btsarnia

A tribute to the life and work of Brian Torode

James and Ann Eley, Farmers of Morton, Kingswood and Tortworth

THE ELEY FAMILY OF THE VALE OF BERKELEY


(?) James Eley (-1688) and Mary (-1686)

of Thornbury

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(?) James Eley (1644-1719) and Elizabeth (1650-1723)

of Thornbury

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James Eley I (1688–1754) and Elizabeth Morgan (–1747)

of Thornbury

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James Eley II (1736-1803) and Ann Taylor (-1799)

Exciseman of Ledbury, Leominster, Birmingham, Banbury etc

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 James Eley III (1762-1831) and Elizabeth Greenwood (1763-1814)

Linendraper of Thornbury |

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Thomas Eley (1794-1864) and Sarah Park (1806-1859)

Farmer of Lower Morton

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 James Eley IV (1836-1874) and Ann Shield (1837-1934)

Farmers of Lower Morton, Kingswood and Tortworth

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 Ernest Edward Eley (1869-1950) and Emily Yarnold (1866-1951)

Farmer of Berkeley, Kingswood and Cranham

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Grace Margaret Eley (1897-1940) and William Edward Terrett

 

 


 

JAMES ELEY IV, Great II Grandfather of Richard Barton

Son of Thomas Eley and Sarah (nee Park)

Husband of Ann Shield

Father of Ernest Edward Eley

 Also Father of Florence Mary Caple, Sarah Catherine Marling, James Shield, Walter Henry, Frances Augusta, Annie Selina, Maud Elizabeth and John Park

James Eley IV was born on 10th March 1836. He was the second son of Thomas and Sarah Eley of Lower Morton, Thornbury. His father was a Yeoman and a devout Baptist, setting up the Morton Baptist Church opposite their family home which is now known as Chapel Farm, When James was only twenty-three his mother died and his father died four years later in 1864. He inherited Whites Garden, House and garden and Homefield at Morton from his father in 1864.

 In the 1861 Census James Eley was described as a Carpenter and then in later life as a Farmer of Lower Morton.

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On 12th May 1863 the Reverend John Morgan at Thornbury Baptist Church married James Eley to Ann Shield of Tytherington. He was described as a twenty-seven-year-old carpenter of Morton, son of Thomas Eley, a yeoman. Ann was described as a twenty-five-year-old spinster of Tytherington, daughter of James Shield, a yeoman. The witnesses were Henry Shield her brother and Susannah Daniell her niece. The Bristol Mercury for 16th May 1863 reported: ‘May 12 at the Baptist Church, Thornbury, by the Rev. J. Morgan, Mr. James Eley,   of Moreton (sic), to Ann, youngest daughter of Mr. James Shield, of Tytherington’.

Ann was born on 15th March 1837 at Barber’s Land, Tytherington and was baptised on 20th May 1837 at Tytherington Parish Church. She was the fifth daughter of James Shield, a farmer of 200 acres, and his wife Mary (nee Isaac) Anne received adult baptism on 28th April 1861 at Thornbury Baptist Church and she became a Member of that church in 1871. In 1881 the Baptist Church was described on a Thornbury town map as ‘Particular’.

The Eley Family had a long association with the Baptist Church in Thornbury. In 1831 James Eley and Thomas Eley were Trustees. Later on John (sic) Eley, Thomas Eley, James Eley, Farmer of Morton, appl on 28-6-1871 and Henry Eley, Saddler of Cotham, 1871.

On 13th November 1866 one of the first Trustees of the British School at Thornbury, built by Handel Cossham, was James Eley, Carpenter of Thornbury.

Castle School, Thornbury website:

In 1862, Handel Cossham, a local preacher, built the original village school, a British School, at Gillingstool. Some years later, because of overcrowding, a new infant school building was added adjacent to the original school. In 1952 the school was separated into infants, juniors and seniors and the latter formed the ‘Thornbury County Secondary’ school. Prior to this it was an ‘all-age’ school taking pupils up to age thirteen, known as ‘Thornbury Council School’.

In 1871 the census return states that the Eleys were at Duckhole, Lower Morton. James Eley was a thirty-five-year-old farmer of thirty-three acres and employing one man. His wife Annie was aged thirty-one-years and born at Tytherington. Florence Mary was aged seven years and a scholar; Sarah Catherine was aged five years and a scholar; James Shield Eley was aged four years and a scholar; Walter Henry was aged two years and Ernest Edward aged one year. The children and their father were all born in Thornbury. Servants included Rosa Baker aged fourteen and born at Aust, a domestic servant; and Charles Willevise (sp?) a sixteen-year-old farm servant (indoor), born at Arlingham

On 7th October 1873 James Eley’s uncle, John Trotman Park of Merry Ford, or Mireford Farm, Kingswood, died aged 61 years. Probably, it was as a result of this death that James and Anne Eley left Morton and moved to the 100 acre (1871 census) Merry Ford Farm. Their youngest son, John Park Eley was born at the farm on 27th July 1874 and their choice of name probably indicates that their uncle (who left property in excess of £5,000) had helped them in some way. From this time James and Anne seem to be worshipping at Kingswood Congregational Church.

James and Anne Eley had nine children between 1864 and 1874. According to the 1881 census return all their children were born at Thornbury except the youngest, John Park, who was born at Kingswood. None of the children were baptised as infants.

Sadly, in 1871, James and Anne lost their infant son, Francis Augustus and in 1873 two more young children, Annie Selina and Maud Elizabeth. Annie Selena drowned accidentally in a pan of water.

Gloucester Journal, 13th September 1873

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‘A Child Drowned: An inquest was held at The New Inn, Kingswood, near Wotton-under-Edge, on Wednesday, before Mr. W. Gaisford, coroner, on the body of Annie Selina Eley, infant daughter of Mr. James Eley, of Merryford Farm, aged one year and eight months, who was accidentally drowned on Monday. From the evidence of Jane Allen, Mr. Eley’s servant, and who was the only witness examined, it appears the child was left alone for a short time while the witness went upstairs. Looking out of the window she saw the child had fallen into a pan of water. She ran downstairs very much frightened, and sent a sister of the deceased to bring the infant indoors. When the child had been brought in restoratives were applied and every means adopted to resuscitate the child, but without effect. The jury, returned a verdict of “Accidentally drowned”. It transpired that Mrs. Eley, mother of the child, had been nursing it at about twenty minutes past two o’clock, and at half-past it was brought in dead.’

Obituary Card: ‘In Affectionate Remembrance of Francis Augustus who died March 2nd 1871, aged 11 weeks, Annie Selina who died September 8th 1873, aged 1 year and 8 months, Maud Elizabeth, who died October 9th 1873, aged 8 months, the beloved children of James & Ann Eley of Merry Ford Farm, Kingswood. ‘Not gone from memory, not gone from love. Only gone to the Father’s house above.’’

The death of the three infants was followed by further catastrophe, James himself was taken ill with Typhoid. He made his will on 14th September 1874 and died on 17th September that year.

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Obituary Card: ‘In fond Remembrance of James Eley of Merry Ford Farm, Kingswood, who departed this life September 17th, 1874, Aged 38 years, and was interred at Kingswood, September 19th. ‘In sure hope of a joyful resurrection’’

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The Death Certificate records that James Eley died at Kingswood and that he was a thirty-five-year-old farmer. The cause of death was given as Typhoid Fever – certified. Benjamin Simmons, Registrar, registered the death on 19th September and the informant was Charles Baker of Kingswood who was present at the time of the death and he made his mark.

His estate was valued at under £800 and his body was laid to rest at Kingswood Congregational Chapel where there is still a fine family gravestone.

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Details from the Will of James Eley, Farmer

 Trustees: Henry Shield of Barber’s Lands, Tytherington Farmer and Brother-in-Law and Thomas Bell of Huntingford, Wotton-under-Edge, Cousin and Farmer.

 ‘I expressly authorise my Trustees the consent and wish of my said wife to carry on my Farming Business if they shall think it expedient so to do and use any of my monies in so doing and I authorise my trustees with the consent in writing of my said wife to make any advances they may think expedient for the benefit of any or either of my children in such manner as they think best.’

Witnesses: C.M. Harris FRCS, Wotton-under-Edge and Osborne Dauncey, Solicitor, Wotton-under-Edge

 May 12, at the Baptist Chapel, Thornbury, by the Re. J. Morgan, Mr.James Eley, of Moreton, to Ann, youngest daughter of Mr. James Shield, of Tytherington.


  

ANN ELEY, Great II Grandmother of Richard Barton

Daughter of James Shield and Mary (nee Isaac)

Wife of James Eley IV

Mother of Ernest Edward Eley

Also Mother of Florence Mary Caple, Sarah Catherine Marling, James Shield, Walter Henry, Frances Augusta, Annie Selina, Maud Elizabeth and John Park

Ann Shield was born on 15th March 1837 at Barbers Land Farm, Tytherington. She was the eighth child and fifth daughter of James and Mary Shield. Her father was a farmer of the two hundred acre Barbers Land Farm. Anne Shield was baptised on 20th May 1837 at Tytherington Parish Church. Her name appears in the 1841 census when she was at home aged four years and in the 1851 census return she was at home and described as a fourteen-year-old farmer’s daughter born in Tytherington. In 1861 Annie (sic) was at home at Barbers Land Farm and described as unmarried twenty-three-year-old daughter and born at Tytherington.

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Anne Shield received adult baptism on 28th April 1861 at Thornbury Baptist Church and she became a Member of that church in 1871.

On 12th May 1863 the Reverend John Morgan at Thornbury Baptist Church married James Eley to Ann Shield of Tytherington. He was described as a twenty-seven-year-old carpenter of Morton, son of Thomas Eley, a yeoman. Ann was described as a twenty-five-year-old spinster of Tytherington, daughter of James Shield, a yeoman. The witnesses were Henry Shield her brother and Susannah Daniell, her niece. The Bristol Mercury for 16th May 1863 reported: ‘May 12 at the Baptist Church, Thornbury, by the Rev. J. Morgan, Mr. James Eley,   of Moreton (sic), to Ann, youngest daughter of Mr. James Shield, of Tytherington’.

When James was only twenty-three his mother died and his father died four years later in 1864. He inherited Whites Garden, House and garden and Homefield at Morton from his father in 1864. In the 1861 Census James Eley was described as a Carpenter and then in later life as a Farmer of Lower Morton.

In 1871 the census return states that the Eleys were at Duckhole, Lower Morton. James Eley was a thirty-five-year-old farmer of thirty-three acres and employing one man. His wife Annie was aged thirty-one-years and born at Tytherington. Florence Mary was aged seven years and a scholar; Sarah Catherine was aged five years and a scholar; James Shield Eley was aged four years and a scholar; Walter Henry was aged two years and Ernest Edward aged one year. The children and their father were all born in Thornbury. Servants included Rosa Baker aged fourteen and born at Aust, a domestic servant; and Charles Willevise (sp?) a sixteen-year-old farm servant (indoor), born at Arlingham

On 7th October 1873 James Eley’s uncle, John Trotman Park of Merry Ford, or Mireford Farm, Kingswood, died aged 61 years. Probably, it was as a result of this death that James and Anne Eley left Morton and moved to the 100 acre (1871 census) Merry Ford Farm. Their youngest son, John Park Eley was born at the farm on 27th July 1874 and their choice of name probably indicates that their uncle (who left property in excess of £5,000) had helped them in some way.

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James and Ann Eley had nine children between 1864 and 1874. According to the 1881 census return all their children were born at Thornbury except the youngest, John Park, who was born at Kingswood. None of the children were baptised as infants.

Sadly, in 1871, James and Anne lost their infant son, Francis Augustus and in 1873 two more young children, Annie Selina and Maud Elizabeth. Annie Selina drowned accidentally in a pan of water.

Gloucester Journal, 13th September 1873

‘A Child Drowned: An inquest was held at The New Inn, Kingswood, near Wotton-under-Edge, on Wednesday, before Mr. W. Gaisford, coroner, on the body of Annie Selina Eley, infant daughter of Mr. James Eley, of Merryford Farm, aged one year and eight months, who was accidentally drowned on Monday. From the evidence of Jane Allen, Mr. Eley’s servant, and who was the only witness examined, it appears the child was left alone for a short time while the witness went upstairs. Looking out of the window she saw the child had fallen into a pan of water. She ran downstairs very much frightened, and sent a sister of the deceased to bring the infant indoors. When the child had been brought in restoratives were applied and every means adopted to resuscitate the child, but without effect. The jury, returned a verdict of “Accidentally drowned”. It transpired that Mrs. Eley, mother of the child, had been nursing it at about twenty minutes past two o’clock, and at half-past it was brought in dead.’

Obituary Card: ‘In Affectionate Remembrance of Francis Augustus who died March 2nd 1871, aged 11 weeks, Annie Selina who died September 8th 1873, aged 1 year and 8 months, Maud Elizabeth, who died October 9th 1873, aged 8 months, the beloved children of James & Ann Eley of Merry Ford Farm, Kingswood. ‘Not gone from memory, not gone from love. Only gone to the Father’s house above.’’

 After the death of her husband, James Eley, in 1874 Annie Eley continued farming. In the 1881 census she was still at Merryford Farm, Kingswood where she farmed 74 acres assisted by two labourers Emma and David Field.

1881 Census:

Merryford Farm, Kingswood. Annie, Head, Farmeress of 74 acres, aged 44 years, Tytherington; Florence M. Eley 17 years, born Thornbury; Kate. S. Farmer’s daughter, 16 years; James S. Scholar, 14 years, Thornbury; Walter H. Scholar, 12 years, Thornbury; Ernest E. Scholar, 11, Thornbury; John Park Scholar, 6 years, Kingswood; Emma Field, General Servant, 18 years The Gibb, Wiltshire; David Field Farm Servant (Indoor) 16 years, Grittleton, Wilts.

In 1881 Annie had the children baptised at St Mary’s Parish Church in Kingswood. Some of them returned to Nonconformity in later life.

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At the time of the 1891 census the return lists Ann Eley as farming at Merryford Farm, Charfield Road, Kingswood. Ann was described as a forty-four-year-old farmer born in Tytherington. Sarah K. was aged twenty-five, a farmer’s daughter, born at Morton; James S. was aged twenty-four, a farmer’s son, born at Morton; Walter H. was aged twenty-two, a schoolmaster-in-training, born at Morton; Ernest E was aged twenty-one, a farmer’s son, born at Morton and John P. was aged sixteen years, an ironmonger’s apprentice born at Kingswood. Their general domestic servant was Amelia F. Greenwood, aged twenty-five-years and born in Abergavenny.

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In 1892 Annie moved to Tortworth where she farmed with her sons Shield and Ernest and in 1894 she is described as a dairy farmer. Ernest married in 1893 and Shield married in 1896 and at this time Annie decided to retire from farming, leaving her eldest son Shield and his wife, Minnie, at Tortworth. By this time Ernest and Emily were probably living at Hengaston Farm, Berkeley.

There is confusion as to the location of Tortworth Farm and its relationship with Brook Farm.

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In 1901 Anne Eley was staying at Kendleshire with her son, John Park Eley, a twenty-six-year-old farmer. She was described as a sixty-three-year-old widow, born at Tytherington.

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Grandma Eley moved to a town house in Montpelier, Bristol where she remained until 1905. In the Kelly’s Directories for 1905 and 1906 she is living at 8 Sefton Park Road, Montpelier which is in St Bartholomew’s Parish. She was living at Kendleshire Farm with her elder daughter Florence Caple from 1905 to 1908, and then with her youngest son, John Park Eley, at The Chestnuts, Mays Hill, Frampton Cotterell until her death.

In the 1911 census she was listed as being at Mays Hill, Frampton Cotterell with John Park Eley. She was described as a seventy-four-year-old widow born in Tytherington.

Ann Eley died in her ninety-seventh year at the home of her eldest son, Shield Eley, at Whitfield near Falfield, on 27th December 1934. She was described as widow of James Eley, farmer. The cause of death was given as a cerebral haemorrhage and Arterio-scierosis (No PM) and was certified by E.M. Grace MRCS. The death was registered on 28th December. J. Shield Eley was present at the death and was the informant and the registrar was W. May. Her body was laid to rest with her late husband at Kingswood Congregational Church on 1st January 1935.

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Genealogical Notes of Annie Eley, dated Whit Monday May 28th 1917:

‘James Eley & Anne Shield were married at the Baptist Chapel Thornbury by the Revd John Morgan May 12th 1863.

James Eley born March 10th 1836. Died Sept 17th 1874

Anne Eley Born March 15th 1837

Florence Mary Eley, Daughter of James & Anne Eley Born Feb 16th 1864

Sarah Catherine their daughter born April 17th 1865

James Shield their son born Feb 7th 1867

Walter Henry their son born Oct 3rd 1868

Ernest Edward their son born Nov 26th 1869

Francis Augustus their son born Dec 15th 1870 died March 2nd 1871 aged 11 weeks

Annie Selina their daughter born Dec 24th 1871 died Sept 8th 1873 aged 1 year 8 months

Maud Elizabeth their daughter born Feb 18th 1873 died Oct 9th 1873 aged 8 months

John Park their son born July 27th 1874’

1871 Land Tax etc. in Thornbury (source?):

James Eley – Morton 8-2-4 acres £2-0-8d

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Extract for ‘The Way I Came’ by Kenneth George Marling:

‘James Eley of Morton, carried on his father’s farm there to which he brought his bride, Anne Shield. Her father, James Shield, farmed at Barbers Lands, Tytherington, and was born in 1780. I have photographs of him and his wife Mary Isaac, born in 1798.

Their daughter Anne was a remarkable woman. She bore eight children in ten years, losing her husband and two children from fever within a year, but carried on the farm and brought up the remaining six, settling all the boys up well, and survived to the age of 97! She was an excellent organiser, as her children sometimes complained, for she worked them hard to keep on the farm with 40 milking cows, and butter and cheese to make and market. During my childhood she was always immaculately dressed, with beautiful caps of velvet, lace and ribbons, and a long gold chain and ivory and gold charms, with which we loved to play. A keen whist player, scathing to anyone who revoked, she maintained a lively, adventurous spirit until her 90s. At 92 she fell downstairs and broke her collarbone, but it set well and she completely recovered, to enjoy rides in a motorcycle sidecar. Seeing a large dock crane she wished she could have a ride in its bucket – at that age. Her health failed in the last two or three years, and she looked forward to being released – not relishing an inactive existence – dying in 1934.

James Shield was one of the earliest motor oil agents, for Mobiloil, and an early car owner. Walter was second master at Latymer High School, Chiswick, retiring to Thornbury to work 5 acres as a market garden, and driving to London with produce until nearly 90, while the youngest son, John Park, a farmer and Chairman of the Gloucestershire War Agricultural Executive Committee 1914-18, made a pioneer of farming radio – predating “The Archers” by a series with his family in 1935 on Western Region, as “Gunters Farm”. I have a photograph from the Radio Times of that year of them in the rickyard, at “Mays Hill”, Frampton Cotterell.

Extracts from the Reminiscences of Frank George Marling:

‘It was perhaps somewhat earlier (late 1860’s ?) than this when the wife of my Mother’s cousin, Mrs. James Eley of Moreton, near Thornbury, called to see my Mother. Ushered into the sitting room, there was young Frank discovered seated upon the floor close to the coal scuttle, busily engaged in playing with the coal, to the detriment of his nice clean pinafore and frock! The horror of my dear Mother, and the exclamations of the visitor can easily be imagined! Little did either of them think how close the future relationship between the grubby little boy and the smartly dressed lady from Moreton would be (mother-in-law!). But that was for many years ahead.’

‘When I was about four and a half years old I had my first outing and met one who was destined to have a great influence on my life, the paramount influence. My Mother’s Mother, my maternal grandmother, had become a widow before I was born. In the early summer of 1867 she had to go to Thornbury on some business connected with her husband’s estate, about which she had to consult her solicitor, I believe. Having to hire a trap, a dogcart, to take her to Thornbury and back, she asked my Mother to accompany her. My Mother took me, and I have very vivid recollections of the event. We drove via Hill. I know this because I remember some white railings alongside the road that branched off from our road where it led up to Bevington. At Moreton we saw the Maypole, where a few days before there had been Mayday revels.’

‘In Thornbury we went to the house of Mr. Vaughan, the Chemist, at the corner house looking out on The Plain, where was the Town Pump, from which the inhabitants of surrounding houses were continually fetching buckets of water. This seemed to me to be very queer.’

(First Account) ‘After we left Thornbury on the return journey we drove through Moreton in order to call on my Mother’s cousin, who was a farmer there. To get to his farm we turned down a lane and the farm house stood back from the lane. A large pool with a big horse-chestnut tree towering over it was on the same side, and just beyond the pool was the garden gate opening on to a path which led up through the front garden to the front door. Having been ushered in we found the cousin’s wife (the same lady who some time before called on us at Berkeley, and found me playing with the coal) engaged in nursing her baby. She was sitting near the centre of the room to the right of the front door as you entered and was facing the window. Presently I was sent out to play with my cousins (second cousins). These were two little girls, one aged about three and a half, the other not much over two. They were playing on the right hand side of the house as you faced it, under, in and out of a very high, thick, box hedge. What fun it was! I did not go there again until I had been married some thirty five years, but on my honeymoon I correctly described to my dear wife the lane, the pool, the tree, the garden gate, path up to the house, the box hedge, and my playing with the two little girls. She did not remember my visit, it was not to be expected, but the fact remains that she was the younger of the two little girls, her sister Florrie the elder, while her brother Shield was the baby in arms! What I cannot claim is that I then and there fell in love with her – it would be splendid if I could – and determined one day to make her my wife, but I claim that she and her sister are the first girls I remember! How I came to meet her again belongs to later days and will be told later.’

(Second Account from 1950’s) ‘We first met when I was four years, four months old, the first week in May 1867, and I have a vivid recollection of same, but as Kate was then only just past her second birthday (being born on 17 April 1865) she does not remember it. My Grandmother, who then lived in Berkeley, had occasion to go to Thornbury about some property of her late husband, and asked my Mother, also then living in Berkeley, to go with her – Mother took me. We drove in a dog cart driven by my Uncle Henry, who had taken over the saddlery business formerly carried out by my Grandfather (his father, James Eley) in Canonbury Street, Berkeley. I remember the white railings at the side of the road leading up to Bevington, so that shows we took the route through Hill. Next I remember seeing the Maypole at Moreton, and Uncle saying “A few days ago they were dancing round the Maypole.” Then I remember being in a house in Thornbury at the bottom corner of High Street as you turn round for Gloucester, and looking out of the window across “The Plain”, and seeing people fetching water from the pump there. When we were ready to start for home someone said “Why not call at Moreton and see cousin James?” James was a first cousin of my mother and Uncle Henry, and kept a farm at Moreton, which was near Thornbury. I remember the left hand turn in the lane, then a big pond on the right overhung by a big tree (walnut, I think), then the garden gate and path up to the house (a double fronted one). As we walked up the path we could see through the right hand window on the ground floor, where in that room was cousin James’ wife sitting on a chair with a baby on her lap (this was Shield, the eldest boy). I was sent out to play with the two little girls, those would be Florrie (three the previous February) and Kate (just gone two), the first girls I ever remember seeing. They took me into their “house”, the interior of a huge hedge of box, hollowed out in the centre where was a bare branch on which I sat and jogged up and down. We did not see cousin James as he was out in the fields and did not come in whilst we were there. I do not remember anything about the drive home.’

‘On the day that Grandma Eley died (18th July 1877), Mrs. Anne Eley of Kingswood, Wotton-under-Edge, (the widow of my mother’s first cousin, James Eley) with two or three of her children, including Kate and John, called to see us, they having been down to the Plantation for a picnic. Going to the station to see them off we found the Lock Gates were open, so we had to walk across on the “Baulk”, a floating wooden structure across the entrance to the locks. John was quite a little boy and I carried him across! In later years he far topped me in height, size and weight!’

‘In the spring of 1893 I asked our choir at Union Church, Sharpness, if they would like to repeat a Service of Song that they had given at Sharpness, at a country place of worship. They were willing, I arranged with Shield Eley, who had the management of Stone Room (where I sometimes conducted services) to give the Service of Song there, he to take the choir. I arranged conveyance and took the choir over, and I did the reading. Shield brought his sister Kate, and seeing her again, unexpectedly, brought all my love back again, and I determined to try and win her. Her Mother, some time widowed, had not long before taken a large farm at Tortworth with the help of Shield and Ernest. Soon I found excuses for going to the farm and found…’

Extract from Walter Eley’s Journal of 1900:

‘Sister Emily joined us for tea and afterwards went with us to see Mrs. James Eley, widow of our cousin James. She lived in Montpelier. There were seven of us altogether, us four brothers, sister Emily Alice, Henry’s wife and her sister. We went a long distance by tram, then walked the rest of the way.

Arriving at her house we found she was not at home. After waiting some little time we decided to make enquiries among the neighbours. Alice knew the person opposite was her friend so we asked of her if Mrs. Eley was there. “No, but she may be down at Mrs. … house.” She kindly directed us. “No, she had not been down there,” said the lady, “but she might be down at my brothers’.” Off trotted the lady to her brothers’ came back saying she was not there. As a final effort we were directed to a little general shop. “They may know.” “No”, they had no idea where she was. So there was nothing for us but to wait. In the meantime brother Edward left us to spend the remainder of the evening with his daughter. He had not been gone long before his future son-in-law came for him. We waited and waited until our patience was well nigh exhausted, and just as we were leaving Mrs. Eley and her daughter Florrie arrived on the scene. They were quite distressed at keeping us waiting. But we were soon at our ease and spent a very pleasant and jolly evening together. “If only I had known you were coming I’d stopped at home, for I have only been down to the shops selecting wallpapers for the house,” We broke up at about 10.30pm, and we had to part for the night.’

 Extract from a letter from Betty Randall to Ken Marling:

‘I have heard Dad say when they lived at Mereford Farm, Kingswood, they used to get up to all manner of mischief & his Mother used to give them all the strap so as to be sure of getting the right one, sound logic??’

Extract from a Letter of Kenneth Marling:

‘My mother (wife of F.G.M.) took me to Kingswood to see “Aunt Park” widow of John Park, who was a brother of Sarah Park. Aunt Park, nee Mary Witts was born at Haroldsfield later the home of Ernest Eley. Her nephew Charlie Witts, took Tortworth Farm after Grandma Eley left’

Extracts from Letters to Ken Marling from Mary Brayley 1981-85:

‘I showed my History class the Eley 1858-60 needlework and they thought the V & A might be interested. There are about 16 baby bonnets, beautiful lace in some, a Bodeine Anglais bedjacket, linen or stiff cotton, a large nightie (Grandma Eley needed it!), a baby cotton vest, drawers (open!) and three pairs of most beautiful fine Brod. Ang. Sleeves, dated 1858 and 1859 and some long white lock-knit stockings (’58) and a silk sash of 1875 and fan calendar. With the mother-of-pearl inlaid workbox, family Bible with her texts etc. and extracts from Grandpa Marling’s and your reminiscences it makes a good talk. … I have the Annie Shield brooch do you remember it? A heavy thing with intertwined metal-work round the photo of a forbidding looking woman. It says Annie Shield on the back but is it her or her mother?’

‘This is the Eley family brooch – who is the lady pictured? Sean Khan our museum curator thinks the date is around 1850 if I remember rightly because of the type of photograph.’

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Mays Hill

 

Letter of Anne Shield to her son-in-law, Frank George Marling:

 The Chestnuts, Mays Hill        May 25th 1917

My dearest Frank,

In answer to yours of Saturday, I do hope it has not put you to any inconvenience by not writing before today being holiday. I could not very well manage to write on Saty or yesterday. I was anything but well – my head very bad at time & my eye is giving me a lot trouble. I ought to see the Dr but put it off from day to day hoping each day it will be better. Glad to say all here are well. And I am well in body. God it is my poor old head that I suffer so much god only knows.

I will tell you what I know but I have forgotten so much. Peter had seven sisters and they all married. John Pinnell’s mother was one. John Bell’s another, Emma Dalton; another but I cannot remember her name just now. She had one daughter dead some years ago. Mrs Dalton’s daughter I don’t know if she is still living. Mrs Bell had two sons and a daughter – all dead. Mrs Pinnell had two daughters Pollie – Mrs Bell and Bessie dead some years. Aunt Pinnell had two sons John and Thomas. I don’t know Thomas dead years ago, left any children and I never knew how many children Aunt Philpott had. I know Willie the one in London and one of his sisters or I did many years ago. Tom Eley’s family now – Ernest and wife came to see us when they are at Bristol 2 or 3 times, as for the girls I know that they married that’s all.

What a day yesterday. I felt sorry for Shield and Minnie and the Mount Pleasant people and the young folk at the Bank at Sharpness. I hope that they are all in the best of health and enjoying themselves with their loving mum and dad. I went down on the road hoping to see you when you returned home. Some one told me you had gone by so I was disappointed. Glad you found things going on alright, garden and all. Well done. Ruthie and how are you now my two darlings. I hope you are well and my dear K quite herself again. I was so sorry she has been so unwell. Now I will close this jumble. I dare say you will be able to understand the most of it with the help of your better half. With all good wishes for a good round sum for my dear children etc. goodbye dear with fondest love to dear Katie yourself and each dear child. Ever your loving and affectionate Mother. Annie Eley.

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Extract from the Running Tide by Kenneth Marling:

 ‘The stairs lay between the office and the sitting room, and were very steep. I took pride in coming down at breakneck speed, in two or three leaps, and enjoyed Mother’s horrified protests. Grandma Eley fell down them when she was 92 and broke her collarbone, but it set well and she lived to be 97. She was a fine old lady, who had been left a widow with six surviving children at the age of thirty-seven. My grandfather died of fever in 1874, and three of the children had also died in the previous year or two. Grandma carried on farming for many years, at Mireford Farm, Kingswood, and eventually at the Home Farm, Tortworth. She was an excellent organiser, and saw to it that the children did their full share, and in due time set all the boys up well. She always wore beautiful caps of velvet and lace, trimmed with ribbons, and wore a long gold chain, from which hung an ivory drum, hand, pistol and several gold charms. We loved to sit on her lap and play with them. She much enjoyed a game of whist, at which she was very good, and had a low opinion of anyone who revoked. At over ninety she still enjoyed a ride in a car, or a motorcycle sidecar, and, viewing one of the tall cranes at work on the dock one day, she said she would like to go up in the bucket! She was then ninety-two, but I think she would have been game. Once when she was visiting us, Mother was called away for a while when preparing lunch, and set me to watch that the cauliflower did not boil over, and was horrified on her return to find that I had ensured this by stirring it so vigorously that it was minced up to fine particles! From time to time Grandma Eley sent us 1/-, in the form of twelve 1d stamps stuck on a printed Post Office slip issued by them to encourage savings. “Look after the pennies and the pounds will look after themselves.” However, one could get a quarter of most sweets for 1d, and that is how it went.

I was finally promoted to a bedroom of my own at the back of the house overlooking the garden. On the mantelpiece stood a dainty Staffordshire wafer burner, in the form of a double fronted Gothic villa, with a central turret and red roofs, and gay flowers round the door. This had belonged to Grandma Eley, and, miraculously having survived, is now one of my most treasured possessions.’

Extract from the Flowing Tide by Kenneth Marling:

‘I came of age in November 1925, and with £5 from Father bought a Raleigh 3 Speed cycle, and my brother gave me a hub dynamo. Grandma Eley, then 88, gave me a developing tank enabling me to develop my own, and other peoples, films.’

‘Grandma Eley died at the age of 97, and was buried at Kingswood with her husband, who was interred there 60 years before. During her lifetime she had seen immense changes, but during my life even more dramatic ones have taken place.’

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Tribute to Anne Eley:

‘Anne Eley, Born Anne Shield 15 March 1837. We your Children, Grandchildren, Great Grandchildren, and Relations by Marriage, lovingly greet you on your Ninetieth Birthday and congratulate you on attaining to so great and honourable an age. Assuring you of our warm affection and our delight in still having you amongst us. We herein append our signatures, their number being 42 in all.

Sons: James Shield Eley, Walter Henry Eley, Ernest Edward Eley, and John Park Eley

Daughters: Florence Mary Caple, Sarah Catherine Marling

Grandchildren: Phyllis May Eley, Betty Emily Eley, Grace Margaret Terrett, Ethel Maud Eley, Ruth Millicent Quick, Annie Florence Janet Durn, Donald James Marling, James Ernest Eley, Kathleen Annie Marling, James Bernard Eley, Dorothy Frances Harman, John Wilfred Eley, Kenneth George Marling, Jack Shield Eley.

Great Grandchildren: Mary Doreen Durn, Margaret Daisy Eley, Patricia Ruth Cory Eley, Isobel Joan Eley, Alma Doreen Eley, Richard John Eley, Mary Ruth Quick, William Ernest John Terrett.

Sons’ Wives: Mary (Minnie) Eley, Alma Louise Eley, Emmie Eley, Mary Ethel Eley.

Daughters’ Husbands: George Caple, Frank George Marling.

Grandchildren’s Partners: Ivy Belle Eley, Francis Lionel Harman, William Edward Terrett, Gilbert Edward Durn, Lilian Theodore Marling, Martha Helen Bridget Eley, Frank Ernest Quick, Alice Maud Eley.’

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Tytherington 1837-1863 (all illustrated)

Morton 1863-1873

Kingswood 1873-1892

Tortworth 1892-1896

Bristol 1896-1905

Kendleshire 1905-1908

Mays Hill 1908-

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Newspaper Article:

‘Congratulations on 90th Birthday. Member of Well-Known Family. Mrs Anne Eley, of Mays Hill, Frampton Cotterell, was the recipient of many congratulations on attaining her 90th birthday on the 15th inst. Mrs Eley, who comes of an old Gloucestershire farming family, was the youngest daughter of the late Mr and Mrs James Shield of Barber’s Lands, Tytherington. She had numerous brothers and sisters, some of whom emigrated to Australia, and she is the only one surviving.

Connected with many of the farming community in a wide district, Mrs Eley, herself carried on a farm at Kingswood, Wotton-under-Edge, and later at Tortworth, from whence she retired into private life some thirty years ago. Among the many presents received by Mrs Eley was an album containing a letter of congratulations and good wishes, signed by her children, grand-children, great-grandchildren, and the husbands and wives respectively of those married, the signatories numbering 42 in all. The album also contained the portraits of those who signed, and pen and ink sketches of the several houses (seven) in which Mrs Eley has resided, with the relative dates.’

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Obituary Saturday 5th January 1935:

 ‘Aged Ninety Seven Years – Death at Whitfield of Mrs Ann Eley – On Monday the grave of Mr James Eley, formerly of Mireford Farm, Kingswood, was re-opened for the interment of his widow, who outlived him by sixty years. Mrs Ann Eley had attained the advanced age of 97, and except for the lifelong affliction of deafness had retained her faculties to marked degree. Death took place at the home of her eldest son at Whitfield.

On the death of her husband Mrs Eley continued farming at Mireford for some years and when her sons grew up moved to another farm at Tortworth. Since her retirement she had resided with sons and daughters. All who knew her held her in the highest esteem and regard.

As stated the remains were interred at Kingswood Chapel graveyard on Monday, many old friends of the deceased joining with the family in the service conducted by the Rev. A.T. Mills (minister), assisted by the Rev. James Hardyman. Miss Mary Mills presided at the organ. Hymns used were, “There is a land of pure delight,” and “How sweet the name of Jesus sounds”.

Family mourners present were Mr and Mrs J Shield, Mr and Mrs Walter Eley, Mr John Eley and Mr Ernest Eley (sons and daughters-in-law), Mr and Mrs Frank Marling (son-in-law and daughter), Mr and Mrs J.T. Shield, and Miss Shield, and Mr and Mrs L.H. Shield (nephews and nieces), Miss Eley, Mr G.E. Durn, Mr and Mrs B Randall, Wick, Mrs Wm Terrett of Tetbury, Miss Kathleen Marling and Mr Cyril Wyatt (grandchildren) and Miss Touchfield.

Among the large number of others who attended as a mark of respect were noticed Messrs Dan Smith (Winterbourne), E.A. Smith (Tortworth), Mr and Mrs Cordeaux, Mr Herbert Wilcox J.P., Mrs Young and Mr v Young of Mangotsfield, Mrs E Mayne, Miss Tudor, Mr W Rogers (Bristol), Mrs Benson, and Miss Langler (Charfield); Messrs A S Durn, T.A. Daniell (Buckover), J H Weekes, T Jones, C.W. Pearce, T J Powell, A Cox, H.G. Oliver, J.P., Miss Holloway, Mrs Bolton, Mrs J Downs, Miss K Orchard, Miss Stinchcombe, Mr J Holpin (Falfield), Mr and Mrs E Bryant, Mrs W Fennell, Mr L G Matthews, Mr W Cowley, Mrs Wallis, Miss Doris Wilson and others.

Four grandsons served as bearers, viz., Messrs. Bernard Eley, Wilfred Eley, James E Eley, and John S Eley. Messrs Tucker Bros, Thornbury, had charge of the arrangements.

Wreaths of a beautiful description were sent from Jack and grandchildren Maud, Bernard and Wilfred; Shield and Minnie; Dorothy, Frank and Boys; Jack and Annie (Wick House); Ernest and Emmie; James, Nellie and children; Kate and Frank; Phyllis, Cyril and children; Annie, Gilbert and Mary; All at Alkington Farm; Alma and Dick; Billy, Grace and family; Grandchildren Donald and Lily and great grand-daughter Molly; Grandchildren Kenneth, Nancy and great-grandchildren John and Joan; Mrs Hooper & Family; Mr and Mrs E.A. Smith (Tortworth); Mrs H Roach; Betty, Bern and the boys; Miss S.E. Dove and M.H. Dove and the household; Grandchildren Ruth and Frank and great-grandchildren Mary and Muriel; Grand-daughter Kathleen and Miss D. Touchfield; Walter and Alma; H. Savage.’

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This was passed down from Annie Eley to Kenneth Marling


FLORENCE MARY CAPLE, Great II Aunt of Richard Barton

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Florence or ‘Florrie’ Eley was born in 1864 at Morton and baptised at St Mary’s Church Kingswood on 18th September 1881 aged seventeen years.

In the 1901 census return Florence Eley, aged thirty-seven-years, born (about 1864) at Morton  and working as a draper’s clerk was staying at 109 Richmond Road, Bristol, the home of her second cousin Henry Shield and his wife Frances Shield. Henry was a farmer’s son, and was aged fifty years, working as a commercial agent and born at Winscombe in Somerset. His wife Frances was aged thirty-nine-years and was described as born in Clifton. Interestingly Henry Shield was brought up in the village of Winscombe at the same time as Florence’s future husband, George Caple.

Florence Eley married George Caple, a sixty-three-year-old Farmer and Widower of Kendleshire Farm, Winterbourne at Coalpit Heath Parish Church on 3rd June 1907. His father was described as William Caple, a deceased Farmer. Florence Mary was described on the Marriage Certificate as a forty-three-year-old Spinster, the daughter of James Eley, a deceased Farmer. The witnesses were John Park Eley and Leah (sp?).

In 1851 seven-year-old George was at the King William, Sidcot, Winscombe, where his father was the beer house keeper. George’s parents were William and Clara Caple and George had older sisters who were both born in Saltford, Ann aged fifteen and Catharine aged eleven. George was born in Winscombe.

In 1861 the Caple family had moved to the Queen’s Head Inn at Willsbridge, Longwell Green, in Hanham Parish. William was the innkeeper and George was described as a seventeen-year-old born at Woodburrow in Winscombe. Staying with the family was George’s cousin, Charles James Morse, an eight-year-old butcher’s son born in Bristol. His mother Clara and sisters Ann and Catherine were all at home on the night of the census.

In 1871 George Caple was living at Longwell Green, Bitton, with his parents William and Clara Caple. His father was a sixty-two-year-old farmer of sixty-two acres, employing one labourer and he was born at Woodborough, Somerset. His mother was aged sixty-three and born in Cheddar. George was described as a farmer’s son, aged twenty-six-years, and born at Winscombe in Somerset.

In 1881 we find Clara Caple farming at Kendalshire Farm (sic), near to Damason’s Bridge, Winterbourne and Coalsack Lane, and the census return informs that this had been amalgamated with Westerleigh. She was described as a seventy-year-old Farmer’s wife, born in Cheddar. With her was her son George, unmarried, thirty-five-years-old, and born at Winscombe. Annie Woodruff was their servant. On the night of the census William was staying with his daughter Catherine Hancock whose husbande Jesse was farming fifty acres at Winscombe.

George Caple married Mary Anne Matthews in Chipping Sodbury Registration District during the last quarter of 1889. She was the daughter of, George Matthews, a farmer, from Winterbourne. In 1841 he farmed at Hicks Common and ten years later, in 1851, he had eighty acres employing five labourers. He came from Winterbourne and his wife Ann came from Blagdon in Somerset. Mary Ann was born in about 1842 and she also had a brother called George. In 1881 George Mathews (sic) was farming 150 acres at Kendalshire (sic) with three labourers and a boy. George was now seventy-seven; his wife seventy; George Mathews was thirty-seven and Mary A. Mathews was thirty-nine. The Caples and the Matthews were clearly neighbours.

In 1891 George Caple was farming at Kendleshire in Westerleigh Civil Parish. He was described as forty-eight-years-old and born at Winscombe. His wife Mary A. Caple, was aged forty-nine-years and born at Winterbourne. With them was George’s mother-in-law, Ann Matthews, aged eighty-five-years, living on her own means, and born at Blagdon in Somerset.

In 1901 George Caple was still farming at Kendalshire (sic) in Westerleigh. George was described as a fifty-seven-year-old farmer and employer, born at Winscombe. Mary Ann, his wife, was fifty-eight-years-old and born at Winterbourne. Their servant was Alfred Watkins, a twenty-one-year-old General Agricultural Labourer, born at  Alveston.

Mary Ann Caple died in the second quarter of 1906 in Bristol Registration District aged sixty-four-years.

At the time of the 1911 census Florence Mary Caple was still at Kendalshire (sic), Winterbourne. She was described as having been married for three years, being forty-seven-years-old and born at Morton, Gloucestershire. Her husband, George Caple, was aged sixty-seven-years, a farmer, born in Winscombe, Somerset. They had seven rooms.

According to probate records George Caple of The Firs, Alveston, died on 22nd August 1927. Probate was granted (save except settled land) at Bristol on 1st December 1927 to Florence Mary Caple, widow, James Shield Eley, commercial traveller, and Henry Wilmot Wickham Atchley, Solicitor. Effects were valued at £5, 585-1-6d. The probate was revoked on 10th February 1928 but re-granted at Bristol on 10th February 1928.

 

 

Monumental Inscriptions at St Saviour’s Coalpit Heath:

Mary                      CAPLE                  1906       64           husband George   1927       84           –

Clara                      CAPLE                  1882       74           husband William  1891       91           –

On  31st December1921 Florence Caple prepared a very succinct will. She left £100 to ‘God’s work viz Muller’s Orphanage, Ashley Down’. She left £50 to her nephews and nieces and her four brothers and sister. To her executor, her brother, Shield Eley, she gave £25 for his trouble. The witnesses were her husband George and her nephew J. Bernard Eley. George Caple died during 1927.

Florrie pre-deceased her mother, Anne Eley, and died on 30th August 1933 aged sixty-nine-years.

According to probate records Florence Mary Caple of 17 Parkstone Avenue, Horfield, Bristol, widow, died at Sherborne House Nursing Home, The Spa, Gloucester. Her administration with will was granted/proved (?) at Gloucester on 5th December 1933 by James Shield Eley, retired commercial traveller, Her effects were valued at £5,011-3-2d.

Florrie’s tombstone refers to her as ‘of Kendleshire’. She was buried at Mount Pleasant Chapel at Falfield.

Whilst George and Florrie Caple had no children their nephew, James Bernard Eley, was farming at Kendleshire in 1939.

Gloucester Journal, March 31, 1928:

 

An Alveston Resident’s Estate – Bequests to Charities

Mr. George Caple , of The Firs, Alveston, formerly of Kendalshire, Winterbourne, who died on August 22nd last, leaving gross estate to the value of £5, 585-1s-6d, with net personality £4, 420-19s-9d. Mrs. Florence Mary Caple, of the same address, the widow, Mr. James Shields (sic) Eley of Whitfield, Falfield, and Mr. Henry Wilmot Wickham Atchley, of 33 Corn Street, Bristol, solicitor, are the executors. Testator left £100 to Bristol Royal Infirmary, £100 to Dr. Barnardo’s Homes, £100 to Muller Orphanage, £100 to Hambrook Village Hospital, £100 to his wife, she being already provided for; £20 to James S. Eley. The residue of his property included certain trust funds over which he had power of appointment is to go as to 2-tenths each to Hester Nurse, William Whiting and Lucy Jenkins and 1-tenth each to Samuel Jenkins, Annie Chidsey, William Jenkins and Jessie Hancock

 

Diary of Mabel Isaac (second cousin) of Hall End Farm, Yate, 28th July 1899:

 

‘Friday. I churned a little drop of cream in bottle it was a long time coming. Aggie went to Mrs Hull’s to ask Sam to bring things from Bristol. Florrie Ely and M. Hewer rode over on bykes gave me a lesson too.’

Extract from The Running Tide by Kenneth Marling:

 ‘Not far away, at a lovely old farm at Kendleshire, lived my mother’s only sister, Florrie, and her husband, George Caple. Aunt Florrie was decidedly eccentric, but Uncle George took a fancy to me for some reason, and avowed I would end up a Director of the Bank! My aunt was a regular miser, and although they had a dining room, drawing room, and a large boudoir, as well as a huge kitchen, she always had her meals in a tiny scullery, with a deal table covered with newspapers. When she died, about forty tablecloths, mostly beautifully embroidered, were found among her things, and she left money hidden all over the place. Three lovely tea services were laid out in the other rooms, as well as other beautiful things, but they had belonged to Uncle George’s first wife, and Aunt Florrie derived no enjoyment from them.

When I first stayed with her, I poured the water from the jug on the washstand into the basin, but it was full of wriggling mosquito larvae! I poured it all back, and sieved it through the face cloth, but my cousin Bernard persuaded me to wash outside at the well in the yard after that. Uncle and Aunt had given up farming, and a couple named Carter rented the land and buildings, apart from an orchard where Aunt Florrie kept her hens, which were her pride and joy. She almost tucked them up at night – certainly they were more important to her than Uncle George. Sometimes they laid away, and I have found clutches of up to fifteen eggs in the long grass, and only patient searching would discover a favourite spot. One hen had the unfortunate habit of laying in a disused earth closet, and despite it not being in recent use I hated having to fish eggs from such an unpleasant nest! Farm closets were social centres, with two, or even three, seats side by side, the third often being lower than the others, for small children. My cousins would sit there together of a morning, enjoying a chat for quite a time, without turning a hair.

I was in one of the buildings playing with a chaff cutter – a lethal implement – and Mr. Carter finding me turning it over, told me to leave it alone, and was turning me out. There was bad blood between him and my aunt, who overheard him, and she leapt over the orchard wall and charged at him like a wild cat for interfering with me. In the orchard, which lay outside the boudoir, were plum trees – great luscious Belle de Louvaine – and I would sit up in the tree fork and stuff down as many as I could eat.

Sometimes Uncle George took me with him in the trap to Bristol. He had a smart stepping horse, and a beautiful turnout, and we bowled along at a spanking pace. He had to be on the alert for the odd piece of paper, or the reflection from a pool of water, which might make the horse shy, and perhaps bolt.’


  1. SARAH CATHERINE MARLING, Great II Aunt of Richard Barton

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Kate Eley was born on 17th April 1865 at Morton and baptised on 18th September 1881 at St Mary’s Church, Kingswood at the age of sixteen years. She married her second cousin Frank George Marling at Mount Pleasant Chapel, Falfield, on 7th September 1893. She was descended from Thomas Eley and her husband, Frank Marling, was descended from Thomas’s brother James Eley.

Frank George Marling (1863-1954) was born in Berkeley. At the time of the 1871 census eight-year-old Frank was staying with his Uncle Edward at 14 Dighton Street, Bristol. He was accompanied by his mother and sister Grace. In 1881 he was at home aged eighteen years and described as a ‘Postmaster’s Clerk’ and in 1891 still at home, a Clerk, aged twenty-eight-years. Frank Marling married his second cousin, Sarah Catherine Eley on 7th September 1893 at Mount Pleasant Chapel, Falfield, and had issue.

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Details: 7th September 1893, Frank George Marling, 30 years, bachelor, Dock Clerk, Sharpness, Berkeley, son of Oliver George Marling (deceased) Dock Clerk and Sarah Catherine Eley, 28 years, Spinster, Tortworth, James Eley (deceased) Farmer at Mount Pleasant Chapel, Falfield, rites & Ceremonies of the Independents, by certificate. Witnesses: James Shield Eley, Florence Mary Eley, Allan Lancelot Marling. Minister – W.H. Jones, Henry Codrington – Registrar

(Rev W.H. Jones was probably the Minister at Berkeley Union/Sharpness Union – Marlings were largely responsible for setting up of Sharpness Union Church)

 

Frank later became Secretary of Sharpness Docks, Pilotage Agent and Agent for the Capital and Counties Bank. He was also a Founder Member, Deacon, Sunday School Superintendent, and Secretary of Sharpness Union Chapel.

At the time of the 1901 census Frank and his family were living at 9 Dock Row, Sharpness. He was described as a thirty-eight-year-old Dock Clerk and Bank Agent, born in Berkeley. His wife Sarah c. Marling was aged thirty-five-years and born in Berkeley. Their children included Donald J. aged six years; Kathleen A. aged five years and Ruth M. Marling aged one year. All the children were shown as born in Sharpness. With them was his mother, Martha Marling, a sixty-six-year-old widow, born in Berkeley.

When Frank retired in 1931he and his wife moved to Esk House, Coombe Terrace, Wotton-under-Edge Later they later moved to Gloucester and then to Harrow. Sarah died on 2nd March 1951 at the age of eighty five. Frank felt lonely after his wife’s death and formed an attachment with a woman in Harrow, whom he married at 89. Frank married Elizabeth Weaver (Lewis) who was to survive him twenty six years. Sarah Catherine and Frank had four children.

‘Mr and Mrs Marling send loving greetings to their four children and partners; to their eight grandchildren, to their surviving brothers and sisters and to other relatives and friends on the 80th Anniversary of their first meeting at Morton, Nr Thornbury, Glos. The first week in May 1867. Vividly remembered by the first named. Happy still to be spared to each other at 55, Radnor Road, Harrow, Middlesex May 1947.

Frank George Marling of Sharpness, Glos. (Born at Berkeley, Glos., 7th January 1863) Sarah Catherine (Kate) Eley of Tortworth, Glos. (born at Morton 17th April 1865) Became Engaged at Tortworth Lake, 1st May, 1893. Married at Mount Pleasant Chapel, Falfield, Glos on 7th September, 1893’

‘September 7th 1893 Sarah C. (Kate) Eley – Frank G. Marling – with Mr & Mrs Frank G. Marling’s Compliments – Ivy Lawn, Sharpness’


3. JAMES SHIELD ELEY, Great II Uncle 0f Richard Barton

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James Shield Eley was born on 7th February 1867 at Lower Morton. His birth was registered on 13th March 1867 by Thomas Harney, Registrar. He was baptised at St Mary’s Kingswood on 18th September 1881 aged fourteen years. In 1893 he was farming with his mother and brother Ernest at Tortworth.

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James Shield Eley married Mary (known as Minnie) Bennett, daughter of Charles and Ann Bennett, a Retired Farmer. She was born on 8th March 1862. The 1881 Census records her as living at home at Falfield with her parents and two of her siblings. A letter dated July 1882 written by her sister Emily Bennett to Hannah Lewis of Falfield speaks of her sister Lucy Bennett going on a visit to Chepstow and her sister Minnie going to Bournemouth for about two months. Minnie would have been staying in Bournemouth with their brother Charles (1854- ).

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Minnie married James Shield Eley at Mount Pleasant Chapel, Falfield, on 13th April 1896, when she was thirty four years old and he was twenty nine. At the time of the marriage Mary was living at Stone and James Shield Eley’s address was given as Tortworth and he was described as a farmer. The witnesses were Charles Bennett and Walter Henry Eley. The minister was Edwin Child and they were married according to the rites and ceremonies of the Congregationalists.

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Minnie’s parents farmed at Falfield Green and later lived at Falfield Villa and then Norton House, Stone, but both were buried at Mount Pleasant Chapel during 1899. During the year of their marriage Shield’s mother, Annie Eley, retired from farming and moved to Bristol. His brother Ernest and his wife had also moved to Hengaston Farm, Berkeley.

According to the Bristol Times and Mirror of 10th April 1897 J.S. Eley stood for election to Falfield Parish Coucil but was not elected as he had only thirty-five-votes.

In1900 Shield and Minnie were still farming at Tortworth. At the time of the 1901 census James S. Eley was farming Tortworth Farm, next to Brook Farm. He was described as aged thirty-four-years, a farmer, born at Morton. His wife Mary was listed as thirty-four also and born at Falfield. Their General Domestic Servant was Sarah Hobby a sixteen-year-old worker, born in Tortworth.

There is confusion as to the precise location of Tortworth Farm and its relationship with Brook Farm.

Eventually Shield gave up farming and in later years he became an Agent for Motor Oil and then for Lister Mill Separators. For 34 years he was associated with the Hop Pickers Mission, Mount Pleasant Union Chapel and Thornbury Baptist Church.

In 1911 James Shield Eley was living in twelve rooms at Norton House, Stone, Falfield. He was described as the head of the household, aged forty-four-years and married for fifteen years. His occupation was given as Commercial Traveller – Dairy Machinery and his place-of-birth was given as Lower Morton, Thornbury. His wife Mary was aged forty-nine-years and was born in Falfield. Living with them was Emily Bennett and Lucy Ann Bennett, his sisters-in-law who were both single. Emily was aged sixty-three-years and Lucy Ann was sixty-one years. Both were born in Falfield and had their own private means. Their domestic servant was Amy Winifred Scriven (sp?), aged nineteen years and born in Bath.

Minnie died on 2nd October 1940 aged seventy-eight-years at Whitfield House. The cause was given as Carcenoma of the Stumoch (cordine end?) and Mitral disease. The informant was J. Shield Eley, Widower of the Deceased and he was described as a Retired Commercial Traveller. Probate of her will was granted out of the Bristol District Registry on 16th December 1940 to Robert Montague Bennett, chartered accountant, and John Wilfred Eley, farmer, and was worth £2,184.1.7d.The probate records index value her effects at £1,638-2-2d.

Western Daily Press and Bristol Mirror, 14th November 1940:

 

Funeral of Mrs. M. Eley at Falfield – Representative Gathering at Service

Falfield has suffered a great loss by the death of Mrs. Mary Eley (72), the wife of Mr. J. Shield Eley, of Whitfield, Falfield. Mrs. Eley had been closely associated for very many years with Mount Pleasant Chapel, of which she was secretary and she was particularly interested in the work of the Sunday School.

The funeral service at the chapel was conducted by Pastor F. Fellows, assisted by the Rev. A, Banner (vicar of Falfield). Mrs. Bradley was the organist. The principal mourners were Mr. J. Shield Eley (husband), Mr. Ernest Eley, Mr. J.P. Eley, and Mr. W.H. Eley (brothers-in-law)… Miss M. Eley, Mr. J.W. Eley, Mr. J.S. Eley, Mr. J. Bernard Eley (nephews and nieces). The mourners included:

Mr. R.P. Curtis representing Thornbury Sunday School Auxiliary Pastor

W.J. Baker and Mr. Wm Webb, Mr. A. Wilcox and Miss White, deacons, representing Wickwar Congregational Church.

Mr. H.M. Haddrell, representing Alveston Down Methodist Chapel.

Rev. D. Edwin Davies, Mrs. Davies and Miss Ford representing Berkeley Union Church.

Mr. and Mrs. H.M. Staley and Mr. and Mrs. G. Staley representing Oldbury Methodist Church.

Mr. and Mrs. J.T. Nichols and Mr. A.S. Cooper, representing Thornbury Baptist Chapel.

Mr. F.S. Lovell, honorary Secretary, Kingswood, Hanham and District Band of Hope Union.

Mrs. Browning J.P., representing Stone and District Nursing Association.

After Mary Eley’s death Shield married his housekeeper, Rosina Pullen, who, after Shield’s death, became life tenant until she vacated Whitfield House in 1950. She died in about 1956.

Shield made a will on 4th May 1944 and died on 2nd January 1945 aged 71 years. He was buried at Mount Pleasant Chapel. Probate was granted on 10th October 1945 to his executors Robert Montague Bennett, John Wilfred Eley and Charles James Pullin and the gross value of his estate was over £12,000. Pecuniary Legacies included £100 to Gloucestershire Congregational Union for Falfield Chapel; and £50 each to Thornbury Baptist Church and Hereford Hop Pickers’ Mission and £25 each to J.W.C. Fegan’s Homes, Scripture Gift Mission, British & Foreign Bible Society and London Missionary Society. The residuary estate was divided in equal shares to the children of Mrs Frank G. Marling, Ernest Edward Eley, John Park Eley and the nephews and nieces of J.S. Eley’s first wife Mary Eley, deceased) who were the children of Charles Bennett deceased, Leonard Bennett deceased and Mrs Isaac Holborow deceased.

Will of Mary Eley:

 

‘This is the Last Will and Testament of me Mary Eley of Whitfield Falfield in the County of Gloucester made this first day of March in the year of our lord one thousand nine hundred and thirty seven. I hereby revoke all wills made by me at any time heretobefore. I appoint Robert Montague Bennett Chartered Accountant 180 Redland Road Bristol and Wilfred Eley Farmer May’s Hill Frampton Cotterell Bristol to be my Executors and direct all my debts and Funeral Expenses shall be paid as soon as conveniently may be after my decease. I give and bequeath unto my husband James Shield all my personal effects and household furniture together with the monies standing in my deposit account at the National Provincial Bank at Thornbury Bristol absolutely and I appoint he shall receive the dividends and interest on all my investments during his lifetime together with the rents of my two cottages situate at Broad Oak Falfield. After his decease I direct my Executors to transfer the said Cottages to my nephew Gordon Bennett now residing at Kingsholm Gloucester for his own possession and to realize all my investments and pay first of all to Gordon Bennett the sum of £100 (one hundred pounds) duty free and afterwards divide the Residue in equal proportions between all the other Nephews and Nieces on both my own and my Husband’s side.

Mary Eley

Signed by the said Testator Mary Eley in the presence of us present at the same time who at her request in her presence and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as witnesses. G.M. Teague (Spinster) Mays Hill, Frampton Cotterell, William J. Baker (Clerk) 292, St. John’s Lane, Bristol 3.

The Will was proved in His Majesty’s High Court of Justice. The District Probate Registry at Bristol:

 

Be it known Mary Eley of Whitfield Falfield in the County of Gloucester, wife of James Shield Eley, died there on 2nd day of October 1940.

Administration granted to Robert Montague Bennett of 180 Redland Road Bristol 6 Chartered Accountant the nephew of deceased and John Wilfred Eley (in the Will called Wilfred Eley) of May’s Hill, Frampton Cotterell, in the County of Gloucester Farmer the Executors in the said Will

Gross value of the Estate is £1638. 2 2d and that the net value of the personal estate amounts to £1467. 14. 8d

Dated 16th December 1940 C.O. French, District Registrar.


4. WALTER HENRY ELEY, Great II Uncle of Richard Barton

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Walter Eley was born on 13th October 1868 at Morton. In the 1891 census return he was described as a twenty-two-year-old schoolteacher in training. Ten years later he was a boarder at Leamington Villas, Chiswick Lane, Chiswick St Nicholas, the home of John Walklate and his family. Walklate was described as a forty-year-old foreman Mechanical Engineer. Walter Henry gained his B.A. Honours degree from London University and became a Master at Latymer High Street, Chiswick from 1895 until 1929.

In 1911 Walter Henry Eley was staying with John Henry Heirgott (sic), a hairdresser, and his family who lived in a private house with eight rooms, St Helens, Bath Road, Hounslow, Middlesex. Walter Henry was described as a forty-two-year-old single Assistant Secondary Schoolmaster employed by the Latymer Foundation at Hammersmith and British by parentage. John Henry Heirgott was aged fifty-five-years, married, a Hairdresser working on his own account and born in Germany. His wife of twenty-six-years was Alma Alice Louise Heirgott, aged forty-two-years and born in Clapham, Surrey. Their son was Arthur Henry Heirgott, a single twenty-five-year-old with no occupation. He was born in Westminster Bridge Road, London, and was described as German. Interestingly the enumerator initially thought that Walter Henry eley was the head of the household and the List had to be amended!

Johann Heinrich Heergott was born in Hamburg in about 1855. He was the son of Johann Heinrich Heergott, a tailor. He had arrived in England by 1881 when he was living at Lambeth Baths, 156 Westminster Road, and working as a Hairdresser. He was described as Henry Hurgott (sic), twenty-five-years-old, single, and born in Hamburg, Germany. With him was Herman Belleville, a fifty-two-year-old Hairdresser, who was born in Freishok (sp?) in Prussia.

On 17th September 1882 Johann Heinrich Heergott, aged twenty-seven-years, married Alice Louisa MacNair at St Peter’s Church, Battersea. He was described as a hairdresser, living at S. Mary, Lambeth, the son of Johann Heinrich Heergott, a deceased tailor. Alice Louisa MacNair was aged twenty-one-years, of 21 Benfield Street, and daughter of James MacNair, a weaver. The witnesses were H. Belleville and L. MacNair.

Arthur Henry Heergott, their son, was born during the third quarter of 1885 in Lambeth Registration District.

In 1891 John Henry Heergott and his family were living at 30 Streathleven Road. He was described as a thirty-five-year-old hairdresser born in Germany and a British subject. His wife Alice (sic) was aged twenty-nine-years and born in Battersea. Their son Arthur was aged five years and born in Lambeth. Visiting was James McNair, a sixty-three-year-old shopman, born in Lambeth. Also staying was Marie Batcheler, a forty-three-year-old Cook (Domestic) who was forty-three-years-old and born in Norfolk.

In 1901 the Heergotts had returned to 156 Westminster Bridge Road. John H. Heergott was a forty-five-year-old employer, a Hairdresser, born in Germany. His wife, Alma Heergott, was aged thirty-eight-years and born in London and their son Arthur H. Heergott, was aged fifteen and born in London. Next door was James McNair, aged sixty-years, the Bath Superintendent, who was born in Lambeth. His wife Emeline M. McNair was the bath attendant and was born in Winchester, Hants. James McNair had married Emmeline Martha Linwood in Fulham Registration District during 1894.

Arthur H. Heergott married Olive E. Taylor during the second quarter of 1919 in Brentford Registration District, Middlesex. His father, John H. Heergott, died during the last quarter of 1924 in Lambeth Registration District, aged sixty-nine-years.

During that same quarter of 1924 Walter Henry Eley married Alma A. L. Heergott in Brentford Registration District. Alice Louisa McNair was born during the first quarter of 1860 in Wandsworth Registration District making her sixty-four-years-old at the time of her marriage. In 1861Alma’s father, was probably the James McNair who was a thirty-six-year-old tailor of 64 Sun Street.

Alma A. L. Eley died in Brentford Registration District during the first quarter of 1936 aged sixty-eight-years.

Walter retired to Alveston where he kept a five-acre market garden. In the 1931 and 1935 Kelly’s directories Walter’s address was given as ‘The Firs’, Alveston, a house situated opposite the Ship Inn.

On October 5th 1937 he applied for planning permission for the erection of a bungalow in the grounds of ‘The Firs’, which was approved by Thornbury R.D.C. The builder, J. Smith of 55 Queen’s Road, Ashley Down, drew up the plans. At the time Walter’s address was given as May’s Hill, Frampton Cotterell, which may indicate that his wife, Alma, may have recently died and that he was wanting to ‘down-size’. Certainly Shield was not living at ‘The Firs’ in 1939. When Alma died his niece, Maud Eley, went to live with him as his housekeeper. Walter died on 1st May 1959 and was buried at St Helen’s Church, Alveston. He left all of his money to Maud but she died in 1965 leaving all to her niece Alma Honeyborne.

 

Details from Gravestone:

Walter Henry Eley BA London

Born 13th October 1868

Second Son of Annie and James Eley of Moreton Thornbury

Died 1st May 1959

Ethel Maud Eley, niece of Walter Henry Eley,

Born 4th October 1898 and died 27th July 1965

Reminiscences of Walter Henry Eley published in the Jubilee Edition of the Latymerian Magazine of spring 1955:

 

‘We are privileged to be able to print some reminiscences of Mr. W.H. Eley, who was appointed to the original staff of our School. He remembers the opening of the School on January 9th, 1895, by Dr Temple, Bishop of London, and later Archbishop of Canterbury.

“I can distinctly visualize Dr Temple because of his distinguished personality. In his audience were many prospective parents and they appeared to be most enthusiastic about the establishment of this secondary school which was the first of its kind in that part of London and would serve quite a wide area of West London. Quite a number spoke to me and made enquiries about the prospects of the new school.”

The School met for the first time on January 14th with 106 boys on the roll and occupied the rooms round the hall and as far as the corridor as the first doors. The staff had been carefully chosen and it was obvious from what Mr Eley says that Latymer owes a very great debt to them.

“The appointment of the Rev. C.J. Smith by the governors was a wise move because, as Vice-Principal of St Mark’s Training College, he had had quite a wide experience of men. Probably they might have been influenced by the fact that he was an old Hammersmith boy who had been at Lower Latymer.

In choosing his staff, the head naturally relied on St Mark’s and, as secondary education was in its infancy, they were elementary trained men with but little knowledge of the new education. From the beginning he introduced a spirit of brotherhood and trust, a spirit that continued throughout his career. On more than one occasion he accepted recommendations from the staff when making new appointments. Owing to the favourable situation of the School, the number of pupils rapidly increased, which led to an increase in the number of the masters. Many of these were young and were inspired by a spirit of enthusiasm and zeal and spared no pains in their duties.

At first the morning period began at 9.45 but with the increased curriculum, optional classes were begun at 9 o’clock and Morning Prayers were held at 10. Here again was a need for extra Masters, some of whom were visiting ones such as M. Peret, who taught French. Mr Francis was appointed for Chemistry and Mr Martin for Drawing.

As there was no playground, except that at the back of the School, pitches on Wormwood Scrubs had to be rented, and when Godolphin School was closed we were able to use their grounds for School matches on Saturdays. On our playground, which gradually got overcrowded, football became popular and form championship matches were so keenly fought that eventually School Prefects had to be appointed to assist in supervision.

The Latymer spirit was at first due to the Head but was fostered by the younger members of the staff who fraternized and shared lodgings. For instance Jimmy King, Fred Weekes, Edgar Coyle, Clem Ayres and I shared rooms on the Upper Mall. As the bigger boys in the School were not many years younger than we were there was practically a “happy band of pilgrims” so to speak. Friendly entertainments were held in the School hall in which King, Weekes, Coyle, Logan, Ayres and I, among the masters and Billy West, Sonny Smith, Charley Fox, H.H.G. Bennett and others among the boys were prominent. King and Weekes organized the cricket and I arranged the football. On some Saturdays there were as many as six matches played, so much supervision was necessary. King and Weekes eventually formed the Old Boys’ Association.”

It is clear from Mr Eley’s account that much of the spirit and some of the characteristic activities of Latymer were present almost from the start. The foundations were well and truly laid.’

From a former pupil: ‘I spent my first term in Form 3B under Mr Eley but soon moved up to 3A…’

‘Photograph of the Staff in about 1896: Back row – W.B. Ping, H. Palmer, S Pontefract, (?), J. King. Middle Row – Cadley, F. Fowler, Rev C.J. Smith, D.C. Hutton, E.D. Martin, Front Row – W.H. Eley, (?).’


 

6. FRANCIS AUGUSTUS ELEY, Infant Great II Uncle of Richard Barton

 

Francis Eley was born in 1870 and died on 2nd March 1871 aged eleven weeks.

Obituary Card: ‘In Affectionate Remembrance of Francis Augustus who died March 2nd 1871, aged 11 weeks, Annie Selina who died September 8th 1873, aged 1 year and 8 months, Maud Elizabeth, who died October 9th 1873, aged 8 months, the beloved children of James & Ann Eley of Merry Ford Farm, Kingswood. ‘Not gone from memory, not gone from love. Only gone to the Father’s house above.’’


7. ANNIE SELINA ELEY, Infant Great II Aunt of Richard Barton

Annie Selina Eley died on 8th September 1873 aged one year and eight months.

Gloucester Journal, 13th September 1873

‘A Child Drowned: An inquest was held at The New Inn, Kingswood, near Wotton-under-Edge, on Wednesday, before Mr. W. Gaisford, coroner, on the body of Annie Selina Eley, infant daughter of Mr. James Eley, of Merryford Farm, aged one year and eight months, who was accidentally drowned on Monday. From the evidence of Jane Allen, Mr. Eley’s servant, and who was the only witness examined, it appears the child was left alone for a short time while the witness went upstairs. Looking out of the window she saw the child had fallen into a pan of water. She ran downstairs very much frightened, and sent a sister of the deceased to bring the infant indoors. When the child had been brought in restoratives were applied and every means adopted to resuscitate the child, but without effect. The jury, returned a verdict of “Accidentally drowned”. It transpired that Mrs. Eley, mother of the child, had been nursing it at about twenty minutes past two o’clock, and at half-past it was brought in dead.’


8. MAUD ELIZABETH ELEY, Infant Great II Aunt of Richard Barton

 

Maud Elizabeth Eley died on 9th October 1873 aged eight months.

Obituary Card: ‘In Affectionate Remembrance of Francis Augustus who died March 2nd 1871, aged 11 weeks, Annie Selina who died September 8th 1873, aged 1 year and 8 months, Maud Elizabeth, who died October 9th 1873, aged 8 months, the beloved children of James & Ann Eley of Merry Ford Farm, Kingswood. ‘Not gone from memory, not gone from love. Only gone to the Father’s house above.’’


  1. JOHN PARK ELEY, Great II Uncle of Richard Barton

 

John Park Eley was born on 27th July 1874 at Merryford Farm, Kingswood and baptised at St Mary’s Kingswood on 28th October 1881 aged nine years. At the time of the 1891 census John Park Eley was aged sixteen years and was described as an Ironmonger’s apprentice. This was not pursued and he made his career in farming.

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John Park Eley (seated) with Walter Eley his brother

He married Mary Ethel Smith and had four children. Ethel Smith was the daughter of Daniel Smith, the brother of Moses Smith (see notes by Annie Eley), and his wife Sarah Ann Shipp Smith. In the 1871 census return Ethel M. Smith was aged one year and living at Crockleys Farm, Tortworth. Her father was Daniel Smith, a thirty-one-year-old farmer of 250 acres, employing six men, and born at Iron Acton. His wife, Sarah Anne was aged twenty-eight-years and was also born in Iron Acton. Ethel was at home aged eleven years in the 1881 census and in 1891 she was described as living at home at Crockleys Farm and working as an Assistant Farmer.

In the 1901 census return Anne Eley was staying with her son, John Park Eley, who was by then farming at Kendleshire. She was then sixty-three-years-old and born at Tytherington. John Park Eley was described as a twenty-six-year-old farmer, born in Kingswood, an employer. His wife, Mary Ethel, was aged thirty years and born in Tortworth and their children were James B. Eley, aged four years, and Ethel M. Eley aged two years. Both of the children were born in Westerleigh. They had a nineteen-year-old servant, Frances A. King, who was born in London.

From about 1908 his mother Ann Eley, lived with them, at The Chestnuts until shortly before her death.

In 1911 John Park Eley was living in the eight roomed Farm House at Mays Hill, Frampton Cotterell within the Civil Parish of Westerleigh and the ecclesiastical parish of St Saviour, Coalpit Heath. He was described as a thirty-six-year-old married man who had been married for fifteen years with four children who had all survived. He was a farmer and employer and was born in Kingswood, near Wotton-under-Edge. His wife Mary Ethel Eley was forty-one-years-old and was born at Tortworth. His mother Anne Eley was a seventy-four-year-old widow who was born at Tytherington. Living with them was Janet Mary Jenner, niece, a single nineteen-year-old Draper’s assistant and born at Newent. Also Elizabeth Townsend a nineteen-year-old general domestic servant who was born in Yate. The children included Bernard Eley, aged fourteen-years, who was at school and was born at Kendleshire; Ethel Maud Eley was aged twelve years, at school and born at Kendleshire; John Wilfred Eley was aged eight years and born at Kendleshire and Arthur Richard was aged one year and born at Mays Hill.

John Park Eley farmed ‘The Chestnuts’ at May’s Hill, Frampton Cotterell and became the Chairman of A.E.C. during the First World War.

In 1921 he bore his Uncle Henry Shield’s coffin with his brother Ernest Edward Eley.

 

Newspaper Photo and Caption from the Gazette May 10th 1930:

 

‘Cutting the First Slice – Mr.  J.P. Eley just commencing his duties of carving at the Ox-Roast Festivities at Coalpit Heath on Saturday. For the slice Mr Eley is cutting, Mr F.C. Stone (extreme right) secured £4. 11s from Mr George Rogers.’

On 4th March 1932 probate was granted to John Park Eley and Daniel Smith, farmers, of  the estate of Sarah Ann Smith of Manten, Tortworth, widow, who died on 17th December 1931.

Mary Ethel Eley died on 30th July 1934 aged sixty-four-years and was buried at Coalpit Heath.

In the Probate records Mary Ethel Eley of Mays Hill, Westerleigh, wife of John Park Eley, died on 30th July 1934. Probate was granted at Bristol on 9th October 1934 to James Bernard Eley and John Wilfred Eley, farmers. Estate valued at £1,011-5-1d.

 

John Park Eley later married Margery Teague. She had helped Ethel during her final illness and continued housekeeping afterwards. It is said that she began courting a man from Frampton that is until Great Uncle II John Eley popped the question. Margery was only in her forties when she married and she survived him by a number of years living in the farm cottage.

Alma Honeyborne remembers that Margery’s father was Tom Teague. It would also seem that Ethel and Margery were related.

Notes from a family tree written by F. G. Marling:

Dan Smith had a brother Moses Smith whose daughter Rose married Tom Teague. Tom was the son of James Teague who had other children Gertie, Ethel, Olive, Dora, May Grace, Hubert and Howard. (This may have been to show a link between Ethel Smith and Margery Teague the wives of John Park Eley)

Note from Ann Reid:

Rosa Smith (daughter of Moses Smith & Julia Nichols) married Thomas James Teague in 1903. I think they had a daughter, Gwendoline Margery Teague in 1904. It is possible that she was known as Margery, & she may be the lady in question. In my calculation, this would make her a 1st cousin once removed from Ethel, thus proving the connection you mention.

His sons James Bernard and John Wilfred married the Newman sisters but Ivy Belle died during childbirth on 5th December 1934. This death was followed by that of his mother, Ann Eley, who died in her ninety-seventh year at Shield Eley’s home at Whitfield on 27th December 1934.

The Eley family of Chestnut Farm featured as ‘Gunters Farm’, a BBC Broadcast during 1935.

Newspaper – Radio Times 1935:

 

‘The story of a Farming Family. The Eley family will take part in ‘Gunter’s Farm’, by F.W. Harvey, tonight at 8.30. The picture shows them in the midst of their haymaking activities. (Western Programme)’ (shows Wilfred, Bernard, Cissie, J.P.Eley, Turk the dog, and Maud)


ERNEST EDWARD ELEY, Great Grandfather of Richard Barton

Ernest Eley was born on 25th November 1869 at Morton and was baptised on 28th October 1881 at St Mary’s Kingswood at the age of thirteen years with his younger brother John Park Eley.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS FAMILY CONTACT: btsarnia@gmail.com

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One comment on “James and Ann Eley, Farmers of Morton, Kingswood and Tortworth

  1. Pingback: Ernest Eley, Farmer of Tortworth, Kingswood and Berkeley | btsarnia

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