btsarnia

A tribute to the life and work of Brian Torode

Hobbs Family of Tytherington

HOBBS FAMILY OF TYTHERINGTON

I am indebted to many people who are also interested in this family including  Dennis Pullen, Roger Howell, Ruth Withers and also Allan Baddeley who wrote ‘Tytherington in the Past’ in 1994′ 

There are further references to this family in the website ‘Tytherington Roots’

 


 

Edward Hobbs alias Clarke (1622c- 1701) and Sarah (1620c-1695c)

Clothier of New House, Tytherington

 

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Mary Hobbs (1654-1735) and William Pullen (1651-1697)

Clothier of Mill Farm, Tytherington

 

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James Pullen III (1687-1733) and Mary Berry (1685-1743/4)

Yeoman of New House Farm, Tytherington

 

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Mary Pullen (1713-) and James Shield I (1710-1773)

 

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James Shill (Shield) II (1745-1816) and Sarah Luce (1749-1824)

 

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James Shield III (1790-1875) and Mary Isaac (1797-1881)

 

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Ann Shield (1837-1934) and James Eley (1836-1874)

 

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Ernest Edward Eley (1869-1950) and Emily Yarnold (1865-1951)

 

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Grace Margaret Eley and William Edward Terrett


 

EDWARD HOBBS alias CLARKE, Great VIII Grandfather of Richard Barton

 

Edward Hobbs was born in about 1623. He was a Clothier of Tytherington and Churchwarden in 1685. He married Sarah who was born in about 1620. She died on 24th February 1693-6 (Bigland) aged seventy-six years and was buried at Tytherington. Edward died on 19th April 1701, aged seventy-eight years.

 The Hearth Tax Returns for 1672 include four chimneys for Edward Hobbs, two for another Edward and two for Nicholas Hobbs.

 

Bigland in the Churchyard:

 

On Altar Tomb: ‘Here lyeth the Body of Edward Hobbs als. Clarke, Clothier, who was buried April 19, 1701, Aetatis suae 78, Sarah, the Wife of Edward Hobbs, als. Clarke was buried Feb. 24, 1693-6, Aetatis suae 76.’

 

Will of Edward Clarke alias Hobbs 11th Mar 1699/1700, probate 8th Sep 1701

In the Name of God Amen I Edward Clarke als Hobbes of Tytherington in the County of Glouc Clothier being aged and infirme of God but of sound disposing mind and understanding for which I give thankes unto Almighty God considering with myself the certainty of death and the uncertainty of the time thereof doe make and ordaine this my last Will and Testament in manner following (that is to say) First and principally I comend and committ my Soul and Spirit into the hands of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ assuredly hopeing through his alone merrits and misery to be made partaker of eternall life And for that Worldly Estate which it hath pleased God to bless me withall I dispose thereof in manner following (that is to say) Imprimis I give and bequeath unto my sonn John Clarke als Hobbes the sume of one hundred pounds of lawfull money of England Item I give unto my Grandchildren Edward John Thomas William and Sarah Clarke als Hobbes sonns and daughter of my said sonn John Clarke als Hobbes the sume of one hundred pounds of like money to be equally divided between them share and share alike within six months next after my decease but if any or either of them should happen to dye before the said Legacy of one hundred pounds shall become due to my said grandchildren the part and portion of him her or them soe dyeing to remaine to the Survivors and Survivor of them Item I give and bequeath unto my daughter Mary Pullen widdow the sume of two hundred pounds of lawfull money of England Item I give and bequeath unto my Grandchildren John and Sarah Clarke als Hobbes sonn and daughter of my sonn William Clarke als Hobbes deceased the sume of five pounds apeice of like money Item I give and bequeath unto my grandson John Pullen eldest sonn of my said daughter Mary Pullen the sume of two hundred pounds of like money And I alsoe give unto him my black horse and one of my best bedds with the appurtenances to the same belonging And my will is that the summe of fifty pounds shall be laid out and distributed for my buryall and interment And alsoe the sume of five pounds for my buryall in Linnen by the order and direction of my Executors and Executrix hereinafter named And I alsoe give unto the poor of the parish of Tytherington aforesaid the sume of five pounds All the rest and residue of my Goods household stuff rights creditts and personall Estate whatsoe ever not hereinbefore given and bequeathed my debts and Legacyes being paid and Funerall expences discharged I give and bequeath unto my said sonn John Clarke als Hobbes to my said daughter Mary Pullen and to my said grandson John Pullen whom I make and constitute Executors and Executrix of this my last Will and Testament to be equally divided between them but my will further is that if either of my said Executors or Executrix shall not agree and consent unto the due partition of the said goods and Personall Estate hereinbefore given equally between them the part and portion of him her or them not agreeing or consenting thereunto shall be and remaine to the other two or one of them And I doe hereby revoake and make void all Wills by me formerly made In witness whereof I the said Edward Clarke als Hobbes have hereunto set my hand and seale this eleaventh day of March in the twelfth yeare of the Reigne of our Sovereigne Lord William the third of England Scotland France and Ireland King Defender of the Faith Anno Dom 1699/1700

                                                                                                              X the mark of Edward Clarke als Hobbes

Sealed published and declared by the Testator to be his last Will and Testament (the impressions of his majesties Sixpenny Stamp being first made hereupon) in the presence of

Anthony Powell

Henry Shelie

John Dimery

Probate 8th Sep 1701 to John Clarke alias Hobbes, Mary Pullen alias Bromwich and John Pullen

 

Allan Baddeley wrote in 1994 in ‘Tytherington in the Past’:

 

‘MILL FARM, NEWHOUSE FARM AND THE CLOTH TRADE – A HYPOTHESIS Mill farmhouse (now known as Mill House) is older than Newhouse farmhouse. It is perhaps in origin a longhouse, that is, built to house family and animals under one roof, and was extensively remodelled early in the 17th century. It was part of the estate of the Verney family, who possessed the Manors of Tytherington and Itchington. The first recorded tenant was James Pullen, who died in 1690. That he lived at Mill Farm is shown by the inventory of his goods made at his death, in which the room-by-room listing correlates closely with Mill farmhouse but with no other house in the village. The inventory shows clearly that he was a man of substance, with four-poster beds upstairs, with curtains, the fashionable coffee pot in the kitchen, and with social ambitions, for the will specifically mentions the Silver Cup given by ‘my Lady Allington’ and another from Sir Richard Ashfield Baronet. His assessment for the Poll Tax of 1673 was by far the highest in the parish. It seems likely that the family, a hundred years or so before, had joined in the prosperous cloth trade of the Stroud region. The clothiers provided the capital, undertook the preparation and the finishing of the cloth, while the wool was spun and woven by families in the village.

Around 1600, many men in Tytherington were employed in weaving, and by 1700 the village was still busy with cloth making as well as farming. Older maps show a layout of ponds around mill Farmhouse similar to those at other cloth mills – a reservoir (fed by the leat along Duck Street) to store water to work the fulling hammers, and a field – under the eye of the clothier – where the cloth could be dried. Many clothiers became rich; James Pullen even by 1667 is described as ‘Gentleman’, no longer yeoman or clothier, and by the time of his death he was perhaps enjoying a comfortable retirement. His possessions valued at £277 6s 11d, but not included was the value of a house in Tytherington which he owned.

Newhouse farmhouse, by contrast, by contrast, was built (though no doubt on the site of an earlier building) in the early part of the 17th century and has remained largely unaltered, though carefully restored…It is a fine and typical example of Northavon farmhouses of this prosperous era, though it had some unusual features. Linda Hall writes that these features ‘imply (that the) builder (was) a man of wealth and originality.’ An inventory of 1708 lists all the usual rooms, but includes, also, in the attic, a wool loft with beam scales and a warping loft with warping bar, squirm (part of the warping mechanism) and teazles, and outside a fully equipped shear shop. In the house were wools, serge, and broadcloths both finished and ‘in yarning’. The central attic has a very large window, to light the weaving; and even in recent years a carder, a weaving spear and teazles have been found in the house. Clearly, Newhouse had been purpose-built as home, farmstead and for weaving.

We know that a John Hobbs lived at the ‘Malthouse’, close by in Duck Street, early in the 1600s. The Hobbs family was prominent in the area, involved in the cloth trade, farming and as landowners. It is  tempting to speculate that the Pullens at Mill Farm and the Hobbs at Malthouse had co-operated as clothiers. Perhaps Mill Farm had the water supply necessary for the washing of the wool and the fulling of the woven cloth, but was itself unsuitable or inconvenient for other processes such as shearing. Was it Hobbs who rebuilt Newhouse Farm in the heady days of the early 1600s, as a farm and home, and to provide weaving and shearing facilities to supplement what already existed at Mill Farm? Newhouse built, did John Hobbs move from Malthouse, to be followed in turn by his son Edward, his grandson John and his great-grandson Edward, all clothiers? The initials IH carved on a beam at Newhouse may well be those of John Hobbs (1656-1701), and it is no more than coincidence that elaborate decorative plasterwork on beams at Mill Farm is identical with that on the beams at Newhouse?

Although broadcloth was still being woven in Tytherington at the end of the 17th century, and the industry in its heartland of the Stroud Valleys could look forward to many decades of increasing prosperity, small scale production further south in Gloucestershire was in decay. Perhaps great-grandson Edward Hobbs was clear sighted enough to decide to turn his back on Tytherington; he married about 1704 and Sarah his wife bore him 18 children. But his interests, and those of his children were increasingly directed to Bristol. The family was selling off some of their land, and Edward’s son was no longer ‘clothier’ but ‘Gent’. The importance and wealth of the Hobbs family in Tytherington can be gauged by the fact that it has more monumental inscriptions inside the church than any other family – six on the walls, 2 stones on the floor. But after 1700 they figure little in the parish story, and Edward’s grandchildren were the last Hobbs to be baptised in the parish.’


SARAH HOBBS alias CLARKE, Great VIII Grandmother of Richard Barton

Wife of Edward Hobbs

Mother of Mary Bromwich

 

Also Mother of William and John

 

Edward Hobbs married Sarah who was born in about 1620. She died on 24th February 1693-6 (Bigland) aged seventy-six years and was buried at Tytherington. Edward died on 19th April 1701, aged seventy-eight years.

 

Bigland in the Churchyard:

 

On Altar Tomb: ‘Here lyeth the Body of Edward Hobbs als. Clarke, Clothier, who was buried April 19, 1701, Aetatis suae 78, Sarah, the Wife of Edward Hobbs, als. Clarke was buried Feb. 24, 1693-6, Aetatis suae 76.’

 


 

 

MARY BROMWICH, Great VII Grandmother (Twice) of Richard Barton

Daughter of Edward Hobbes and Sarah

Wife of William Pullen

Mother of Anne Parker and James Pullen

 

Also Mother of John, Sara, Mary Powell, Sarah, William and Elizabeth

 

Also Wife of John Bromwich

Mary Hobbes was the daughter of Edward Hobbes, a Clothier, of New House Farm, Tytherington. She was born in about 1654 and married William Pullen in 1675. The marriage allegation is dated 28th June 1675. William and Mary Pullen had at least eight children who were baptised at Tytherington between 1676 and 1691 and I am directly descended from both James and his sister Anne, who married Richard Giles. The elder Sarah died in infancy and the younger Sarah was buried in 1725 aged nineteen years.

William Pullen was buried on 1st December 1697 at Tytherington, aged forty-six years. He made a will in 1697 and left messuages and land he had bought to his three sons.

Mary Hobbs became a widow in December 1697. She married her late husband’s friend, John Bromwich, a gentleman and esquire. The marriage took place on 7th March 1699 at Tytherington. He had previously been married to Elizabeth who, according to Bigland, died in 18th February 1696. John and Elizabeth had two children: John Bromwich junior who was born in 1681 and Richard who was born in 1685. There is a brass in the church to Richard Bromwich, Gentleman of Malmesbury.

John Bromwich, snr. died in March 1715 according to Bigland. His widow, Mary, made her will on 8th September 1732. She was then living at Porch House, Tytherington. She was buried on 21st December 1735 at Tytherington and the will was proved on 21st May 1736.

 

Bigland:

 

On Flat Stones in the Chancel

 

‘Here lyeth the Body of  John Bromwich, of this Parish, Gent. Who departed this Life, the 3rd day of … …Dom. 1715. Here lyeth the Body of Mrs. Elizabeth Bromwich, late Wife of John Bromwich, of this Parish, Gent. She died Febr. 18, Anno Dom. 1696, Aetatis suae 55. Vivat post iunera virtus.’

On a brass plate

 

Richard Bromwich, Gent. Late of Malmesbury in the County of Wilts who departed this Life, June 18, 1753, Aged 67 Years.

 

Allan Baddeley wrote in 1994 in ‘Tytherington in the Past:

 

‘PORCH HOUSE Porch House then became occupied by John Bromwich, his wife Elizabeth and their two sons. Widowed by 1697, he married Mary Pullen, herself recently widowed, in 1700. Mary lost her husband in 1715 but lived on in the house until her own death in 1738. The house was known as Bromwich’s for a century and more. John Bromwich himself was given the title Esquire in the church registers. During most of this period, the manor of Tytherington belonged to the Verney family, but in 1728 they sold all but a few of their properties here to Peter Hardwicke. Bromwich’s, exceptionally, was sold off to Benjamin Parnell, for £160. Parnell was Peter Hardwicke’s bailiff and receiver of rents. When Mary Bromwich died, Parnell moved in…’

 

and also:

 

‘MILL FARM, NEWHOUSE FARM AND THE CLOTH TRADE – A HYPOTHESIS (cont.) At this point, it seems fairly certain that the ownership of Newhouse passed to Edward’s  (Hobbs) aunt Mary on the death of his parents in 1701 and 1705. Mary had married William Pullen of Mill Farm, and had three sons and several daughters. On William’s death, she remarried and lived at Bromwich’s in West Street (now Porch House). Her eldest son John, who seems to have been somewhat dissolute, probably continued a while with the tenancy of Mill Farm. It was not long before he had mortgaged his inheritance. The middle son, William, died on the eve of his marriage. James, the youngest, in all probability moved to Newhouse farmhouse, (vacant after the death in 1705 of his widowed aunt Elizabeth Hobbs), when he married Mary Berry in 1708; and it may well have been he who carved ‘JP 1712’ on a beam.’

 

Will of John Bromwich, Gent of Tytherington,  28th July 1714, proved 4th April 1716

In the Name of God Amen I John Bromwich of Tythrington in the County of Gloucester Gent being sick and weake in body but (blessed be God) of a Sound perfect and well disposing Mind and Memory and Understanding calling to mind the frailty of this Life and the certainty of death doe in such my memory and Understanding make publish and declare this to be my Last Will and Testament in manner and forme following. First and principally I recommend my Soul into the hands of Almighty God hopeing to be saved by the sufficient Meritts of my only Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ and my body I commit to the Earth to be buryed in the upper part of the Chancell of Tythrington Church between the Grave of my late dear Wife Mrs Elizabeth Bromwich and the North wall of the said Chancell If it shall happen my decease to be neare or at Tythrington aforesaid otherwise I leave my body to be buryed in Christian Buryall at the discretion of my Executor hereunder named or the Overseers of this my Will, And for such Earthly Goods and Estate as God hath been pleased to bestow upon me I give devise and dispose thereof as followeth Imprimis I give unto my dear and beloved Wife Mrs Mary Bromwich the Summe of Ten pounds to be paid within the Space of Six Months after my decease. Item I give and bequeath to her my Sorrell Nagg on which I use to ride to be delivered to her immediately after my Funerall. Item I give and bequeath to her two Grand daughters Mary Pullen and Sara Pullen daughters of John Pullen Two Guineas to each of them to be paid to them or to their said Grand Mother or such other Friend which shall be left in Trust for them for their respective uses in Nine Months after my decease. Item I give and bequeath unto such poor housekeepers of the Parish of Tythrington which have Chargeable Families and receive noe releife on the Parishes Account the Summe of Twenty Shillings to be distributed in one Month after my decease among them according as their several wants shall appear to require the same to my said Executor or the Overseers of this my Will Item I further give to the poor of the said Parish Twenty Shillings more to be layd out for Bread to be given to the poore of the said Parish to be distributed among them in two Months after my decease according to the discretion of my said Executor or of the Overseers of this my Will. Item I give devise and bequeath to my deare and only Son Mr Richard Bromwich and to his heires and Assigns all my reall and personall Estate lying and being in Tythrington aforesaid and alsoe in the Town and Parish of Malmesbury in the County of Wilts (Chargeable with the payment of the aforesaid Legacies and alsoe of all my debts and Funerall Expences) and also all my Goods of Household and Plate Pewter Linnen bedding brass Copper amongst which is one Copper Furnace and all other my Goods and Chattells lying and being in either of the said Townes and parishes of Tythrington and Malmesbury or in any other places wheresoever in Great Britain (chargeable as aforesaid) and all Deeds Writings touching or concerning the premises, And I doe hereby make nominate and appoint full whole and sole executor of this my Last Will and Testament my said Son Mr Richard Bromwich revoking and making void all former Wills by me heretofore made or declared and I do hereby further nominate and appoint my very good Friends Mr Robert Plummer of the Parish of Charfield in the County of Gloucester and Benjamin Parnell of Tythrington aforesid to be Overseers in Trust of this my Last Will and Testament desiring them to accept the trouble of seeing the same performed and Executed according to my true intent and meaning and I doe Order my said Executor to pay half a Guinea to each and either of them as a Token and Mark of my Acknowlegement of the kindness which herein they shall doe to me Item I give and bequeath unto my Neice Mrs Susanna Atkinson of the City of Worcester Twelve Shillings to buy her a Mourning Ring In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and Seale the Twenty Eighth day of July in the yeare of the Reigne of our Sovereigne Lady Anne by the Grace of God of Great Britain France and Ireland Queen Defender of the Faith or anno domine 1714

                                                                                                                                                             John Bromwich

Signed sealed and delivered published and declared by the Testator himselfe to be his Lat Will and Testament and alsoe attested by us in the Sight and presence of the aforesaid Testator

Robert Cullemore

Thomas Smith

William Olief

Probate 4th April 1716 to Richard Bromwich

 

The Will of Mary Bromwich:

 

‘I Mary Bromwich of Tythrington in the County of Glocester Widow being aged and weak in Body but Sound of Mind and understanding do declare this to be my Last Will and Testament. Impris I do give and bequeath to my son James Pullen the Bed, Bedstead, and appurtenances thereunto belonging in the Kitchen Chamber which I do lye upon my self, Item I give to my Daughter Mary Powell my two handled Silver Cupp; Item I five to my Daughter Anne Parker my Little Chest in the Kitchen Chamber;

Item I give to my Daughter Elizth Plomer one little Drawing Table wch is in the Parlor Chamber; Item I give to my Granddaughter Mary Pullen Daughter of John Pullen, one Large Chest in the Parlour Chamber one small Brass Boyler, and two dishes of  Pewter, Item I give to my Grand daughter Sarah Walker one Bell Metall Pott, and one Dish of Pewter and all the remainder of my goods, Money, and Effects wch I shall  be pofsefs’d of att the time of my Death, I order to be distributed in Equall Shares to my Son and three Daughters abovenam’d my funeral Expenses ffirst deducted out of it; And I hereby revoke and make Void all formr Will or Wills by me made and do publish this as my Last Will and Testament, Wittnefs my hand this Eighth day of September in the Year of our Lord God one thousand seven hundred and thirty two. The mark of Mary Bromwich MB.

Witness hereto – Richd Bromwich, Peter Park, Benjamin Parnell

Item It is further bequeathed by the within nam’d Mary Bromwich being forgotten in the Body of her Will; That the Silver Cup bequeathed by her to her Daughter Mary Powell shall after the Decease of the said Mary Powell be and Remain for the Use and Behaaf of Elizabeth Hyett Daughter of the Said Mary Powell and her Heirs and Executors for Ever Witnefs her hand this fifteenth Day of March In the Year of our Lord one thousand Seven hundred and thirty two. The mark of Mary Bromwich MB

Witness hereto Rich Bromwich Benjamin Parnell

This will was proved the 21st Day of May in the year of our Lord 1736 before the worshipful Sir Henry Penrice Knight Doctor of Law Vicar General in Spirituals of the Right Reverend Father in God Martin by Divine permifsion Lord Bishop of the Diocese of Gloucester and of the Episcopal Consistory official principal Lawfully constituted by Mary Powell Daughter and Administratix with the will approved and so forth to whom and so forth after having first sworn well and faithfully to administer to the said will and also to exhibit an Inventory and render an account and so forth.’


FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS FAMILY CONTACT: btsarnia@gmail.com

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This entry was posted on December 22, 2016 by in Shield, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , .
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