btsarnia

A tribute to the life and work of Brian Torode

Noad Family of Slimbridge

NOAD FAMILY OF WEST KINGTON AND SLIMBRIDGE


James Noad I (1717-1792) and Ann (1721-1801)

of West Kington, Wilts

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Isaac Noad (1762-1832) and Hester Buckle (1767-1829)

Labourer and Pauper of West Kington, Nettleton, Leonard Stanley and Slimbridge

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 James Noad II (1796-1867) and Louisa Cook (1796-1867)

Labourer of Rowley Regis and Slimbridge

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James Noad III (1826-1887) and Sarah Byford (1823-1895)

Labourer of Slimbridge

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 Arthur John Noad (1862-1938) and Ann Duffell (1866-1943)

Carpenter, Wheelwright and Pattern Maker of Slimbridge

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Florence Noad (1891-1968) and Edward Percy Barton

 

 


 

JAMES NOAD I, Great V Grandfather of Richard Barton

 

Husband of Ann

Father of Isaac Noad

 

Also Father of Betty, Elizabeth Provin, Hannah, Ann, Thomas and James

 

James and Ann Noad were probably married in about 1746 and they had seven children who were baptised between 1748 and 1762 at West Kington. Although a Noad family was well established in West Kington there is neither baptism of a James Noad in the parish records nor details of his marriage.

A James Noad, pauper, was buried at West Kington on 2nd August 1792 aged seventy-five-years. An Ann Noad was buried on 9th April 1801 aged eighty-years.


Their children were Great V Aunts and Uncles:

BETTY NOAD, Great V Aunt of Richard Barton

Betty Noad was baptised on 14th February 1748/9 at West Kington and may have died in 1753


ELIZABETH NOAD, Great V Aunt of Richard Barton

Elizabeth Noad was baptised on 15th February 1748/9 at West Kington and she may have married Henry Provin in 1784.


MARY NOAD, Great V Aunt of Richard Barton

Mary Noad was baptised on 2nd December 1750/1 at West Kington.

A Mary Noad signed the register at the time of the marriage of Thomas Noad and Mary Smart in 1780.


 

ANN NOAD, Great V Aunt of Richard Barton

Ann Noad was baptised 26th August 1753 at West Kington


THOMAS NOAD, Great V Uncle of Richard Barton

Thomas was baptised on 19th September 1756 at West Kington. He married Mary Smart of West Kington on 13th March 1780 at Nettleton. At the time of the marriage Thomas was described as of Nettleton parish and he made his mark in the register. Mary also made her mark. The witnesses were Joseph Shelard who made his mark and Mary Noad who signed her name.

They had nine children and all but the eldest were born in Nettleton: Betty baptised in 1780, William baptised in 1782, John baptised in 1784, Sarah baptised in 1784 (?), Daniel baptised in 1792, Isaac baptised in 1794, Thomas baptised in 1796, Francis baptised in 1798 and Betty baptised in 1801. In 1794 he was described as a pauper. He was buried at Nettleton on 8th February 1822 aged sixty-five-years.

Their children were cousins of James Noad I, Great III Grandfather:

WILLIAM NOAD, cousin of James Noad I

William Noad was baptised on 29th September 1782 at Nettleton. He married Susannah and had a child, Sarah, born in 1808.

Their daughter was a second cousin of James Noad II, Great II Grandfather:

Sarah Noad was born on 23rd March 1808 and baptised at Nettleton on 17th April 1808.

JOHN NOAD, cousin of James Noad I

Joan Noad was born on 30th August 1784 and baptised at Nettleton on 26th September 1784.

SARAH STILES, cousin of James Noad I

Sarah Noad was born on 20th August 1789 and baptised at Nettleton on 18th September. She married William Stiles on 15th June 1818 at Yatton Keynell (West Yatton?) in Wiltshire. In 1823 the family was living at Gideahall, Wiltshire. William Stiles was born at Biddlestone in Wiltshire in about 1796 (i.e. aged fifty-five-years) and was described as an agricultural labourer of Ford, North Wraxhall in the 1851 census return. Sarah was by then aged sixty-two-years. The couple had at least seven children.

Their children were second cousins of James Noad II, Great II Grandfather:

Mary Anne Stiles

John Stiles

William Stiles

Sarah Stiles

Sarah Stiles

Elizabeth Stiles

Jane Stiles

DANIEL NOAD, cousin of James Noad I

Daniel was baptised at Nettleton on 8th July 1792. He married Mary and they had a daughter Betty who was baptised on 20th October 1832 at Nettleton. Daniel was described in the baptism register at Nettleton as a labourer of Nettleton.

Their daughter was a second cousin of James Noad II, Great II Grandfather:

Betty Noad was baptised at Nettleton on 20th October 1832 at Nettleton.

ISAAC NOAD, cousin of James Noad I

Isaac Noad was born on 27th February 1794 and baptised at Nettleton on 23rd March 1794. His father was described as a pauper in the baptism register.

THOMAS NOAD, cousin of James Noad I

Thomas Noad was born on 29th May 1796 and baptised on the same day at Nettleton.

FRANCIS NOAD, cousin of James Noad I

Francis Noad was born on 7th November 1798 and baptised at Nettleton on 2nd December.

BETTY NOAD, cousin of James Noad I

Betty Noad was born on 5th August 1802 and baptised at Nettleton on 22nd August. She was buried there on 7th December 1820 aged eighteen years.


JAMES NOAD, Great V Uncle of Richard Barton

James Noad was baptised on 16th January 1760 and married Joanne Viner at Acton Turville in 1787. Their children included Elizabeth Viner who was baptised at Acton Turville in 1787 and James in 1789. James later married Susannah and their children included Mary Ann who was baptised in 1793 and Louise in 1794.

The children of James and Joanne were cousins of James Noad I, Great III Grandfather:

ELIZABETH VINER NOAD, cousin of James Noad I

Elizabeth Noad was baptised in 1787 at Acton Turville

JAMES NOAD, cousin of James Noad I

James Noad was baptised in 1789 at Acton Turville

The children of James and Susannah were cousins of James Noad I, Great III Grandfather:

MARY ANNE NOAD, cousin of James Noad I

Mary Noad was baptised in 1793 at Acton Turville

LOUISE NOAD, cousin of James Noad I

Louise Noad was baptised in 1794 at Acton Turville


ISAAC NOAD, Great IV Grandfather of Richard Barton

Son of James Noad I and Ann

Husband of Hester Buckle

Father of James Noad II

Also Father of Thomas, Isaac and Henry

Isaac Noad was baptised at West Kington on23rd January 1763, the sixth child of James and Ann Noad, Wiltshire.

He married Hester Buccle at Nettleton on 30th September 1793. He was described as being of West Kington and he made his mark in the register and she was described as of Nettleton and she too made her mark. The witnesses were James Clack who made his mark and Edith Bullock who signed the register.

They had four sons – Thomas, James, Isaac and Henry who were born between the years 1794 and 1803. By the year 1799 Isaac Noad and his family had moved to Leonard Stanley where their son Isaac was baptised on 3rd or 9th February 1800 and where they were in receipt of poor relief:

‘In the first half of 1799 Isaac Noad received seven shillings and sixpence and later a “Bush of flower” worth thirteen shillings. In the second half of the same year we find that he had one pound two shillings and a penny in “monies etc.”, two shillings and sixpence for his settlement examination and finally fourteen shillings and nine pence for “Removing his goods”. The last item tells its own sorry tale. Isaac and Hester Noad were very poor, they needed help but Leonard Stanley was under no obligation to give it.’

 By October 1800 they had settled in Slimbridge where they were once again in receiving poor relief and this continued until at least 1823. Their third son, Isaac Noad, was buried at Slimbridge on 10th April 1802 and their youngest son, Henry Noad, was born there in 1803 and baptised at Slimbridge Parish Church on 7th August 1803.

Hester Noad was buried on 18th January 1829 in Slimbridge aged sixty-two-years. ‘Isaac Node’ died in 1832 aged sixty-nine-years and was buried on 25th March at Slimbridge.

Extract from Slimbridge Parish Records: Section IV Overseers of the Poor (Accounts date from 1635):

 

23rd October 1800 Paid Isaac Noad in distress 2s 0d

“A list of those paupers who received weekly pay from April 7th 1801”… Paid Isaac Noad to 19 weeks at 3shillings per week £2-17-0d

Nov 8th 1801 Paid Hester Note for waiting on Susanna Workman 1s 0d

Nov 16th 1801 Paid Hester Noat for waiting on Susanna Workman 1s 0d

June 24th 1802 Paid Isaac Note at 3 different times in distress 3s 0d

Feb 1st 1802 Paid Isaac Note in distress twice 5s 0d

Feb 11th 1802 Paid Isaac Noad in distress 2s 6d

Feb 14th 1802 Paid Isaac Noad in illness 3s 0d

Feb 16th 1802 Paid Isaac Noate Illness 3s 0d

Feb 16th 1802 Paid Noat’s child work 2s 51/2d

Feb 28th 1802 Paid Isaac Note feavor 2s 0d

Feb 28th 1802 Paid Isaac Notte at times in distress 3s 0d

March 20th 1802 Paid Isaac Noat ill 1s 0d

March 28th 1802 Paid Isaac Noat in distress 1s od

April 16 1802 Paid to Isaac Noad rent to Mr Archard for 1 year £3-3-0d

May 16th 1802 Paid Isaac Noad’s wife 4s 0d

“Disbursements in the Parish Account by discretion”

1808 Dec 11th Paid Isaac Noad ill 2s 0d

1808 Dec 14th Paid Isaac Noad ill 2s 0d

1810 March 2nd Paid Isaac Noad in distress 2s 0d

1810 March 2nd Paid Isaac Noad in distress 1s 0d

1810 Dec 7th Paid Isaac Noad in distress 2s 0d

1810 Dec 21st Paid Isaac Noad in distress 2s 0d

1812 July 20th Paid Isaac Noad his wife very lame 5s 0d

1814 April 14th Paid for taking Isaac Noad to the Infirmary 5s 0d

1814 April 14th Paid for taking Noad’s wife to the Infirmary 4s 0d

“Disbursements at discretion of the Overseers from 22nd April to 21st October”

1814 Paid Hester Noad 3s (?) Family with passes 4s-0d

14 entries no specific dates & similar i.e. Paid Hester Noad 3s 0d

Paid Isaac Noad pair of glasses 2s 0d

5 further entries Paid Hester Noad 3s 0d

Paid Hester Noad’s son pair of shoes 3s 0d

Paid Hester Noad 3s 0d

“Disbursements by weekly payments 21st October to 27th April”

1815 Paid Hester Noad 14 weeks 3s per week £3-14-0d

1815 Hester Noad Horse load of coal 3s 0d

“Maintenance of the Poor”

1815 Oct 6th Paid Isaac Noad ill 3s 0d

“Account for Coles given to the Poor”

1823 Feb 7th Isaac Noad 6

May 9th 1802 “Account of James Cornock one of the overseers of the Poor in the parish of Slimbridge for the year 1802”

June 8th Paid to Mr Orchard for planting Isaac Noad garden to Potatoes 5s 0d

 

Slimbridge Poor Rate Assessment

Date                Occupier        Proprietor            Annual Value            Rate 1s in the pound

July 1825  Thomas Noad   Edw. Phillimore    £1-10-0d                       1s 6d

July 1825  James Noad      Isaac Byford          £1-0-0d                         1s 0d

Feb 1826 as per 1825 but name spelt Noade

Oct 1826   Thomas Noad   Edw. Phillimore     £1 –10-0d                     £0-0-41/2d

Oct 1826    James Noad      Messrs. Marklove   £1-5-0d                        £0-0-33/4d

Mildred Collins wrote:

‘We know therefore, without doubt, that Henry Noad came from Slimbridge and that some of our cousins several times removed still live there but the mystery of Isaac and Hester Noad still remained. What were they doing in Leonard Stanley – they do not appear to have stayed any length of time – and what happened to them when they arrived in Slimbridge? I had had a feeling for some time that the Noads were very poor and this made me think of the conditions of the poor generally. Up to the early 1840’s (1834) the relief of the poor devolved on the parish in which they had ‘settlement’. Settlement was conferred by birth or by contributing to the parish ‘wealth’ by having a job or renting a house valued at not less than 310 a year, etc. Obviously if one had to ask for Parish Relief one had usually been born there. Should this turn out not to be so then it was more than likely that you and your family would be returned to where it was so – the Parish of your birth – so that they could have the expense of you in your poverty. But before this decision was made there was a ‘settlement examination’ which gave an opportunity for the situation to be looked at and for directions to be given for removal of the family if settlement was not given. These directions were given by two Overseers found in each parish. The Overseers collected dues from the more prosperous of the parish and ‘disbursed’ them to the poor. They sometimes supervised a workhouse or poor house as well but a family with one able-bodied member was rarely put into the workhouse – it was cheaper to keep them outside.

I decided to look in the Leonard Stanley ‘poor books’ or ‘Overseers Accounts’. These turned out to be beautiful suede leather bound volumes with large brass clasps and meticulously kept. I searched for the inclusion of any Noads. Sadly I found them. In the first half of 1799 Isaac Noad received seven shillings and sixpence and later a “Bush of flower” worth thirteen shillings. In the second half of the same year we find that he had one pound two shillings and a penny in “monies etc.”, two shillings and sixpence for his settlement examination and finally fourteen shillings and nine pence for “Removing his goods”. The last item tells its own sorry tale. Isaac and Hester Noad were very poor, they needed help but Leonard Stanley was under no obligation to give it. Isaac could not have been born there, so they were moved on, but not very far, to Slimbridge. The end of the eighteenth century was a time of very great hardship; bread riots occurred in the Gloucestershire area and are described in Mrs Craik’s ‘John Halifax Gentleman’. The Leonard Stanley Overseers’ Accounts also tell the same tale: in 1795 the disbursements to the poor for the first half year were £50-3-10d and £50-5-0d but four years later, in 1799, they were £64-11-0d and £127-3-10d and by 1800 they were much higher still. The Noads were caught up in this new army of the rural poor, ‘press ganged’ by force of circumstances, changes in farming practices and very poor harvests.

But why were the Noads ‘removed’ to Slimbridge? I could find no evidence that they were born there. On the other hand Miss (Marian) Barton, a relative of Mr (Bill) Noad and also living in Slimbridge, soon discovered from the Slimbridge Overseers’ records that Isaac and Hester received a great deal of help from the Slimbridge Overseers beginning on their arrival there. An entry dated October 23rd 1800 reads, “Paid Isaac Noad in distress 2s 0d” and poor relief continued until February 7th 1823 when Isaac Noad received six lots of “Coles”. This does not necessarily mean that Isaac had no proper job during this period, for, following on from what was known as the Speenhamland scale of 1796 in which wages were made up to a subsistence level by Poor Law disbursements, it would have been possible for him both to have worked and also to have had help. In fact, however, later listed items in the record suggest that Isaac Noad was often ill: there are eight instances along the many denoting “in distress” and other items. Also during 1814 and 1815, except for a pair of glasses to Isaac Noad and a pair of shoes to Hester Noad’s son, all help is given in Hester Noad’s name. Was her husband in hospital, for in 1814 they were both taken to the infirmary? Whatever the case the records suggest a sad picture of a continuous struggle against poverty and ill health. But at the same time time it also suggests kind support of the village for a family which had apparently no right of settlement. A possible clue of the circumstances is given by one entry in the Overseer’s record of 1814 in which it says, “Family with passes”. Now it was possible for a Justice of the Peace, at a settlement examination to give the applicant a ‘travelling pass’ which permitted him to claim help, at the rate of a halfpenny per mile for the distance travelled, from the area through he happened – in theory – to be passing. Perhaps this is how Noad’s sojourn in Slimbridge began. But one can hardly be said to be passing through for fourteen years. Sometimes parishes instead of giving ‘travellers’ a halfpenny per mile set them to work and this of course then made it possible for some to get out of the eighteenth century poverty trap. This parish seems to have tried with the Noads, employing Hester Note (sic) and Noats (sic) child at the beginning of their stay. And in a real sense they were successful for the Noads did recover themselves: Mr William Noad was Chairman of the Parish Council for many years but long before that, James and Louisa Noad, were marking the family with Slimbridge traditions by the purchase of the 1840’s Bible. Thus the family was established in Slimbridge in 1800. But where did they come from originally?

The clue emerged from the 1950 (sic – surely 1851!) Census because this gave the birth place of James Noad (the one with the Bible), who had been born before the Noads went to Leonard Stanley, en route, one might say, for Slimbridge. At first I misread the entry, thinking it to be West Burton, a non-existent place. Then Miss Barton came to the rescue with the suggestion that it was “Wilts Burton”. This proved to be a village just over the borders of Wiltshire on the road between Chipping Sodbury and Chippenham and very near to places I had already met, such as Tormarton and Acton Turville, in the Noad lists in the Mormon records (I.G.I.). Home seemed in sight!

I went to the Record Office at Trowbridge and there indeed found Isaac and Hester Noad. Burton proved to be part of the parish of Nettleton and Isaac Noad was married there to Hester Buccle (sic) in 1793, although he himself came from the adjacent village of West Kington. In fact the family to which Isaac belonged seems to have come originally from West Kington. Thomas and James seem to be key names in the Noad family and it is interesting to see how early they crop up in the records consulted. A Thomas was born to a Hugh and Elizabeth Noad in West Kington in 1666 and in 1701 we find that a Thomas Noad (yeoman) and his wife, Sarah, had a son who died in the next year. However, in the middle of the seventeen hundreds there lived in West Kington a James and Ann Noad who had several children, Betty born in 1748, followed by three more daughters and three sons called Thomas, James and Isaac born in 1762. This third son I believe to have been Isaac who married Hester Buckle and had four sons, at least one of whom, James, should be recorded in the Baptism Register of Burton (Nettleton) and there sure enough he was: born on December 4th 1796 and christened on January 15th 1797. This was the James who really settled the family in Slimbridge. However, James turned out not to be the eldest son for on March 29th 1794 we find a son Thomas was baptised. This is the Thomas who also settled in Slimbridge and married Hester Pearce in 1825 but who died early, in 1841, and therefore tends to be forgotten. As we would expect there are no more recorded baptisms of Hester’s and Isaac’s children in Nettleton for they moved on. Hence it seems the Noads came from north-east Wiltshire, on the borders with Gloucestershire, where they had lived from at least the sixteenth century and where Noads still live.

Why did some leave? Briefly to look for work and better times. One glance at the Overseer’s Reports for Nettleton shows that the Noads and the families they married into were poor, some such as Isaac’s brother, Thomas, very poor, even before the failed harvests of 1799 onwards made the food situation desperate. The Nettleton records are incomplete but it seems that Isaac in fact was not given any disbursements until 1799 and then he, himself, only received one. After that it was in Hester’s name that help was received and then in 1800 we find to “Hester and son”. It looks as if Isaac had gone away to look for work – to Leonard Stanley in fact – while Hester stayed behind until the baby was born. Then she too went north and the baby was baptised “Isaac” in Leonard Stanley. But alas as we already know work was not available there and they had no ‘settlement’. They were moved on to Slimbridge. Isaac Noad was a poor labourer who could not sign his name but whose sister Mary could. Possibly he could read however, otherwise how does one account for the glasses bought for him by the Overseers of Slimbridge. The picture emerges of Isaac as a sick and unsuccessful man and Hester as a heroic figure trying to keep the family together. One feels that they did their best and they succeeded.

This then is the story of the Noads who came from “far away”. Isaac and Hester who set out from Burton, went to Leonard Stanley and finally on to Slimbridge. Henry, their youngest son, who left Slimbridge for the Black Country, married Ruth Darby in Tipton and lived in that area all his life but kept “in touch”. Louisa, Henry’s youngest daughter, born at Shutt End, married in Dudley, lived – and died – in West Bromwich, all within a few miles of where her parents were married. And Louisa herself of course married William Lowe. Was he a wanderer too? Well hardly, as I had suspected from his name his roots were in the Black Country.’


HESTER NOAD, Great IV Grandmother of Richard Barton

Daughter of William Buckle and Betty (nee West)

Wife of Isaac Noad

Mother of James Noad

 

Also Mother of Thomas, Isaac and Henry

 

Hester the eldest daughter of William and Betty Buccle was baptised on 4th June 1770 at Nettleton.

There is an entry in the baptism register at Nettleton recording the baptism on 18th April 1790 of William the base born son of Hester Buckle, the child having been born on 27th December 1788. As yet I have found no further reference to this child.

Isaac Noad married Hester Buckle at Nettleton on 30th September 1793. He was described as being of West Kington and he made his mark in the register and she was described as of Nettleton and she too made her mark. The witnesses were James Clack who made his mark and Edith Bullock who signed the register.

They had four sons – Thomas, James, Isaac and Henry who were born between the years 1794 and 1803. By the year 1799 Isaac Noad and his family had moved to Leonard Stanley where their son Isaac was baptised on 3rd or 9th February 1800 and where they were in receipt of poor relief:

‘In the first half of 1799 Isaac Noad received seven shillings and sixpence and later a “Bush of flower” worth thirteen shillings. In the second half of the same year we find that he had one pound two shillings and a penny in “monies etc.”, two shillings and sixpence for his settlement examination and finally fourteen shillings and nine pence for “Removing his goods”. The last item tells its own sorry tale. Isaac and Hester Noad were very poor, they needed help but Leonard Stanley was under no obligation to give it.’

 By October 1800 they had settled in Slimbridge where they were once again in receiving poor relief and this continued until at least 1823. Their third son, Isaac Noad, was buried at Slimbridge on 10th April 1802 and their youngest son, Henry Noad, was born there in 1803 and baptised at Slimbridge Parish Church on 7th August 1803.

Hester Noad was buried on 18th January 1829 in Slimbridge aged sixty-two-years.

 


The children of Isaac and Hester Noad were Great IV Aunts and Uncles:

 

1. THOMAS NOAD, Great IV Uncle of Richard Barton

Thomas Noad was born in Nettleton, Wiltshire, on 27th February 1794 and he was baptised in the parish church on 23rd March 1794. He died in 1841 at Slimbridge aged forty-seven-years. He was buried in the churchyard on 4th April.

In the 1841 census he was described as an Agricultural Labourer of Slimbrdge, aged fifty-five-years. On 22nd October 1821 he married Hester Pearce at Slimbridge. In the Parish Rate Book compiled as an assessment for the relief of the Poor of Slimbridge, Hesther Noad was living in a house and garden at Slimbridge belonging to Thomas Pearce.

In the 1851 Census a Hester Noad was living at Churchend, Slimbridge aged seventy-five-years and described as formerly a house servant. This same Hester died on 10th January 1861 aged eighty-seven-years and was buried in the churchyard on 15th January. The informant was Elizabeth Williams who was present at the time of the death. Hester seems rather old to be Thomas Noad’s wife but it is more than likely that she was.


3. ISAAC NOAD, Infant Great IV Uncle of Richard Barton

 

Isaac Noad was born in 1800 at Nettleton in Wiltshire and was baptised on 3rd or 9th February 1800 at Leonard Stanley. He was buried on 10th April 1802 at Slimbridge.

 


4. HENRY NOAD, Great IV Uncle  of Richard Barton

 

Henry Noad was born in 1803 and baptised at Slimbridge Parish Church on 7th August 1803.

On 22nd July 1820 there is the following reference in the Slimbridge bastardy records –

‘Kezia Bendall on 16th May a Female Bastard Child. Henry Note of Purton, Berkeley, a labourer, the Father’

In 1827 he was described as a labourer of Tipton when he married Ruth Darby at Tipton. Ruth was born in 1808 at Tipton, the daughter of William and Elizabeth Darby.

Later they lived in Dudley and by 1837-8 they were at Shutt End, Kingswinford. In the 1841 census return the family was living at Darby End (Derby Hand?). Henry Noad, aged thirty-five-years was described as a furnace man. His wife, Ruth, was of the same age. Their children included James, aged eleven, Thomas aged nine, Henry aged five, Luesia aged three and William aged one year.

In 1851 Henry and Ruth were living at Windmill End, Dudley. Henry Noade (sic) was aged forty-seven, a nailor born in Dudley. His wife was also aged forty-seven and born in Dudley. Thomas, their son, was a twenty-year-old labourer, born in Dudley. Henry, aged fifteen, was a labourer and born at Kingswinford. Lucy was a thirteen-year-old nailor born in Kingswinford and William was aged eleven and born in Kingswinford.

By the early 1860s Henry was living at West Bromwich with his wife and his daughter Louisa.

In the 1861 census return Henry and Ruth Node (sic) were living at 27 New Street, West Bromwich. He was described as a fifty-seven-year-old labourer who was born in Slimbridge. Ruth was fifty-six and was born in Dudley. Living with them was their daughter Louisa and her husband William Lowe together with their two-year-old daughter Martha. William Lowe was a twenty-four-old labourer who was born in Rowley. Louisa was aged twenty-two and was born in Kingswinford. Their daughter, like her father, was born in Rowley. Staying with them was their grand daughter, Ruth Millard, aged three, a visitor, born at Rowley.

Ruth Noad died of epilepsy in 1866. Henry died in 1869 at West Bromwich, aged sixty-six, when he was described as a carter.

Their children were cousins of James Noad III:

1.      ESTHER MILLARD, cousin of James Noad III

Esther Noad was baptised at St Thomas’s, Dudley on 27th July 1828. She was not at home on the night of the 1841 census but at Black Berry Town, Rowley Regis. She was described as a thirteen-year-old nailor or nailman.

On 25th October 1847 she married David Millard at St Thomas’s Church, Dudley.

In 1851 David and Esther were living at Windmill End, Rowley. He was a twenty-two-year-old furnace man born at Rowley. She was aged twenty-two and also from Rowley. Their children included Mary A. Millard, aged seven, and Samuel aged four months. Both were born in Dudley.

In 1861 David (but looks more like Daniel) and Esther were living at Black Berry Town, Rowley Regis. He was described as a thirty-three-year-old labourer and she as his thirty-three-year-old wife. Children included Mary A. Millard aged twelve; Samuel a ten-year-old scholar; David aged eight; Joseph aged six and Thomas Henry aged two years. The whole family was shown as born in Rowley.

In 1871 David and Easter Milard (sic) were living at 15 Monk Street, Barrow, Lancashire. He was a forty-four-year-old Kopen (?) born in Staffordshire and she was forty-three. Children included D.P. Millard aged eighteen; Joseph aged sixteen, Thomas Henry aged nine, W. James Millard aged nine, Edwin aged eight, George aged six, Ruth E. Millard aged twelve, R.A. Millard (dau) aged three and John aged one.

George Edwin Millard was baptised at the Bible Christian Church, Barrow, on 9th June 1872.

In 1881 David and Esther Millard were residing at 14 Monk Street, Barrow. David was aged fifty-three years, an ironworks labourer, and native of Dudley. Esther was aged fifty-four and born in Dudley too. Children included William, aged twenty, born in Rowley; Rachel, aged fourteen, born in Gold’s Green, Staffordshire; John, aged eleven, born in Barrow; George, aged eight, born in Barrow and Thomas, aged five, born in Barrow. In residence boarding was William Noad, aged forty-one, married, an ironwork’s labourer, born in Pennsett, Staffordshire.

David Millard died in Barrow in 1885.

In 1891 Esther Millard was living at 14 Monk Street, Barrow. She was a sixty-four-year-old widow born in Rowley. Her son John was aged twenty-one; George aged eighteen and Thomas aged fifteen. Also in residence was William, her son, aged twenty-nine, his wife Rosa, aged twenty-three, and their son Henry aged two years.

In 1901 Esther Millard was living with her son William and his family at 26 Monk Street. She was a widow of seventy-four years and she was listed as born in Rowley. William was a thirty-nine-year-old stoker at a steelworks and was born at Rowley. His wife Rosa J. Millard, was thirty-three and born at Newport, Monmouthshire. Their children included Henry N. Millard aged thirteen, Elsie, and Albert. Also in residence was John Millard, brother, aged thirty-two-years, a general labourer, born in Barrow.

Esther Millard died in Barrow in 1907.

2. JAMES NOAD, cousin of James Noad III

 

James Noad who was born at Sprink House, Dudley and baptised on 15th November 1829 at St Thomas’s Church, Dudley. He was described as eleven in the 1841 census return.

On 25th December 1849 James Noad married Ann Mees at St Thomas’s Church in Dudley.

In 1851 James and Ann Node were visiting Joseph and Hannah Mees at Northfield Road, Dudley. James was described as a twenty-one-year-old labourer born at Kingswinford. Ann was aged twenty-five and born at Kingswinford also. Their daughter Sarah A. Node was aged two years and born at Dudley.

In 1861 James and Ann Noad were living at Springfield Lane, Rowley Regis. James was aged thirty-one, a coke burner, born at Rowley. Ann was aged thirty-five, and born at Dudley. Their children include Sarah A. Noad, aged ten, and born at Dudley; Henry, aged seven, and born at Dudley; Eliza, aged four, and born at Dudley and Esther, aged four months and born at Dudley.

At the time of the 1871 census return he was living at Bumble, Hole Road, Darby, Dudley. James was described as a forty-two-year-old ‘Coake Master’ born at Dudley. His wife, Ann, was aged forty-five-years and born in Dudley. Their children were Henry, aged seventeen years, a Coake burner, born in Cradly Heath, Staffs., Eliza, aged thirteen years, a nailer, born in Golds Hill, Esther aged ten years, born in Dudley and Elizabeth aged eight years, born in Dudley. Both were scholars.

In 1881 James and Ann were living at Bumble Hole, Dudley in a house with no number. James was a fifty-one-year-old general labourer, born at Dudley. Ann was aged fifty-seven and from Dudley. Their children included Esther aged twenty; Elizabeth, aged eighteen, a dressmaker, born at Dudley. Also in residence were Henry and Eliza Noad and their children. Henry Noad was a twenty-seven-year-old general servant, born at Cradley and his wife was twenty-nine and from Dudley. Their children included Eliza Noad, aged six, born at Dudley and Jane Noad, aged five, born at Dudley.

In 1891 James and Ann were living at Windmill End, Dudley, near to the Fox and Goose Inn. He was sixty-one, living on his own means, and born in the area. Ann was aged sixty-six.

Ann Noad died in 1891 and James Noad died in 1896.

3. THOMAS NOAD, cousin of James Noad III

 

Thomas Noad who was born in Dudley in 1831 and he was baptised at St Thomas’s Church in Dudley on 22nd April 1832. He was at home and described as nine years old in the 1841 census return. He was at home aged twenty and working as a labourer in 1851.

He married Isabella Edwards at St Edmund’s Church in Dudley on 12th April 1852.

In 1861 Thomas and Isabella were living at Windmill End, Golds Hill. Thomas Noad was aged thirty, a boot loader, born at Windmill End. Isabella was aged thirty-three and Born at Darby Land. Their children included Catherine, aged eight, a scholar, born at Darby Land; Joseph, aged six, a scholar, born at West Bromwich and Henry, aged two years, born in West Bromwich.

In 1871 Thomas and Isabella Noade (sic) were living at Great Bridge Road, West Bromwich. Thomas was a forty-year-old labourer born at Rowley Regis and Isabella was aged forty-two and born at Netheron. Their children included Catherine, aged eighteen, born at Netherton; Joseph, aged sixteen, a horse driver, born at West Bromwich; Henry, aged thirteen, born at West Bromwich; Ruth aged nine; John D. Noade aged three and Mary aged two.

At the time of the 1881 census he was living at a grocer’s shop at 12 Pudding Bag Street, West Bromwich. He was described as a fifty-year-old carter born at Rowley. His wife Isabella was aged fifty-two-years, a provisions dealer born in Rowley. Their children included Ruth, aged nineteen-years, born in West Bromwich; John Thomas, aged thirteen-years and born in West Bromwich; and Mary aged eleven years and born in West Bromwich. Next door at No. 10 was their son Joseph and his family.

In 1891 Thomas and Isabella Noad were living at 12 Pudding Bag Street, West Bromwich. Thomas was described as a sixty-year-old grocer and provision dealer, born in Rowley. His wife was aged sixty-two and born at Rowley. Their son, John T. Noad, was a twenty-three-year-old pattern maker, born in West Bromwich.

Isabella Noad died at West Bromwich in 1891.

Thomas Noad of 11 Darlaston Road, the Pleck, Walsall, died on 11th August 1905. Probate was granted on 1st November at Lichfield to Joseph Noad, haulier, and George Allsopp, commercial clerk. His effects were valued at £553.0.3d.

  1. HENRY NOAD, infant cousin of James Noad III

 

Henry was baptised at St Thomas’s, Dudley, on 7th April 1833.

5. RACHAEL NOAD, infant cousin of James Noad III

 

Rachael Noad was baptised at St Thomas’s, Dudley, on 6th July 1834. She probably died before the 1837 registration and was not mentioned as being at home in the 1841 census return.

6. HENRY NOAD, cousin of James Noad III

 

Henry Noad who was born in Dudley in 1836 and was baptised at St Thomas’s Dudley on 2nd October 1836. He was described as five-years-old in the 1841 census return. In 1851 he was at home aged fifteen and working as a labourer. He married Mary Ann Griffiths at St Edmund’s Dudley on 12th March 1855. The family returned from Shirehampton, Bristol, to West Bromwich in 1860.

In 1861 Henry and Mary were living at Bagnall Street, West Bromwich. Henry was a twenty-five-year-old potter, born in Pensett, Worcestershire. Mary was thirty and born at Netherton, Joseph aged three and born at Rowley, Staffordshire, and James, aged one, born at Shirehampton, Bristol.

In 1871 Henry and Mary were living at Doulton’s Pottery, Prescot, St Helen’s. Henry was a thirty-five-year-old foreman at a pottery and born at Pensnett, Worcestershire. Mary was aged forty and born at Netherton. Joseph Henry was aged twelve, a clerk, born at Springfield, Staffordshire; James was an eleven-year-old scholar born in Shirehampton; Esther was a nine-year-old born at Gold’s Green, Staffordshire; William was a four-year-old born at St Helens and Isabella was aged two and born at St Helens.

In 1881 Henry and Mary were living at 60 Peter Street, Eccleston, St Helens. Henry was listed as a forty-five-year-old sanitary pipe burner, born in Pensett, Worcestershire. Mary was aged forty-nine and born at Netherton. James was aged twenty-one, a glass bottle packer, born at Shirehampton; William was aged fourteen, a post boy, born in St Helens and Isabella was aged twelve, a scholar, born in St Helens.

In 1891 Henry and Mary were living at 104 Peter Street, Eccleston. Henry was described as a fifty-six-year-old brick burner, born in Pensett, Staffordshire. Mary was aged fifty-nine and born at Netherton. William was aged twenty-four, a sanitary pipe worker, born in St Helens and Isabella, aged twenty-two, was a dressmaker, born in St Helens.

In 1901 Henry and Mary were still residing at 104 Peter Street, Eccleston. Henry was described as a sixty-five-year-old brick kiln burner, born at Pensett, Staffordshire, and Mary was sixty-five and born at Netherton, Staffordshire. With them was Esther, aged thirty-nine, and born at Gold’s Green, Staffordshire.

Henry died in 1910 at Prescot.

In 1911 Mary was living in four rooms at 89 Talbot Street, St Helens. She was described as an eighty-year-old widow engaged in home duties and born at Netherton, Worcestershire. She had had eight children of whom four had survived. Esther, her daughter, was aged forty-nine and also engaged in home duties. She was listed as born at Gold’s Green.

Mary Noad died in 1915.

  1. LOUISA LOWE, cousin of James Noad III

 

Louisa Lowe who was born on 24th December 1837 at Shutt End, Kingswinford, near Dudley. She was baptised on 28th January 1838 at Kingswinford and St Mary’s Chapelry, Stafford. She was described as Luesia, a three-years-old in the 1841 census return. In 1851 she was at home, aged thirteen and working as a nailor.

She married William Lowe at St Edmund’s Dudley on 13th September 1857.

In 1861 they were living at 27 New Street, West Bromwich with Louisa’s parents, Henry and Ruth Node (sic). William Lowe was described as twenty-four-year-old labourer, born at Rowley. Louisa was aged twenty-three and born at Kingswinford. Their daughter Martha was aged two and born at Rowley. Staying with them was Louisa’s niece, Ruth Millard, aged three, a visitor, born at Rowley.

By 1871 William and Louisa were living at Golds Green, West Bromwich. William was described as a thirty-four-year-old coal heaver, born in Rowley. Louisa was thirty-three and born in Rowley. Their children included William aged seven; Martha aged five; Mary aged four; Joseph aged two and Samuel aged one year. All were born in West Bromwich.

In 1881 they were living at No 60, Pike Helve, West Bromwich. William Low (sic) was described as a forty-four-year-old labourer who was born at Rowley Regis. Louisa was aged forty-three and born at Darby End. Their children were all born in West Bromwich. William was seventeen and working as a moulder; Martha aged fifteen; Mary aged thirteen; Joseph aged twelve; Samuel aged eleven, Ruth aged eight and Ernest aged one.

In 1891 the Lowes were living at 36 Pike Helve Street, West Bromwich. William was described as a fifty-four-year-old grocer who was born in Rowley. Louisa was aged fifty-three and born in West Bromwich. Their children were all born in West Bromwich. Joseph was a thirty-two-year-old moulder; Samuel was twenty-one-year-old fitter and Ernest was an eleven-year-old scholar.

In 1901 William and Louisa were living at the shop, No 60, Pike Helve Street, Golds Hill, West Bromwich. William was described as a sixty-four-year-old grocer, born at Rowley. Louisa was aged sixty-three and born at Windmill End. Ruth was twenty-eight and an assistant, born in West Bromwich. Their granddaughter, Henrietta Lowe, was working as a domestic servant, aged thirteen, and born in West Bromwich.

Louisa died in 1904 and her husband, William Lowe, died in 1909.

8. WILLIAM NOAD, cousin of James Noad III

 

William Noad was born in Shutt End, Kingswinford, on 10th November 1839. He was baptised on 22nd December 1839 at Kingswinford and St Mary’s Stafford. He was described as one-year-old in the 1841 census return. In 1851 he was at home aged eleven. He married Mary Ann Slone on 15th July 1860 at St Thomas’s Dudley.

In 1861 William and Mary Ann were lodging at Netherton Hill, Dudley, Worcestershire. He was a twenty-year-old labourer and she was a twenty-year-old nailor. Both were born at Netherton.

Mary Ann died in West Bromwich in 1870. William then married Harriet Knowles on 1st January 1871 at St Thomas’s Dudley.

In the 1871 census return there is a William Noad at New Street, West Bromwich. He was described as a thirty-one-year-old coal heaver, born in Shut End. His wife, Harriet, was aged thirty-five-years and born in West Bromwich. Their children included Ruth Noad aged nine-years and born at Netherton; Ann aged seven-years and born in West Bromwich and William aged three-years and born in West Bromwich. Other offspring of Harriet included Phebe E. Knowles, aged thirteen; Joseph J. Knowles aged eight years and Mary Knowles aged five years.

In the 1881 census return a William Noad was boarding with the Millard Family at 14 Monk Street, Barrow-in-Furness. He was described as a forty-one-year-old married Ironworks labourer, born in Pensett, Staffordshire. Meanwhile Harriet was at 110 Pike Helve, West Bromwich. She was aged forty-five and born in West Bromwich. Her children included Joseph (Knowles!) aged eighteen, Sarah aged nine, James aged eight and William aged three. All four were born in West Bromwich.

In 1891 William and Harriet were residing at 109 Hanover Street, Eccleston, Prescot, Lancashire. He was aged fifty-one, a general labourer, born at Pensett, Worcestershire. She was aged fifty-five and born at West Bromwich. James was an eighteen-year-old potter and William a thirteen-year-old potter’s apprentice. Both were born in West Bromwich.

In 1901 William and Harriet were living at 107 Napier Street, St Helen’s, Lancashire. William was a sixty-two-year-old labourer in a pottery, a worker, born at Netherton, Worcestershire. Harriet was aged sixty-five and born at Wednesbury. Ann Noad was aged thirty-seven, a confectioner and baker, born at Wednesbury and William was aged twenty-four, a gatherer in a bottle works and born in Wednesbury.

William Noad died in 1908 at Prescot, Lancashire and Harriet died in about 1916 at West Bromwich..

 


  

JAMES NOAD II, Great III Grandfather of Richard Barton

 

Son of Isaac Noad and Hester (nee Buckle)

Husband of Louisa Cook

Father of James Noad III

 

Also Father of Thomas, Henry and William

 

James Noad was born on 4th December 1796 and christened on 15th January 1797 at Nettleton in Wiltshire. He was the eldest son of Isaac and Hester Noad. He moved with his parents to Leonard Stanley in about 1799 and from there they moved to Slimbridge where they settled in about 1800.

On 19th June 1825 James Noad II married Louisa Cook of Thornbury at Slimbridge Parish Church. In 1830 he was described as a labourer of Slimbridge. On 19th February 1832 their third son, Henry, was buried at Slimbridge, aged seven weeks. James and Louisa were in Dudley for the birth of their fourth son, William, in 1836 and this may be connected to William’s uncle, Henry Noad, moving to West Bromwich some time before 1827. In the 1841 census the family was living at Bulfield, Rowley Regis, Staffordshire, which is situated southeast of Dudley and north of Halesowen. James was described as a forty-year-old labourer whilst his wife’s name was spelt as ‘Luazer’. The children included James, aged fourteen years, Thomas, aged ten years and William, who was born in Staffordshire, aged five years. Bulfield was situated close to the railway line.

We know that James Noad II and his family had returned to Slimbridge by 1844 because I have a Family Bible inscribed ‘James & Louisa Noad, Slymbridge, 1844’. This volume had previously belonged to the Rymer Family of Gloucestershire and there are six baptisms recorded from the first decade of the nineteenth century. Later it became the Bible of William Noad – ‘William Node His Book’ and ‘Elizabeth and William Noad Chepstow 1860’ and finally a stamp ‘Wm. Noad’.

The Parish Rate Book, dated 18th April 1849, describes him as living in a house and garden at Slimbridge belonging to the trustees of the late Dr.Fry. James and Louisa were still living there when a Valuation of the Parish was surveyed in 1861. From this valuation we can glean information that their house and garden were at Kington (641) and the property has been identified as being at Price’s Court. It would seem to have consisted of a small garden to the left of the house – a house and frontage – with no land behind the house.

In the 1851 census return James Noad was described as a fifty-nine-year-old Agricultural Labourer working at Prices Farm, Slimbridge together with his two eldest sons James III and Thomas. Louisa Noad was described as fifty-four-years of age and born at Berkeley. Even though she was in Thornbury at the time of her marriage, she consistently gave her place of birth as Berkeley in the census returns. James, their son, was a twenty-four-year-old agricultural labourer born in Slimbridge. Thomas was a twenty-year-old agricultural labourer born in Slimbridge.

 In 1861 James was working as a labourer at the Patch, which could mean that they were still living at Price’s Court. He was described as sixty-four-years-old and born at Burton in Wiltshire. His wife Louisa was aged sixty-four-years and born at Berkeley.

Their youngest son, William Noad, became the harbour master at Newport.

Louisa Noad died aged sixty-six-years and was buried at Slimbridge on 27th January 1863.

James Noad II died on 16th December 1867 at Union House, Dursley. He was described on the certificate as a seventy-one-year-old Farm Labourer. The cause of death was given as ‘Decay of Nature – Certified’. George Leonard, Registrar, registered the death on 18th December and the informant was Daniel Walkly of the Union House, Dursley, who was in attendance.

Entry in register of deaths in Dursley Union  Workhouse for James Noad of Slimbridge, aged 71, buried on 16 December 1867
Date 1867
Description Cause and date of death not given
Notes This is a full transcript of the entry in the register; no additional information is present in the original document
   
Entry in register of deaths in Dursley Union Workhouse for James Noad of Slimbridge, aged 71, buried on 16 December 1867
1867

James was taken back to Slimbridge and buried there on 19th December, aged seventy-one-years.

William Noad’s First Bible:

I have a Family Bible inscribed ‘James & Louisa Noad, Slymbridge, 1844’. This volume had previously belonged to the Rymer Family of Gloucestershire and there are six baptisms recorded from the first decade of the nineteenth century. Later it became the Bible of William Noad – ‘William Node His Book’ and ‘Elizabeth and William Noad Chepstow 1860’ and finally a stamp ‘Wm. Noad’.

 


LOUISA NOAD, Great III Grandmother of Richard Barton

 

Daughter of Aaron Cook and Joanna (nee Malpass)

Wife of James Noad II

Mother of James Noad III

 

Also Mother of Thomas, Henry and William

 

Louisa Cook was in about 1797 and baptised on 18th March 1798 at Berkeley. She was described as the daughter of Aaron Cooke of Saniger. Her father, Aaron Cook, a Labourer of Purton, was buried on 30th January 1794 at Berkeley, leaving Joanna a widow with two daughters. Her mother, Joanna, later married Richard Bishop.

Louisa married James Noad on 19th June 1825 at Slimbridge Parish Church .In the marriage register at Slimbridge it states that Louisa Cook was of the Parish of Thornbury but she consistently gave her place of birth as Berkeley in the census returns.

In 1830 her husband, James Noad II, was described as a labourer of Slimbridge. On 19th February 1832 their third son, Henry, was buried at Slimbridge, aged seven weeks. James and Louisa were in Dudley for the birth of their fourth son, William, in 1836 and this may be connected to her husband’s brother, Henry Noad, moving to West Bromwich some time before 1827. In the 1841 census return ‘Luazer’ was living with her family at Rowley Regis in Staffordshire.

Louisa and her family returned to Slimbridge before 1844 and the Parish Rate Book, dated 18th April 1849, describes them as living in a house and garden at Slimbridge belonging to the trustees of the late Dr.Fry. James and Louisa were still living there when a Valuation of the Parish was surveyed in 1861. From this valuation we can glean information that their house and garden were at Kington (641) and the property has been identified as being at Price’s Court. It would seem to have consisted of a small garden to the left of the house – a house and frontage – with no land behind the house.

In the 1851 census return James Noad was described as a fifty-nine-year-old Agricultural Labourer working at Prices Farm, Slimbridge together with his two eldest sons James III and Thomas. Louisa Noad was described as fifty-four-years of age and born at Berkeley. Even though she was in Thornbury at the time of her marriage, she consistently gave her place of birth as Berkeley in the census returns. James, their son, was a twenty-four-year-old agricultural labourer born in Slimbridge. Thomas was a twenty-year-old agricultural labourer born in Slimbridge.

In 1861 James was working as a labourer at the Patch, which could mean that they were still living at Price’s Court. He was described as sixty-four-years-old and born at Burton in Wiltshire. His wife Louisa was aged sixty-four-years and born at Berkeley.

Louisa died on 21st January 1863 at Slimbridge. She was described on the death certificate as the sixty-six-year-old Wife of James Noad, a Husbandman. The cause was given as Influenza and there was no medical attendant. George Leonard, Registrar, registered the death on 25th January 1863 and the informant was James Noad of Slimbridge (could be husband or son) who was present at the death and signed his name.

Louisa Noad was buried at Slimbridge on 27th January 1863.

There is a Family Bible inscribed James and Louisa Noad, Slymbridge, 1844 with the further entries “Elizabeth and William Noad, Chepstow, 1860, Wm. Noad” and “William Node His Book”.


 

The children of James and Louisa Noad were Great III Aunts and Uncles: 

  1. THOMAS NOAD or NODE, Great III Uncle of Richard Barton

Thomas was baptised on 15th August 1830 at Slimbridge. In 1841 he was living with his family at Bulfield, Rowley Regis, and was described then as ten-years-old. In the 1851 census he is described as a twenty-year-old labourer at Prices Farm, Slimbridge.

There is a Family Bible with the inscription ‘Thomas Node (altered to Noad) Chepstow Mon’ and the first entry records ‘Thomas Noade Born July 15th 1830’. The second entry is for ‘William Noad Born Dec. 23, 1836. Married Febury 15 1860’. There are further entries for the family of his nephew Arthur John Noad up until 1938.

In the 1861 census return Thomas was living in the home of Mary Jones at Beaufort Row, Lower Church Street, Chepstow. Mary Jones was a sixty-five-year-old widow who was born in Slimbridge. Her twenty-year-old son, Charles Jones, was described as an apprentice to Gas engineering. Thomas Noad was one of her four lodgers and he was described as a thirty-year-old Sawyer at a Steam Mills. His birth at Slimbridge is confirmed. The other lodgers included a coach painter from Taunton, a Ship smith from Devon and a carpenter/wheelwright from Herefordshire.

There is a death of a Thomas Node at Chepstow in September 1868.


3. HENRY NOAD, Infant Great III Uncle of Richard Barton

Henry Noad was baptised on 28th December 1831 at Slimbridge and buried on 19th February 1832 aged seven weeks.

 


4. WILLIAM NOAD, Great III Uncle of Richard Barton

William Noad was born in Dudley and the Family Bible gives his date of birth as Dec 23rd 1836. The 1841 census refers to him as living with his family at Bulfield, Rowley Regis and as aged five years. By 1844 (Bible) he had returned to Slimbridge.

The 1851 census reveals that a William Noad, aged sixteen years, was working as an agricultural labourer at Eastington. In 1860 he was a Mariner of South Hamlets, Gloucester and it was from this address that he married his twenty-four-year-old bride, Elizabeth Jones, at St Luke’s Church, Gloucester on 15th or 16th February 1860. The witnesses at the wedding were James and Sarah Noad.

So far I have been unable to locate William and Elizabeth in the 1861 census. In 1871 the couple was living at 2 Queen Street, St Paul’s Parish, Newport. William was described, as a thirty-five-year-old Mariner who had been born at Dudley and his wife, was aged thirty-four and had been born in Chepstow.

In the 1881 census return the couple was living at 3 Dock Head Cottages, St Woollos, Newport. William was now forty-five and was working as a ‘Dock Gate Man’. His wife, Elizabeth, was aged forty-four.

Ten years later in the 1891 return they are living at 36 Queen Street. No occupations were given but their ages were given as fifty-five and Fifty-four.

In 1901 William Noad was living at 36 Price Street, Newport. He was described as a sixty-five-year-old Berthing Master, born in Dudley, Staffordshire. His sixty-four-year-old wife Elizabeth was born in Chepstow.

In 1911 William Noad and his wife were living at 36 Price Street, Newport, in the ecclesiastical parish of Holy Trinity, Pillgwenlly, and the ward of Alexandra. William was described as seventy-five-years-old, married, a retired Master Mariner in the Merchant Service. He was born at Slimbridge. His wife Elizabeth Ann was seventy-four-years and born in Chepstow. They were married for fifty years and were occupying four rooms.

Later William and Elizabeth were living at 36 Price Street, Newport and he was Newport Berthing Master. He died on 30th August 1911 at Highfields, Bassalag, aged seventy-five years. His wife Elizabeth died in April 1922 (Family Bible).

William Noad’s First Bible:

I have a Family Bible inscribed ‘James & Louisa Noad, Slymbridge, 1844’. This volume had previously belonged to the Rymer Family of Gloucestershire and there are six baptisms recorded from the first decade of the nineteenth century. Later it became the Bible of William Noad – ‘William Node His Book’ and ‘Elizabeth and William Noad Chepstow 1860’ and finally a stamp ‘Wm. Noad’.

William Noad’s Second Bible:

 

I have another Family Bible with the inscription ‘Thomas Node (altered to Noad) Chepstow Mon’ and the first entry records ‘Thomas Noade Born July 15th 1830’. The second entry is for ‘William Noad Born Dec. 23, 1836. Married Febury 15 1860’. There are further entries for the family of his nephew Arthur John Noad up until 1938.

The Will of William Noad:

 

This is the Last Will and Testament of me William Noad of 36 Price Street in the county borough of Newport Berthing Master I hereby revoke all testamentary instruments heretofore made by me and declare this to be my last will. I appoint James S. Reed of 35 Courtybella Terrace, Pillgwelly, Newport aforesaid Dock Foreman and Albert Evans of 14 Price Street aforesaid Coal-trimmer (hereinafter called my trustees) Executors and Trustees of this my will. And I bequeath to each of them in case they shall respectively prove my will and accept the trusteeship thereof the sum of five pounds. I give devise and bequeath all my estate real and personal not otherwise disposed of by this my will to my trustees In trust to sell convert and get in the same with power to postpone such sale and conversion indefinitely without being responsible for loss. And out of the proceeds to pay my funeral and testamentary expenses and debts. And to invest the residue in any investments authorised by law in the case of the trust money with power to vary such investments at discretion. And to pay the income of the said trust estate as well before as after the sale conversion and investment thereof to my wife Elizabeth during her life. And in the event of such income not amounting to the sum of sixteen shillings per week I direct my trustees to pay to my said wife out of the capital of the said trust estate such sum in addition thereto as shall make with the said income the said sum of sixteen shillings per week during her life. And I empower my trustees further to pay and apply such parts of the capital of the said trust estate as they in their absolute and uncontrolled discretion shall think fit for and towards the maintenance support and care of my said wife during her life. And after her death my trustees shall stand possessed of the residue of the said trust estate in trust to pay the sum of fifty pounds to William Miller of Barrow in Furness, Ironworker, and the sum of fifty pounds to Ruth Lowe of No 61 Pike Elve Street, Hill Top, West Bromwich, Spinster. And to pay the residue of the said trust estate to my nephew John Noad of Slymbridge in the county of Gloucester, Wheelwright, absolutely. In witness whereof I have to this will set my hand this twenty first day of September one thousand nine hundred and seven – William Noad – Signed by the said testator as his last will in the presence of us present at the same time who at his request in his presence and in the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses – F.S. Dauncey Solr Newport Mon – W.A. Brenton clerk to Messrs Dauncey & Sons Solrs, Newport, Mon.

I William Noad of Number 36 Price Street in the county borough of Newport, Berthing Master, declare this to be a codicil to my will above written dated the twenty first day of September one thousand nine hundred and seven. I revoke the bequests contained in my said will of fifty pounds each to William Miller and Ruth Lowe respectively and I declare that the whole residue of the trust estate after the death of my said wife shall be paid to my nephew John Noad in my said will mentioned. And in all other respects I confirm my said will. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand this sixteenth day of November one thousand nine hundred and eight – William Noad – Signed by the said testator as a codicil to his last will above written in the presence of us present at the same time who at his request in his presence and in the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses – F.S. Dauncey – F H Dauncey Solicitors Newport Mon

On the 15th day of November 1911 Probate of this will and codicil was granted to James Samuel Reed and Albert Evans the Executors.

Probate for an estate of £959 11s 0d.


JAMES NOAD III, Great II Grandfather of Richard Barton

 

Son of James Noad II and Louisa (nee Cook)

Husband of Sarah Byford

Father of Arthur John Noad

 

Also Father of Mary Jane, William Henry and Henry

 

James Noad III was born in 1826 the eldest son of James and Louisa Noad but the baptism is not recorded at Slimbridge. His father was a labourer of Prices Farm, Slimbridge and he had three younger brothers, one of whom died aged seven weeks.

By 1836 James had moved to the Dudley area and in the 1841 census return he is described as fourteen-years-old and living at Bulfield, Rowley Regis. Here his youngest brother, William, was born. The family was back in Slimbridge by 1844.

In the 1851 census return James Noad III was shown as a twenty-four-year-old agricultural labourer employed at Prices Farm at Slimbridge. He married Sarah Byford on 15th October 1851 at Slimbridge Parish Church. On the marriage certificate he was described as a labourer, the son of James Noad. Sarah was described as the daughter of William Byford. In 1852 the family was still living in Slimbridge but from 1854 to 1855 they had moved to Cambridge.

In the 1861 Census they were at Whitehall Farm Cottage, Churchend, Slimbridge and still in Slimbridge in the following year. This is substantiated by the Valuation of the Parish, which was surveyed in 1861 as James Noad, Junior, is described as inhabiting a cottage and garden (601b) belonging to Sarah Manning. This property has been identified as the small left hand part of Whitehall Farm with the garden behind.

The 1861 census return describes James as an agricultural labourer, aged thirty-four-years, and born in Slimbridge. His wife was aged thirty-six-years and born in Cam. Their son Henry was aged four years and born in Slimbridge.

James and Sarah Noad had four children between 1852 and 1862 but only the younger brothers Henry and Arthur John, survived infancy. Mary Jane died aged nineteen months and William Henry lived for only five months. Their third child, Henry, died aged sixteen years in 1873.

In 1871 James and Sarah were at Churchend, Slimbridge. James was an agricultural labourer, aged forty-four-years, and born in Slimbridge. Sarah was aged forty-five-years and born in Cam. Henry was aged fourteen-years and born in Slimbridge. John was aged eight years, a scholar, born in Slimbridge. With them was Ann Byford, James’s mother-in-law, who was aged seventy-eight-years and born in Cam. There were only two properties between their home and the Forge at Churchend.

In the 1881 census James and Sarah were living at Churchend, Slimbridge. James was described as aged fifty-four-years, an agricultural labourer, born in Slimbridge. Sarah was aged fifty-five-years and born in Cam. Their son, John Noad, was aged eighteen years and was described as a carpenter and wheelwright, born in Slimbridge.

James Noad III died on 16th February 1887 at Slimbridge. He was described on the death certificate as a sixty-year-old Farm Labourer. The cause of death was given as Bronchal Pneumonia and this was certified by D.J. Dutton MRCSL. George Leonard, Registrar, registered the death on 18th February 1887 and the informant was E.J. Hurd of Slimbridge who was present at the death.

He was buried in Slimbridge Churchyard on 20th February.


SARAH NOAD, Great II Grandmother of Richard Barton

 

Daughter of William Byford II and Ann (nee Coopey)

Wife of James Noad III

Mother of Arthur John Noad

 

Also Mother of Mary Jane, William Henry and Henry

 

According to all the census returns and other records Sarah believed that she was born in about 1825 or 1826 at Cam. Her parents were William and Ann Byford of the Quarry, Cam, and her father was a Mason. We also know that she had a younger sister, Charlotte who was born in about 1827 and baptised at Cam Parish Church.

In the Registers of the Dursley Independent Church we find an entry for a Sarah Byford who was born on 30th August 1820 and baptised on 10th October 1820 by Rev William Bennett at Dursley Independent Church. Her parents were William and Ann Byford of the Quarry at Cam. The Reverend William Bennett was Minister of Dursley Independent Church from 1804-1823 and he was responsible for erecting the Tabernacle, which was opened on 22nd August 1809. These dates for the birth and baptism of Sarah appear to be five years earlier than would be expected but no other Sarah Byford was baptised at Cam Parish Church, Cam Meeting, Stinchcombe Parish Church or Dursley Tabernacle during the period 1822-1826.

At the time of the 1841 census Sarah was working as a female domestic servant for John and Elizabeth Shatford at Walton, Walton Cardiff, Tewkesbury. She was fifteen-years-old and the Shatfords were both ten years older than her. The Shatfords had a one-year-old child, Hannah, and four other employees. In 1851 the Shatfords were farming 110 acres at Ham, Berkeley. The census reveals that he came from North Nibley and his wife from Coaley so we can see how Sarah Byford came to be living with them. In 1844 the Shatfords were living at Itchington.

In 1851 we find Sarah Biford (sic) working for Samuel and Sarah Pegner (sp?) at Coaley. Sarah Biford was described as a twenty-six-year-old servant, born in Cam. Her employer farmed sixty acres with a man and a boy and he was born in Coaley. His wife, Sarah, was born in North Nibley. Walter Phillimore, a seventeen-year-old agricultural labourer, was a Coaley boy.

Sarah married James Noad on 15th October 1851 at Slimbridge Parish Church. On the marriage certificate he was described as a labourer, the son of James Noad. Sarah was described as the daughter of William Byford. In 1852 the family was still in Slimbridge but from 1854 to 1855 they were living at Cambridge. In the 1861 Census they were at Whitehall Farm Cottage, Churchend, Slimbridge and they were still living in Slimbridge in the following year.

The 1861 census return describes James as an agricultural labourer, aged thirty-four-years, and born in Slimbridge. His wife was aged thirty-six-years and born in Cam. Their son Henry was aged four years and born in Slimbridge.

 

James and Sarah Noad had four children between 1852 and 1862 but only the younger brothers Henry and Arthur John, survived childhood. Mary Jane died aged nineteen months and William Henry lived for only five months. Their third child, Henry, died aged sixteen years in 1873.

Extract from the will and from an 1869 indenture re the estate of Thomas Coopey II, her grandfather:

 

Upon Trust for the sole use of his daughter Ann, wife of William Byford during her natural life to occupy or rent and upon her death upon trust for his two grandchildren Sarah and Charlotte her daughters, the cottage where she resides…

And Reciting that the said Sarah Noad (formerly Sarah Byford) intermarried with James Noad in October 1851

In 1871 James and Sarah were at Churchend, Slimbridge. James was an agricultural labourer, aged forty-four-years and born in Slimbridge. Sarah was aged forty-five-years and born in Cam. Henry was aged fourteen-years and born in Slimbridge. John was aged eight years, a scholar, born in Slimbridge. With them was Ann Byford, Sarah’s mother, who was aged seventy-eight-years and born in Cam.

In the 1881 census James and Sarah were living at Churchend, Slimbridge. James was described as aged fifty-four-years, an agricultural labourer, born in Slimbridge. Sarah was aged fifty-five-years and born in Cam. Their son, John Noad, was aged eighteen years and was described as a carpenter and wheelwright, born in Slimbridge.

James Noad III died on 16th February 1887 aged 60 years and he was buried in Slimbridge Churchyard on 20th February.

His widow, Sarah, was living with her son Arthur John Noad in 1891 and the census reveals that she was then sixty-seven-years-old and that she had been born in Cam. Her son Arthur J. Noad, was aged twenty-eight-years. Annie was aged twenty-four-years and born in Kington, Hfds. Their child Bessie was aged ten months.

Sarah Noad died on 9th February 1895 at Slimbridge, aged seventy-one-years. She was described on the death certificate as the Widow of James Noad, Farm Labourer. The cause of death was given as Paralysis for three years and was certified by D.J. Dutton MRCS LSA. George Adams, Registrar, registered the death on 13th February 1895 and the informant was Anne Noad, of Slimbridge, daughter-in-law, who was present at the death.

Sarah Noad was buried on 16th February at Slimbridge. The Family Bible records her death as Feb 18th aged seventy-two-years.

Obituary Card

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In Loving Memory of Sarah Noad, of Slimbridge, who died February 9th 1895, aged 71 years.

How still and peaceful is the grave,

Where, life’s vain tumults past,

The appointed house, by heaven’s decree,

Receives all at last

“Cast thy burden on the Lord, and He shall sustain thee, and strengthen thee, and comfort thee.”


 

Their children were the Great II Aunts and Uncles:

 

  1. MARY JANE NOAD, Infant Great II Aunt of Richard Barton

 

Mary Jane was baptised on 5th September 1852 and buried on 23rd January 1854 aged

nineteen months

 


 

  1. WILLIAM HENRY NOAD, Infant Great II Uncle of Richard Barton

 

William Henry was baptised on 1st March 1855 and died on 15th April 1855 aged five months.

 


  1. HENRY NOAD, Great II Uncle of Richard Barton

Henry Noad was baptised on 25th July 1856 and received into the church on 18th August 1856.

The 1861 census return describes Henry as being at home, aged four years, and born in Slimbridge. In the 1871 census Henry was aged fourteen years and born in Slimbridge. He died on 30th June 1873 aged sixteen years and was buried on 5th July. His mother, Sarah, was the informant of his death.


ARTHUR JOHN NOAD, Great Grandfather of Richard Barton

 

Son of James Noad and Sarah (nee Byford)

 

Husband of Ann(ie) Duffell

Father of Florence Barton

 

Also Father of Bessie Cashmore, Arthur, Mary Cuff, William, Henry, Thomas, Edith Evans and Evelyn James

Arthur John Noad was born on 22nd June 1862, third son of James Noad, a labourer of Whitehall Farm Cottage, Cambridge and his wife Sarah. John Noad was baptised at Slimbridge Parish Church on 27th July and there would appear to be no reference to his first name, Arthur.

In the 1871 census his parents were at Churchend, Slimbridge, and John was described as an eight-year-old scholar, born in Slimbridge. James Noad was a forty-four-year-old agricultural labourer born in Slimbridge and Sarah was aged forty-five-years and born in Cam. John’s brother, Henry, was aged fourteen years and his grandmother Ann Byford was also staying with them. There were only two dwellings between his childhood home and the Forge.

In the 1881 census his parents, James and Sarah Noad, were still living at Churchend. James was described as aged fifty-four-years, an agricultural labourer, born in Slimbridge. Sarah was aged fifty-five-years and born in Cam. Their son, John Noad, was aged eighteen years and was described as a carpenter and wheelwright, born in Slimbridge.

John probably met Annie Duffell when she was working as a servant at Cambridge House and they were married after banns at Christ Church, Clifton, on 29th June 1889. This church was situated across the Downs from 7 Gloucester Row, Clifton, where she was in service. The bridegroom was described on the marriage certificate as a twenty-seven-year-old Wheelwright of Slimbridge, son of James Noad, a Labourer, and the bride was the twenty-three-year-old, daughter of Thomas Duffell, a Labourer. The witnesses were her brother Thomas Duffell and Annie Morris.

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The young couple settled in Slimbridge where John worked as a Carpenter and Wheelwright. Between 1890 and 1913 they had nine children, all of whom survived childhood. My father referred to their home at Churchend as being nicknamed ‘Starlings Castle’.

In the 1891 census they were described as Arthur J. Noad, aged twenty-eight-years. Annie was aged twenty-four-years and born at ‘Kington, Hfds’. Their child Bessie was aged ten months. With them was John’s mother, Sarah Noad, aged sixty-seven-years and born in Cam.

1901 census of Slimbridge Part 2 Entry number 69 Gossington  4 rooms

’A. John Noad  Head  M  38  Wheelwright & Carpenter  Worker (as opposed to
Employer/Working at Home etc) born Slimbridge

Annie Noad   Wife  M  34   born at Kings Caple, Herefordshire

Children: Bessie 10, Florence 9, Arthur 7, Mary 5 and William 3 all born at
Slimbridge’

In 1911 the family was living at Victoria Cottage, a five roomed property at Gossington. Arthur John was forty-eight-years-old, a wheelwright and worker born at Slimbridge. His wife Annie was forty-four-years-old and born at King’s Caple. She had been married for twenty-one-years, had eight children and was engaged in home work. The children included Bessie aged twenty and at home; Arthur aged seventeen, a builder’s apprentice; William aged thirteen a school boy; Henry Walter aged nine a school boy; Tom Duffell aged seven a school boy and Edith Annie aged four years and at home. All were born at Slimbridge.

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Their eldest son, Arthur Noad enlisted in the 10th Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment, and died in action at the Battle of Loos on the 13th October 1915, aged twenty-two-years.

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Arthur John Noad became the chief Carpenter and Wheelwright and Pattern Maker for Frances Workman & Sons of Slimbridge, Agricultural Engineers. This firm was established back in 1861 by Mrs Frances Workman who died in 1931, aged ninety-one-years. She ran the firm with her sons – Harry, who was a wheelwright, and Arthur who was an engineer. At their peak there were 30 employees and they carried out all manner of work including:

Wood – Coffins, Roof Construction (cottages opposite Tyning Crescent, cowsheds at the Patch over the canal, large store shed at the Patch), wood for presses etc., wood for carts, wagons etc.

Cider Making Machinery, Presses, Pumps etc (Awarded first (£20) and second prizes (£10) at the Royal Agricultural Society of England trials in 1890 and Silver Medal at the Gloucestershire Agricultural Society Stroud Meeting in 1892)

Repairs – Carts & Wagons, Wheel banding, Traction Engines for Fairgrounds. Retubing, Timber Hauling Vehicles (Brownings Bros), single banding, removing solid rubber tyres replaced on steam tractors by hydraulic press, Church weather cock, mowing machines and binders.

Wood Sawing Machinery (Berkeley Castle, Badminton, Walkers Sticks of Nailsworth, Peake Sawmills of Cambridge)

Waterworks – pumps and steam engines

Steam Cars – White steam car AD1

Castings – Kells of Gloucester ( later Dudbridge Iron Works and Bloodworth & Co., Brimscombe Docks on side of the canal – large docks there).

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Arthur John Noad (1862-1938), Great Grandfather, with his wife Anne nee Duffell (1866-1943) and their children. From an original belonging to Marian Barton. Left to Right Back row: Florence Noad (1891-1968), Arthur Noad (1893-1915), Bessie Noad (1890-1965), Mary Noad (1895-1934). Middle row: Henry Walter Noad (1901-1946), Arthur John Noad (1862-1938), Anne Noad (1866-1943) nee Duffell, William Noad (1898-1992). Front row: Thomas Duffell Noad (1904-1941), Edith Annie Noad (1906-1986)

After the death of Aunt Elizabeth Noad of Newport in 1922 John received a substantial legacy from his uncle’s estate and the family purchased Victoria Cottage at Gossington.

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Anne Noad outside Victoria Cottage, Gossington, with Edith and Evelyn

Arthur John Noad died on 29th April 1938 aged seventy-five-years at Bristol Royal Infirmary.  He was described on his death certificate as of Victoria Cottage, Gossington, Slimbridge and as ‘Formerly a Carpenter and Wheelwright (Journeyman)’. The cause of death was given as post operative cardiac failure and a strangulated inguinal hernia (operation – hernia reduced sac not excised) and this was certified by Coralie Rundle Short M.B. Mr. F.D. Sainsbury, Registrar, registered the death on 30th April and the informant was W. Noad, the son, who was in attendance at the death. His address was given as “Hemworthy”, Slimbridge.

Arthur John Noad was buried at Slimbridge on 3rd May in that year and a gravestone was erected which was restored in 2006 by L.W. Clutterbuck of Cam, having had its kerbs removed some years ago.

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Inscription on Gravestone:

‘In Loving Memory of Arthur John, Noad. Died April 29th 1938 Aged 75 years. Also Anne his Wife, Died Dec 22nd 1943 Aged 77 years. May they rest in peace’

According to probate records Arthur John Noad of Victoria Cottage, Gossington died on 29th April 1938 at the Royal Infirmary, Bristol. Probate was granted on 28th June 1938 to Anne Noad, widow, William Noad, tool grinder and Tom Duffell Noad, bricklayer. Effects were valued at £1,072-19-7d.

From Janet Freeman 29th July 1996:

‘The cradle at Gloucester Folk Museum has the number F.3403 and is described in the catalogue thus:

‘Cradle, pitch pine. Rectangular canopy with four vertical knobbed corner pieces; lower part also rectangular with knobbed terminals; the whole on two rockers. Both rocker ends are broken away at one end and the top of the canopy is cracked. Overall length 2ft 8 ins, height of canopy 2 ft 1.5 ins, height of body 1 ft 5 ins, Loc. Gloucester, Donor: Mr W.P. Pope, April 1939.’

Mr Pope apparently was the auctioneer who suggested to Annie Noad that the cradle could go to the museum when Victoria Cottage was sold.’

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An additional note:

Marian Barton has an apprentice piece – a cutlery tray – made by Arthur John Noad and my father, Jack Barton, had his tool box.

Ann Wilson & David Evans, ‘Around Dursley in Old Photographs’, 1986, page 23:

 

‘Arthur Lacey, Gilbert Hurl, Eddie May and Bert Phillips, in the doorway of Workman’s Engineering Works, Slimbridge. Workman’s made wagons and carts, and around 1908 they developed a flat bed lorry, which had a full lock and could turn on its own ground. They also made a cranked axle milk float. Mr Arthur Noad worked for the company for 49 years, and made all the patterns for castings used on the cider mills, for which Workman’s won great acclaim. They also serviced Centinal Lorries, renewing the steam pipes, and were the first to put rubber tyres on to their wheels.’

Women’s Institute: ‘The Story of Slimbridge’ March 1958

 

‘At the Foundry, Slimbridge, high-class cider mills and presses were invented, built and sold by Messrs. Workman & Son, who at one time employed 18 men. These presses and mills won the Gold Medal at the London Show and machinery for cider-making was sent to America and other distant parts. Many exhibition tractors and threshing machines have been repaired there and all farm implements made as required for use in the village.’

 


 

ANN(IE) NOAD, Great Grandmother of Richard Barton

 

Daughter of Thomas Duffell and Mary Preece

Wife of Arthur John Noad

Mother of Florence Barton

 

Also Mother of Bessie Cashmore, Arthur, Mary Cuff, William, Henry, Thomas, Edith Evans and Evelyn James

Anne or Ann Duffell was born on 8th August 1866 at High House, Kings Caple, in Herefordshire. She was the elder daughter of Thomas Duffell, a Farm Labourer, and his wife Mary (nee Preece). John Parsons, Registrar, registered the baptism on 13th September and her mother was the informant.

In the 1871 census return Anne was at home at Kings Caple and described as a four-year-old child, born in King’s Caple.

Sometime between 1871 and 1880 the family moved to Llanbaddock near Usk. Her father died there when she was only fourteen years old and at the time of the 1881 census Annie was described as a Domestic Servant in the home of Jno. T. Cherry of Usk. She later became a servant at Cambridge House, Cambridge, Glos, where she presumably met Arthur John Noad. Later she was in service at 7, Gloucester Row, Clifton which is situated close to the Clifton Suspension Bridge.

Anne Duffell married Arthur John Noad on 29th June 1889 at Christchurch, Clifton, which was situated within sight of 7 Gloucester Row, Clifton. The bridegroom was described on the marriage certificate as a twenty-seven-year-old Wheelwright of Slimbridge, son of James Noad, a Labourer, and the bride was the twenty-three-year-old, daughter of Thomas Duffell, a Labourer. The witnesses were her brother Thomas Duffell and Annie Morris.

The young couple settled in Slimbridge where John worked as a Carpenter and Wheelwright. Between 1890 and 1913 they had nine children, all of whom survived childhood. My father referred to their home at Churchend as being nicknamed ‘Starlings Castle’.

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Annie Noad with daughters Bessie and Florence 1892c

In the 1891 census they were described as Arthur J. Noad, aged twenty-eight-years. Annie was aged twenty-four-years and born at ‘Kington, Hfds’. Their child Bessie was aged ten months. With them was John’s mother, Sarah Noad, aged sixty-seven-years and born in Cam.

On 9th February 1895 she was present when her mother-in-law died and informed the registrar of the death on 13th February, signing her name.

1901 census of Slimbridge Part 2 Entry number 69 Gossington  4 rooms

’A. John Noad  Head  M  38  Wheelwright & Carpenter  Worker (as opposed to
Employer/Working at Home etc) born Slimbridge

Annie Noad   Wife  M  34   born at Kings Caple, Herefordshire

Children: Bessie 10, Florence 9, Arthur 7, Mary 5 and William 3 all born at
Slimbridge’

In 1911 the family was living at Victoria Cottage, a five roomed property at Gossington. Arthur John was forty-eight-years-old, a wheelwright and worker born at Slimbridge. His wife Annie was forty-four-years-old and born at King’s Caple. She had been married for twenty-one-years, had eight children and was engaged in home work. The children included Bessie aged twenty and at home; Arthur aged seventeen, a builder’s apprentice; William aged thirteen a school boy; Henry Walter aged nine a school boy; Tom Duffell aged seven a school boy and Edith Annie aged four years and at home. All were born at Slimbridge.

Their eldest son, Arthur Noad enlisted in the10th Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment, and died in action at the Battle of Loos on the 13th October 1915, aged twenty-two-years.

Anne Noad was a friend of the Hurd family of Slimbridge. When this family moved to the west side of the River Severn, Annie’s grand-daughter, Marian Barton, and her youngest daughter, Evelyn Noad, would stay with them.

After her husband’s death, in 1938, she sold Victoria Cottage, Gossington, and bought ‘Kilmaur’, 5 Lawrence Grove, Dursley, where she lived with her recently widowed daughter, Bessie, and her grandson, John Cashmore. Thomas Duffell Noad, her youngest son, died on 18th March 1941 at Gloucester Infirmary aged thirty-seven-years.

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According to probate records her husband Arthur John Noad of Victoria Cottage, Gossington died on 29th April 1938 at the Royal Infirmary, Bristol. Probate was granted on 28th June 1938 to Anne Noad, widow, William Noad, tool grinder and Tom Duffell Noad, bricklayer. Effects were valued at £1,072-19-7d.

According to probate records her son Tom Duffell Noad of Moorend Lane, Slimbridge, died on 18th March 1941 at the Royal Infirmary, Gloucester. Probate was granted on 29th May 1941 to Anne Noad, widow, and his effects were valued at £855-12-11d.

Anne Noad died on 22nd December 1943 aged seventy-seven-years at ‘Kilmaur’, Lawrence Grove, Dursley, The death certificate described her as the Widow of Arthur John Noad, Carpenter and Wheelwright. The cause of death was given as atypical Pneumonia and Influenza and was certified by B.W.D. Fayle M.B. R.S. Barnard, Registrar, registered the death on 23rd December and the informant was her daughter, B. Cashmore, who lived at the same address.

Anne Noad was buried with her husband at Slimbridge on 24th December.

Inscription on Gravestone:

‘In Loving Memory of Arthur John, Noad. Died April 29th 1938 Aged 75 years. Also Anne his Wife, Died Dec 22nd 1943 Aged 77 years. May they rest in peace’

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In Memoriam card:

‘In affectionate remembrance of Anne Noad who departed this life December 22nd 1943 and was interred at the Church of St John, the Evangelist, Slimbridge, Dec 24th. “Kilmaur”, Lawrence Grove, Kingshill, Dursley, Glos. With the family’s kind regards. Farewell dear children, my life is past, I dearly loved you to the last; Weep not for me, nor sorrow take, but love each other for my sake.’

Letters from A. John Noad and Annie Noad to their daughter Florence:

 

Gossington

28th July 1911

2 Caledonia Place

Clifton

Bristol

Dear Florrie,

I am sending you a line to tell you we heard from Bessie yesterday. She is giving her notice today & coming home.

I came home yesterday. I had a week down there & last Saturday we took him to a nursing home about 3 miles from Newport nearer Cardiff. Uncle said when I was with him he should very much like to see you both, so I think the best thing for you to do would be to go & see him the first opportunity as there is no certainty about how long he is going to last.

Aunt she is very poorly, she had to go to bed the day I came away. Mary she is with her, she seems to get on alright with her now.

I think I have told you all for now. We remain your ever affectionate B & S & F & M.

Annie & J. Noad

(written on the back of the above letter)

Dear Florrie,

I don’t think you will understand Dad’s letter very well unless I write you a few lines.

Mrs Taylor the woman in Uncle’s house sent to ask me to let Mary go down as the work was to (sic) much for her. So Mary went last Saturday week, and I am inclosing the only letter I got from Dad but he came back on Monday. I sent his letter to Bessie, got back on Monday. I wanted him to write to you Monday night but he was so tired out and looked ill from worry, and I have been so busy. The other Sow had 13 (?) little ones while Dad was away, all doing well, but one of the three died Monday 5 weeks old; we were sorry for that.

Please send the two letters back that I have inclosed (sic). Has Percy sent you the piece put in the paper about Harry’s death. I have sent it to Bessie and am sending it on to Mary. I will ask her to send it on to you if you have not seen (it) and you let me know. I think your name is in it, Dad only said 6 when he came to it, Arthur and Willie looked at me in a bit of surprise.

Please write soon. Hoping this will find you well. Bessie said it was off between Fred & her. Dad said that was a good thing.


ARTHUR NOAD, Great Uncle of Richard Barton

 

Arthur Noad was born on 29th July 1893 and was baptised at Slimbridge Parish Church on 5th November 1893. In 1911 Arthur was living at home aged seventeen, a builder’s apprentice.

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Arthur enlisted and died in action. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission records that: ‘Private Arthur Noad 16052, 10th Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment who died on the 13th October 1915, aged 22, is buried in Plot IV, Row E, Grave number 19 in Dud Corner Cemetery, Loos, France. Loos is a village 3 miles north-west of Lens. Dud Corner Cemetery is west of the village, the north-east side of the main Bethune-Lens road. Most of the dead buried there fell in the Battle of Loos in 1915.

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Arthur Noad’s name is recorded on the Slimbridge War Memorial and his photograph was included in a War Memorial Album that seems to have been stolen from the church.

WW1 MEMORIAL QUARTER PEAL AT ST JOHN THE EVANGELIST CHURCH SLIMBRIDGE……. As part of the more widespread commemorative activities marking the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of the First World War in August 1914 the local Wotton branch of the Gloucester and Bristol Association of Church Bell Ringers have arranged to ring quarter peals at each of the church towers in the branch which had ringing members killed in the conflict. St Johns Slimbridge, one of eight towers in the branch to have suffered in this way, will have the quarter dedicated to the three ringers, Percy Cuff, Arthur Noad and Bernard R H Carter, lost over the course of this war. The half muffled quarter peal will be rung at the church between 11.30a.m.and 12.30p.m. on Saturday 9th August 2014. The choice of muffling the bells was made as this is the typical emotive and poignant way of signifying to all those who hear the bells that this “in memoriam” activity is marked out from other ringing events.In addition it is planned to ring further quarter peals at the church in the coming three years on or close to the date of the centennial anniversary of each ringers death. These will be further notified. All villagers, and especially those with family connection to the three named ringers, are invited to listen out for the bells or even come to the church to remember all those local lads who madethe ultimate sacrifice over those dark days and who, as well as being recorded on the war memorial in the churchyard, will now have their names on a plaque inside the church scheduled to be unveiled at a special Sunday service on the 3rd August


2. FLORENCE BARTON, Grandmother

Daughter of Arthur John Noad and Anne (nee Duffell)

Wife of Edward Percy Barton

Mother of Five children

Florence Noad was born on 27th November 1891 at Slimbridge and baptised on 7th February 1892 at Slimbridge Parish Church. She was the second eldest daughter of Arthur John Noad and his wife Anne. Having attended Slimbridge Parochial School she went into service in Bristol.

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Florence Barton (nee Noad) on the left

A postcard was sent to her by her sister Bessie, postmarked 9th March 1906 to her at West Royd (Royal?), Kempsey, Worcestershire. In a letter that was probably written in January 1908, she was at 1 Osborne Road, Clifton. From August 1910 until the summer of 1912 she was with Mrs King (census suggests Mrs Danbury), an elderly lady of 2 Caledonia Place, Clifton and from October 1912 she was with a Mrs. Weston of 8 The Avenue, Clifton.  At one point she spoke of going to work in an Infirmary nearer to home but nothing came of that. During this time she received regular letters and visits from Percy Barton and this culminated in their marriage.

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At the time of the 1911 census Florence was living at 2 Caledonia Place, Clifton a house consisting of twelve rooms. The head was Mary Louisa Danbury a seventy-seven-year-old widow living from private means and born in Brighton. With her was her daughter Mabel Agnes Danbury a forty-one-year-old single woman born in Chelsea, London. The staff included Jemima Robbins s sixty-two-year-old cook, Elizabeth Bru…(?) the fifty-six-year-old French maid born in Boulogne and Florence Noad a nineteen-year-old Parlour maid (domestic) born at Slymbridge

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The couple married at Slimbridge Parish Church on 21st August 1913 and they settled in the house next to the Forge at Churchend, Slimbridge. Here their five children were born between 1914 and 1924 and brought up. On the marriage certificate Edward Percy was described as a blacksmith, son of William Barton, blacksmith. Florence was described as a domestic servant the daughter of John Noad a wheelwright.

Dursley Gazette 23rd August 1913:

‘An interesting wedding at St John the Evangelist’s Church, Slimbridge, on Thursday last. The contracting parties were Mr. Edward Percy Barton (4th son of Mr. And Mrs. William Barton of Slimbridge) and Miss Florence Noad (2nd daughter of Mr. And Mrs. John Noad of Gossington. The service was conducted by Rev. J.O.H. Carter M.A. Rector. The Bride was given away by her father. Miss Mary Noad (sister of bride) and Miss Winifred Barton (sister of bridegroom) acted as bridesmaids. Mr. Maurice (sic) Barton (brother of the bridegroom) carried out the duties of best man… A merry peal of bells rang out as they left… Numerous and useful presents.’

Letter from the Rector of Slymbridge regarding the wedding:

Gossington, Slymbridge dated August 15th 1913

 ‘My dear Florence,

It would be nice if you were able to come with Percy to Holy Communion at 8 on Sunday, before your approaching marriage, in which I am deeply interested, & in which I wish you every happiness. I shall not expect any fee on this occasion from the bridegroom, except that which is due to Hobbs (2/6) for I feel that I am in Percy’s debt for kindnesses on many different occasions, & should like to take this opportunity of showing my appreciation of them. With all best wishes, Yrs very truly, H.H. Carter.

You will see at the end of the Marriage Service that there is a note about Holy Communion & now that weddings are often late the course I propose is a usual one.’

Percy and Florence had five children and during 1927 they moved to Narles Farm, Cambridge.

Florence Barton died on 21st April 1968 at Standish Hospital, Standish. She was aged seventy-six-years and described on the death certificate as ‘of Narles Farm, Cambridge, Slimbridge, Dursley, the wife of Edward Percy Barton a farmer’.


FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS FAMILY CONTACT: btsarnia@gmail.com

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