btsarnia

A tribute to the life and work of Brian Torode

Coopey Family of Cam

COOPEY FAMILY OF CAM

 

I am indebted to John and Hilary Theyers for the information that they have generously shared with me

 


 

FIRST DESCENT

Jeptha Coopey (-1706) and Mary Edwards (-1714)

 

|

 

Samuel Coopey (1684-1729) and Sarah Parslow

 

|

 

John Coopey (1714-1743) and Elizabeth Freem (1714-)

of Cam

 

|

 

Thomas Coopey I (1734-1793) and Mary Budding (1730-)

Broadweaver of Quarry, Cam

 

|

 

 Mary Coopey (1770c-1856) and Abraham Byford II (1767-1832)

Mason of Cam

 

|

 

William Byford II (1794-1859) and Ann Coopey (1793c-1871)

Mason of Quarry, Cam

 

 

Sarah Byford (1824-1895) and James Noad

 

|

 

Arthur John Noad and Anne Duffell

 

|

 

Florence Noad and Edward Percy Barton


SECOND DESCENT

Jeptha Coopey (-1706) and Mary Edwards (-1714)

 

|

 

Samuel Coopey (1684-1729) and Sarah Parslow

 

|

 

John Coopey (1714-1743) and Elizabeth Freame (1714-)

of Cam

 

|

 

Thomas Coopey I (1734-1793) and Mary Budding (1730-)

Broadweaver of Quarry, Cam

 

|

 

Thomas Coopey II (1763-1848) and Sarah Nelmes (-1838)

Broadweaver of Quarry, Cam

 

|

 

Ann Coopey (1793c -1871) and William Byford II (1794-1859)

Mason of Quarry, Cam

 

|

 

Sarah Byford (1824-1895) and James Noad

 

|

 

Arthur John Noad and Anne Duffell

 

|

 

Florence Noad and Edward Percy Barton

 


JEPTHA COOPEY, Great VIII Grandfather of Richard Barton

 

Husband of Mary Edwards

Father of Samuel Coopey

 

Also Father of Elizabeth, John, Joseph, Mary and Jeptha

On 25th June 1676 Jeptha Coopey of North Nibley married Mary Edwards of Stinchcombe, at North Nibley Parish Church. They had at least six children. The eldest, Elizabeth was baptised at North Nibley in 1677 and the younger children at Stinchcombe between 1679 and the death of little Jeptha in 1687.

 Jeptha Coopey died on 9th June 1706 at Stinchcombe and Mary, his widow, died on 8th August 1714.


MARY COOPEY, Great VIII Grandmother of Richard Barton

 

Wife of Jeptha Coopey

Mother of Samuel Coopey

 

Also Mother of Elizabeth, John, Joseph, Mary and Jeptha

 

On 25th June 1676 Mary Edwards of Stinchcombe married Jeptha Coopey of North Nibley at North Nibley Parish Church. They had at least six children. The eldest, Elizabeth was baptised at North Nibley in 1677 and the younger children at Stinchcombe between 1679 and the death of little Jeptha in 1687.

 Jeptha Coopey died on 9th June 1706 at Stinchcombe and Mary, his widow, died on 8th August 1714.


SAMUEL COOPEY, Great VII Grandfather of Richard Barton

 

Son of Jeptha Coopey and Mary (nee Edwards)

Husband of Sarah Parslow

Father of John Coopey

 

Also Father of Sarah, Samuel, Martha, Benjamin, Mary Morgan, Elizabeth Vizard and Esther Russell

 

Samuel Coopey was baptised on 7th September 1684 at Stinchcombe (IGI). He was a child of Jeptha and Mary Coopey. Samuel married Sarah Parslow on 27th October 1705 and their eldest child was baptised at Cam on 12th August 1706. They were described in the baptismal register as ‘of Dursley’ and their seven later children were baptised at Dursley from 1710.

Sarah Parslow may have been the daughter of Benjamin and Katherine Parsloe of Cam who was baptised on 13th June 1685 at Cam.

Samuel Coopey died (was buried?) on 25th May 1729 at Dursley. His widow, Sarah Coopey, was still alive in 1735.


SARAH COOPEY, Great VII Grandmother of Richard Barton

 

Wife of Samuel Coopey

Mother of John Coopey

 

Also Mother of Sarah, Samuel, Martha, Benjamin, Mary Morgan, Elizabeth Vizard and Esther Russell

 

Sarah Parslow may have been the daughter of Benjamin and Katherine Parsloe of Cam who was baptised on 13th June 1685 at Cam. She married Samuel Coopey at Cam on 27th October 1705 and their eldest child was baptised at Cam on 12th August 1706. They were described in the baptismal register as ‘of Dursley’ and their seven later children were all baptised at Dursley between 1710 and 1727.

 

Samuel Coopey died (was buried?) on 25th May 1729 at Dursley but his widow, Sarah Coopey, was still alive in 1735.


JOHN COOPEY, Great VI Grandfather of Richard Barton

 

Son of Samuel Coopey and Sarah (nee Parslow)

Husband of Elizabeth Freem

Father of Thomas Coopey I

 

Also Father of Betty Butcher and Mary

 

John Coopey was baptised on 14th April 1714 at Dursley. His parents were Samuel and Sarah Coopey and he was the fifth of their six known children. John Coopey married Elizabeth Freem on 6th January 1733 at Cam. Both were described as ‘of Cam’. They had three children who were baptised between 1734 and 1742. The elder two were christened at Stinchcombe and the youngest, Mary, at Cam where she was buried in the following year.

John Coopey died (was buried?), aged twenty-nine years, on 18th October 1743 at Cam.


ELIZABETH BROWN, Great VI Grandmother of Richard Barton

Daughter of Moses Freeme and Esther

Wife of John Coopey

Mother of Thomas Coopey I

 

Also Mother of Betty Butcher and Mary

 

Also Husband of Thomas Brown

Elizabeth Freeme was baptised on 9th September 1714 at Cam. She was a daughter of Moses and Esther Freeme of Cam. She married John Coopey on 6th January 1733 at Cam. They had three children who were baptised between 1734 and 1742. The elder two were christened at Stinchcombe and the youngest, Mary, at Cam where she was buried in the following year.

John Coopey died (was buried?), aged twenty-nine years, on 18th October 1743 at Cam leaving Elizabeth a widow with two young children aged nine and seven.

Elizabeth Coopey later married Thomas Brown, in 1744 at Cam.


THOMAS COOPEY I, Great V Grandfather (Twice) of Richard Barton

 

Son of John Coopey II and Elizabeth (nee Freem)

Husband of Mary Budding

Father of Thomas Coopey II and Mary Byford

 

Also Father of Betty Mutlow and William

 

Also the bastard daughter of Ann Jones

 

Thomas Coopey I was baptised on 15th November 1734 at Stinchcombe. He was the son of John and Elizabeth Coopey of Cam. His father died when young Thomas was only nine-years-old. Thomas Coopey I was described as a Broadweaver of the Quarry, Cam, and he later owned eighteen cottages. He married Mary Budding on 18th June 1757 at Cam. They had four children including Thomas and Mary who were both Great IV Grandparents of Richard John Barton.

Mary Budding was a daughter of Daniel Budding and Mary Harding and was baptised at Cam on 28th February 1729/30.

In the bastardy records for Cam there is the following entry:

‘Ann Jones, single, on 7th April 1769 delivered a female bastard and Thomas Coopey of Cam, broadweaver, the father’

Thomas Coopey died in 1793 having made a will.

 3rd February 1793: By WILL of this date Thomas Coopey the Elder of the Quarr Parish of Cam, County of Gloucester, Broadweaver, gave and devised to his son Thomas Coopey the Younger:

 

All his nine cottage and gardens together with the well of water standing on part of the same premises, all of which lie in the Quarr etc. and which cottages were then in the occupation of Saul Cox, John Butcher the Elder, John Butcher the Younger, William Butcher, George Hill, Betty Harper otherwise Bradshaw, Peter Butcher and William King.

To hold the same for life. And from and immediately after his decease, unto the use of his Grandson, Thomas Coopey son of his son Thomas Coopey the Younger, with the payment of £30 to his daughter Elizabeth, wife of William Mutlow to be paid within a year after his death.

Testator appointed his son William Coopey sole executor.

Thomas Coopey the Elder died – February 1793, and the will was proved at Gloucester by sole executor 23.2.1793.

Letter from John and Hilary Theyer 24th January 1992:

 

‘Last summer, John had letters from two other Coopey researchers within a week, which set us thinking about them again – and it suddenly seemed strange that in his Will of 1793, Thomas Coopey only left bequests to his younger son yet made his elder son the Executor. Clearly they had not fallen out, so it appeared that William had already received his inheritance on marriage. What was it? I found William’s will, and he had also left nine cottages in the Quarry to his children, so presumably Thomas had owned 18 cottages there. There is a description of Cam in the 1830’s (written c. 1894) in Gloucestershire Notes and Queries which says that it had changed very little over the past 60 years – and we know how little it had changed from 1920 onwards from John’s mother and aunts who were all born there. Putting these two together, eighteen cottages in 1793 must have been a sizeable proportion (half?) of the housing there then. Thomas was quite well off – which posed the question of where did the money come from. We doubted that even as a Broadweaver in those days, he had earned that sort of money.

I looked at Coopey Wills, hoping to find someone who had left Thomas the land, but none were in the least bit relevant, either proved in Gloucester or at the PCC. Maybe he had inherited it from \his mother, Mary Budding? Again I drew a blank, and turned without great hope to his grandmother , Mary Harding.

The Will of John Harding, Broadweaver of Cam, made in 1746 proved to be the key, as among other legacies he left ‘Tenn Shillings apiece to the six children of my daughter Budding deceased’. (Mary, the wife of Daniel Budding was buried in Cam 24th April 1738) Not enough money to answer the original question, but suddenly we were off on a new trail altogether with the Hardings.’

Notes of John and Hilary Theyers: Coopey: Precis of deeds from printed volume plus extracts from some of the deeds. Glos R.O. 22 and 28.1.1992:

 

D2957/p721 65 (131) 7th April 1763:

 

Conveyance 1) Hopton Hadley of Cam, Yeoman

                      2) William Turner of Cam, Yeoman

                       3) Thomas Coopey of Cam, Broadweaver

Cottage in Cam with a close called Coxes Close (1 acre)

Consideration: £34

Witnesses John Hodgson and John Whittock

Sense of the document itself: Cottage or tenement late in the occupation of Daniel Reeve, Mason, since in the occupation of Thomas Cox and now of Thomas Coopey where he now lives and one acre of land called Coxes Close enclosed out of a commonfield called Woodfield in the parish of Cam. Both were lately the property of Margaret Trotman and Eleanor Trotman late of Cam, singlewomen now both deceased and afterwards and late also of Thomas Row of Hackney in the County of Middlesex Esq.. Indenture of lease and release dated 4th and 5th April 1763, the release being between Thomas Row and his wife Mary of the first part, William turner of the second part and Hopton Hadley of the third part.

The property went from Thomas Row for the use of Hopton Hadley and his heirs in trust for William Turner.

Thomas Coopey acquired the land for himself, his heirs and assigns for ever by paying £34 to William Turner and 5/- to Hopton Hadley, both of whom quit-released all claim on the land to Thomas Coopey his heirs & assigns etc. Thomas Coopey made his mark- ‘T’.

D2957/p721 65 (130) 23rd October 1763:

 

Mortgage 1) Thomas Coopey of Cam, Broadweaver

                  2) Joseph Everatt of Dursley, Butcher

Cottage in Cam with a close of 1 acre called Coxes Close.

Term 500 years

Principal: £20

Witnesses: Nicholas Cousins and William Vizard

 

 

D2957/p.721 65 (132) 4th April 1766:

Assignment of Mortgage 1) Thomas Coopey of Cam, Broadweaver

                                          2) Joseph Everett of Dursley, Butcher

                                           3) Thomas Brown of Cam, Broadweaver

Cottage in Cam with a close of 1 acre called Coxes Close.

Term: Residue of 500 years

Principal: £60

Witnesses Thomas Bonnor Bishop and William Vizard

D2957/p.721 65 (132) (Beware numbers!)

This is an Indenture tripartite, in which Thomas Coopey borrows £60 from Thomas Brown on security of the cottage (late in the occupation of Paule Reeve (in 1763 they said Daniel Reeve) since of Thomas Cox and now of Thomas Coopey where he now lives) and 1 acre of land called Coxes Close. Thomas Coopey was then able to pay Joseph Everett the £20 which he owed him.

Both Thomases made marks – our Thomas Coopey marked his will.

Notes and thoughts:

 

Elizabeth Briggs’ ancestor Elizabeth Coopey married Thomas Brown, Pig-Killer in Cam on 6th November 1744. There are clear claims for this Thomas and Elizabeth to be linked to our family. The Thomas Coopey above was baptised in Stinchcombe 1734, s/o John and Elizabeth. Was Mrs Briggs’ Elizabeth mother of Thomas – parents John and Elizabeth Coopey married in 1733. Thomas Brown was referred to as a Pig-Killer on his will in 1785. Is Thomas Brown Thomas Coopey’s stepfather ? did he change his occupation?

Cam – especially the Quarry area where the Coopeys lived – was a Broadweaving area, which was hit particularly hard by the industrial revolution and the opening of the weaving mill at Draycott (later Hunt and Winterbottom’s). The value of property in the quarry would have fallen, if anything 1763 onwards even until the 1790’s. How on earth after only three years, did Thomas Coopey manage to end up with both the cottage and land, and £26 in his pocket. … Is this where the money came from to buy the other sixteen cottages he owned in the Quarry and left to his two sons, William and Thomas ?’


MARY COOPEY, Great V Grandmother (Twice) of Richard Barton

 

Daughter of Daniel Budding and Mary

Wife of Thomas Coopey I

Mother of Thomas Coopey II and Mary Byford

 

Also Mother of Betty Mutlow and William

 

Mary Budding was baptised on 28th February 1729/30 at Cam. She was the second daughter of Daniel and Mary Budding. Her parents had married in 1757 and they had four daughters.

Mary Budding married Thomas Coopey I on 18th June 1757 at Cam. They had four children including Thomas and Mary who were both Great IV Grandparents of Richard Barton.


MARY BYFORD, Great IV Grandmother of Richard Barton

Daughter of Thomas Coopey I and Mary Budding

Wife of Abraham Byford II

Mother of William Byford II

 

Also Mother of Hannah, Isaac, Isaac, Mary-Anne, Charlotte, Jemima, Lois, Jemima and George

Mary was a daughter of Thomas and Mary Coopey of the Quarry, Cam. She was born in about 1770 and baptised on 22nd January 1772 at Cam. Mary Coopey married Abraham Byford on 13th May 1792 at Cam. Their first child, Hannah, was baptised at Cam in September of that year so there may have been some pressure on the marriage. A further nine children were to be born between 1794 and 1815.

Mary’s brother, Thomas Coopey II, was to become the father-in-law of her son William Byford II.

Mary’s husband died in 1832 leaving her a widow.

In the 1841 census for the Quarry we find William Byford a forty-year-old mason. Also with him was his wife Ann aged thirty-five-years and his daughter Charlotte, aged ten years. We also find Mary Byford, his mother, aged sixty-five-years.

In the 1851 census return for the Quarry we find Mary Byford, a widow, who was described as an eighty-year-old pauper and hand-loom weaver of the Quarry and born in Cam.  Living close by was her son William Byford II and his wife Ann. He was recorded as fifty-six-year-old Mason and born in Cam. His wife was described as a fifty-eight-years-old and also born in Cam. They would seem to have had only two children.

Mary Byford died on 25th December 1856 at the Quarry, Cam. She was described on her death certificate as aged eighty-six-years and ‘Widow of Abraham Byford, Mason’. The cause of death was given as ‘Old Age – certified’.  George Leonard, Registrar, registered the death on 29th December and the informant was Ann Byford of the Quarry, Cam, who was present at the death.


THOMAS COOPEY II, Great IV Grandfather of Richard Barton

 

Son of Thomas Coopey I and Mary (nee Budding)

Husband of Sarah Nelmes

Father of Ann Byford

 

Also Father of William, Mary Cowley, Betty Theyers, Thomas, Hannah, Henry and John

 

Thomas Coopey II was baptised on 3rd December 1763 at Cam. He was the son of Thomas and Mary Coopey. His father was a broadweaver of the Quarry at Cam. Thomas Coopey II married Sarah Nelmes on 10th September 1786 at Cam. His bride was probably the daughter of William Nelmes, a broadweaver of Stinchcombe who had married Elizabeth Shipway at North Nibley on 25th September 1759. If this is the case, Sarah was baptised on 18th July 1763 at Stinchcombe.

Some time between 1793 and 1796 Thomas and Sarah became members of Dursley Independent Church. The church was associated with Rev Rowland Hill of Wotton-under-Edge but from 1795 the Reverend David Ralph became the first settled minister at Dursley Independent Church.

‘As Mad as a Hatter! – A History of Nonconformism in Dursley’ by David E. Evans 1982, page 98:

 

At first, judging by baptismal records, Ralph’s pastorate was successful, though seemingly he quoted too much scripture in his sermons to please some of his hearers. The success however was short lived and by about 1800 religious life seems to have dropped to a low ebb…In early 1802 David Ralph resigned…’

Their daughter Ann Coopey was born on 3rd November 1796 and baptised at Dursley Independent Church on 5th February 1797. According to the church register the Coopeys lived at the Quarr, Cam. Further baptisms of children followed in 1799, 1802 and 1805 and grandchildren were baptised there between 1820 and 1823.

Thomas Coopey II was a Broadweaver of The Quarry, Cam and inherited half of his father’s cottages. Sarah Coopey died on 24th December 1838, aged seventy-nine-years, at the Quarry.

In the 1841 census Thomas Coopey II was living at the Quarry, Cam. He was described as a seventy-five-year-old weaver. His son John was with him and he was a thirty-year-old weaver. Close by were William Coopey, aged forty-five-years, another weaver together with Esther aged forty-five years. Staying with them was Augusta Trotman aged five years. Also near to Thomas was the home of William Byford and his wife, Ann. He was a forty-year-old mason and she was thirty-five-years. Their child, Charlotte, aged ten years was staying with them.

Thomas Coopey the Younger made his will on 2nd January 1846. He died on 14th January 1848 at Cam. He was described on his death certificate as an eighty-three-year-old Weaver. The cause of death was given as ‘Old Age – Certified’. George Leonard, Registrar, registered the death on 15th January and the informant was Benjamin Cox of the Quarry, Cam, who was in attendance.

Thomas Coopey was buried on 17th January 1848 at Cam. His will was never proved.

Mary, the younger sister of Thomas Coopey II, married Abraham Byford at Cam on 18th May 1792. Their son, William Byford II, was to marry his first cousin, Ann, the daughter of Thomas and Sarah Coopey.

Abstract of The Title of Thomas Coopey to Three Cottages and Garden Ground at The Quarry in the Parish of Cam in the County of Gloucester Contracted to be Sold to George William White 1869

3rd February 1793: By WILL of this date Thomas Coopey the Elder of the Quarry Parish of Cam, County of Gloucester, Broadweaver, gave and devised to his son Thomas Coopey the Younger:

 

 All his nine cottage and gardens together with the well of water standing on part of the same premises, all of which lie in the Quarr etc. and which cottages were then in the occupation of Saul Cox, John Butcher the Elder, John Butcher the Younger, William Butcher, George Hill, Betty Harper otherwise Bradshaw, Peter Butcher and William King.

To hold the same for life. And from and immediately after his decease, unto the use of his Grandson, Thomas Coopey son of his son Thomas Coopey the Younger, with the payment of £30 to his daughter Elizabeth, wife of William Mutlow to be paid within a year after his death.

Testator appointed his son William Coopey sole executor.

Thomas Coopey the Elder died – February 1793, and the will was proved at Gloucester by sole executor 23.2.1793.

April 1793: The said Thomas Coopey, the Grandson, died an infant under the age of two years and was buried at Cam, Glos, leaving William Coopey, his eldest Brother & Heir at Law.

May 1847: By Indenture of this date between Thomas Coopey of the Quarr etc., Broadweaver, and William Coopey of the same place, Broadweaver of one part, and Daniel Cook of North Nibley, Gentleman of the other part. And reciting that Thos Coopey, the grandson, shortly after departed this life an infant, leaving his Father tenant for life and William Coopey his eldest Brother heir at law him surviving. And Reciting agreement for a loan of £55 to Thomas and William Coopey

The said nine Cottages then being in the occupation of the said Thomas Coopey, Simeon Cox, Henry Butcher, William Coopey, George Coley, Joshua Cox, George Cox, and William Byford as tenants thereof.

4th Feb. 1860: Received of Henry Coopey £55.9.2d in complete discharge of Mortgage – Anne Cooke, widow of Daniel

As to the remainder of the Garden Ground;

30th and 31st August 1815: By Indenture of this date the release between William Hopton Hadley of Cam etc., Getleman of the one part and Thomas Coopey of the Quarr, etc., Weaver of the other part.

Sold to Thomas Coopey for £40: All that piece or parcel of land called the Old Quarries situate in the Parish etc. by estimate 3 roods (more or less) adjoining the South end of a garden then or late belonging to the said W.H. Hadley in the occupation of William Malpass and divided from another piece of land late belonging to W.H. Hadley and then to Samuel Nicholls also called the Old Quarries by the road there. And also all ways etc.

23rd September 1819: Mortgaged by Thomas Coopey to john Thomas of Berkeley for £40.

18th February 1823: Between John Thomas, Thomas Coopey and Richard Barrett of Stancomb, Stinchcombe.

On 4th February 1823 T. Coopey paid John Thomas the sum of £40 and all interest for the same.

The North East plot or parcel of the same land called the old quarries in length North to South 32 yards or thereabouts and East to West 26 yards or thereabouts to Henry Coopey and his wife, Hannah.

Mortgage transferred to Richard Barrett on the rest of the land for £40, the lease to run the remaining 500 years or thereabouts.

8th October 1827: Richard Barrett received £40

Reciting that Richard Barrett had required payment of £40 and Thomas Coopey being unprovided, Mr. William Duderly of Dursley had agreed to advance him. – for the residue of the term of 500 years.

15th November 1827: Reciting that since the last abstract a dwelling house had been erected on part of the said land and was in occupation of William Coopey, Weaver. Mr. Duberley required payment of £40 and John Fisher of Dursley, Gentleman had advanced Thomas Coopey the sum of £40 and an additional £10.

15th and 16th October 1835: £46 was still outstanding to John Fisher and Thomas Coopey being unprovided, Charles Harding of Dursley advanced the sum on mortgage of land measuring 2 roods and 4 perches (little more or less) adjoining Garden Ground formerly of W.H. Hadley but then of Henry Malpass to the garden ground late part of the said land released by Thomas Coopey to Henry Coopey and Hannah his wife on the North East of the Quarry and land of the Rt. Hon. Lord Segrave on the South West of the highway dividing ground late of Samuel Nicholls deceased from the premises thereby released and the ground of Henry Coopey and Wife on the South East and a narrow strip of ground or court belonging to and fronting other cottages of Thomas Coopey on the North West.

Covenant by Thomas Coopey, William Coopey and George Cowley, Yeoman for payment of principal and interest.

As to all property.

2nd January 1846: By Will of Thomas Coopey, the tenant for life.

 To his eldest son, William Coopey, his cottage at the Quarry then in the occupation of Henry Butcher, Shoemaker, and a piece of garden in the rear thereof to be the width equal with the cottage and extending to the boundary hedge. To hold for life.

To his third son, John Coopey, the cottage at the Quarry in which Thomas the testator resided, together with garden ground in the rear thereof etc.

To his second son, Henry Coopey, his cottage at the Quarry then in the occupation of Simeon cox, Weaver, and garden in the rear etc.

To his eldest daughter, Elizabeth, the Wife of William Thayers Weaver, his cottage situate at the Quarry then in the occupation of his Grandson, Henry Coopey, together with garden ground in the rear, And Also his cottage situate in the Quarry and occupied by his son William Coopey as a Weaving Shop together with garden ground at the East end thereof, to Elizabeth Thayers and her heirs and assigns forever.

To his daughter Mary, the wife of George Cowley, Yeoman, his cottage in the Quarry then converted into two tenements, one in the occupation of his son William Coopey and the other of his son-in-law George Cowley and garden ground in the rear etc.

To the use of his son Henry Coopey the cottage at the Quarry together with garden ground adjoining thereto and respectively then in the occupation of Elizabeth Cox and also his cottage adjoining the last mentioned cottage then in the occupation of his son-in-law William Byford and also his garden ground called the Back Garden adjoining the garden ground belonging to Richard Malpass and Joseph Workman.

Upon Trust for the sole use of his daughter Ann, wife of William Byford during her natural life to occupy or rent and upon her death upon trust for his two grandchildren Sarah and Charlotte her daughters, the cottage where she resides.

Testator directed that a road 5 yards in width to be made in front of his cottage devised to his said children Henry, John, William, Mary, and Elizabeth, such road to commence at the well and to extend as far as the door of the cottage left to Henry Coopey and to be made at joint expense for joint use. Also joint use of the well and to share the cost of maintaining the well and rope and bucket.

Testator devised a strip of land lying on the West side of the cottage belonging to his son Henry Coopey then in his occupation and extending as far as the South garden wall of the same cottage on the one side, and the boundary line between the cottages left to his sons Henry and john on the other side, unto the use of his son Henry his heirs and assigns forever subject to and charged with the payment of a proportionate part of the mortgage debt affecting the same.

Testator devised unto his son William Coopey the piece or parcel of land whereupon his said son about 35 years since erected the cottage in which he then resided, and also the piece or parcel of land adjoining the South garden wall of the cottage belonging to the said son Henry Coopey and the strip of land lastly devised to him, and extending in breadth as far as the South End of the cottage in which his son William Coopey resided on the one side and the boundary line between the cottages devised to his sons William and John. For William and his heirs and assigns forever subject to and charged with a proportionate part of the mortgage debt affecting the same.

Testator devised the piece or parcel of land adjoining the land lastly devised to his son William Coopey on the one side and land belonging to Earl Fitzhardinge on the other side unto the use of his son John Coopey and his heirs etc. subject to and charged with etc.

And as to the rest of his estate etc. to his son John Coopey.

Henry and John Coopey appointed joint executors.

14th January 1848: The said testator died and his will has never been proved.

22nd February 1869: By Indenture of this date made between Elizabeth Thayers of Dursley, widow of the first part, Samuel Cowley of Kingswood, County Labourer of the second part, Ann Byford of Dursley widow and James Noad of Slimbridge, County Labourer and Sarah his wife and Thomas Webb of Dursley, Labourer of the third part, and Thomas Coopey of the Quarry, County Quarryman of the fourth part.

Reciting the before abstracted will of Thomas Coopey the elder (hereinafter called Thomas Coopey (A)) dated 3rd February 1793, his death and Proof of will.

And Reciting that said Thomas Coopey, the Grandson (hereinafter called Thomas Coopey (C)) died an infant under the age of two years shortly after the death of the testator, leaving William Coopey his eldest brother and heir at law.

And Reciting the before abstracted will of Thomas Coopey, the tenant for life (hereinafter called Thomas Coopey (B)) dated 2nd January 1846 and his death without having revoked or altered his said will.

And Reciting that the said John Coopey died in March 1856 a bachelor and intestate, leaving William Coopey his eldest brother and heir at law.

And Reciting that the said William Coopey died in January 1858 intestate and a widower without issue, leaving Henry Coopey, his eldest brother and heir at law.

And Reciting that Henry Coopey died on 4th August 1868 intestate and a widower, leaving said Thomas Coopey (partly thereto) his eldest son and heir at law.

And Reciting that Mary Cowley died intestate in 18—having survived her husband, George Cowley, and leaving the said Samuel Cowley his eldest son and heir at law.

And Reciting that the said William Byford died on  — 18—leaving Ann Byford his widow.

And Reciting that the said Sarah Noad (formerly Sarah Byford) intermarried with James Noad in October 1851

And Reciting that the said Charlotte Byford intermarried with Charles Webb in March 1848 and died in March 1861, leaving said Charles Webb her surviving, and leaving Thomas Webb (who was born on 21st April 1849) her eldest son and heir-at-law.

And Reciting that it was apprehended that upon the death of Thomas Coopey (B) said William Coopey was bound in equity to elect whether he would give effect to the devise expressed to be made by the said will of Thomas Coopey (B) of cottages and premises devised by the said will of Thomas Coopey (A) and of which Thomas Coopey (B) was only tenant for life under last mentioned will as aforesaid, or would insist upon his Title to said cottages and premises as heir at law of the said Thomas Coopey (C) and give up to the disappointed devisees under said will of said Thomas Coopey (B) the premises devised to him said William Coopey by same will and which belonged to the testator in fee simple.

And Reciting that said William Coopey did not in fact declare his election, but on the death of said Thomas Coopey (B) entered into possession or receipt of the rents and profits of all said premises and remained in such possession and receipt until his death.

And Reciting that on the death of William Coopey the said Henry Coopey as his heir at law entered into possession or receipt until his death, since which time Thomas Coopey (party thereto) had been in such possession.

And Reciting that the said Thomas Coopey (party thereto) as the person upon whom several premises had devolved subject to such liability to elect as aforesaid, had elected to insist upon the title of said William Coopey as heir at law of said Thomas Coopey (C) to said devised by said will of said Thomas Coopey (A) as he did thereby declare.

And Reciting that in consequence of such election of said Thomas Coopey (party thereto) as the heir at law of Henry Coopey and John Coopey respectively and said previous parties thereto of the 1st 2nd and 3rd parts were in equity entitled between them to the premises devised by the said will of said Thomas Coopey (B) and which belonged to the testator in fee simple as aforesaid according and in proportion to the respective values of said cottages and premises expressed to be devised to them respectively by the same will and of which the testator was only tenant for life as aforesaid.

And Reciting that the said Thomas Coopey (party thereto) had agreed with said persons or parties thereto of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd parts to purchase from them their respective estates and interests in the premises in which they were in equity entitled as aforesaid for £12 to be divided between them as thereinafter expressed and which sum was to include and cover all claims and demands of said Elizabeth Thayers, Sam’l Cowley and Ann Byford respectively with respect to the back rents and profits of the said premises.

And Reciting that it was intended that the abstracting Indenture should be executed by the said Thomas Webb when and so soon as he attained the age of 21.

It is witnessed that in pursuance of said agreement and in consideration of £4 to Elizabeth Thayers, £4 to Samuel Cowley, and £4 to Ann Byford, Sarah and James Noad, and Thomas Webb as follows viz. £1.6.8d to Ann Byford, £1.6.8d to Sarah and James Noad, £1.6.8d to Thomas Webb paid by said Thomas Coopey (party thereto) received by the said parties and every one of them did grant and release unto said Thomas Coopey their respective estates and interests for his heirs and assigns for ever, viz. all the said pieces or parcels of land and cottages or premises in the Parish of Cam etc. by will of Thomas Coopey (B) devised to William Coopey and which belonged to Thomas Coopey (B) in fee simple.

As to the cottage and garden ground in mortgage to Charles Harding.

22nd February 1869: By indenture of this date (re. Indenture of 16th October 1835 between Charles Harding and Thomas Coopey (Grandson of Thomas Coopey))

And Reciting that said Sum of £46 was still owing to Charles Harding on security, but all interest had been paid to date.

And Reciting that Thomas Coopey (party thereto) was then entitled to the equity of redemption of and in cottages, land and hereditaments and was desirous of paying off the said £46.

And Reciting that the said Charles Harding acknowledged receipt of said £46 and thereby grants to Thomas Coopey (party thereto) all lands etc. that were mortgaged.

The said Thomas Coopey to be discharged from all principal monies and interests etc.

25th August 1868: Thomas Coopey, quarryman, contracted to sell part of the above to George William White, Mason, for £5.15.0d

14th June 1869: Thomas Coopey died intestate, leaving his only brother, Henry Coopey, Coal Cropper, of Mountain Ash, Llanwanno, Glamorgan as heir at Law, without having executed any conveyance of property.

19th July 1869: Letters of Administration were granted to Henry Coopey. G.W. White called upon and requested Henry Coopey to convey the agreed land, viz. All those three cottages situate at the Quarry now or late in the occupation of John Ettle, George Cox and William Butcher having in front of them a footpath to cottages belonging to Richard Malpass from the road or way of 8’ wide intended to be set out forthwith from the Bye Road leading from Cam to Stinchcombe, and also all the small piece of garden ground lying on or towards the West end of the said cottages, And also all that piece of Garden ground adjoining  the East End of the said cottages and which has the road of 8’ on the North side, land of the Rt. Hon. Lord Fitzhardinge on the South and West sides, and the said Bye road on the East side Together with a right of way over the 8’ wide road and use of the well of water, G.W.W. to pay a share of upkeep of well, rope, bucket etc. etc. for G.W. White to have and to hold, for his heirs and assigns for ever.

Henry Coopey to hold the original documents mentioned in the abstract of the title, and to show them to anyone in England on G.W. White’s request at any time unless prevented from doing so by fire or any other reasonable accident.

1st February 1871:  Sale completed and money received.

(Throughout the document the figure 8’(eight feet) has been inserted in a different hand)


SARAH COOPEY, Great IV Grandmother of Richard Barton

 

Daughter of William Nelmes and Sarah (nee Shipway)

Wife of Thomas Coopey II

Mother of Ann Byford

 

Also Mother of William, Mary Cowley, Betty Theyers, Thomas, Hannah, Henry and John

 

Sarah was probably the daughter of William Nelmes, a broadweaver of Stinchcombe. He married Elizabeth Shipway at North Nibley on 25th September 1759. If this is the case Sarah was baptised on 18th July 1763 at Stinchcombe.

Sarah Nelmes married Thomas Coopey II on 10th September 1786 at Cam and they had at least eight children.

Some time between 1793 and 1796 Thomas and Sarah Coopey became members of Dursley Independent Church. The church was associated with Rev Rowland Hill of Wotton-under-Edge but from 1795 the Reverend David Ralph became the first settled minister at Dursley Independent Church.

‘As Mad as a Hatter! – A History of Nonconformism in Dursley’ by David E. Evans 1982, page 98:

 

At first, judging by baptismal records, Ralph’s pastorate was successful, though seemingly he quoted too much scripture in his sermons to please some of his hearers. The success however was short lived and by about 1800 religious life seems to have dropped to a low ebb…In early 1802 David Ralph resigned…’

Their daughter Ann Coopey was born on 3rd November 1796 and baptised at Dursley Independent Church on 5th February 1797. According to the church register the Coopeys lived at the Quarr, Cam. Further baptisms of children followed in 1799, 1802 and 1805 and grandchildren were baptised there between 1820 and 1823.

Sarah Coopey died on 24th December 1838 at the Quarry, Cam. She was described on her death certificate as the seventy-nine-year-old wife of Thomas Coopey, Weaver and the cause of death was given as ‘Old Age’. Abraham Warner, Registrar, registered the death on 27th December and the informant was John Coopey of the Quarry, Cam, who was in attendance there.


ANN BYFORD, Great III Grandmother of Richard Barton

 

Daughter of Thomas Coopey II and Sarah (nee Nelmes)

Wife of William Byford II

Mother of Sarah Noad

 

Also Mother of Charlotte Webb

 

Ann Coopey was the daughter of Thomas and Sarah Coopey of the Quarry, Cam. She had been born on 3rd November 1796 baptised at Dursley Independent Church on 5th February 1797. According to the church register they lived at the Quarr, Cam and her father worked as a Broadweaver.

Ann married William Byford II, her first cousin, on 3rd February 1818 at Cam. Her husband was the son of her paternal aunt, Mary Byford. Like his father, William Byford II was a Mason, of the Quarry, Cam.

In the Registers of the Dursley Independent Church we find an entry for a Sarah Byford who was born on 30th August 1820 and baptised on 10th October 1820 by Rev William Bennett at Dursley Independent Church. Her parents were William and Ann Byford of the Quarry at Cam. The Reverend William Bennett was Minister of Dursley Independent Church from 1804-1823 and he was responsible for erecting the Tabernacle, which was opened on 22nd August 1809. On 19th August 1827 their younger daughter Charlotte was baptised at Cam Parish Church. They would seem to have had only two children.

In the 1841 census for the Quarry we find William Byford a forty-year-old mason. Also with him was his wife Ann aged thirty-five-years and his daughter Charlotte, aged ten years. We also find Mary Byford, his mother, aged sixty-five-years.

In the 1841 census was also her father, Thomas Coopey II, who was living at the Quarry, Cam. He was described as a seventy-five-year-old weaver. His son John was with him and he was a thirty-year-old weaver. Close by were William Coopey, aged forty-five-years, another weaver together with Esther aged forty-five years. Staying with them was Augusta Trotman aged five years.

Extract from her father’s will (1846):

Upon Trust for the sole use of his daughter Ann, wife of William Byford during her natural life to occupy or rent and upon her death upon trust for his two grandchildren Sarah and Charlotte her daughters, the cottage where she resides.

 In the 1851 census return for the Quarry we find William Byford II and his wife Ann. He was recorded as fifty-six-year-old Mason and born in Cam. His wife was described as a fifty-eight-years-old and also born in Cam.

She was the informant at the time of her mother-in-law’s death on Christmas Day 1856.

William Byford II died on 7th September 1859, aged sixty-eight years. Maria Frape of Bolton Lane, Dursley was in attendance at the time of his death but unable to sign her name.

In the 1861 census for Boulton Field, Dursley we find Ann Byford staying with her son-in-law, Charles Webb, a very recent widower and chimney sweep. Her grand children were Thomas, who was aged eleven years, Julia aged nine years and Evangeline aged seven years. Ann Byford was described as a sixty-year-old widow, a cloth weaveress, who was born in Cam.

In 1871 Ann was staying with James and Sarah Noad at Churchend, Slimbridge. James was aged forty-four-years and born in Slimbridge. Sarah was aged forty-five-years and born in Cam. John was aged eight years, a scholar. Ann Byford, James’s mother-in-law, was aged seventy-eight-years and born in Cam.

Ann Byford died on 14th July 1871 at Slimbridge. She was described on her death certificate as the seventy-eight-year-old ‘Widow of William Byford, Mason’. The cause of death was given as ‘Senile Decay – certified’. George Leonard, Registrar, registered the death on the same day and the informant was Sarah Noad or Noat (sic), of Slimbridge, who was present at the death and made her mark. Ann Byford was buried at Slimbridge.

 


 

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS FAMILY CONTACT: btsarnia@gmail.com

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on December 20, 2016 by in Byford and tagged , , , , , , , .
%d bloggers like this: