRAY OF 18th JANUARY 1816.

 

‘By kind permission of Mr. and Mrs. John Berkeley and their Sons… a “gathering” is to be held at Berkeley Castle on Monday 27th June 2005 assembling in the visitors Car Park (on the edge of Berkeley town off the Berkeley to Gloucester road) by 9.30am for introductions and distribution of name badges before we enter at 10.00am.

The aim is to bring together for the first time, descendants of as many participant families and those with a particular interest (from both sides of the fence) as possible. The Affray has been my long-term interest and subsequent research together with Ms Jo Watson of Australia; we have managed to track down a number of descendants thereof. Apart from the UK, people will be travelling from Australia and the United States.

The Castle is closed to the general public on that day and we have its’ facility until approx 4pm, during which time Mr. John Berkeley and his son Charles will show us around both the Castle and the grounds. The Castle tour can be anything up to two hours or so depending upon available time. Of particular interest will be the portrait of Colonel William Berkeley, the Castle incumbent and a leading player in 1816, also the painting of the Affray in Catgrove Wood by the celebrated artist Henry Cobould. We will have the use of the Great Hall with an introductory morning coffee/tea and biscuits and a finger buffet lunch. There will be an opportunity for anyone who wishes to say a few words regarding the Poaching Affray and/or their family connection or specific interest. We shall have a display board/table for anyone to display photographs or other interesting material. It would be most helpful if you could indicate on your reply should you desire to say a few words.

Therefore you and your spouse or friend are invited by Jo Watson and myself to attend this unique event. I would be grateful if you could indicate your acceptance together with numbers and names before the 31st May by enclosing a cheque for £9.85 per head to the above address (those indicating acceptance from overseas may of course pay on the day).

On one of the succeeding days – weather permitting – it is hoped to arrange a trek up into Catgrove Wood (the scene of the crime). Taking this part of the Poachers route, will be rough, quite steep and with possible wet areas in the wood. Walking boots or other appropriate footwear is essential. The total distance being 3 or 4 miles. Camera and binoculars are a must. A visit to the graves of William Ingram and John Allen could also be included. Light lunchtime refreshment could be purchased in the nearby country town of Thornbury. Car sharing wherever possible is desirable. Again an indication of your intent to partake would be helpful.

I look forward to hearing from you. Jo and I, together with my wife Carole, very much look forward to seeing you on 27th June.’


 

 

 

Descendants of Anthony/Aaron Barton

 

The Children of Anthony and Maria Barton were cousins of John Barton III, Great II Grandfather of Richard John Barton:

 

1 WILLIAM FORD BARTON, cousin of John Barton III

 

Anthony and Maria had four children who were born and baptised in Gloucestershire – William Ford Barton was baptised on 29th May 1812 (born 25th April 1811), George on 3rd March 1813, Sarah in 1814 and Hannah on 31st October 1815 all at Thornbury. On his gravestone it says that William Ford Barton was born on the 24th April 1811 and that he came from Gloucestershire. William Ford Barton was one of the beneficiaries in his Uncle Henry’s will which was made in 1819 and so he would have received a substantial sum of money when he reached the age of twenty-one in 1832. His father had fled from Gloucestershire in 1816 as the result of the murder of William Ingram, Gamekeeper to Colonel Berkeley.

 

His obituary suggests that he went to Charleston in 1825 when he was aged fourteen years. There is nothing to prove this but it is possible that he stayed on in England with his grandmother and his uncle, George Barton, at Starvall Farm. It would seem that he trained to be a physician. Coincidentally his future brother-in-law, Henry Pregnall, was indentured to a Mr. Wm. Michell, a “practitioner of medicine” but Family lore is consistent reporting that Henry was mistreated by Michell. According to lore Anthony/Aaron Barton stepped in, and the indenture to Michell was broken. Was Michell anything to do with William Ford’s training as a physician?

 

‘Without money or the advantage of a liberal education but with a laudable ambition supported by an indomitable courage, he worked out a success in his young manhood that enabled him to study medicine and to enter upon a broader field of usefulness. As a practicing physician he was eminently successful and few men in his profession have made a more enviable reputation for skill and high attainment than he.’

 

We do know that in about 1831 William Ford Barton married Mary M. Seignious of Bay Street, Charleston, South Carolina. She was born on 18th December 1808, and died on 24th September 1840. He then married Ann Horton between 24th September 1840 and 4th October 1844. He then married Mrs. Ann E. (Izlar) Wright on 22nd November 1859. She was born on 14th October 1812 and died on 3rd March 1874. Finally he married Ellen Rachel (Dantzler) Moorer. She was born on 12th September 1831 and died on 3rd September 1888.

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Dr William Ford Barton moved to Orangeburg in the year 1846.The death of Dr. William Ford Barton took place on 16th December 1890 in Orangeburg, South Carolina. His grave marker is located in New Hope Cemetery, one half mile out of Rowesville, South Carolina, on the Orangeburg to Rowesville Highway.  The details of his first and third wives also appear on the two gravestones, which share the same iron fence enclosure with his son’s gravestone – Dr William S. Barton. Their descendent Dr Baynard Barton reported that ‘The gravestones are in good condition and of good craftsmanship’ but he believed that the second gravestone was of William Ford Barton’s second wife rather than his third one.

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Richard Byrd who wrote the following in November 2006 has discussed this matter:

 

‘I believe that Dr. Barton made a mistake in identifying the second gravestone.  I believe that it is the gravestone of William Ford Barton’s third wife, Ann E. (Izlar) (Wright) Barton and not that of Ann (Horton) Barton.  There seems to have been something peculiar about William Ford Barton’s second marriage to Ann Horton.  Ann Horton is the mother of Isabella Barton who is my great grandmother.  Up until now, I have never been able to find Isabella Barton in the census prior 1880.

Recently, I found her in the 1850 and 1860 censuses along with her mother, but they are not living in South Carolina with William Ford Barton.  In 1850, they are living in Georgia with a Lunquist family in Pike County, Georgia.  Elizabeth A. Horten, using her maiden name, is age 32 and Isabella Barton is age 6.  Both born in South Carolina.

In 1860, I found them with the same family, but now they are in Spalding Co., Georgia.  Eliza A. Horton is 39, and Isabella Barton is 16.

In 1870, Elizabeth Whorten, age 55, is still with the Lunquist family, but living back in Pike Co., Georgia.  Isabella is not with her, and I have been unable to find her in 1870.  1870 is about the time she married Samuel Thomas Izlar.

So it is obvious that Elizabeth Horton, who married William Ford Barton sometime between the death of  his first wife, Mary Seignious, on Sept. 24, 1840 and the birth of his daughter, Isabella Barton, on Oct 4, 1844, did not die before William Ford Barton married his third wife, Ann E. (Izlar) Wright on Nov. 22, 1859.

The only conclusion that I can reach is that William Ford Barton divorced Ann Horton, assuming that they were ever married, or the marriage was annulled.  Since they were obviously living apart, I don’t believe that she is the wife buried in the second grave in New Hope Cemetery, near Rowesville, South Carolina.

I do not have any information on the marriage of William Ford Barton and Ann Horton other than Dr. Barton’s book.  But it would seem reasonable that they did marry in light of Isabella showing up in the census with Ann Horton as Isabella Barton.  I do not know how Dr. Barton verified that they were married.

I have found one entry in the book, Marriage and Death Notices from the Southern Christian Advocate,1837-1860 Vol. 1 that may be William Ford Barton’s marriage to Ann Horton, but from the information provided, there is no way to be sure.

Issue of June 6, 1845

Married on the 29th May, by the Rev. C. A. Crowell, Mr. William Barton, of Orangeburg, S. C.’

 

1850 Census, District No. 68, Pike County, Georgia

Series M432, Roll 80, Page 212, Dwelling 1210

John M. Lunquist                39yrs     male         jueler (jeweler?)              SC

Mariah S. Lunquist             24yrs      female                                                   “

Magnus Lunquist                 9yrs       male                                                       “

Benj Lunquist                        6yrs      male                                                       “

Elizabeth A. Horten            32yrs      female                                                   “

Isabella A? Barton                6yrs      female                                                   “

 

1860 Census, 1001st District, Spalding County, Georgia

Series M653, Roll 136, Page 187, Dwelling 201

John M. Lunquest               48yrs      male       dentist                                    SC

Susan M. Lunquest             34yrs      female                                                   “

Magnus Lunquest                18yrs      male                                                       “

Benjamin Lunquest            16yrs      male                                                       “

Susan F. Lunquest                 9yrs      female                                                   GA

Isabella Burton                    16yrs    female                                                   SC

Eliza A. Horton                   39yrs    female                                                   “

 

1870 Census, Pike County, Georgia

Series M593, Roll 169, Page 223, Dwelling 1581

Lunquest, John M.               54yrs      male       dentist                                    SC

Lunquest, Sousan 39yrs      female   keeping house                                     “

Lunquest, Benjamin           23yrs      male       farm laborer                          “

Lunquest, Sousan A.           15yrs      female   at home                               GA

Whorten, Elizabeth             55yrs      female   at home                               SC

Strickland, Sousan              28yrs      female   demestic servant                GA

Strickland,  Sarah 10yrs      female   at home                                              “

Strickland, Nathan                6yrs      male                                                       “

Strickland, Thomas              2yrs      male                                                       “

Street, Daniel*                     26yrs      male       farm laborer                          “

*Black

 

1880 Census, Barnesville ??533rd Dist. GM, Pike County, Georgia

Series T9, Roll 161, Page 126A/B, Dwelling 154

Lunquest, Susan                female    52yrs  married             keeping house                            SC  Eng SC

Lunquest, John M.               male       65yrs  married  husband     j???(Jeweler)                      SC  SC   London

Lunquest, Benjamin           male       29yrs  single     son                    farmer                            SC  SC     SC

Milner, John B.                  male       29yrs  married  son-in-law        farmer                            GA GA  GA

Milner, Susie                        female   24yrs  married  wife of       keeping house                    GA  SC  SC

Milner, Magness B.             male         6yrs      single        son               at home                        GA  GA  GA

Horton, Elizabeth                female   64yrs      single        aunt             at home                        SC   SC   SC

 

In his will he left a homestead and ten acres called Joe Sawney Place and one hundred dollars to his faithful servant, John Seabrook, his 798 acre farm to his son Theophilus F. Barton for his lifetime, and further bequests to his son William S. Barton and his daughter Margaret Stokes.

 

Baynard Barton also wrote – ‘A personal letter written in long hand by Dr. William Ford Barton to his son, William Samuel Barton who at the time was in the Physio-Therapy Medical College at Macon, Georgia, has been seen by the writer and the date on the letter is February 9, 1860, which letter revealed him to be a typical father giving advice to his son to learn all he could and to make the best of grades in his work. The writing is that of an excellent penman and the wording is that of an educated man.’

 

One of the Esteem articles from the Orangeburg Times and Democrat gives us the following account of his life:

 

‘Dr W.F. Barton was a native of the Parish of Berkeley, England, but came to this country when a boy about 14 years of age and at once entered upon a career the changing fortunes of which made him a conspicuous figure in the history of his adopted country. Without money or the advantage of a liberal education but with a laudable ambition supported by indomitable courage, he worked out a success in his young manhood that enabled him to study medicine and to enter into a broader field of usefulness. As a practicing physician he was eminently successful and few men in his profession have made a more enviable reputation for skill and high attainment than he. Through a long series of years, even down to the war and after, he held the confidence and esteem of the entire community in which he lived and practiced. Growing in years and unable to pursue his profession further, he now devoted his entire time and energies to the farm. Here too his excellent judgement and close application to duty made him not only a successful farmer and trusted counsellor, but a leader in whatever enterprise which had for its object the advancement of agriculture and prosperity of the people.

 

It was mainly through the influence of Dr. Barton assisted by other progressive farmers that the Orangeburg Agricultural and Mechanical Association was formed. Under the auspices of this Institution with Dr. Barton as President, several country fairs were held which rivalled those of the State in the magnitude of their proportion, variety and extent of exhibits and wholesome influence upon the farming communities of the county.

 

Dr Barton was also president of the Orangeburg Agricultural Society for many years and only ceased to be its honoured presiding officer and a regular attendant upon its quarterly meetings when old age and failing health made it impossible for him to do so. At these meetings he was the central figure – the controlling spirit and his words were always words of wisdom treasured by the members and acted upon in their practical workings on the farm. He did so much and perhaps more than any other man to perfect the system of Agriculture and to work out the natural prosperity of the people of this county.

 

Dr Barton was twice honoured with a seat in our State Legislature, once in 1863 and again in 1865, and was on several occasions a member of the State Conventions. In every instance and in every position he proved himself worthy of the trust reposed in him by the citizens of the county. He was a patriot in the true sense of the term, loving his adopted country with a devotion little short of life itself, and it was this that made him ready and willing whenever demanded to contribute freely of his means, his time and his talent to her support and defense.

It is strange that a man, so modest and unassuming in his manners, so little prepared apparently either mentally or physically for the great burdens of life should be able – to work out such success in business, to exercise such a controlling influence among his fellows, and to meet so nobly all the demands in every relationship of life. Character lies behind it all, and it was this that made Dr Barton the eminent physician, the successful farmer, the wise counsellor, the trusted official and the true patriot. In the more private relations of life, it was character that made him the unselfish friend, the affectionate husband and father, the humble Christian, the symmetrical man.

 

Dr. W.F. Barton lived and died in the faith of the Episcopal Church and, in the 79th year of his age, was consigned to his last resting place by Rev. J.B. Williams, Rector of that Church at this place.’

 

From the Forty Sixth General Assembly First Session: November 28th 1864 – December 22nd 1864 – Orange –William Ford Barton

 

And the Forty Seventh General Assembly 1865-1866 – Orangeburg – William Ford Barton

Special Session:  October 25, 1865-November 13, 1865

First Session:  November 27, 1865-December 21, 1865

Special Session:  September 4, 1866-September 21, 1866

Second Session:  November 26, 1866-December 21, 1866

 

Tribute of Respect – Orangeburg , S.C. Jan.1, 1891:

 

‘Whereas it has pleased the all-wise and Supreme Ruler of the Universe to call to his reward our esteemed and honoured brother and Past Grand Master William F. Barton, therefore, be it resolved,

That we the officers and members of Edisto Lodge, No. 33, I.O.O.F., have heard with profound sorrow, the sad intelligence, announcing the death of our lamented friend and brother.

 

That in his death we have lost one to whom we delighted to do honor, one who was faithful to every trust, one who walked uprightly before God and acted honourably with all mankind and one who discharged with fidelity the duties of all the high and honourable offices to which his admiring brethren elevated him. That a blank page in our minute book be suitably inscribed to his memory and that these resolutions be published in the county papers. P.T. Hildebrand, E.B. Williams, H. Spahr – Committee.’

 

Resolutions on the Death of Dr. W.F. Barton:

 

Whereas, Death has again visited our society and taken from us our beloved friend and brother, Dr. W.F. Barton. Therefore be it

 

Resolved 1st, That New Hope Alliance misses the kind face and wise counsel of this, our oldest, true and tried member.

 

Resolved 2nd, That while we bow in submission to the will of an all wise Father, we cherish his memory and imitate his virtues, for we feel sure that his lamp was trimmed and burning and that he is now at rest in Glory.

 

Resolved 3rd, That a page in our book of minutes be inscribed to his memory and that a copy of these resolutions be sent to the family, also a copy to the Cotton Plant and Enterprise and Alliance Monitor for publication. T.P. Stokes, E.N. Chisolm, A.M. Cox – Committee.

 

The Agricultural Society. It adopts Resolutions of Respect to the Memory of Dr. W.F. Barton:

 

The Orangeburg Agricultural Society held its quarterly meeting at Sheridan’s Hall in the city, on Saturday, February 14th, 1891, at 12 o’clock Mr. Vice-President James H. Fowles presiding.

 

“Capt. John L. Moorer, one of the members of the society, at its organization twenty years ago, read the following paper as a tribute to the memory of Dr. W.F. Barton, our deceased president:”

 

Today we are without a president and it is a sad thought that Dr. W.F. Barton, one of the founders of the Society, is no more, never again to meet and counsel with us in our meetings. Three months ago he met with us here, and although feeble and broken by age, he agreed to serve us as president once more, our desire being for him to preside over us while he lived. For more than thirty years I have been intimately associated with him socially and in business, and have always found him to be true, generous and kind. He was a good man, the friend of all who sought his aid and his advice was never withheld. He served his country and State in war and in peace, with credit to himself and honour to his people. He was our most progressive agriculturalist, his advice was sought far and near, even beyond his State. He was over fourscore years of age, although afflicted and worn by age, his energy failed not, he always did his duty nobly. We will miss him, it will be hard to fill his place.

The following resolutions were read:

Since our last meeting the reaper death has entered our society and removed to the other side of the river our honoured president, Dr. W.F. Barton, one of its organizers and its presiding officer continuously since its incipiency. Realizing the immensity of its loss, the Orangeburg Agricultural Society offers the following resolutions:

Resolved, That in the death of Dr. W.F. Barton, this society has sustained the loss of one of its most devoted, influential and active members, whose life and career are well worthy of our emulation.

Resolved, That as a tribute of our respect and esteem, a blank page in our minute book, be inscribed to his memory.

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the bereaved family and be published in the county papers. E.R. Walter, Jno. C. Holman, Jno. L. Moorer, Committee.

The following gentlemen made speeches seconding the adoption of the resolutions and adding their testimony and esteem to our deceased friend and president: Messrs. Jas. H. Fowles, Jos. W. Hodges, Capt. N.N. Hayden and Dr. Jno. C. Holman. Capt E.R. Walter said that the most fitting tribute that could be paid to the memory of the deceased, would be to keep up the society that he founded. Several names were added to the society’s roll and the members adjourned to partake of a sumptuous feast furnished by a committee for the occasion. Jno. S. Rowe, Secretary.

 

Obituary: The Charleston World

 

‘Death of W.F. Barton – A Prominent and Esteemed Citizen of Orangeburg, and Grandfather of Senator Stokes –

 

Orangeburg, S.C., Dec. 16 – (Special) – This community was shocked this afternoon at hearing the tidings of the death of Dr William F. Barton, which occurred today at the residence of Mr. Charles Culler, the step-son of the deceased. The Doctor was in his 79th year, and had for some time shown some of the infirmities of his age, but was in his average health when he went to pay this his last visit to his step-daughter, Mrs. Culler, and while at dinner, at her home fell back in his chair and when helped up by loving hands was dead, his death occurring, as is supposed, from heart disease.

 

Dr. Barton was an honoured citizen of this county where he has lived a long and useful life. He was an Englishman by birth, and settled in this State at an early age, practicing medicine in the country below this city for many years and was eminently successful as a physician and also as a farmer, and he acquired a very handsome property and leaves a large estate, including many valuable houses in this city.

 

Dr. Barton was married several times, and leaves four children, viz: two sons, Dr. W.S. Barton and Theophilus F. Barton, and two daughters, Mrs. James Stokes and Mrs. Sam Izlar, and numerous grand-children among whom is the distinguished senator from this county, and president of the State Alliance, Dr. J. Wm. Stokes. The deceased was a devout Churchman and a constant attendant of the Episcopal Church of this city of which he was vestryman. He was very liberal to his church and its rectory lot is one of the many memorials of his generosity. He was for many years the president of the county agricultural society, and served this county twice in the Legislature, in 1863 and 1865 and was a public-spirited and patriotic citizen, and a noble and worthy gentleman.’

 

Laid to Rest – Times and Democrat:

 

‘The funeral services of the late Dr. W.F. Barton were held Thursday at New Hope Church at Rowesville. The services were performed by the Rev. John B. Williams, rector of the Episcopal Church of this place. After reading the burial service Mr. Williams made some appropriate and impressive remarks concerning the life and character of the deceased. Dr. Barton was laid away to rest beside his wife in the family plot at the church. The esteem in which Dr. Barton was held by the people among whom he lived is witnessed by the very large number of people who attended the funeral. Numbers of colored people, formerly servants, were all present to witness the last sad rites performed over the mortal remains of their former master.’

 

Will of William F. Barton (transcribed by Richard Byrd):

 

The State of South Carolina

In the name of God.  Amen!

I William F. Barton of the County of Orangeburg

in the State aforesaid, being of Sound and Disposing mind

and understanding Do make and publish and declare

this to be my last will and testament hereby revoking

and making void all former wills by me at any time

heretofore made.

Item 1- It is my will that my body be buried in

a decent manner and that all my just debts be paid.

Item 2- I give unto my executors hereinafter

named, or to such of them as shall qualify the

sum of One thousand four hundred Dollars.  In

trust nevertheless, and to and for the following uses

and purposes, and none other, that is to Say, in

trust to invest the same in such good and safe

interest bearing securities, from time to time, as

they may deem best and to pay the interest

arising from the Source to my daughter Isabella

Izlar, wife of Samuel T. Izlar, during her

natural life, quarterly semi-annually, or annually

as they may deem most to her advantage; and

in further trust after the death of my said

daughter Isabella Izlar, to divide the same

equally among the children of the said Isabella

share and share alike, the child or children of

any deceased child to take the share which the

parent would have taken had the parent been

living free and discharged from all trusts

Item 3- I give devise and bequeath unto my

faithful Servant John Seabrook One Hundred

dollars, to be paid out of my personal Estate,

absolutely and forever.  Also ten acres of land with

the house thereon part of my homestead tract

and known as the Joe Sawney Place, to be held

(he to reside thereon)

by him during his natural life ^ and from and

immediately after his death to go to his wife Eliza

should she survive him, for and during the term

of her natural life, and from and immediately

after the death of both the said John Seabrook

and Eliza his wife to go to my son Theophilus

  1. Barton, for and during his natural life , and

after his death to go as the remainder of the

Farm hereafter devised to him.

Item 4- I give and devise unto my son

Theophilus F. Barton my Farm on which he

lives containing Seven Hundred and

Ninty-Eight acres more or less, purchased by me

from Paul S. Felder (Save and Except the ten acres

devised in Item 3.  To my faithful Servant John

Seabrook and Eliza his wife) to have and to hold

the Same for and during the term of his natural

life, and from and immediately after the death

of my Said son Theophilus F. Barton, it is my

will, and I so direct, that my said Farm shall

go to and be equally divided among the wife of

my Said Son (in case she shall survive him)

and the Children of my Said Son share and

share alike, to be held by them absolutely and

forever, but in case the wife of my Said Son

shall not survive him, then and in that case

to be Equally divided among the Children

of my Said Son, if more than one, and if but

one, then to that one, to be held by him, her

or them, as the case may be, his, her, or

their, heirs and assigns forever, the Child

or children of any deceased child to take

by representation the parents Share

Item 5- All the rest residue and remainder

of my Estate both real and personal where-

soever situate or found at my death, I give

devise and bequeath unto my Son William S.

Barton and my daughter Margaret Stokes to

be Equally divided between them, share and

share alike, but in case either or both of my

said Children shall predecease me, it is my

will, that the child or children of my Said

Son an daughter respectively shall take

among them the Share which the parent would

have taken under this my last will and

testament had such parent Survived me.

Item 6- It is my will and I hereby authorize

and Empower my Executors, or such of them as shall

qualify under this my will, and the survivor of

them to sell all or any part of my real

or personal property either at private sale or

public auction, as they may deem most to the

advantage of the parties intended for the purpose

of carrying out the object and intention of this

my last will and testament and upon such

sale or sales being made, to make, execute and

deliver good and sufficient deed or deeds

of Conveyance, or such further and other deeds

and papers as may be necessary in law for the

valid transfer of title to the purchaser or purchasers

of the property sold by them or the Survivor of

them, under the power hereby conferred, and

without any order for so doing from any

court or courts.

Item 7- I hereby constitute nominate and appoint

my Sons Theophilus F. Barton and William S.

Barton and my nephew J. William Stokes or any

or Either of them jointly and Severally to be Exec-

utor or Executors of the my last will and

testament.

In witness whereof I William F. Baton

Testor have to this my last will and

testament set my hand and Seal this

fifth day of April in the year of our

Lord one thousand Eight hundred and

Eighty nine.                          W F Barton LS

 

Signed, Sealed, published and declared

by the Testator William F. Barton as

and for his last will and testament

in the presence of us, who in his presence

at his request, and in the presence of Each

other, have hereunto subscribed our names

as witnesses- The word “four” written

over the word “Six” in thirteenth line first

page; Also, the word “he to reside thereon”

interlined on second page fifth line

before signing.

  1. L. Glaze
  2. P. Izlar
  3. L. Izlar

 

The children of William Ford and Mary Barton were second cousins of William Barton II, Great Grandfather of Richard John Barton:

 

Mary Margaret McIntosh Stokes was born on 8th November 1832 and died on 23rd June 1915. She married James Stokes on 16th January 1851. He was born in about 1818 and died on 24th August 1883. They had four children Mary Annie Stokes (8th December 1851 – 28th August 1927); Dr. James William Stokes (12th December 1853 – 6th June 1901) who became a Senator for Orangeburg County and president of the State Alliance; Lucy Stokes (20th April 1860 – 24th May 1925) and James Edwin Stokes (5th April 1863 – 22nd February 1902)

 

 

Theophilus Fisk Barton was born on 16th August 1836 and died on 8th April 1912. He was married twice, his first wife being Mary Raysor of Orangeburg, South Carolina who he married on 8th November 1871 in Barnwell County, South Carolina. She was born on 18th September 1849, and died on 23rd August 1876. Theophilus Barton’s second wife was Nellie Raysor, who was born on 16th July 1860, and died on 22nd August 1942. By his first wife he had two children namely, Carlisle Barton who married Lucy Love and had one child and Anna Barton who married Frank Dantzler, who had three daughters and one son. By his second wife, Theophilus had seven children including two sons and five daughters. These were Theophilus F. Barton Jr, born 25th December 1885; Cornelia Ayer Barton married D. A. Stack; Sue Barton; William Ford Barton; Hannah Barton married George S. Irby; Nellie Louise Barton and Margaret Stokes Barton.

 

William Samuel Barton was born on 23rd September 1838 at Charleston, South Carolina and died on 23rd November 1919 and was buried at New Hope Cemetery, Rowesville. He attended common schools of Orangeburg, graduated from reform Medical College, Macon, Georgia in 1859. In 1860 he graduated from the Physio-Medical College. After his medical school graduation he was sent by his father to do post graduate work and he served his internship in St Bartholomew’s Hospital, London, England. He returned home a Medical Doctor but found that the Civil War was about to start.  Dr Baynard Barton took up the story in his Family History of the Bartons of Carolina:

 

‘Immediately he and Donald Rowe, Theodore Kohn, Murray Robinson, Paul Jodon, and others, joined Lieutenant John Felder and went to Virginia to participate in the First Battle of Manassas. They were attached to the Palmetto Guards of Charleston as Independent Volunteers and were engaged in the Battles of the 18th and 21st at Manassas. The “War of the Rebellion” books record that there were 2,896 Union soldiers dead on that battlefield after the engagement.

 

Even though Dr Barton was a graduate Medical Doctor, time did not permit his services being used in Medical Corps and on his return home from the Battle of Manassas he with others organized Co.I of the 2nd South Carolina Volunteers Artillery, and was mustered into the Confederate Service on Sunny Side Hill in the city of Orangeburg, where at that time he was elected as a Second Lieutenant. Immediately, he with his Company was sent to James Island, Fort Johnson, near Charleston, and across the river from the city. The fiercest conflicts around the city of Charleston were fought from Fort Johnson and at Secessionville, S.C. until the evacuation of Charleston.

6 Barton IV Gt 12 1 3 a

During the hard fought battles on James Island and Fort Johnson the Artillery group that Dr. William Samuel Barton was attached to saved the day for the Confederates time after time by pouring a murderous fire on the approaching Yankees. The dead piled up and obstructed their fire. For this bravery in action there was a citation mentioned for Lieutenant W.S. Barton, T.P. Oliver and J.W. Moseley of the Artillery Company on Page 95, vol. 14 of the “War of the Rebellion”…

 

It was during these detachment periods that Lieutenant Dr. William Samuel Barton was used as a courier. A cannon ball was fired with another later at Lieutenant W. Samuel Barton while on messenger mission. The cannon that fired the ball was evidently on a vessel in the river or harbor, for it is a large one, measuring about ten or twelve inches in diameter. The cannon ball never exploded and neither of them had been unloaded apparently, and may still be capable of exploding. Lieutenant William Samuel Barton, got off the horse that he was riding on the courier mission and marked the spot where the cannon balls landed in the soft dirt, and later came back with friends and dug the balls up and sent them to his father at Orangeburg. The balls remained on his father’s gatepost until he died and then they were  transferred to his own gatepost. It is there that I first saw them during my boyhood years…

 

After the surrender of Charleston the Artillery Company was withdrawn from the Fort Johnson area… For after the withdrawal from Fort Johnson and James Island, Lieutenant W.S. Barton and his Artillery Company joined General Hardee’s Corps on the retreat toward North Carolina, and he with the Artillery Company was engaged in the Battles of Aversboro and Bentonville (near Goldsboro, N.C.). He surrendered with the other Hardee Corps to General Sherman after the last two above battles. There were 100,000 Union troops encamped about Goldsboro, N.C. for some two weeks while the Confederate troops were being paroled.

 

From the South Carolina Archives Department in the World War Memorial, Columbia, S.C., and dated July 18th 1955:

 

Record of Lieutenant William Samuel Barton – “Age 24, Orangeburg District, 3rd Lieut. Company I, 2nd Lieut. South Carolina Artillery, Appointed Nov. 19th 1861 at Orangeburg, S.C. under Capt. A.D. Frederick. On the roll April 30th 1862 as 2nd Lieutenant. Commissioned 1st Lieutenant Sept. 9th 1862. On the Roll Feb. 29th 1862, as Acting Ordnance Officer. On the last Roll Dec 31st 1864 as absent. Paroled at Greensboro , North Carolina.”

 

After the Parolees at Greensboro, N.C. as per the above South Carolina record, Lieutenant Dr William Barton returned home with one silver dollar in his pocket to commence a new life. The first year at home he raised eight bales of cotton on eight acres, which he secured from his father, and for this eight bales of cotton he received $800.

 

On May 3rd 1866, he married Miss Elodia Cecilia Seignious of Charleston, S.C. and in the fall of that year he with his bride moved to the Middlepen section of Orangeburg County, and settled down to practice medicine and farm on a small scale. He carried on his medical career while attending his farm interest, travelling on horse back with saddlebags or in the Sulky, within a radius of thirty miles.

 

In 1867 Dr Barton rented the Col. Frederick place, about five miles from Orangeburg, S.C. on the Rowesville road. Charles Ford Barton was born there and died that same year. In 1868 he rented the Old Grover Hunkerpillar place, located near Four Holes Church. His second son (my father), Willie Seignious Barton, was born there October 11th 1868.

 

In 1869, on January 6th, Starwall Plantation was purchased from Henry N. Snell. This is the Barton home place. The back part of the farm was purchased from David W. Snell in 1878.

 

It was in the years after the Civil War and the Reconstruction period in the Carolinas that times were so difficult, life so cheap and at the same time so dear, that Dr. W.S. Barton began the active practice of medicine. During the years until about 1900 many threats were made on his life and some three attempts to murder him in or near his own barn were related. He was active in politics and took an active part in the Movement of Red Shirts in 1876 around Orangeburg, S.C. On one occasion a political meeting was called in Orangeburg and Dr W. S. Barton was elected to speak to the public on Democratic Issues, and to welcome the Democratic candidate, Wade Hampton, to Orangeburg, when he was then campaigning for Governorship of South Carolina. Dr W.S. Barton’s eight year old son, Willie Seignious Barton, a member of the Middlepen Red Shirt Boys made the opening address from a speech prepared by his father, introducing the principal speaker.

 

In later years, 1894 to 1896, Dr Barton was elected to the Senate of South Carolina. One of his first and main acts as Senator was the separating of the Claflin University and the Colored State University at Orangeburg. The Claflin University was a mixed white and colored school, and the separation improved the morals of the University and gave the State Colored  College, a colored President which is still the rule there to this day.

 

During the years that Dr. W.S. Barton practiced medicine from Starwall Plantation he used a horse much of the time. On numerous occasions he was threatened, but on several times he went into his barn at night to get his horse to make night calls, and was attacked one time by a white man with a pitchfork, and on two other occasions by Negro men with the same instrument. I was told as a boy that the prongs of one of the forks could be seen in the post in the barn even to that day. I also understood that neither of the three men lived to tell what happened and were silently buried in the harried times behind the barn in an unmarked grave, having been killed in self defense by the doctor, one of them by manual strength of choking…

 

Starwall Farm was built about six feet up off the ground so that during the Post War days and the era of the Klu Klux Klan, peepers or carpetbaggers could not look in to the windows unless they were on horseback, and there always were three fences between the house and the road, to cross. Also the farming equipment was kept under the house out of the weather near to the family to prevent the loss by theft…

 

Dr William Samuel Barton was an active member of the Klu Klux Klan of Orangeburg area and was Grand Master of the local organization for a time, and they met on his farm down near Middlepen swamp in a natural amphitheatre in an old rice field. The locale is still there even at this time, and it was selected as a meeting place because one sentry could do watch duty over the area by virtue of the lay of the land and swamp. The Klan did guard duty over the whites and saved them to take over the governing of the county and the return to legal Government with safety.

 

Dr Barton’s wife, Elodia Cynthia Cecilia Seignious Barton, was ever at his side during the trying years, and mended and made many a Klan uniform by lamp light. During the trying years she bore him nine children, four which lived to maturity, and old age. The others dying in infancy.

 

Dr Barton continued his active practice from the close of the Civil War until 1898, when he got his left arm caught in the gin saws of his own cotton gin on his plantation. The arm was amputated by Dr. Mike Salley of Orangeburg on the front porch of Dr. Barton’s home. Without an anaesthetic, and Dr Salley was told how to do the amputation, one step at a time, by Dr Barton himself. It is said that Dr Barton’s wife complained of the pain he was having to stand, and Dr Barton replied to his wife that “Missus be a woman, I am a man.”

 

The next important part of this honoured ancestor came in 1900, when he took a pleasure and vacation trip back to Europe in 1900 on the Steamer Rotterdam, to Rotterdam, Holland, April 18th. He went to Belgium, Paris, England, and returned to the U.S.A. from Arrowsmith, Somerset, August 1900, on a tramp steamer, to get two weeks of Ocean voyage. A Miss Georgia Hadley, a guest of the Barton English families, returned with him, and lived at Starwall farm for a while, and married Dr. W.S. Barton’s youngest son, Leon Samuel Clay Barton in January 1901.

 

The late Bryan Barton of Starvale Farm, Sodbury Common, recalled that a cousin of his father was Gilbert King, son of Kate King of Walgaston Farm. He lived in Henbury. It was he who visited Barton relatives at Petty France at the age of fifteen. Here he met Dr.William S. Barton on his visit from North Carolina. The adults excluded him from their conversation but he remembered that the doctor had lost his arm and that he had fought in the American Civil War. (The Bartons of Petty France later went to London where they had livery stables. Some of them, including Mrs E. Gillings, later moved to Vancouver))

 

After 1900 Dr Barton retired from the active practice of medicine gradually, although in 1910, I remember his office in the Eastern corner of his front yard and its doctor like contents, with parts of a skeleton still there. He farmed on the Starwall Plantation until his death in 1919. I remember as a child walking from my father’s nearby plantation home, down to our grandfather’s on lazy Sunday afternoons and we children could smell the nice aroma of fresh cooked home-made lightbread even before we ever got to the house. In those days it was buttered with yellow butter while it was hot, and grandmother would give us a special treat by sprinkling a little sugar on each slice. There was never any better eating…

6 Barton IV Gt 12 1 3 b

He had his grave dug in New Hope Cemetery, near Rowesville, S.C. many years before he died… The Barton plantation at Starwall was left to his youngest son, Leon Samuel Clay Barton, during his lifetime, and then to the son’s children. This farm which was bought in 1869 was recently sold by the grandchildren in 1955 and brought a very handsome price. It is located exactly 7.1 miles east of Orangeburg, S.C. on the Five Chop Road (S.C. State Route 4)

 

He was a Physician and planter in Orangeburg. From (43) 1866 until his death he was a member of the Klu Klux Klan and Grand Master until (44) 1890. He served on the South Carolina Senate for Orangeburgh from 1894 to 1896. He was a Mason. He patented several successful inventions including Carolina cotton cultivator. He was a Member of the Episcopal Church. He married Loeta Elodia Cecilia Seignious on 3rd May 1866. She was born on 20th March 1845 and she died on 16th October 1924. Their children living to adulthood included Willie Seignious Barton, Leon Samuel Clay Barton, Mattie Beckman Barton and Isadora Pearl Way. There was a Charles Ford Barton who was born in 1867 and died in the same year.

 

(43) 1866 unsure of source

(44) 1890 unsure of source

 

The daughter of William Ford and Ann Barton was a second cousin of William Barton II, Great Grandfather of Richard John Barton:

 

Isabella Izlar was born on 4th October 1844 at Charleston and died on 7th March 1913 at 503 East Liberty Street, Savannah, Georgia. She married Samuel Thomas Izlar and had seven children: Cyrmanthia Virginia Izlar; Margaret Izlar; Ernest Barton Izlar, Marie Louise Izlar; Benjamin Whiteman Izlar; James Stokes Izlar and Nell Izlar.

 

From Richard Byrd:

 

ISABELLA A. BARTON was born October 04, 1844 in Charleston, South Carolina, and died March 07, 1913 in 503 E. Liberty St., Savannah, Chatham County, Georgia. She married SAMUEL THOMAS IZLAR April 19, 1866. He was born Abt. 1833 in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, and died November 25, 1909 in 416 E. 36th St., Savannah, Georgia.

The Children of Isabella A. Barton and Samuel Thomas Izlar:
1. CYRMANTHIA VIRGINIA5 IZLAR, b. October 05, 1869, Orangeburg, South Carolina; d. June 30, 1940, 122 E. Waldburg St., Savannah, Chatham County, Georgia.
2. MARGARET “MAGGIE” IZLAR, b. January 08, 1871, Orangeburg County, South Carolina; d. August 15, 1957.
3. ERNEST BARTON IZLAR, b. July 03, 1873, Orangeburg County, South Carolina; d. January 02, 1968, Candler General Hospital, Savannah, Chatham County, Georgia; m. EVA MAE BRUNSON, May 27, 1908, Effingham County, Georgia; b. November 04, 1879, Ridgeland, South Carolina; d. March 08, 1968, Candler General Hospital Savannah, Chatham County, Georgia.
4. MARIE LOUISE IZLAR, b. December 16, 1877, Orangeburg County, South Carolina; d. September 15, 1956, Hartsville, South Carolina.
5. BENJAMIN WHITEMAN IZLAR, b. November 10, 1880, Orangeburg County, South Carolina; d. October 04, 1910, Tyron, North Carolina.
6. JAMES STOKES IZLAR, b. December 04, 1885, Orangeburg County, South Carolina; d. February 19, 1913, Braid & Hutton Printing House, Bryan and Witaker St., Savannah, Chatham County, Georgia.
7. NELL IZLAR, b. December 04, 1885, Orangeburg County, South Carolina; d. January 04, 1966, Orlando, Orange County, Florida.

 

You will note that my grandfather’s middle name was Barton.

 

ERNEST BARTON IZLAR was born July 03, 1873, and died January 02, 1968 in Savannah, GA. He married EVA MAY BRUNSON May 27, 1908 in Effingham County, Georgia. She was born November 04, 1879, and died March 08, 1968 in Savannah, Ga.

Children of ERNEST IZLAR and EVA BRUNSON are:
1. ERNEST BARTON5 IZLAR, JR., b. August 03, 1909; d. March 15, 1973, Savannah, Georgia.
2. MILDRED ISABELL IZLAR, b. March 06, 1917; d. March 10, 2002

 

 

Richard Byrd outlined his descent from this union:

 

Anthony/Aaron Barton married Maria Ford

Son:  William Ford Barton married 2nd Ann Horton ( From Dr. Barton’s Book)

Daughter:  Isabella Barton married Samuel Thomas Izlar

Son:  Ernest Barton Izlar married Eva Mae Brunson

Daughter:  Mildred Isabell Izlar married Bernice Van Byrd

Son:  Richard Van Byrd (Me)

 

Richard Byrd wrote in November 2006:

 

‘There seems to have been something peculiar about William Ford Barton’s second marriage to Ann Horton.  Ann Horton is the mother of Isabella Barton who is my great grandmother.  Up until now, I have never been able to find Isabella Barton in the census prior 1880.

Recently, I found her in the 1850 and 1860 censuses along with her mother, but they are not living in South Carolina with William Ford Barton.  In 1850, they are living in Georgia with a Lunquist family in Pike County, Georgia.  Elizabeth A. Horten, using her maiden name, is age 32 and Isabella Barton is age 6.  Both born in South Carolina.

In 1860, I found them with the same family, but now they are in Spalding Co., Georgia.  Eliza A. Horton is 39, and Isabella Barton is 16.

In 1870, Elizabeth Whorten, age 55, is still with the Lunquist family, but living back in Pike Co., Georgia.  Isabella is not with her, and I have been unable to find her in 1870.  1870 is about the time she married Samuel Thomas Izlar.

So it is obvious that Elizabeth Horton, who married William Ford Barton sometime between the death of his first wife, Mary Seignious, on Sept. 24, 1840 and the birth of his daughter, Isabella Barton, on Oct 4, 1844, did not die before William Ford Barton married his third wife, Ann E. (Izlar) Wright on Nov. 22, 1859.

The only conclusion that I can reach is that William Ford Barton divorced Ann Horton, assuming that they were ever married, or the marriage was annulled.  Since they were obviously living apart, I don’t believe that she is the wife buried in the second grave in New Hope Cemetery, near Rowesville, South Carolina.

I do not have any information on the marriage of William Ford Barton and Ann Horton other than Dr. Barton’s book.  But it would seem reasonable that they did marry in light of Isabella showing up in the census with Ann Horton as Isabella Barton.  I do not know how Dr. Barton verified that they were married.

I have found one entry in the book, Marriage and Death Notices from the Southern Christian Advocate,1837-1860 Vol. 1 that may be William Ford Barton’s marriage to Ann Horton, but from the information provided, there is no way to be sure.

Issue of June 6, 1845

Married on the 29th May, by the Rev. C. A. Crowell, Mr. William Barton, of Orangeburg, S. C.’

 

 

2 GEORGE BARTON, Cousin of John Barton III

 

Anthony and Maria had four children who were born and baptised in Gloucestershire – William Ford Barton was baptised on 29th May 1812 (born 25th April 1811), George on 3rd March 1813 Sarah in 1814, and Hannah on 31st October 1815 all at Thornbury. George Barton was baptised on 3rd March 1813. The fact that his name does not appear in his Uncle Henry’s will of 1819 may indicate that he died young.

 

 

3 HANNAH HAYS, cousin of John Barton III

 

Anthony and Maria had four children who were born and baptised in Gloucestershire – William Ford Barton was baptised on 29th May 1812 (born 25th April 1811), George on 3rd March 1813, Sarah in 1814 and Hannah on 31st October 1815 all at Thornbury. Hannah Barton married Richard H. Hays and had at least three children.

Sierra Exif JPEG

Richard Byrd has pointed out the following details:

 

(47)  “W. Hayes”  Hannah Hayes obituary indicates that she married a Mr. Richard Hayes in 1846.  Dr. Baynard Barton book shows “W. Hayes”.  I don’t know which is correct.

(48) “three children”  On page 24, Dr. Baynard Barton shows “five children”:  James Hayes, Margaret Hayes, Lizzie, Hayes, Zine Hayes and Mary Jane Hayes.

I have never found James Hayes, possibly died young; Margaret Hayes is Margaret Elizabeth Hayes who married first, Richard Moore Frost, and second, Morton David Fitts; Lizzie Hayes is Elizabeth Victoria Hayes who married a Miller; Zine Hayes is Richardine Haycock Hayes who married Josiah Miller and Mary Jane Hayes, died young.

According to Hannah Hayes obituary, she was survived by Mrs. Josiah Miller (Richardine Haycock Hayes), Mrs. M. E. Fitts (Margaret Elizabeth Hayes), Mrs. E. V. Miller (Elizabeth Victoria Hayes) and one son that Dr. Barton does not show, Mr. W. B. Hayes.

 

 

Source:  The Augusta Chronicle, Saturday, August 3, 1907; Pg 3, Col 6.
Death Announced Mrs. Hannah Hays Passed Away Yesterday at Home of Her Daughter, Mrs. Josiah Miller–
Remembered Many Important Events In Early American History  The death is announced, in her 92nd year, of Mrs. Hannah H. Hayes, which occurred at 3 o’clock yesterday afternoon, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Josiah Miller, 918 Reynolds street.  The funeral services will be conducted from the St. James Church Sunday at noon, immediately after the conclusion of the regular Sunday morning service, Dr. Richmond Wilkinson officiating, and the interment will take place at the City Cemetery.  Mrs. Hayes was one of the pioneer residents of Augusta, having made this city her home for fifty years.  She was known and loved by the best people of the city, and her death will be deeply mourned.  In failing health for some time, she became seriously ill last Tuesday, and although the most skilled physicians did all in their power to prolong her life, the aged lady realized that the end had come, and as loved ones and friends gathered at her bedside, passed peacefully away.  Before her marriage at Charleston in 1846 to Mr. Richard Hayes, she was a Miss Barton, the daughter of a prominent Englishman who had come to America while she was yet a child.  Dating back as they did in the days when the United States were but a few scattered colonies, the years of her girlhood were fruitful of reminiscences which, when related in after times, to her children and grandchildren, were full of a deep and charming interest.   When the great Frenchman, LaFayette, visited the South and spent a few days at Charleston, the school children of the city were presented to him.  The procession, as it moved past the great benefactor of the struggling colonies, was led by little Miss Hannah Barton, then a laughing school girl.  Afterwards, when Osceola, the Indian chief, whose grave on Sullivan’s Island is now visited by hundreds of interested tourists, was a prisoner in one of the old forts around Charleston, the same little girl was taken one day to see him.  She remembered having timidly shaken hands with the fierce old warrior a few days before his death.   During the dark days of the Civil War, Mrs. Hayes, ever patriotic to the “Lost Cause,” was among the first to offer her services as a nurse in one of the hospitals where hundreds of Southern men lay sick sand dying.  Along other lines of benevolent work, she was ever in the vanguard.   Besides living to relate to the children of her children the interesting recollections of her girlhood days, Mrs. Hayes leaves, at her death, a number of great-grandchildren.  The more immediate surviving relatives are three daughters:  Mrs. Josiah Miller, Mrs. M. E. Fitts of Augusta, Mrs. E. V. Miller of Charleston, and one son, Mr. W. B. Hayes of Augusta.

 

Source:  The Augusta Chronicle, Sunday, August 4, 1907; Pg 10, Col. 4


Funeral Notice
Died:  Augusta, Ga., August 2nd, 1907:  Mrs. Hannah Hays, in the 92nd year of her age.  Funeral services from St. James M. E. Church this (Sunday) 12 o’clock.  Relatives and friends are requested to attend.  Pall-bearers:  Doughty Miller, Marvin Miller, W. B. Hays, W. H. P. Shepherd, W. K. Young, Charles Howe.

 

Richard Byrd writes in December 2006:

 

 

I recently made a visit to Magnolia Cemetery in Augusta, Georgia and talked with the records clerk about the H. B. H. picture that I sent you indicating that I believed it to be Hannah (Barton) Hays.  This is in fact the gravestone of Hannah (Barton) Hays.  The cemetery records show the following.

 

***************

Miller, Josiah

 

Sections # E277-F278

Sixteen Graves

Perpetual Care

 

2nd Walk North of 9th St.

5th Walk East of West Wall

 

(Mrs.) Hannah M. Hays

  1. 8-2-1907  Died August 2, 1907

(n/e cor. of sec.)  Grave is located in the north/east corner of section.

***************

 

Whether the name is spelled Hays as in the cemetery records and funeral notice or Hayes as in her obituary, I am not sure.  The date her obituary appeared in “The Augusta Chronicle” is August 3, 1907 and indicated that she died yesterday.  The location of the H. B. H. gravestone in the Josiah Miller section is in the north/east corner.  The cemetery records indicate that her middle initial is M. and the obituary indicates that it is H.  I do not know which is correct.

 

The children of Richard and Hannah Hays are second cousins of William Barton II:

 

James Hays, possibly died young

Margaret Elizabeth Fitts who married first, Richard Moore Frost, and second, Morton David Fitts

Elizabeth Victoria Miller (‘Lizzie’)

Richardine Haycock Miller (‘Zine’) who married Josiah Miller

Mary Jane (Hays) Love who died young

William B. (probably Barton) Hays mentioned in mother’s obituary

 

4 SARAH PREGNALL, cousin of John Barton III

 

Thornbury Baptismal Register entry: ‘April 14th 1814, Sarah, daughter of Anthony and Maria Barton, Moreton, Pig Butcher, by R. Slade, Priv. baptd, Pub. Rec. 29 May’

 

  • Sarah Barton was baptised on 14th April 1814 at Morton, Thornbury. In America the family believe that she was born in Charleston, South Carolina. She died on 26th June 1842 in Charleston aged twenty-eight years. She married Henry Pregnall on the 4th July 1832 in St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, Charleston. He was twenty-one; she, seventeen.

 

Richard Byrd wrote on 27th December 2006:

 

‘Sarah Barton’s date of birth (June 26, 1814) apparently was derived from several sources.

  1. Death Cards located in the South Carolina Room of the Charleston County Public Library.

He calculated Sarah’s year of birth by using the information provided on her Death Card.  He subtracted her age at death from her date of death.  The date of death is 26th June to 3rd July 1842.  Her age is 28.  Therefore, 1842 minus 28 gives a year of birth of 1814.

I am unsure of the history of these Death Cards.  I do not know when they were written or by whom.  I have copies of these cards for Aaron and Maria Barton and they reflect information found in the “Return of Deaths within the City of Charleston”.  I assume that the “Return of Deaths within the City of Charleston” is an original handwritten log with entries being made weekly as deaths occurred.  Unfortunately, they apparently weren’t concerned with the exact day of death, only the week that a person died.

  1. I am not sure how he arrived at Sarah’s month and day of birth, but assume that it was derived from the following family sources which should be considered a single source:  (1) records kept by Robert Pregnall, proprietor of the Pregnall Shipyard, (2) Emmie Powell Pregnall’s copies of Robert Pregnall’s records given to William S. Pregnall, and (3) Robbie’s (assumed to be Robert Pregnall’s) son, John’s records, given to William S. Pregnall through John’s mother.

 

Sarah Barton’s marriage date (July 4, 1832) was apparently obtained from the St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church Register, Charleston.

 

The parish register reads:

        Henry Pregnall and Sarah Barton were united in the holy Bands of Matrimony on the 4th July 1832 by the Rev. Christian Hanchel at my request and on my behalf.

        s/W.H. Mitchell

 

The only question that comes to mind about Sarah’s marriage is “how do we know that Sarah Barton is the daughter of Aaron Barton?”  Email #2  states “Both speak of Sarah Barton, daughter of Aaron Barton, as Henry Pregnall’s first wife.”  I am not sure how dependable this statement is.

 

Sarah Barton’s Date of Death (June 26, 1842) was apparently obtained from the same sources as the Date of Birth.  However, it does seem strange that her month and day of birth is the same as her month and day of death.  It would lead one to believe that either her month and day of birth or month and day of death were known, and 28 years was subtracted to get the other.  If this was done, I am not sure how accurate the month and day are because ages at death sometimes don’t included months and days, but round off the age to the year.

 

It would seem to me, unless a transcription error was made on the Death Card, that the year, 1814, is probably accurate.  I am somewhat disturbed by the Place of Birth:  Charleston.  However, miscommunication and assumptions sometime lead to errors.

 

If Sarah is truly the daughter of Anthony and Maria Barton, her place of birth would definitely be England.  Since Mervyn Harding has not found a record for a Sarah Barton, the question arises:  “Is she really a daughter of Anthony and Maria Barton?”  An English baptismal or christening record would definitely help solve our delimma.’

 

Henry Pregnall was born on (52) 3rd December 1809 in (53) Rotherhithe Parish, London, and died on 3rd July1902 in Charleston.

 

(52) “3rd”  I am unsure of the source of this date.

(53)  “Rotherhithe Parish, London”  I am unsure as to the source of this information.

 

Extract from : William S. Pregnall’s informally published book, ‘The Pregnalls of Charleston, South Carolina’:

 

Henry Pregnall: Orphan and Husband of Sarah Barton 1819 – 1842

‘In the first installment of the Pregnall family history the last chapter placed Henry Pregnall in Charleston, South Carolina arriving with his grandfather in 1817 on the sloop Victor from New York. They were passengers listed as “Mr. Pregner and Son.” [The Times of Charleston, Saturday Evening, September 20, 1817 list on page 3 under “Ship News.”]

Those who have read The Prangnells/Pragnells of the Isle of Wight – A Family History – Part I will remember that Henry Pragnell was, after the death of his grandfather, placed by a Warden of the City of Charleston in the Charleston Orphan House on February 25, 1819 under the name “Henry Pregnall” at age nine years. Twice he was indentured until his sixteenth birthday.

The indentures stated that the child s hall “dwell and continue in said Orphan House, “to be supported, educated and maintained,” until he shall be of sufficient age to be bound and appr entice (sic) to such profession, trade or occupation as may be suited to his genius and inclination, and from thence to dwell, continue and serve with such person to whome (sic) these Indentures shall be transferred from the day “that the child reaches his sixteenth birthday.

[Gene McKnight, The Charleston Orphan House, p.4. South Carolina Historical Society, Charleston, S.C.]

[State Archives, Columbia, S.C. courtesy Carrie Pregnall]

The above document is entitled at the top of page 50, “Registry of the Children of the Orphan House Institution Continued.” On this sheet Henry is fourth from the bottom. For Henry in the columns listed at the top are the following data: Dates of Admission “25th” (the month of February 1819 is established earlier) Children: Henry Pregnall, Number “592,” Of what age when admitted “9,” Born – blank, Parents, blank, City Wardens “Robt Howard Esq, C.W.” Discharged, blank. It is in this document that the name Pragnell has the vowels transposed to Pregnall.

The Orphan House, at the corner of Calhoun and St. Phillip’s Streets, pictured below was founded in 1790, and the above building was officially occupied October 18, 1794. It was “the oldest municipal orphanage in the United States.” In 1853 the building was renovated. Earlier in 1802 a nondenominational chapel was built and staffed by various local ministers. The Orphan House was governed by a Board of Commissioners annually elected by City Council. Financial support came from the City and State governments and private sources. It was in the building immediately below that Henry Pregnall was admitted as orphan. [Susan L. King, History and Records of the Charleston Orphan House, Volumes I (1790-1859) II (1860-1899), passim.]

Those of us old enough will remember it as it was in the 1950 below.

Henry “Pregnall” was first indentured to a Mr. Wm. Michell, a “practitioner of medicine” on March 11,1824. Henry was then14 years old. This original indenture stated “Expiration of Servitude” as “25th February 1831.” This meant Henry would be twenty-one years old when free. This appears in conflict with the age sixteen in the above policy of indentures discussed by Mr. McKnight. Perhaps the policy changed from freedom at age sixteen to twenty-one. The question of such a long servitude under William Michell became moot, however. Family lore is consistent reporting that Herny was mistreated by Michell. According to lore Aaron Barton stepped in, and the indenture to Michell was broken. Henry’s indenture then was transferred to Wm Bull as a carpenter on17 February 1825. It was under Mr. Bull that Henry learned carpentry.

[Registry of the Children of the Orphan House, S.C. State Archives, Columbia, S.C.]

In the Charleston City Directory of 1822, both Aaron Barton at 26 Archdale St. and Wm. Bull at 19 Market St. are listed as grocers. Archdale and Market intersect, and these two grocers must have known each other as competitors and probably friends. In 1824 Aaron Barton, carpenter, lived at 20 Wall St. (Wall Street on an 1855 Charleston map ran for one block east of Anson St. Wall Street ran south from Calhoun to Laurens St. It no longer exist.) In 1824 Mr. William Bull is unlisted in the City Directory. His grocery at 19 Market was then run by John Bull, a son or brother, perhaps. In 1825 John Bull reappears in the records of the Orphan House as a carpenter to whom Henry Pregnall’s indenture was transferred from Wm. Michell. [Register of Children bound or otherwise discharged by the Commissioners of the Orphan House, p. 43, SC State Archives, Columbia, SC.]

In 1826 at age sixteen, Henry Pregnall left Mr. Bull to become a carpenter with Mr. Aaron Barton. Whether this switch was Henry’s choice (doubtful) or an agreement between Bull and Barton, we know not. Barton was a carpenter and ran a lumber mill. Although we do not yet know from whence he came to Charleston or who his parents were, Bartons were definitely from Southern England…’

The Marriage of Henry Pregnall and Sarah Barton

‘In 1831 Aaron J. Barton was a carpenter at 10 St. Philip’s St. We do not know his wife’s name. According to the 1830 Census there were 8 males under 50 (one obviously was Aaron himself), 3 females under 15, 1 female under 20, and 1 female under 50 (his wife). Aaron’s daughter Sarah Barton was born 26 June 1814 in Charleston. Her siblings whom have been identified are Anthony G., born in 1818; Elizabeth May, born in 1820; and Aaron J. Barton, II born in 1829. Possibly all those males under 50 were not all Aaron Barton’s children, but young men like Henry Pregnall who not only worked for him but lived in his house. The elder Aaron J. Barton’s son, Aaron J. Barton, II had a rather distinguished career.

Aaron J. Barton, II of Charleston, born 1829 engaged in the manufacture and sale of lumber. At the time of the War he was a member of the Washington Light Infantry, Company A. 25th Infantry Regiment. He was also in the Engineering Corps of Charleston. After the war he went to Columbia then Charlotte, N.C. Since the War he has resided in Charleston continuing his business ranking among the leading manufactories of the kind in the city.   [Confederate Military History, Vol VI, (Columbia, SC, Caroliniana Library) p.449]

We shall find Aaron J. Barton, II again in Chapter 6 in his waning years living next door to William S. Pregnall, my grandfather. These families maintained close ties.

Henry Pregnall most probably lived with the Barton family and was counted in that household during the Census of 1830. Other young men who went to work for Mr. Barton may have also been taken into the household. Sarah, the oldest of Aaron’s children of whom we have record, was four and a half years younger than Henry, but their relationship must have blossomed. They married on the 4th of July 1832 in St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, Charleston. He was twenty-one; she, seventeen.

The parish register reads:

Henry Pregnall and Sarah Barton were united in the Holy Bands of Matrimony on the 4th July 1832 by the Rev. Christian Hanchel at my request and on my behalf.

   s/W.H. Mitchell

The first major project of the Charleston Female Domestic Missionary Society of the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina was to build St. Stephen’s Church on Guignard Street in Charleston in 1824 “for the gratuitous use of such members of our Communion, as may not be able to defray the expense of seats (i.e. pew rentals) in other places of worship. It was said that this was the first undertaking of purely “free church” in our Communion in the United States.” That first building burned down in the fire of 1835. By 1836 it was rebuilt on Anson Street.

[Albert Sidney Thomas, A Historical Account of the Protestant Episcopal Church in SouthCarolina 1820-1957 (Columbia, S.C.: The R. L. Bryan Company, 1957), 262.]

Aaron Barton surely gave approval for this marriage, for he and his new son-in-law are recorded together as house carpenters. The Orphan House became a source of young carpenters for them. From the records of the Charleston Orphan House is the following:

RIDGEWAY, LAWRENCE. Admitted October 14, 1830 aged seven years by CHARLES RIDGEWAY, father. Delivered to his mother, ELIZABETH SMITH, to be bound to PREGNALL and BARTON as a house carpenter August 7, 1832. Indentures expired October 14, 1844.

Henry, the former orphan, also took under his supervision:

SIVIL, ALEXANDER. Admitted August 14, 1834 aged eleven years by JANE BARTON, unknown. (N-65)

Indentured to HENRY PREGNALL as a carpenter July 25, 1837. (BO) Indentures expired August l4, 1844. (N-65)

There are two fascinating facets to this indenture. First, the child, Alexander Sivil, is admitted by a Jane Barton, unknown. Possibly she is a sister or sister-in-law of Aaron J. Barton. Second, Sivil is a family name to be found in the Public Record Office, in Ryde, Isle of Wight. These two records from the Charleston Orphan House suggest how closely tied were the immigrant families in Charleston related to the Isle of Wight- Barton, Baker, Pragnell/Pregnall, Sivil.

There is further testimony that Aaron Barton and Henry Pregnall became close friends during these years. On 3 October 1831 Aaron Barton was listed by Charleston County records as giving “Notice of Intention” to become a naturalized citizen of the United States. Also, “Henry Pregnall (Alien) at (Age) 22 whose (Nation) is London, England, a (Residence) in Charleston with the (Occupation) Carpenter undergoes (Admission) to citizenship 5 October 1832.” [South Carolina Naturalizations 1783-1850, cp. Brent H. Holcomb (Baltimore: Genealogical Publications Co., Inc., 1985), 28]

As every young man knew to have the love of your bride was important, but also to gain with the marriage, a father-in-law who was mentor, fellow worker, and friend was treasured lagniappe. Both men must have rejoiced over the birth of Sarah’s children. Family lore refers to five children, but only three of Henry’s and Sarah’s children have been identified by name. Aaron B. Pregnall was born in March 1834 and died at age “seventeen months and 25 days.” There is no other record of a surviving male child. Catharine J. Pregnall was identified in a pre-marriage settlement document signed by Henry’s second wife, Eleanor Jane Stewart on 11 January 1844. Anthony G. Barton, the brother of Sarah, Henry’s first wife, was a witness. The document established the possession of a seventeen year old slave, Susan, by Eleanor. If Eleanor died the slave, Susan, would go to her husband’s child, Catharine J. Pregnall.

. . .and in such case no such instrument be executed by the said Eleanor Jane then in trust for the use benefit and behalf of Catharine J. Pregnall the said daughter of the said Henry Pregnall by a former marriage . . .

Another daughter, Martha Pregnall, is a name that is part of family lore, a part of which affirms she was living in Spartanburg, South Carolina in 1900. We do not know if she was older or younger than Aaron B. and Catharine J. Pregnall.

Initially, Henry and Sarah lived with her mother and father, but as their family expanded they moved. When, is yet to be discovered. However, in the 1840-41 Charleston City Directory is the following listing:

Pregnell, Henry, Firm of Alderson & Pregnell, Blind Makers, res. 16 Tradd St.

Their residence at 16 Tradd Street may have been shared with the Aldersons, and it also may have been the address of the business It does establish that before Sarah Barton Pregnall’s death, she and Henry had moved out of her father’s house and Henry was now working independently as a carpenter by 1840-41 with the “Firm of Alderson & Pregnall, Blind Makers.”

Unsurprisingly, there was a marital tie between the Bartons and Aldersons. On October 18, 1836 Aaron Barton’s daughter, Elizabeth Mary Barton, married John Fessenden Aldersson at her Mother’s house in Charleston before many witnesses.

I do hereby certify that on the eighteenth of October, 1836 (I being then Minister of St. Stephen’s Chapel), I married, John Fessenden Alderson to Elizabeth Mary Barton, at her Mother’s house, in this city, before many witnesses-

Charleston.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Paul Trapier

 August 10:1849                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Rector of St. Michael’s church

The couple must have lost the original certificate, but they certainly held on to the one above. The above wedding certificate- shown in its actual size- was sent to me by Belton Hoffman on June 16, 2001. The personal significance for me of this document is that, as seen in the Aaron Barton Descendents tree to follow, Elizabeth Mary Barton is the great-grandmother of my mother, Marion Lockwood (Lewis) Pregnall and her sister, Cloelia (Lewis) Hoffman. She is, therefore, the great- great-grandmother of Belton Hoffman and me.

There is abundant evidence that the Bartons and Pregnalls continued close ties as families for years. The 1900 Census of Ward 6 of Charleston list at 178 Wentworth Street William S. and Flora Pregnall, my grandparents. At age 50 he was “superintendent of shipyard.” With him and his wife were my aunts Florence, Lula, Ellen, and Susie. Also listed were my uncle, William S. for whom I was named, and my father, Alexander H. Pregnall. Next door at 180 Wentworth Street lived A. Barton Miller and his wife Charlotte. Mr. A. Barton Miller was superintendent of a lumber yard. At 182 Wentworth Street lived Anthony J. Barton, the previously mentioned brother of Sarah Barton Pregnall and veteran of the Civil War at age seventy-one. His wife had died, and with him lived a niece, Elizabeth Miller, and a boarder, William Morrison.

Earlier, in 1891 in this same house at 182 Wentworth Street we have two slightly different reports of the marriage of John R. Lewis (my maternal grandfather) and Helen May Ford. The first is pasted in the back of the Hoffman family Bible and reads:

LEWIS-FORD-On Thursday evening October 15, 1891, at the residence of the bride’s uncle, Mr. A.J. Barton, by the Rev. R.D. Smart, D.D. assisted by the Rev. R.N. Wells, D.D. John R. Lewis to H. May Ford, both of this city. No cards.

Another news clipping hand dated Oct 15, 1891 states the wedding was at Mr. Miller’s. Perhaps Mr. Miller owned two houses, one on each side of William and Flora Pregnall’s house.

Assuming Mr. Miller owned both house, Elizabeth Miller (daughter, niece?) lived there with Aaron J. Barton, II. At his age of seventy-one he would have needed her assistance. Remember too that Aaron Barton ran a lumber yard. Mr. Miller at 180 Wentworth is Superintendent of a lumbar yard in 1900, and Arron J. Barton, II is a “lumber dealer.” These families: the Pregnalls, Bartons, Millers, and Aldersons were closely entwined.

The 1840 Census for Ward No. 1 in Charleston enumerated Henry Pregnall and one male “5 & under 10” (unknown- not Aaron B. Pregnall, who died in infancy in 1835), one male 10 – 15 (unknown), one male 15-20 (unknown) one male 30-40 (Henry Pregnall), one female under 5 (Catharine), one female 20-30 (Sarah, Henry’s wife), one female 30-40 (unknown- possibly a relative of Sarah or a woman to take care of the house and children.) Strangely, there was no indication in this census of another female child for Henry and Sarah.

Family lore is consistent that there was a daughter named Martha. Also this census would account for lore that says there were five children, for Aaron had died, and four children are listed in the census, three males, and a female. Perhaps it demonstrates an error on the part of the census taker, or the lack of clarity of the census available on microfilm obscures a reference to a female child who would have been Martha.

Sadly Sarah Barton Pregnall, attended by Dr. Schmidt, died of consumption on 26 June 1842 at age twenty-eight . She was buried in the St. Phillip’s (sic) Burial Ground. [Burial Card File,

Charleston County Library, Charleston, SC] For Henry Pregnall, widower, at age thirty-two with two daughters, Martha and Catharine, and perhaps two or three sons, unknown to us, a new life was about to begin.

 

 

The Children of Henry and Sarah Pregnall are second cousins of William Barton II:

 

Aaron Pregnall was born in March 1834, at Charleston. He died in August 1835 at Charleston “aged 17 months and 25 days”.

Martha Pregnall was born in 1836 at Charleston and died after 1901 at Spartanburg, SC.

Catherine Jane Pregnall was born in 1838, Charleston.

 

5 ELIZABETH MARY ALDERSON, cousin of John Barton III

 

Elizabeth Mary Barton is believed to be the child of Anthony/Aaron and Maria Barton and to have been born on 21st November 1818. On 18th October 1836 Elizabeth Mary Barton married John Fessenden Alderson at her mother’s (actually stepmother’s) house in Charleston before many witnesses.

Sierra Exif JPEG

Charleston, SC City Directories

1837-38

Barton, & Pregnal, Sashmakers, 16 Tradd St.

1840-41

Pregnell, Henry, Firm of Alderson & Pregnell, Blind Makers, res. 16 Tradd St.

 

From the Pregnall Family History:

 

Their residence at 16 Tradd Street may have been shared with the Aldersons, and it also may have been the address of the business. It does establish that before Sarah Barton Pregnall’s death, she and Henry had moved out of her father’s house and Henry was now working independently as a carpenter by 1840-41 with the “Firm of Alderson & Pregnall, Blind Makers.”

 

Unsurprisingly, there was a marital tie between the Bartons and Aldersons. On October 18, 1836 Aaron Barton’s daughter, Elizabeth Mary Barton, married John Fessenden Alderson at her Mother’s house in Charleston before many witnesses.

 

I do hereby certify that on the eighteenth of October, 1836 (I being then Minister of St. Stephen’s Chapel), I married, John Fessenden Alderson to Elizabeth Mary Barton, at her Mother’s house, in this city, before many

witnesses-

 

Charleston                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Paul Trapier

August 10:1849                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Rector of St. Michael’s church

 

The couple must have lost the original certificate, but they certainly held on to the one above.

The above wedding certificate was sent to me by Belton Hoffman on June 16, 2001. The personal significance for me of this document is that Elizabeth Mary Barton is the great-grandmother of my mother, Marion Lockwood (Lewis) Pregnall and her sister, Cloelia (Lewis) Hoffman. She is, therefore, the great- great-grandmother of Belton Hoffman and me.

 

Their children were second cousins of William Barton II:

 

Robert Alderson, married and died young

Emily Alderson

Ellen Barton who married her cousin, Ashley Barton

Alice Alderson

Marion Ford who married Orin Ford. Their daughter Birdie married Gordon Hoffman and another daughter married John Lewis.

 

6 ANTHONY G. BARTON, cousin of John Barton III

 

Anthony G. (J) Barton is believed to be the fifth child of Anthony/Aaron and Maria Barton and to have been born on 3rd December 1822 and he died on 27th October 1867. His mother died in 1825 and his father in April 1834. On 14th August 1834, when he was aged twelve years, his stepmother, Jane Barton, admitted him to the Charleston Orphan House together with Alexander Sivill (later indentured to Henry Pregnell in 1837). Anthony was indentured to John W. Hodges as a merchant on 16th March 1837. These Indentures expired on 14th August 1843 and 14th August 1844, respectively. He married Sarah R. Mann on 17th May 1846 Sarah was born on 26th August 1823 and died on 29th October 1867. They had three children.

Sierra Exif JPEG

 

Information put together on Anthony G. Barton by Richard Byrd, Savannah, GA:

 

History And Records Of The Charleston Orphan House, 1790-1860

Barton, Anthony.  Admitted August 14, 1834 aged twelve years by Jane

Barton, unknown.  Indentured to John W. Hodges as a merchant March 16, 1837.

Indentures expired August 14, 1843.  (n-64)

 

The South Carolina Historical Magazine, Vol. 77, 1976, Pg. 50

The Schirmer Diary

May 17, 1846

  1. G. Barton Sarah R. Mann Mr. Honour

 

Charleston, SC City Directories

1849

Barton, A., Carpenter, Boundary St.

1855

Barton, A. G., Carpenter, res. St. Philip St.

1859

Barton, A G, Carpenter, St Philip St, near Morris St, home same

1860

Barton, A G, Carpenter, house St Philip St, near Radcliffe St

 

It appears to me that Anthony or A. G. Barton was enumerated twice in the 1850 census.

I can not explain the variation in the answers or the disappearance of James.

 

1850 Charleston, SC Census, October 7, 1850

Anthony Barton                 35    male              carpenter               SC

Sarah Barton                        29    female                                          SC

Melvin Barton                     4     male                                               SC

James Barton                       2     male                                               SC

 

1850 Charleston, SC Census, November 16, 1850

  1. G. Barton 30 male                carpenter               SC

Sarah Barton                        28  female                                             SC

Mel?? Barton                         4  male                                               SC

 

1860 Charleston, SC Census, June 6, 1860

Antony G. Barton              42           male       carpenter               SC

Sarah Barton                        40           female                                   SC

Antony H. Barton                12           male                                       SC

Ashley Barton                        8           male                                       SC

Robert Barton                        4           male                                       SC

John Barton                            2           male                                       SC

 

1861 Charleston, SC City Directory

Saint Philip Street.

    Runs from Beaufain Street, nearly opposite Archdale, partly through Ward No. 4,

entirely through Ward No. 6, and partly through Ward No. 8, to Line Street.

No.                                            Brick.    Wood.    Owners.                                Occupants.

West Side, Ward No. 4.

99                                                            1            Tr. Est. Eliza Mann & Chil      Eliza Mann.

101                                                          1            Tr. Est. Eliza Mann & Chil      Anthony G. Barton.

 

Magnolia Cemetery Marker, Charleston, SC

Anthony G. Barton

Born:  Dec. 3, 1822

Died:  Oct. 27, 1867

 

Their children were second cousins of William Barton II:

 

Melvin Barton born about 1846 (from census returns)

(?) James Barton born about 1848

Antony H. Barton born about 1848

Ashley Barton born about 1852 who married his cousin, Helen Alderson

Robert Barton born about 1856

John Barton born about1858

(?) Frank Barton who lives in Charleston

 

The child of Anthony and Jane Barton was a cousin of John Barton III, Great II Grandfather of Richard John Barton:

 

7 AARON J. BARTON, cousin of John Barton III

 

Aaron Barton was the child of Anthony/Aaron and Jane Barton and was born on 2nd March 1829. At the time of the War he was a member of the Washington Light Infantry, Company A. 25th Infantry Regiment. He was also in the Engineering Corps of Charleston. After the war he went to Columbia then Charlotte, N.C. After the war he resided in Charleston continuing his business. He died on 11th July 1911.

5 Barton IV Gt 12 7

See Pregnall Family History:

 

Aaron J. Barton, II had a rather distinguished career. Aaron J. Barton, II of Charleston, born 1829 engaged in the manufacture and sale of lumber. At the time of the War he was a member of the Washington Light Infantry, Company A. 25th Infantry Regiment. He was also in the Engineering Corps of Charleston. After the war he went to Columbia then Charlotte, N.C. Since the War he has resided in Charleston continuing his business ranking among the leading manufactories of the kind in the city. [Confederate Military History, Vol VI, (Columbia, SC, Caroliniana Library) p.449]

 

We shall find Aaron J. Barton, II again in Chapter 6 in his waning years living next door to William S. Pregnall, my grandfather.”

 

At 182 Wentworth Street lived Anthony J. Barton, the previously mentioned brother

of Sarah Barton Pregnall and veteran of the Civil War at age seventy-one. His wife had died, and

with him lived a niece, Elizabeth Miller, and a boarder, William Morrison.

 

Earlier, in 1891 in this same house at 182 Wentworth Street we have two slightly different

reports of the marriage of John R. Lewis (my maternal grandfather) and Helen May Ford. The first

is pasted in the back of the Hoffman family Bible and reads:

 

LEWIS-FORD-On Thursday evening October 15, 1891, at the residence of the bride’s uncle, Mr. A.J. Barton, by the Rev. R.D. Smart, D.D. assisted by the Rev. R.N. Wells, D.D. John R. Lewis to H. May Ford, both of this city. No cards.”

 

Information put together on Aaron J/G Barton by Richard Byrd, Savannah, GA:

 

Charleston, SC City Directories

1852

Barton, A. J., Clerk, 89 Beaufain St., res. 116 Wentworth St.

1855

Barton, A., Clerk, 89 Beaufain St., res. 89 Beaufain St.

1859

Barton, Aaron G, Bookkeeper, house Beaufain St, above Lynch St.

 

1861 Charleston, SC City Directory

Lilly Court Runs East from Pine Street, next North of Allway Street)

No.            Brick.    Wood.    Owners.                    Occupants.

North Side.

2                              1             Aaron G. Barton      Jane A. Johnson, f. p. c.

 

1870 Charleston, SC Census, July 6, 1870

Michel, Catherine               49           female                                                   SC

Michel, Edward                 22            male       Clerk Seed Store               SC

Michel, Annie                      19           female                                                   SC

Michel, Amelia                  17            female                                                   SC

Michel, Addie                      12           female                                                   SC

Barton, Aaron                   35           male       Clerk Saw Mill                   SC

Wright, Mary                       13           female   Domestic Servant                SC

 

Magnolia Cemetery Marker, Charleston, SC

  1. J. Barton

March 2, 1829

July 11, 1911

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