btsarnia

A tribute to the life and work of Brian Torode

Thomas and Sarah Smith of Hill, Earthcott, Cromhall and Tytherington

THE SMITH FAMILY OF SOUTH GLOUCESTERSHIRE AND BRISTOL


William Smith (1769c-1845) and Ann (1770-1849)

Farmer of Hill, Butcher and Dealer (Higler) of Rockhampton

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Thomas Smith I (1805- ) and Ann Wilson (born 1808-1842)

Carpenter of Hill and Compton Greenfield, Wheelwright of Bristol

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 Thomas Smith II (1831c-1884) and Sarah Woodward (1833-1880)

Agricultural Labourer of Hill, Earthcott, Dealer of Cromhall and Labourer of Tytherington

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 Ellen Smith (1862-1930) and Henry Terrett (1850-1908)

Millwright, Engineer and Publican of Kingswood

 


 

THOMAS SMITH II, Great II Grandfather

Son of Thomas Smith I and Ann Wilson

Husband of Sarah Woodward

Father of Ellen Jones

Also Father of Enoch, Charles, Alfred, Sarah Ann Harris, Augustus, Thyrza Newman, Edward, George, Joshua and Harry

On 13th October 1833 Mr. Darville, the Curate, conducted the baptism at Thornbury, of Thomas and he entered him in the register as the son of ‘Thomas and Anne Smith’, Carpenter of Crossways. On the following day the Curate also baptised Thomas’s cousin, Philip, son of a labourer and his wife, Ephraim and Hannah Wilson, of Duckhole. However, it would seem that Thomas’s parents were not actually married.

In 1841 Thomas’s parents were living at Compton Greenfield. Thomas was described as a thirty-two-year-old carpenter and his wife Ann was aged twenty-six years. The whole of the family were born in Gloucestershire. The children were listed as Agustus (sic) aged ten; Thos (sic) aged eight; Celea (sic) aged five and Elen (sic) aged two years. With then was Joseph Smith, aged twenty-five-years, an agricultural labourer, aged twenty-five-years, who only stayed one night.

 At the time of the 1851 census Thomas Smith was probably at Hill where we find a nineteen-year-old Farm Servant employed by and living with George Wetmore a farmer of 340 acres and with three labourers. On this occasion the boy gives his place of birth as Earthcott. We also find at the same farm his future wife, Sarah Woodward, who is described as a general Servant, aged twenty-years, and born in Hill. Another general servant was an Ann Smith who was also born in Hill. Was she perhaps a sister or cousin of Thomas Smith?

Thomas Smith II married Sarah Woodward on 29th December 1851 at Bedminster Parish Church. He is described as twenty-two-years-old, a bachelor, and labourer living with his bride at Little Paradise. His father was given on the certificate as Thomas Smith, a Carpenter. Neither the bride nor the bridegroom was able to sign their names and the witnesses were recorded as Thomas and Lucy Smith. It is highly likely that this couple were his father and stepmother and they were probably living at 39 Milk Street, St Paul’s, Bristol, at the time of the 1851 census.

At the time Sarah was only twenty-three-years-old and other details on the marriage certificate confirm that her father was Henry Woodward, a labourer of Hill. Sarah was unable to sign her name.

From these marriage details we can establish that Thomas Smith, Junior, was born in about 1829. Later census returns would indicate that the date could be as late as 1831.

Thomas and Sarah Smith had at least eleven children between 1852 and 1873 but little is known of what happened to some of them. Their son, George, who married his sister’s stepdaughter, was a merchant seaman. Joshua or Josiah fought in the Boer War whilst his older brothers, Enoch and Charles, were both labourers.

Their eldest son Enoch was baptised at Compton Greenfield, Henbury, on 22nd August 1852 and the child was listed in the register as the son of Thomas Smith, labourer of Compton in Henbury, and his wife Sarah. Their second son Charles Smith was baptised on 23rd July 1854 at Hill. His parents were described then as Thomas and Sarah Smith of The Gully, Ham, Berkeley, and his father’s occupation was given as labourer. The third child, Alfred, was baptised at St Helen’s Church, Alveston, on 1st February 1857 and now Thomas was described as a Labourer of Alveston.

The 1861 Census records that Thomas and Sarah were living at Earthcott, near Alveston. He is described as a thirty-one-year-old, born in Thornbury, and working as an agricultural labourer. His wife was aged thirty years and born in Hill. Four of their children were born before the night of the census and from the return we can glean that the two eldest sons, Enoch, aged nine years and Charles, aged seven, were born at Hill whilst Alfred, aged four, and Sarah Ann, aged one year, were born at Alveston.

Western Daily Press Thursday February 20th 1862:

Thornbury Petty Sessions – Wednesday – Thomas Smith, Haulier, of Earthcott, parish of Olveston, was summoned by Mr. J. Bullen, agent of the Animals’ Friend Society etc. for working a horse in an unfit state in the parish of Lateridge, near Thornbury, on Wednesday, the 5th inst. He pleaded guilty and was fined 10s and costs, or ten day’s imprisonment, with hard labour. Also William Taylor, farmer of Earthcott, was summoned by Mr. J. Bullen for working two horses with sore shoulders. He pleaded guilty and was fined £5 and costs or 3 months imprisonment with hard labour.

Kelly’s Directory for 1870 lists Thomas Smith as a beer retailer of Cromhall and again in 1876. Also the baptismal register for Cromhall lists the baptism of George on 22nd March 1871. The register entry gives his father’s occupation as a beer house keeper. In those that followed in 1872 and 1873 he was described as a publican. The birth certificate for Joshua, who was born on 4th November 1871, records his father as a beer house keeper of Cromhall.

From the 1871 Census return we discover the family living at Weir Bridge, Cromhall. Thomas Smith, aged thirty-nine-years, was described as a Beer Shop Keeper and Dealer, and born in Thornbury. His wife Sarah was aged forty years and born in Hill. In this census the eldest son, Enoch, aged nineteen, was born in Henbury rather than Hill (1861 census). Charles was aged fourteen and born in Hill; Alfred aged thirteen was born in Alveston; Sarah aged eleven and born in Alveston; Ellen aged ten years and born in Alveston; Augustus was born in Alveston and aged five years; Thurza was aged four years and born in Alveston; Edwin was aged three years and born in Alveston. The youngest child, George Smith, in this census return was aged one year and born at Cromhall.

Sometime between 1875 and 1880 the family moved to Tower Hill, Tytherington. Here there was an established family of Smiths who had farmed there for generations. It is possible that they may have been distant cousins and the name Thurza occurs in their lineage. Sarah died at Tytherington and was buried there on 22nd December 1880 aged fifty-years.

Her death certificate reveals that Sarah Smith died on 16th December 1880 at Tytherington. She was fifty-years-old and the wife of Thomas Smith, a Pig Dealer. The cause of her death was Phthisis for one year – a cavity of the left lung and consolidation of the right and this was certified by Edward Roberson M.R.C.S. Thomas Smith was in attendance at Tytherington and made his mark as the widower of the deceased.

In the 1881 Census return the family is living at Tower Hill Cottages, Tytherington. He was living in the one nearest to Tower Hill Farm, which was at the time being farmed by Thomas E. Harding. Thomas Smith was described as a forty-nine-year-old widower, born in Thornbury, and working as an Agricultural Labourer. Living with him were his younger children – Augustus, aged sixteen years, and born in Alveston; Thurza aged fifteen years and born in Alveston; Edward aged thirteen years and born in Alveston; George aged eleven and born in Cromhall; Josiah aged nine years and born in Cromhall and Harry aged seven years and born in Cromhall.

Of his two elder daughters both had left home by the time of the 1881 census. Sarah was living at 9 Highgrove Street, Bedminster, Bristol, with the Brown Family. Mrs Brown, the wife of a house painter, had been born in Cromhall. Sarah was herself described as a twenty-year-old unmarried visitor, a domestic servant, born at Earthcott. Meanwhile at the time of the census her younger sister, Ellen, was working as a general domestic servant for Henry Terrett of Kingswood, a young widower with two daughters.

When Ellen Smith married Henry Terrett on 12th September 1881, at St Barnabas, Bedminster, the witnesses were her brother Alfred and sister Sarah. The bride and groom were residing at 17 Denbigh Street at the time of the marriage. It is likely that by 1881 Alfred had moved away from Tytherington to Bristol or Gloucester.

Ellen gave details of her father’s occupation for the marriage certificate as a Dealer but by the time of her second marriage in 1913 he was ‘deceased’. In 1897 Edward  said that his father was a deceased Dealer. In the marriage certificate of his son Augustus in 1890 and Josiah in 1898 he was described as ‘Labourer’. In 1893 at the time of the marriage of his son Alfred Smith, Thomas was described as a deceased cattle dealer and in 1903 Edward described his father as simply ‘deceased’. In the marriage certificate for his son George, dated 1910, Thomas Smith was described as a deceased horse dealer.

Thomas Smith died at Bristol Infirmary in 1884 and was buried at Tytherington on 10th March 1884. He was aged fifty-three-years.

The death certificate records that he died on 4th March 1884 at the Royal Infirmary. He was described as a fifty-three-year-old Farm Labourer of Rockhampton in Thornbury Union Registration District. He died of chronic Bright’s disease of the kidneys, which was certified by J. Paul Bush M.R.C.S. The informant was Harriet E. Broomsgrove of Bristol Royal Infirmary who was present at the death. The death was registered on 8th March 1884 at Bristol.

From the above information we can deduce that Thomas was the son of Thomas Smith, a carpenter, and that he was born sometime between 1829 and 1831 in the Thornbury area. There is a baptism at Thornbury on 13th October 1833 of Thomas Smith, son of Thomas Smith, a carpenter of Crossways and his wife Anne. In 1851 Thomas was working as a farm labourer in Hill with his wife-to-be and in the December of that year he married Sarah Woodward at Bedminster. In the following year Thomas and Sarah were living at Compton in Henbury Parish and then from 1854 at The Gully, Ham in Berkeley Parish, near to Hill. From 1857 they were living at Earthcott in Alveston Parish where they stayed until at least 1867. Sometime between 1867 and 1870 they moved to Cromhall where Thomas worked as a publican. The family then moved to Tower Hill Cottages, Tytherington, sometime between 1873 and 1880, the year in which Sarah died. Thomas remained in Tytherington until his own death at Bristol Infirmary in 1884. During the late 1860s and early 1870s Edwin White, the stepson of Thomas Smith’s father was blacksmith in Tytherington.


SARAH SMITH, Great II Grandmother 

Daughter of Henry Woodward and Joanna (nee Allen)

Wife of Thomas Smith II

Also Mother of Enoch, Charles, Alfred, Sarah Ann Harris, Ellen Jones, Augustus, Thyrza Newman, Edward, George, Joshua and Harry

Sarah Woodward was baptised on 2nd June 1833 at Hill. She was the daughter of Henry Woodward and his wife Joanna Allen. Her mother died, aged forty-two years, when Sarah was only a few months old. Her father remarried and had further family.

In the 1841 census she was at home and described as eleven-years-old.

In the 1851 Census she is described as a General Servant, aged twenty years and born in Hill, living at the home of George Wetmore, a farmer of 340 acres with three labourers, at Hill. Also we find working on the farm on the night of the census Thomas Smith, a nineteen-year-old Farm Servant, and very likely her future husband. Another servant employed by the Wetmores was Ann Smith who was also born in Hill. Was she a sister or cousin of Thomas Smith?

Sarah Woodward married Thomas Smith at Bedminster Parish Church on 29th December 1851. At the time Sarah was only twenty-three-years-old and other details on the marriage certificate confirm that her father was Henry Woodward, a labourer. Sarah was unable to sign her name. Thomas Smith was described as twenty-two-years-old, a bachelor, and labourer living with his bride at Little Paradise. His father was given on the certificate as Thomas Smith, a Carpenter. Neither the bride nor the bridegroom was able to sign their names and the witnesses were recorded as Thomas and Lucy Smith. It is highly likely that this couple were his father and stepmother. They were living at 39 Milk Street, St Paul’s, Bristol, at the time of the 1851 census.

From these marriage details we can establish that Thomas Smith, Junior, was born in about 1829. Later census returns would indicate that the date could be as late as 1831.

Thomas and Sarah Smith had at least eleven children between 1852 and 1873 but little is known of what happened to some of them. Their son, George, who married his sister’s stepdaughter, was a merchant seaman. Joshua or Josiah fought in the Boer War whilst his older brothers, Enoch and Charles, were both labourers.

Their eldest son Enoch was baptised at Compton Greenfield, Henbury, on 22nd August 1852 and the child was listed in the register as the son of Thomas Smith, labourer of Compton in Henbury, and his wife Sarah. Their second son Charles Smith was baptised on 23rd July 1854 at Hill. His parents were described then as Thomas and Sarah Smith of The Gully, Ham, Berkeley, and his father’s occupation was given as labourer. The third child, Alfred, was baptised at St Helen’s Church, Alveston, on 1st February 1857 and now Thomas was described as a Labourer of Alveston.

The 1861 Census records that Thomas and Sarah were living at Earthcott, near Alveston. He is described as a thirty-one-year-old, born in Thornbury, and working as an agricultural labourer. His wife was aged thirty years and born in Hill. Four of their children were born before the night of the census and from the return we can glean that the two eldest sons, Enoch, aged nine years and Charles, aged seven, were born at Hill whilst Alfred, aged four, and Sarah Ann, aged one year, were born at Alveston.

In 1861 Edwin Charles Smith (sic) was lodging with a widow, Mary Hicks, at Earthcott a few doors away from his stepbrother Thomas Smith and his family. Edwin was described as an unmarried twenty-two-year-old blacksmith born at Sherborne, Dorset.

Kelly’s Directory for 1870 lists Thomas Smith as a beer retailer of Cromhall and again in 1876. Also the baptismal register for Cromhall lists the baptism of George on 22nd March 1871. The register entry gives his father’s occupation as a beer house keeper. In those that followed in 1872 and 1873 he was described as a publican. The birth certificate for Joshua, who was born on 4th November 1871, records his father as a beer house keeper of Cromhall.

From the 1871 Census return we discover the family living at Weir Bridge, Cromhall. Thomas Smith, aged thirty-nine-years, was described as a Beer Shop Keeper and Dealer, and born in Thornbury. His wife Sarah was aged forty years and born in Hill. In this census the eldest son, Enoch, aged nineteen, was born in Henbury rather than Hill (1861 census). Charles was aged fourteen and born in Hill; Alfred aged thirteen was born in Alveston; Sarah aged eleven and born in Alveston; Ellen aged ten years and born in Alveston; Augustus was born in Alveston and aged five years; Thurza was aged four years and born in Alveston; Edwin was aged three years and born in Alveston. The youngest child, George Smith, in this census return was aged one year and born at Cromhall.

Sometime between 1874 and 1880 the family moved to Tower Hill, Tytherington. Here there was an established family of Smiths who had farmed there for generations. It is possible that they may have been distant cousins and the name Thurza occurs in their lineage. Sarah died at Tytherington and was buried there on 22nd December 1880 aged fifty-years.

Her death certificate reveals that Sarah Smith died on 16th December 1880 at Tytherington. She was fifty-years-old and the wife of Thomas Smith, a Pig Dealer. The cause of her death was Phthisis for one year – a cavity of the left lung and consolidation of the right and this was certified by Edward Roberson M.R.C.S.. Thomas Harney, Registrar registered the death on 18th December and the informant was her husband, Thomas Smith of Tytherington, who was in attendance at the time of the death and made his mark.


 

Their eleven children were Great II Aunts and Uncles:

 1. ENOCH SMITH, Great II Uncle

Enoch was the eldest of the children and according to census returns he was born in either Hill or Henbury in about 1852. According to one world tree he was born on 25th July 1852. Enoch was baptised at Compton Greenfield Church, in Henbury Parish, on on 22nd or 27th August 1852 and was described in the register as the son of Thomas Smith, a labourer of Compton in Henbury, and his wife Sarah. In the 1861 census return he was aged nine years and born in Hill. In 1871 he was nineteen, born in Henbury, living at home in Cromhall, and working as an agricultural labourer.

Enoch married Ellen Crook in Bristol during the second quarter of 1877. Ellen was the daughter of Anthony Crook, an agricultural labourer. According to the 1861 census she was living at home at Water Mill Cottage, Quedgeley, and was described as three-years-old and born at Hardwicke. In 1871 she was staying at Huntingford near Michaelwood and working as a domestic servant. She was the niece of William Smith, with whom she was staying, her age was given as fourteen years, and she was shown as born in Quedgeley.

In the 1881 census Enoch was a General Labourer of Bagstone, in the Parish of Wickwar. He was described as born at Compton and married to Ellen. Their children included Archie C. aged three years and born in Cromhall; Ina E. aged one year and born at Cromhall and Cicely aged three months and born at Bagstone.

In the 1891 census there was an Enoch Smith living at Bagstone Cottages, Wickwar. He was described as a thirty-eight-year-old quarryman born in Compton, Gloucestershire. His wife, Ellen was aged thirty-eight and born in Quedgeley. Children included Archie Caleb Smith, aged thirteen years and born in Cromhall; Ciceley aged ten years and born in Wickwar; Dora Daisy aged eight and born in Wickwar; Anthony aged seven years and born in Wickwar; Arthur aged five years and born in Wickwar; Leonard aged three years and born in Wickwar and George aged two years and born in Wickwar.

Enoch died during the first quarter of 1900 in Chipping Sodbury Registration District. He was buried at Wickwar and the register describes him as being buried on 19th February 1900 aged forty-eight-years and from Bagstone, Wickwar.

In the 1901 census we find Ellen, a widow, living at Bagstone Road, Wickwar. She was described as aged forty-four-years and born in Hardwicke. With her were her children – ‘Archibald’, aged twenty-four-years and born in Cromhall, a stone quarryman; Anthony, aged seventeen-years, born in Wickwar, a stone quarryman; Arthur aged fifteen, a stone quarryman; George aged eleven; Ellen M. aged nine; John L. aged eight; Amy L. aged six; Norman C. aged five and Edith E. aged three years.

In 1911 Ellen was living with her family in eight rooms at Wotton Road, Iron Acton. She was described as a fifty-three-year-old widow and General Haulier working on her own account and born in Harwicke (sic). Her children included George Smith, a twenty-two-year-old single man working as a farm labourer. Lawrence was listed as an eighteen-year-old single farm labourer; Cecil was listed as single, aged fifteen, and working as a farm labourer. Edith Ella was listed as a fifteen-year-old daughter. All the boys were born at Bagstone, Wickwar.

An Ellen Smith died during 1943 in Sodbury Registration District aged eighty-eight-y 

 2. CHARLES SMITH, Great II Uncle

Charles was born in 1854 at Berkeley although in the 1861 and 1871 census returns the place of birth was given as Hill. In 1911 we find Clapton. He was baptised on 23rd July 1854 at Hill. His parents were described as Thomas and Sarah Smith of The Gully, Ham, Berkeley and his father’s occupation was given as labourer. Charles was aged seven years in the 1861 census and fourteen in 1871. He had left home by the time of the 1881 census and married Susannah Carpenter during the first quarter of 1880 in Dursley Registration District.

In the 1881 census return ‘Chas’ was living at Under the Hill Cottages, Tytherington. He was described as a twenty-six-year-old agricultural labourer, born in Berkeley. His wife Susan, aged twenty-one-years, was born in Cam. Their child Laura was aged three months and born in Tytherington.

In the 1891 census he was at Hill Cottage, Tytherington. He was described as a thirty-seven-year-old farm labourer born in Berkeley. His wife, Susan, was aged thirty-nine-years and was born in Cam. Their children included Laura, aged ten-years, a scholar, born in Tytherington; Percy aged eight years and born in Tytherington and Augustus aged two years and born in Tytherington.

In 1901 Charles Smith was still in Tytherington and living at Station Road. He was described as a forty-five-year-old labourer on a farm, born at Aust. His wife Susannah, was aged forty-five-years and was born in Cam. The children included Laura aged twenty, Augustus aged twelve and Gordon aged three years. All were born in Tytherington.

In 1911 Charles Smith was living at Station Road, Tytherington. He was described as a fifty-four-year-old worker who had been married for thirty-one-years. He had six children of whom two had died. His occupation was given as a horseman on a farm – a Waggoner – and his place of birth was given as Clapton. His wife Susan was aged fifty-two-years-old and born at Cam. His children at home included Gordon Truey aged thirteen years, a scholar, born in Tytherington and Augustus William, aged twenty-one-years, and born in Tytherington. The family occupied three rooms.

Charles Smith worked as a labourer in Tytherington where he died in 1935 aged eighty-one-years. His wife died in 1951 aged ninety-two-years.

Julia Salter wrote in July 2009: ‘Mum did tell me that Gran ( Nellie )(1897-) used to cycle from Totterdown to Tytherington to see relatives.’

3. ALFRED SMITH, Great II Uncle

Alfred was born 0n 19th December 1856 (1857 in 1939 Reg) at Alveston and baptised at St Helen’s Church on 1st February 1857. His parents were described as Thomas, a labourer of Alveston and Sarah, his wife. In 1861 he was at home aged four years and in 1871 aged thirteen. He had left home by 1881.

In the 1891 census there was a thirty-two-year-old blacksmith at 2 Kimbrose, St Owens, Gloucester called Alfred Smith, who stated that he was born at Earthcott (Eastcoat). With him was, Mary, who was aged thirty-eight-years and was born in Ashchurch. Nevill Downham, an adopted son, was living with them. He was aged seven years and born in Tewkesbury.

It seems likely that Mary was the Mary Elizabeth Downham who was baptised at Brockworth on 3rd February 1856, daughter of James and Mary Downham. Her father was described in the register as a Carpenter. This would make Mary an elder sister of the Clara Downham who later married Alfred Smith in 1893.

Nevile Downham

We know that Nevile Downham was born on 17th November 1883 at Oldbury, Tewkesbury. His mother was Clara Downham, a milliner. She registered the birth herself on 12th December.

For the 1901 census Nevile’s surname appears to have changed to Neville Smith.

Nevile Downham married a Lillian Maud Coleman at St John’s Parish Church, Weymouth, on 16th October 1904. He was described as aged twenty-one, a fireman, of 1 Elsie Villas, Lennox Street, Weymouth, son of Alfred Downham, blacksmith. She was aged twenty-one, of 15 Alma Road, Westham, the daughter of a Charles Coleman, Chief Officer, Merchant Navy. The witnesses were J (?) Cox and M. Coleman.

On 6th January 1900 Nevile became an engine cleaner in Gloucester but from 12th May 1902 he was a shunter foreman at Weymouth. In September 1904 he was back in Gloucester and in 1906 was a third class fireman in Weymouth. In 1913 we find him in Tetbury and from 1920 in Oxford. He retired as a first class group fireman on 24th November 1945.

In 1911 Nevile Downham and his family were living in six rooms at 10 Napier Street, Gloucester. He was a twenty-seven-year-old Railway Engine Stoker employed by GWR and was born at Oldbury, Gloucestershire. His wife Lillian Maud was aged twenty-eight and born at Weymouth. The couple had three children and they had been married for six years. Children included Gladys Clara aged five, at school, born at Weymouth. Vere Madeline was aged four, at school, and born in Gloucester. Percival Nevile Downham was aged one year and born in Gloucester.

Neville Downham probably died during 1957 aged seventy-three-years at Abingdon.

On 18th September 1893 Alfred Smith married Clara Downham in St Nicholas’s Parish Church in Gloucester, after banns had been called. Alfred was described as a thirty-five-year-old bachelor, a blacksmith, of 10 Priory Road, Gloucester. His father was given as Thomas Smith, Deceased Cattle Dealer. The bride, Clara Downham, was aged thirty-three-years, a spinster of the same address and daughter of James Downham, a builder. The witnesses were Daniel Downham and Emma Eliza Downham.

Clara Downham was born in Brockworth 28th February 1860. In 1861 the family was living at Watermead, Brockworth. Her father James was then a thirty-four-year-old Carpenter from Croydon, Surrey, and her mother, Mary, was from Cranham. James and Mary had other children Albert, Elizabeth and William.

Ten years later, in 1871, Clara was a twelve-year-old scholar and further siblings included Harry, Daniel and James Downham. In 1881 Clara was still at home at Watermead and Clara was listed as a twenty-one-years-old, with no occupation. By this time, James Downham, her father, was listed as a Carpenter and Master Builder, employing three men and a boy.

Clara’s son, Nevile Downham, was born on 17th November 1883 at Oldbury, Tewkesbury. His mother was described as Clara Downham, a milliner. She registered the birth herself on 12th December.

In 1891 James Downham was not only described as a Carpenter but he was now also the Innkeeper of the Victoria Inn, Brockworth, and his daughter Clara was still living at home.

In 1901 Alfred Smith was living at 17 Priory Road, Gloucester. He was aged forty years and was described as a Journeyman Blacksmith, born in Gloucester. With him was his wife, Clara, aged forty-one-years and born in Gloucester. With them were Neville Smith, son, aged seventeen-years, an Engine Cleaner, born in Gloucester.

At the time of the 1911 census return Alfred Smith was living in four rooms at 134 Millbrook Street, Gloucester. He was described as a fifty-one-year-old blacksmith, a carriage worker – possibly ‘Healing’. Hs wife Clare was forty-nine-years-old. Both of them were described as being born in Gloucestershire. They had been married for nineteen years and had had four children of whom two had already died. Their children at home included Beatrice aged nine years and Lizzie aged eight years. Both were born in Gloucester.

In 1930 Alfred Smith was described as ‘of Gloucester’ in his sister Ellen Jones’s obituary.

At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales, Alfred Smith was staying with his Arthur and Elizabeth Groves at Twyning Police Station. Arthur was described as Police Constable-in-Charge, Number 290.  Alfred was described as a Retired Blacksmith. Meanwhile, Clara Smith was staying with Frank and Beatrice Downham at Woodside in the Forest of Dean. Frank was working as a Bread and Confectionary Sales Representative.

An Alfred Smith died in 1944 in Gloucester Rural Registration District aged eighty-six-years and a Clara Smith died in Gloucester City Registration District in 1937 aged seventy-five-years.

4. SARAH ANN HARRIS, Great II Aunt

Sarah Ann Smith was born in Alveston in about 1859. Her name appears in the birth register index for Thornbury in the second quarter of 1860. She was baptised on 13th May 1860 at St Helen’s Church, Alveston. In the 1861 census she was called Sarah Ann and was one-year-old. In 1871 she was simply Sarah, at home, aged eleven.

Bristol Mercury 2nd July 1870

Highway Robbery by a boy – an incorrigible boy named Greenman, whose friends live at Crossways, near Thornbury, on Friday met two little girls aged 8 and 11 respectively the daughters of Mr. Thomas Smith of Cromhall, going toward Thornbury and immediately pounced on them, threw down the eldest child and rifled her pockets, taking there from in money 4s 6d. The young culprit, who is only 12 or 13 years of age, a short time since lived for several days in Prest Wood, a large covert belonging to Earl Ducie, and for food caught very young rabbits, skinned and cooked them. He is now in the custody of the Thornbury police, who will at the earnest request of the young vagabond’s friends ask the magistrate to send him to a reformatory school.

Sarah Ann had left home by 1881. In the census she was listed as Sarah Smith and visiting at 9 Highgrove Street, Bedminster, Bristol. She was described as a twenty-year-old unmarried, visitor, a domestic servant, born at Earthcott. Her hosts were Charles and Catharine Brown. He was a forty-one-year-old house painter born in Cirencester and she was a forty-four-year-old born in Cromhall. Catharine may be the reason for various great aunts and uncles ending up in Totterdown.

The Browns of Highgrove Street

Ten years later in 1891 Catherine Brown, a forty-year-old widow, was living at 18 Highgrove Street with her sister Sarah Capprell (sp?), married, aged thirty-two-years, both were shown as born in Cromhall. With them was Henry Smith, an eighteen-year-old lodger and bottle washer, born in Cromhall – Sarah Ann’s youngest brother! Also living with them was William Desmond, a twenty-two-year-old Cattle Drover from Cork. Back in 1871 Charles and Catherine Brown were living at 20 Redcliffe Mead Lane, Redcliffe. He was a thirty-one-year-old house painter, born Cirencester, and she was aged thirty years and born in Cromwell (sic). In the 1890 Wright’s Directory Charles Brown, Painter and Glazier, was living at 18 Highgrove Street.

Sarah Ann witnessed the marriage of her sister, Ellen Smith in 1881 and Thyrza Smith, in 1889.

In 1891 a Sarah A. Smith, aged thirty years, was living with the Martin Family at 10 Upper Belgrave Road, Clifton, and working as a Cook there and the return stated that she was born somewhere in Gloucestershire.

On 9th October 1893 Sarah Anne Smith, aged thirty-three-years, a spinster of Emmanuel Parish, Clifton, Bristol, daughter of Thomas Smith, cattle dealer, married Edward William Harris, aged thirty-seven, a publican and bachelor, of Kingswood, son of Charles Harris, Farmer. Both signed their names and the witnesses were Alfred Smith, Ellen Terrett and Edward Charles Neal.

In 1891 Edward Harris, aged thirty-six-years, was Licensee and Victualler of the Dog and Badger Inn at Kingswood. He was described as born at Westerleigh and living with him was his sister, Elizabeth Harris. This public house was situated near to that of Daniel and Ann Terrett.

Edward William Harris was baptised at Westerleigh on 14th September 1856. He was the son of Charles and Elizabeth Harris.

In 1861 his parents were farming 186 acres at Henfield, Westerleigh, and Edward William, aged five, was then one of seven children.

In 1871 Charles Harris, aged fifty-two-years, was an innkeeper on Wickwar Road, Kingswood. With him were five of his children including Edward W. Harris, aged fourteen years.

In 1881 Edward William Harris, aged twenty-four-years, was staying with his brother, Charles at 62 Litchurch Street, Litchurch, Derby. Charles Harris, aged thirty-six, was married to Catherine, a native of Derby, and he was working as a goods guard. Edward William was described as a pointsman. Also staying in the house was Joseph Harris, aged nineteen, a younger brother, who was a horse driver or carter. All three brothers had been born in Westerleigh.

Hilda Blanche Harris was baptised at St Mary’s Church, Kingswood, on 2nd December 1894 and her father was described as a Publican.

The Bristol Mercury for 3rd August 1896 reported that the license for the Dog and Badger had been transferred from E. Harris.

Their second child, Harold Edward Harris, was baptised at St James’ Church, Mangotsfield, on 7th May 1899.

In 1901 Edward and Sarah Ann Harris were living in five rooms at Wharfe, Curdworth, Warwickshire. He was described as a forty-five-year-old General Farm Labourer and she was aged forty-one. Their places of birth were given as not known. Hilda Blanche was aged six and born at Kingswood, Gloucestershire, and Harold Edward, aged two, was born at Mangotsfield.

In 1911 Edward William Harris, widower, aged fifty-four-years, was living at 6 Woodlands, Kingsbury, Tamworth. He was described as a General Labourer above ground and born at Westerleigh. His son Harold Edward was aged twelve years.

5. ELLEN JONES, Great Grandmother 

Daughter of Thomas Smith and Sarah (nee Woodward)

Wife of Henry Terrett

Also Mother of Frederick Henry, Edward Frank, Lucy Ethel Terrett, Alice Maud Herrick, Florence Emily Milner, William Edward and Sidney George

Also Wife of Thomas Fitzherbert Jones

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Thomas Fitz Herbert Jones and his wife Ellen, nee Smith

Ellen Smith was born on 13th October 1862 at Earthcott, Alveston and baptised on 16th November 1862 at St Helen’s Church, Alveston. Her parents were described in the church register as Thomas Smith, a labourer of Alveston, and his wife Sarah. She was actually their fifth child and second daughter and her father was variously described as an agricultural labourer, pig dealer and horse dealer….

For more details about Ellen Jones see my blog:

Terrett Engineers of Kingswood

https://wp.me/p4BX9P-E1

6. AUGUSTUS SMITH, Great II Uncle

Augustus Smith was born at Alveston and baptised at St Helen’s Church on 22nd May 1864. In the 1871 census return he was aged five years and at home. In the 1881 census he was described as a sixteen-year-old agricultural labourer, born in Alveston, who was living with his father at Tower Hill Cottages.

On 24th March 1890 he married Mary Anne Liveall, a thirty-two-year-old spinster of Tytherington, daughter of Richard Liveall, a labourer. Augustus was described as a twenty-six-year-old labourer of Tytherington, son of Thomas Smith, a labourer. The witnesses were George Livall and Mary Ann Godwin.

They had at least three children but the parentage of the Livall children is unsure. In the 1881 census return for Thornbury Union Work House was Mary A. Livall, an unmarried domestic servant. She was aged twenty-five-years and born in Tytherington. Her children were Emily Livall aged four, a scholar born in Tytherington; Edwin Livall aged two years, a scholar and born in Tytherington and William G. Livall aged one year and born in Thornbury. A

In the 1891 census Augustus was living with his family at Under Hill Cottage, Tytherington. He was described as a twenty-four-year-old farm worker who was born in Iron Acton. His wife, Mary Ann, was aged thirty-two-years and born in Tytherington. Their daughter Frances E. Smith was aged one year and born in Tytherington. With them was his stepson, Mary Ann’s son, Edwin Livall who was an eleven-year-old farm labourer.

Augustus died in 1898 at Tytherington at the age of thirty-four-years.

In 1901 Mary Smith, his widow, was aged forty-four-years and living in Tytherington with her family. With her were her children Nellie Smith aged ten years and Annie Smith aged seven years. Also living with them were her sons William, aged twenty-years, and Edwin Livall, aged twenty-two-years who were both working as stone quarrymen born in Tytherington. Other members of the Livall family were boarding with her.

In 1911 Mary Ann Smith was living in three rooms at Tytherington. She was described in the census return as aged fifty-six-years and a widow, born in Tytherington. Boarding with her were Walter Hillier a forty-five-year-old single Labourer working in Asphalt and born in Stroud. Her nephew, sixteen-year-old William Livall, was living with them and he was described as a blacksmith’s striker – manufacturing.

In 1911 Edwin Livall was a thirty-four-year-old labourer in a stone quarry and living in Tytherington. His children included Augusta Annie aged nine years; Celia May aged eight years; Hubert A.E. aged six years; E. Rose aged four years and Catherine M. aged three years. Living with the Livalls was William Livall, Edwin’s cousin, a blacksmith’s striker who was born in Milbury Heath.

Mary Ann Smith died in 1932 in the Bristol Royal Infirmary and her younger son, William Livall, died in 1956. An entry for a Mary A. Smith in 1932 for Bristol Registration District gives an age for her of seventy-years.

Ian Morrison:

My mother was Gwyneth Jean Livell b.1929.
Her father was Edgar Charles Livell b. 1904.
His father was Edgar Livell b. 1882.
His father was Edwin Livell b. 1857. Brother of Mary Ann Livell b. 1855 and she married Augustus Smith b. 1867c.

Thornbury Roots: 77 High Street:

William and Bessie Livall –  when the house was put up for sale in 1938 (following the death of Charlotte and Ann Wise) it was occupied by William and Bessie Livall.

William was born in Tytherington in 1895.  He appears to have been the son of William Henry Livall and his wife, Louisa (nee Pritchard).  They had married in 1893 and had two children, Florence May born in late 1893 and William Henry in 1895, before Louisa died aged only 22 and she was buried on 28th January 1897.  The family had been living at The Hackett at the time of Louisa’s death.

Life must have been very hard for young William.  The 1901 census shows that his widowed father then aged 31 was working as a labourer at the quarry and looking after his two young children.   They were sharing the house in Tytherington with Mary Smith.

In 1915 William married Bessie White.   Bessie had been baptised on 16th February 1898, the daughter of Charles White, a labourer and his wife, Harriett. They had at least two children: Lily Mary born on 20th April 1916, Violet Joan born on 30th July 1920.

The Livalls were living in St Mary Street when Lily was baptised on 7th November 1917 at which time William was described as being a blacksmith.  We assume that they were living with Bessie’s parents who were living at 27 St Mary Street.  The 1927 electoral register lists William Livall as living with Charles White in St Mary Street and later registers up to 1935 show that they continued to live in St Mary Street.

By 1938 William and Bessie were at 77 High Street.  Their daughter, Lily May married Leslie George Thomas Stephens of Alveston in 1938.  They moved to live in Lower Almondsbury.

William and Bessie carried on living at 77 High Street until their deaths.  William died on 9th April 1954 aged 59.  Bessie died on 22nd February 1955 aged 59.

7. THYRZA NEWMAN, Great II Aunt

Thyrza was born at Alveston and baptised at St Helen’s Church on 18th March 1866. In the 1871 census return she was aged four years. She was living with the family in 1881 at Tower Hill Cottages, Tytherington. She was described as a fifteen-year-old born in Alveston.

She married William Newman during the fourth quarter of 1889 in Bristol Registration District.

On 28th October 1889 Thyrza Smith, a twenty-three-year-old spinster of 11 Pembroke Road, Clifton, married William Newman of 19 Plummer Street, Stapleton Road, Bristol, a twenty-three-year-old bachelor, a labourer in a cocoa factory. They were married at Broadmead Meeting House according to the rites of the Baptists. She was described as the daughter of Thomas Smith, a deceased farmer, and he was the son of James Newman, a labourer. The witnesses were Sarah Ann Smith and Albert Henry Dudbridge,

In 1871 William Newman was listed as being at home with his parents James and Sarah Newman at Bratton. He was described as aged four and born at Bratton, near Westbury, Wiltshire. His father was a thirty-one-year-old agricultural labourer.

At the time of the census of 1881 he was a fourteen-year-old agricultural labourer at home with his parents James and Sarah, in Bratton and his father was again listed as an agricultural labourer.

In 1891 William and Thyrza (sic) were living at 7 Hatherley Brow, Horfield, Bristol. She was aged twenty-five and born in Earthcott, Gloucester. Her husband William Newman was described as a twenty-four-year-old general labourer born in Bratton, Wiltshire. Their child Florence T. was aged eight months and was born in Bishopston, Bristol.

In 1901 the family had moved to ‘Llandaff’, 41 Rosebery Road, Moorfields, Bristol. William was a thirty-four-year-old chocolate work labourer born in Bratton. Thirza (sic) was now thirty-five and again born at Earthcott. Their children included Florence T. Newman who was aged ten and born in Horfield; William M. Newman aged three years and born in St George and Dorothy aged two months was also born at St George..

In 1911 the family was living at in seven rooms at 49 Rosebery Road. William Newman was described as a forty-four-year-old house decorator working on his own account and born at Bratton, Westbury, Wiltshire. Thyrza was aged forty-five-years and was listed as born at Earthcott, Gloucestershire. She had been married for twenty-one-years with eight children born alive and still alive. The children included Florence Newman aged twenty, assisting at home, and born at Horfield; William Morly aged thirteen and born in St George’s Bristol; Dorothy Lillian aged ten and

born in St George’s; Clifford Percy aged seven and born at Brislington; Gerald Ivor aged six years and born in St George’s; Phyllis Mabel aged four years and born in St George’s; Elsie Muriel aged three and born in St George’s and Reginald George aged ten months and born in St George’s.

In 1908 Mr W. Newman of Bristol attended the funeral of Henry Terrett with his brothers-in-law Messrs. E. J. and H. Smith. Both William and Thurza attended Ellen Jones’s funeral in 1930.

In about 1900 a William Newman was living at 15 Gilbert Road, Redfield. In 1903 a William Newman was listed at 43 Roseberry Road in Wright’s Directory. From 1905 until 1912 there was one at 49 Roseberry Road. From 1913 until 1917 a William Newman was at 218 Whitehall Road and from 1917 until 1950 at 30 Hill Street, Totterdown.

According to probate records Reginald George Newman of The Limes, Hanham, Gloucestershire, died on 20th December 1933. Adminstration was granted at Bristol to his father, William Newman, house decorator, on 12th January 1934. His effects were valued at £140-1-3d.

According to probate records William Newman of 38 Nag’s Head Hill, St George, Bristol, died on 10th December 1935. Probate was granted at Bristol to Clifford Newman, decorator, Leonard Bailey commercial traveller and Henry Wilmott Wickham Atchley. The effects were valued at £13, 496. 6. 8d.

According to probate records Thirza Newman of Porthtowan, Nag’s Head Hill, St George, Bristol, widow, died on 2nd October 1948. Administration was granted at Bristol on 22nd November 1948 to Clifford Percy Newman, house property repairer. The effects were valued at £452.12.11d.

8. EDWIN or EDWARD SMITH, Great II Uncle

Edwin was born on 11th April 1868 in Thornbury Registration District and was baptised at St Helen’s Church, Alveston, on 10th May 1868. He was aged three years and at home for the 1871 census and his name was given as Edwin.

He was living at Tower Hill Cottages with the family at the time of the 1881 census. He was then described as a thirteen-year-old, born in Alveston, a scholar, and his name is now given as ‘Edward’.

In the 1891 census return an Edward Smith was lodging with Aaron Stiles at 112 Mead Road, Bedminster East but his age was given as twenty-six-years and his place of birth was given as Thornbury.

On 31st January 1897 Edward Smith married Ada Evans at the Church of St Luke in Bedminster. He was described as a twenty-eight-year-old bachelor and Labourer of 37 Weare Street, Bedminster, (the home of Thomas Shute, a shopkeeper, according to Wright’s Directory). He was the son of Thomas Smith, a deceased Dealer. Ada was a twenty-seven-year-old spinster of the same address, the daughter of William Fowles Evans, a deceased foreman. Both bride and groom signed their names as did the witnesses William Newman and Rose Dagger.

Ada Evans was born on 20th August 1869 in Bedminster Registration District. Ada’s parents were William Farmer EVANS (Born 3 May 1827, Died 30 Jan 1891) and Amelia DIX (Born 23 Jan 1827, Died 30 Mar 1899).In 1871 we find her, aged two-years and born in Bedminster, at home with her parents William and Amelia. Her father was a forty-five-year-old Clerk and native of St Nicholas Parish in Worcester and her mother was forty-five and born in Bedminster. Their address was either Princes or Francis Street (sp?), Bedminster. By 1891 Ada, now twenty-one-years-old, was living at 88 Park Street, Bedminster, with her mother, a sixty-four-year-old Widow.

In the 1901 census Edward and Ada were living at 23 Windsor Terrace, Knowle, Bristol. He was described as a thirty-two-year-old flour mill warehouse foreman, a worker, born in Earthcott. His wife, Ada, was aged thirty-one-years and born in Bristol. Their children were Nellie M. Smith, aged three years and born in Bristol and Harry, aged two years and born in Bristol.

In the 1911 census return Edward Smith and his family were living in five rooms at 23 Windsor Terrace, Totterdown. He was described as forty-two-years-old, married for fourteen years with six children of whom one had already died. His occupation was given as formerly a warehouse foreman in a flour mill and his place of birth was given as Alveston. His wife Ada was forty-one-years and born in Bedminster. Children included Nellie Muriel aged thirteen and at school; Harry aged twelve who was described as at school but also a baker’s boy (worker); Hilda Blanche aged nine years; Leonard George aged six years and Ernest Albert aged five years. All the children were born in Bedminster.

So far I have been unable to locate the baptisms of their children in the obvious local Anglican parishes but Ada referred to Oxford Street Chapel in her will of 1946.

Edward attended Henry Terrett’s funeral in 1908 and also his sister, Ellen Jones’s funeral in 1930 and was still of Bristol.

Edward Smith died on 8th May 1941 but he is shown as the householder at 23 Windsor Terrace right up until 1947 according to Wright’s Directories. Ada Smith died on 7 Apr 1952.

Will of Ada Smith:

December 1946

My Will.  I wish all my loose money to be used to pay Dr’s expenses also Funeral expenses and 5£ to Oxford St Chapel the rest to be divided amongst my 4 Children also Bank money likewise. Ada Smith – Hilda, Leonard, Ernest, Nellie.

Julie Salter: ‘Edward had a terrible work accident. I don’t know the year but mum seems to think he was working for a company called ‘ Humphries Bobbets ‘ with premises on the Halfpenny bridge in Bristol. I don’t know what they made but apparently he was on the first floor trying to mend a belt in a belt shaft which went between the two floors. Somehow he fell through the shaft and was crippled as a result.’

9. GEORGE SMITH, Great II Uncle 

George Smith was born in about 1870 at Cromhall. He was baptised on 22nd March 1871 at Cromhall. In the 1871 census return he was described as one-year-old. In the 1881 census return he was at home with his father at Tower Hill, aged eleven years. He became a sailor and worked on the clipper ships probably from about 1882 until his marriage. He married my Great Aunt, Edith Jane Terrett. at Kingswood Parish Church on 31st August 1910….

Dursley Gazette 3rd September 1910 (notes):

Interesting Wedding at Kingswood. On Wednesday last at the Parish Church, Kingswood, Miss Edith Jane Terrett, eldest daughter of the late Mr. Henry Terrett of Kingswood was united in matrimony to Mr. George Smith of Bristol and late of Sydney, New South Wales.

The wedding was of a quiet character… (description of dresses) . The bride was attended by one bridesmaid, her cousin Miss Alice Terrett of Wotton-under-Edge. Mr. Daniel Terrett of Wotton-under-Edge, the bride’s uncle gave her away. Mr. F. Winder of Bristol (friend of Groom) was the best man. The service was conducted by Rev. Chas R. Cottell.

The Reception followed at Rose Villa, residence of Mrs. W. Terrett, the bride’s aunt, with whom she had resided for some years. The honeymoon took place in Clevedon. Presents…

Edith Jane Terrett was baptised on 10th October 1875 at St Mary’s Kingswood. Her mother, Clara, died in 1881 when she was six. In the 1891 census return Henry Terrett, her father, was described as a publican and millwright of the Star Inn, Kingswood. He was aged forty-years. His new wife, Ellen, was aged twenty-eight-years and born at Earthcott. Edith was aged fifteen years.

6 Smith II Gt 9 a

Rose Villa, Kingswood

George retired from being a merchant sailor and farmed Rose Villa, Kingswood. In the 1911 census he was listed as a forty-one-year-old retired seaman who had been married for less than a year and was living at Rose Villa, a property with eight rooms, with his wife Edith. His place-of-birth was given as Cromhall. Edith Jane was aged thirty-five-years and born at Kingswood. Edith’s aunt, Bedelia Terrett, was also living at Rose Villa and she was described as a seventy-two-year-old widow, of private means, born in Wotton.

7 Terrett II Gt 8 2 a

George and Eddie Smith with her sister Annie Louise and her husband Frederick Werrett and son Henry John Werrett in the rear garden of Deanery Road, Warmley, Kingswood, Bristol. The Werrett home. Approximately 1935. Original May Werrett. to R. Edith Jane Smith, Henry John Werrett, Frederick George Werrett George Smith, Annie Louise Werrett

Their son William George Smith was born in 1912 and died on 14th September 1920 of Diphtheria. He is buried at Kingswood.

Dursley Gazette 25th September 1920:

The sympathy felt for Mr and Mrs George Smith of ‘Rose Villa’, Kingswood, in the death of their only child Willie has been most marked. Following an attack of diptheria the little fellow appeared to be going on favourably but the heart failed and death occurring on 14th inst. He was only 8 years of age, full of promise and a general favourite.

There was a large attendance at the funeral conducted at St Mary’s Church by Dr. Irwin. Among those who followed to the graveside were Mr George Smith (father), Messrs. Fred Terrett, Harry Grimes, William Holloway, Tom Jones, Dan Terrett, Edward Terrett and E. Herrick (uncles). Miss Alice Terrett and Mrs. D. Terrett (aunts), Messrs. George and William Terrett (cousins) and Mrs Fred Ellery, Mrs Newman, Mr George Lovell, Mr Fred Lovell etc…

Four school friends and playmates acted as bearers, namely Berty Pearce, Raymond Musty, Hubert Jones and Stanley Vines.

Beautiful wreaths and crosses –

Mother and Dad; Grannie and family; Fred, Meg and children; Maud, Elly and children; Annie, George and Henry (Warmley; Flo, George and Mary (Mear); Aunt and Alice (Sunnyside); Dan and Emily (Walk Mills); Mrs Heyward and Mabel; Sidney Oakhill; Capt and Mrs Alston; Willie Simmonds; Mr and Mrs Ellery; Chum George and sisters; Mr Polloard; Olive and May; Emily and Cissie; Nurse; Doctor; Mr and Mrs Boulton; Lily; Mr Rufus Cook and family; Aunt Ethel and children (Bath).

Dursley Gazette October 1920:

Mr and Mrs George Smith, Kingswood, Wotton-under-Edge, return thanks for kind enquiries and sympathy in their sad bereavement and also for beautiful flowers sent.

My mother remembers George rearing his pigs and cattle and having an array of exotic furnishings and curiosities from foreign parts. He died on 21st December 1948 aged seventy-five-years.

Edith died on 8th October 1950 and was buried at Kingswood on 11th October.

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George Smith with his brother-in-law, Frederick Werrett

Donald Emes wrote in 1983:

‘Of course I knew George Terrett (sic) (should be Smith) and his wife. I can see her now passing our house at Kingswood taking flowers to the grave of their only child who died aged seven years.’

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George Smith

Radio Gloucestershire – 21st May 2006 – Day the Cutty Sark caught fire

Mrs Kay Parker rang into the programme with the following details:

In 1939, as Miss Marian Kathleen Malpas, she took up an appointment as a student teacher at Kingswood Primary School under Mr Brewer. Because she lived at Leonard Stanley she only returned home at the weekend and lodged with George and Edith Smith at Rose Villa. Miss Malpas travelled by train from Frocester to Charfield Station. Besides spending weekday nights with them she would also join them for lunch.

She grew very fond of the couple and had affectionate memories of them. She recalled that George Smith had told her that he had run away when he was about twelve-years-old and served as a cabin boy on the Cutty Sark. He worked on many of the tea run clippers. He had a fine collection of artefacts from abroad including black pearls from Australia. These items were displayed in a proper museum type display case. George would sit into the night telling her about his varied treasures and his adventures in the Far East. He always spoke affectionately of the Salvation Army and the help that they had given to him in ports throughout the world. She mentioned his fine Grandfather clocks. She also spoke of the wheelbarrow and other toys in his workshop that he had made for little Willie and. she remembered his tears when he talked about his dead son.

The former Miss Malpas also remembered land that George tended at the top end of the village as well as his animals. She described him as a great tease and full of fun. She recalled Terrett and Wherrett relatives.

Miss Malpas moved on to take up an appointment at Nailsworth National School. She remained in contact with the Smiths and remembering Aunt Edie moving to Bristol where she suffered in a hospital there with Parkinson’s Disease.

Letter of 25th May 2007:

Dear Richard

I was delighted to talk to you after Radio Gloucester’s report on the Cutty Sark. The programme stirred up so many happy memories of my stay at Rose Cottage with Mr. and Mrs. Smith. As I explained, I was awaiting entry to Teachers’ Training College but there was a delay due to the outbreak of war and so many premises being taken over for military purposes etc. I got tired of waiting for the course to commence and decided to get a job instead.

I started teaching at Kingswood (Wotton) at the end of September 1939 and lodged with George and Edith Smith for over a year, travelling home to Leonard Stanley at weekends, until I finally obtained a post at Nailsworth C. of E. Girls’ School (opposite the Police Station) and I was able to live at home again.

Mr. And Mrs. Smith were both wonderful people and very kind to me. They were a delightful couple and always so happy together!

George used to talk to us a lot about Australia and Thought it was a wonderful place to live. He intended to settle there but his wife to be didn’t want to emigrate so he gave up the sea and settled at Rose Cottage. He had collected lots of souvenirs from his travels on the tea clippers, had many adventures and was very fit and healthy. We three sat through many an air raid in the dark hearing of his love for the sea. It was in his blood! We also made sea boot socks, gloves etc for the Sailors’ Society. After I moved on from Nailsworth School I kept in touch with them regularly and went to Mr. Smith’s funeral. Mrs. Smith developed Parkinson’s disease and died in hospital (Bristol way I think). I remember visiting her there and taking our baby daughter to meet her. Their only child, a son, Billy, died of Diphtheria when he was a toddler and it was a great sadness in their lives. George was a very gifted man and had made some beautifully crafted toys for his son, including a child sized wheelbarrow, a chair etc. I remember him showing them to me and the three of us wept for his loss. I often wonder what became of them as they were treasures!

Some evenings we would go for a ride in the car. On one occasion George took us to Badminton and Queen Mary was staying there, the road was gated in places so I had the honour of hopping out of the car and opening the gate to let the Queen’s car through before we could continue our ride. Petrol was strictly rationed but my Dad had an extra allowance for farming etc. so we were able to draw on them.

I am now almost 87 years of age so some of my memories are a little blurred at the edges but I am almost sure that George told me that he ran away to sea and also he recounted many experiences of life on board the tall ships, the Cutty Sark was mentioned, his ship duties and the dangers of voyages round the Australian coast. He was so appreciative of the Salvation Army and of how they always had a warm bed and a meal for sailors when they reached port after a rough voyage.

Thank you so much for getting in touch and both my husband and I would love to receive some photos if you have any. Please feel free to call if you are coming this way. Best wishes from John and me, Kay (Parker).

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George Smith

For more information about the Terrett Family see my blog:

Terrett Engineers of Kingswood

https://wp.me/p4BX9P-E1

 

10. JOSHUA or JOSIAH SMITH, Great II Uncle

Joshua Smith was born on 4th November 1871 at Cromhall. The birth certificate records his father as a beer house keeper of Cromhall. He was baptised on 29th May 1872 at Cromhall. His name appeared as Josiah in the 1881 census. He was at home, aged nine years, and born at Cromhall at the time of the 1881 census. Uncle George Terrett said that he served in the Boer War and later lived in Bristol.

On 17th December 1898 Josiah Smith married Hester Sheppard at the Church of the Holy Nativity in Knowle, Bristol. He was described as a twenty-seven-year-old bachelor and ‘Keymaker’ (indecipherable?), the son of Thomas Smith, a Labourer. Hester was a twenty-six-year-old Spinster, the daughter of John Sheppard, a Packer. They were both living at 13 Highgrove Street at the time of the wedding and the witnesses were the bride’s brother and sister Henry Charles and Rosa Elizabeth Sheppard. Rosa was later to marry Josiah’s brother Harry in 1903.

In 1881 the Sheppard Family were living at 32 Highgrove Street, Totterdown. John was a thirty-seven-year-old Glass – Labourer at a Bottle Works and born at Whitchurch. His wife Selina was aged forty-three-years and a native of Chewton, Keynsham. Their children were Henry, a fourteen-year-old scholar born in Whitchurch; Rosa, an eleven-year-old scholar born in Bristol and Hester aged eight years, a scholar and born in Bristol. Ten years later the Sheppards were at 13 Highgrove Street. By then John was a forty-eight-year-old General Labourer; Selina was aged fifty years; and with them were Henry C. and Hester. He was aged twenty and she was aged eighteen years and born in Totterdown.

At the time of the 1901 census Josiah and Hester were living at 13 Highgrove Street, Totterdown, with her parents. John Sheppard was a fifty-seven-year-old Packer in a Glass Works born at Whitchurch; Selena was a sixty-four-year-old born in Chewton, Keynsham; Josiah was a twenty-nine-year-old Packer at a Glass Works, born in Cromhall and Hester was twenty-eight-years-old and born in Bristol.

Three of their children were baptised at Holy Nativity, Knowle, between 1901 and 1906. The eldest, Albert Edward, was baptised on 19th April 1901 and was described as the child of Josiah Smith, a Packer, and Esther, his wife, of 13 Highgrove Street. By 1903 Josiah was a Packer and living with the family at 12 Park Terrace, Windmill Hill. In 1906 they were living at 12 Somerset Terrace, Windmill Hill and Josiah was described as a (word indecipherable) Maker. From 1911 until 1944 Josiah was living at 3 Somerset Terrace, Windmill Hill, but had gone by 1947 (Wright’s Directories). In 1926 Josiah was described as an Iron Worker.

In 1911 the family was at 3 Somerset Terrace, Windmill hill living in five rooms. Josiah was a thirty-nine-year-old Iron Maker in a paint factory, a worker, born at Cromhall. His wife Hester was aged thirty-eight-years and had been married for twelve years and had three children. She was born in Totterdown. Their children included Albert Edward Smith aged nine years and born at Totterdown; Phyllis Mary Smith aged seven years and born at Bedminster and Glenville George Smith who was aged four and born at Bedminster. Lodging with them was Alfred White a general labourer born in Jersey.

Josiah attended Henry Terrett’s funeral in 1908 and he and his wife attended Ellen Jones’s funeral in 1930. They were described as of Bristol. There was a wreath from ‘Josh, Hetty and Family’.

During 1961 an eighty-nine-year-old Joshua Smith died in Bristol Registration District.

11. HARRY SMITH, Great II Uncle

Harry was born in about 1873 at Cromhall. He was baptised at Cromhall on 29th June 1873. He was described as a seven-year-old scholar and born in Cromhall in the 1881 Census.

In 1891 we find a Henry Smith lodging at 18 Highgrove Street with Catherine Brown, a Widow, and Sarah Comnell (sp?), aged thirty-two-years. , All three were listed as born in Cromhall. Henry Smith was described as an eighteen-year-old lodger and bottle washer. Also living with them was William Desmond, a twenty-two-year-old Cattle Drover from Cork.

Henry’s sister Sarah Ann was living with the Browns in 1881 at 9 Highgrove Street, Totterdown. Her hosts then were the Charles and Catharine Brown. He was a forty-one-year-old house painter born in Cirencester and she was a forty-four-year-old born in Cromhall. Back in 1871 Charles and Catherine Brown were living at Mead Lane, Redcliffe.

On 25th June 1903 Harry Smith married Rosa Elizabeth Sheppard at the Church of Holy Nativity, Knowle. He was described as a thirty-year-old Bachelor and Baker of 13 Highgrove Street and the son of Thomas Smith, a labourer. The bride was aged thirty-three-years, a Spinster, of the same address, and daughter of John Sheppard, a Packer. The witnesses were the bride’s brother H.C. Sheppard and the bridegroom’s brother J. Smith.

In 1881 the Sheppard Family was living at 32 Highgrove Street, Totterdown. John was a thirty-seven-year-old Glass – Labourer at a Bottle Works and born at Whitchurch. His wife Selina was aged forty-three-years and a native of Chewton, Keynsham. Their children were Henry, a fourteen-year-old scholar born in Whitchurch; Rosa, an eleven-year-old scholar born in Bristol and Hester aged eight years, a scholar and born in Bristol. Ten years later the Sheppards were at 13 Highgrove Street. By then John was a forty-eight-year-old General Labourer; Selina was aged fifty years; and with them were Henry C. and Hester. He was aged twenty and she was aged eighteen years and born in Totterdown.

In 1898 Hester Sheppard married Josiah Smith and they were living at 13 Highgrove Street until at least 1901. This meant that Henry and Josiah had married sisters.

Between 1906 and 1912 three baptisms took place at Holy Nativity, Knowle of children of Harry and Rosa. In the entries in the register for all three Henry was working as a Baker and living with his family at 13 Highgrove Street, Totterdown.

Harry attended Henry Terrett’s funeral in 1908 and also that of his sister, Ellen Jones, in 1930. There was a wreath at Ellen Jones’s funeral from ‘Harry, Rose and Family’.

In 1911 John Sheppard aged sixty-eight-years was living at 13 Highgrove Street. He was described as a packer born at Whitchurch, Somerset. In the same house lived Harry Smith aged thirty-seven-years, a baker’s deliverer and worker born at Cromhall. His wife Rose Elizabeth Smith was aged forty-one-years, married eight years with three children and born at Totterdown. Their children included Reginald Herbert aged seven, Frederick Charles aged four and Leonard George aged two years. All the children were born in Totterdown. The family lived in six rooms.

Before 1915 the householder of 13 Highgrove Street was Harry’s father-in-law, John Shepherd but from 1915 until 1931 Harry was the householder according to Wright’s Directories. From 1932 until 1947 it was his wife, Mrs Rosa Eliz. Smith. Harry Smith probably died in 1931 and was referred to as deceased – Baker’s Assistant at the time of his daughter’s wedding in 1937.

The death of a Harry Smith, aged fifty-seven-years, is recorded in the index for Bristol Registration district for 1931.

From 1950 until 1953 we find Stanley Harry Smith but he had gone by 1956 and in 1964 was at 10 Gatehouse Close, Withywood. Whether he was a relative is uncertain.


The 59 Grandchildren of Thomas and Sarah Smith:

The thirteen children of Enoch and Ellen Smith:

  1. ARCHIE CALEB SMITH

Archie Caleb Smith was born in about 1878 at Cromhall. At the time of the 1881 census Archie was at home and aged three years. He was at home aged thirteen for the 1891 census and in 1901 ‘Archibald’ was a twenty-four-year-old stone quarryman living at home.

Archie Caleb Smith married Ada Helen Thomson on 21st May 1907 at St John’s Church, Walham Green, Fulham, London. He was described as a twenty-nine-year-old bachelor and quarryman of Rangeworthy, Gloucestershire, son of Enoch Smith, deceased, a quarryman. His bride was a thirty-two-year-old spinster of 29 Dawes Road, daughter of James Thomson, a house decorator. The witnesses were Adelaide Bricker and Robert Bruce.

In 1911 Archibald Smith and his family were living in six rooms at Itchington near Alveston. Archibald was described as a thirty-three-year-old delver in a stone quarry. Employed by Limstone (?). He was born at Cromhall, married for four years with two children who were both alive at the time of the census. Ada Helen was aged thirty-six-years and born at Camberwell in Middlesex. Their daughters were Adelaide aged three and Ethel aged one and both of them were born at Itchington.

According to Probate records Archie Caleb Smith of Sunnyside, Chain Gate Lane, Iron Acton, died on 4th July 1958 aged eighty-years. Probate was granted at Bristol on 10th September 1958 to Rodney Smith, fitter. His effects were valued at £2,509-17-6d.

Their children were:

Adelaide Smith was born in about 1908 in Itchington, Alveston. She was at home for the 1911 census, aged three years

Ethel Smith was born in about 1910 in Itchington, Alveston. She was at home for the 1911 census, aged one year

  1. INA ELSIE HICKLING

great grandma Ina Elsie Hickling (Smith) 001.jpg

Ina Elsie Hickling

Ina Smith was born in the second quarter of 1879 in Thornbury Registration District, according to the one world tree on 27th April 1879 at Cromhall. At the time of the 1881 census she was at home and aged one year.

At the time of the 1891 census she was an eleven-year-old general domestic servant at Rock Cottage, Cromhall, the home of Charles Withey, a farmer. Ina was born in Cromhall.

Ina Elsie married on 11th August 1902 at Cotham, Bristol. Her husband was William Thomas Hickling, son of Robert F. Hickling and his wide Emily nee Mitchell. William Thomas Hickling was born on 3rd January 1878 in Barton Regis.

Ina and her husband emigrated to Australia. Ina died on 3rd August 1932 in Queensland and her husband died on 1st August 1971 in Brisbane, Queensland.

Karen Maitland August 2012:

‘I did feel my Great grandma Ina’s sadness to be separated from so much family.  I do know that she really wanted to return home to England to visit her family but wasn’t able to and died of breast cancer at the age of 52.  She had seven children and lived with her husband on a sugar cane farm in Aloomba North Queensland.  My grandfather Norman was very close to her and described her as a wonderful woman who could never do enough for those around her.  I remember her husband William Thomas Hickling who lived to about 95 years.  He travelled back to England for a visit and brought home a second wife Elsie Smith.  I wonder if she was related to Ina, I haven’t checked that out yet.  She had three children with Pop  (William Hickling).  Some of William and Ina’s descendants are still farming here in Aloomba and the property they lived on is currently for sale.  My husband and I along with my sister and her husband own a cane farm in Aloomba as well.  I have a photo of Ina which I will scan and attach.  I know my Dad has some more photos if you are interested.  

Sorry its taken time but finally I have located some photos and scanned them.  I have asked my Dad, (Raymond Hickling) to write down his memories, so I hope he does it soon.  William Hickling, known as Pop to us all, developed a sugar cane farm on the banks of the Behana Creek in a very small farming area called Aloomba.  He worked also as a carpenter and eventually they built the house you see in these pictures.  My Dad has some stories about this. The house still exists today however it has been built over and around and looks nothing like these photos.

A family gathering beside the creek. 

Aloomba is in the Far North of Queensland, it is the wettest area in Australia and our farms get flooded most years.  We also have Tropical Cyclones and very humid weather.  We are in a valley surrounded by mountains covered in Rainforest.  Pop and Ina were among the pioneers in this area.  Apparently my grandad Norman and his brothers were helping him clear land with dynamite at the ages of 11 and 12.  Life can’t have been easy and from what I remember of them all they worked always, time off wasn’t important to them and they had very good senses of humour.  Fancy Dress Balls were something to look forward to.

I think I’m right in saying the Aloomba Tennis Club was situated at their house.  When I was a child I grew up with an old tennis court right beside my house and my grandad’s sister Connie also had a tennis court.  I can remember my grandad and his brothers playing tennis and apparently they were very competitive with each other.  They also enjoyed playing cards.  As far as I’m aware those two things were my Grandad’s only interests.

  1. CICELY SMITH 

Cicely was born in the first quarter of 1881 in Chipping Sodbury Registration District, at Bagstone, Wickwar. At the time of the 1881 census she was at home, aged three months, and born at Bagstone. She was at home aged ten years for the 1891 census.

In 1901 she was working as a servant at Taplow Hill House, Buckinghamshire, in the home of Mrs Marie Pearce-Serocold, a sixty-three-year-old native of France and British citizen. Marie was the widow of Charles Pearce-Serocold, a brewer. Cicely was described as a twenty-two-year-old kitchen maid born in Wickwar, Gloucestershire.

In 1911 she was a thirty-four-year-old domestic cook at Fairmile Hotel, Cobham, Surrey. The head was George Howard Trollope a builder. Cicely was single and born in Wickwar.

A Cicely Smith died in Chipping Sodbury Registration District during 1928 aged forty-seven-years.

According to probate records Cicely Smith of Woodland Farm, Doynton, spinster, died on 9th January 1928. Probate was granted at Bristol on 27th March to Archie Caleb Smith and Anthony Smith, quarrymen. Effects were valued at £583.13s and resworn as £135.11.2d.

  1. DORA DAISY STRANGE

Dora was born in about 1882 at Wickwar. She was at home aged eight years for the 1891 census.

In 1901 a Daisy Smith was working as a servant at Wotton Road, Charfield, in the home of Anne Vellander, an eighty-year-old retired farmer, and native of Cromhall. Daisy was described as a fifteen-year-old general domestic servant born in Wickwar.

Daisy married Alfred Strange (1879- ) during 1905 in Bristol Registration District. He was the son of Joseph and Lydia Strange. In 1881 Joseph Strange was a farm labourer in Court Lane, Yate. In 1901 their son Alfred was a twenty-two-year-old Carter on a farm and boarding in Rangeworthy.

Alfred and Daisy moved to Bedwas in Monmouthshire. In 1911 Alfred and Daisy were living at 16 Gutsfield Terrace, Bedwas. Alfred was described as a thirty-two-year-old coal miner hewer born in Yate. Daisy was aged twenty-nine and born at Wickwar. She had been married for six years and had four children. These included Edward aged five, born Clifton; Vida aged four and born at Bedwas; Norman aged two and born at Bedwas and Archibald aged six months and born at Bedwas. They lived in five rooms in a tenement.

Dora D. Strange died in 1918 and her husband Alfred probably died in 1952 in Caerleon Registration District.

Their children were:

Edward Strange was born in Clifton in about 1905

Vida Williams was born in Bedwas in 1907. In 1933 she married Ronald Williams

Norman Strange was born in Bedwas in about 1908

Archibald Strange was born in Bedwas in about 1910

(?) Doris (?) 1917 -1995

  1. ANTHONY SMITH

Anthony was born during the second quarter of 1884 in Chipping Sodbury Registration District at Wickwar. He was at home aged seven years for the 1891 census. In 1901 he was still at home and working as a stone quarryman. In 1911 Anthony Smith was boarding with his brother Arthur in the home of Harriet Davies at 37 Union Street, Ferndale, Glamorgan in the Rhondda part of Pontypridd. He was described as a twenty-seven-year-old quarry labourer born at Wickwar. William Harris from Wickwar was also boarding in the same house.

He probably died in 1965 aged eighty-one-years in Sodbury Registration District.

  1. ARTHUR SMITH

Arthur was born during the first quarter of 1886 in Chipping Sodbury Registration District at Wickwar. He was at home and aged five years for the 1891 census and fifteen in 1901 and working as a stone quarryman.

In 1911 Arthur Smith was boarding with his brother Anthony in the home of Mrs. Harriet Davies at 37 Union Street, Ferndale, Glamorgan in the Rhondda part of Pontypridd. He was described as a twenty-five-year-old quarry labourer born at Wickwar. William Harris from Wickwar was also boarding in the same house.

  1. LEONARD SMITH

Leonard was born in about 1887 at Wickwar. He was at home aged three in 1891.

A Leonard Smith married a Jane E. Garland during the first quarter of 1914 in Thornbury Registration district and a Leonard Smith died in the same registration district in 1954 aged sixty-seven-years.

  1. GEORGE SMITH

George was born during the second quarter of 1889 in the Chipping Sodbury Registration District at Wickwar. He was at home and aged two years for the 1891 census and aged eleven in 1901. In 1911 he was at home in Iron Acton and working as a farm labourer.

  1. ELLEN MAY SMITH

Ellen was born during the second quarter of 1891 in Chipping Sodbury Registration District at Wickwar. She was at home aged nine years for the 1901 census.

  1. JOHN LAWRENCE SMITH

John was born during the last quarter of 1892 in the Chipping Sodbury Registration District at Wickwar. He was at home aged eight years for the 1901 census. In 1911 Lawrence was at home in Iron Acton and working as a farm labourer.

  1. AMY LOUISA SMITH

Amy Louisa was born during the third quarter of 1894 in Chipping Sodbury Registration District at Wickwar. She was at home aged six years for the 1901 census.

In 1911 Amy was a general domestic servant at the Laurels, Rangeworthy, the seven roomed home of  John Henry and Hettie Sheldon, farmers. Amy was described as a single sixteen-year-old, born at Bagstone.

     12. NORMAN CECIL SMITH

Norman Cecil was born in 4th March 1896 in Chipping Sodbury Registration District at Wickwar. He was at home aged five years for the 1901 census. In 1911 Cecil was at home in Iron Acton and working as a farm labourer.

He probably died during March 1991 in Sodbury Registration District.

  1. EDITH ELLA TOWNSEND

Edith Ella was born on 22nd September 1897 in Chipping Sodbury Registration District, at Wickwar. She was at home aged three years for the 1901 census and again in 1911.

During the second quarter of 1918 she married Oliver J. Townsend in Chipping Sodbury Registration District. He was born during the last quarter of 1894 in Sodbury Registration District. In 1901 he was aged six years and at home with his family at the back of the British School in Yate. His father, George Townsend was a coal heaver. Oliver served in the Gloucestershire Regiment and was a corporal in the Royal Warwicks. He was discharged on 15th April 1919 and was given medals.

Oliver J. Townsend died in 1957 in Sodbury Registration District, aged sixty-two-years and Edith Ella died during 1981 in Bristol Registration District.

Their children were: 

Marjorie Olive Townsend was born during the second quarter of 1920 in Chipping Sodbury Registration District. A Marjorie O. Townsend married Frederick W. Shute during the last quarter of 1938 at Braintree.

Oliver J. Townsend was born during the second quarter of 1922 in Chipping Sodbury Registration District. An Oliver James Townsend, who was born on 30th April 1922, died during 1979 at Elstree, Hertfordshire.

John Townsend was born during the last quarter of 1927 in Chipping Sodbury Registration District. A John Townsend who was born on 11th September 1927, died during 1980 in Bristol Registration District.

Betty I. Townsend was born during the first quarter of 1929 in Chipping Sodbury Registration District.

Trevor T. Townsend was born during the first quarter of 1934 in Chipping Sodbury Registration District.


The five children of Charles and Susan Smith:

  1. LAURA POWELL

Laura was baptised at Tytherington on 13th August 1882 but her age was given as three months in the 1881 census return. She was aged ten years, a scholar, and at home on the night of the 1891 census. In 1901 she was at home and aged twenty years. She married George Powell at Tytherington on 27th December 1902. She was a twenty-two-year-old spinster, daughter of Charles Smith, a labourer. George was a thirty-year-old labourer, son of Joseph Powell, a labourer. They were both living at Station Road, Tytherington.

In 1911 the Powells were living in six rooms at 165 Henry Street, Tonypandy, Glamorgan. George was described as a thirty-eight-year-old coal miner hewer who was born at Iron Acton. Laura was aged thirty and born at Tytherington. They had been married for eight years and had four children who were all alive. These included May aged seven; Evelyn aged six years both born in Iron Acton and twins, Albert and Gordon, aged one, and born in Tonypandy. Boarders were twenty-five-year-old Henry Fletcher and twenty-one-year-old Frederick Woodward who was born in Tytherington and working as a coal miner hewer.

Their children were:

May Powell was born in about 1904 in Iron Acton

Evelyn Powell was born in about 1905 at Iron Acton

Albert Powell was born in about 1910 at Tonypandy

Gordon Powell was born in about 1910 at Tonypandy

  1. PERCY SMITH, cousin of William Edward Terrett

Percy was baptised on 4th February 1883 at Tytherington. He was aged eight years and at home on the night of the 1891 census. He died in 1895 aged twelve years.

       3. AUGUSTUS WILLIAM SMITH

Augustus was baptised on 4th August 1889 at Tytherington. He was aged two years and at home on the night of the 1891 census. In 1901 he was at home and aged twelve years. In 1911 he was still at home at Station Road, Tytherington and described as twenty-one-years-old, born in Tytherington and no occupation is given. He died at Tytherington in 1925 aged thirty-seven years.

  1. GORDON TRUEY SMITH

Gordon Truey Smith was born on 2nd November 1897 in Thornbury Registration District. He was baptised on 21st December 1897 at Tytherington. He was at home, aged three years at the time of the 1901 census. His place of birth was given as Tytherington. In 1911 he was still at home and described as a thirteen-year-old scholar born in Tytherington.

Gordon married Winifred Celia Longman (1898-1966). Gordon died in 1972 aged seventy-five-years

  1. UNKNOWN SMITH, cousin of William Edward Terrett

Referred to as having already died in the 1911 census return.


The four children of Alfred and Clara Smith:

  1. ALFRED JAMES SMITH

Alfred James was baptised at Nicholas’s Church, Gloucester, on 7th July 1895. His parents were given as Alfred and Clara Smith and his occupation was given as Blacksmith. Alfred died in 1896.

  1. BEATRICE EVA MARY DOWNHAM

Beatrice Eva Mary Smith was born on 9th April 1901 and baptised at St Mary de Lode Church, Gloucester, on 5th June 1901. Her parents were described as Alfred and Clara Smith of 19 Priory Road and her father’s occupation was given as Blacksmith.

Beatrice Smith was at home, aged nine years, at the time of the 1911 census. She was born in Gloucester.

On 13th March 1923, Beatrice Eva Mary Smith married Frank Downham at All Saints’ Church in Gloucester. The bride was described as a Grocer’s Assistant, aged twenty-one, the daughter of Alfred Smith, Blacksmith. Her address was given as 134 Millbrook Street. The bridegroom was a twenty-five-year-old Baker, at the Forest Bakery, Bream, the son of Albert Downham, a deceased Baker. The witnesses were Henry Gatfield and Lilly Smith. Frank was born on 19th March 1897.

At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales, Frank and Beatrice were living at Woodside in the Forest of Dean and he was working as a Bread and Confectionary Sales Representative. Staying with them was Beatrice’s mother, Clara.

Beatrice died in Weymouth in 1986.

  1. ELIZABETH MARY GROVES

Elizabeth Mary Smith was born on 15th July 1902 and baptised at St Mary de Lode Church, Gloucester, on 17th August 1904. Her parents were described as Alfred and Clara Smith of 19 Priory Road and her father’s occupation was given as Blacksmith.

Lizzie Smith was at home, aged eight years, at the time of the 1911 census. She was born in Gloucester.

During 1929 Elizabeth Smith married Arthur Raymond Groves in Gloucester.

Arthur was born in Gloucester 8th September 1907 and baptised at St Mary de Lode Church on 2nd October. His parents were James and Elizabeth Jane Groves of Stephen’s Court, Westgate Street, and his father worked as a Waterman.

At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales Arthur and Elizabeth Groves were living at Twyning Police Station. Arthur was described as Police Constable-in-Charge, Number 290. Their son, Douglas G. Groves, was born on 31st August 1930 and was attending school. Staying with them was Elizabeth’s father, Alfred Smith, a retired Blacksmith.

Arthur Groves died at Bankside, Wyesham, Monmouthshire, on 21st November 1973 and Elizabeth, his widow, died in Herefordshire in 2005.

  1. UNKNOWN SMITH

Died before 1911


The two children of Sarah Anne and Edward Harris:

HILDA BLANCHE HARRIS

Hilda Blanche Harris was baptised at St Mary’s Church, Kingswood, on 2nd December 1894 and her father was described as a publican.

In 1901 Edward and Sarah Ann Harris were living in five rooms at Wharfe, Curdworth, Warwickshire. He was described as a forty-five-year-old General Farm Labourer and she was aged forty-one. Their places of birth were given as not known. Hilda Blanche was aged six and born at Kingswood, Gloucestershire, and her brother, Harold Edward, aged two, was born at Mangotsfield.

In 1911 she was living in three rooms at 2 Raglan Street, Coventry. She was described as a drapery assistant, aged sixteen years, and born at Kingswood, Gloucestershire. With her was Annie Amelia Taylor, the draper and manageress.

HAROLD EDWARD HARRIS

Harold Edward Harris, was baptised at St James’ Church, Mangotsfield, on 7th May 1899.

In 1901 Edward and Sarah Ann Harris were living in five rooms at Wharfe, Curdworth, Warwickshire. Harold Edward Harris was aged two years and was born at Mangotsfield.

In 1911 his father, Edward William Harris, was a widower, aged fifty-four-years, and was living at 6 Woodlands, Kingsbury, Tamworth. He was described as a General Labourer above ground and was born at Westerleigh. His son Harold Edward was aged twelve years.

Harold Edward Harris probably married Doris Archer in 1919 at Tamworth. She was born in 1899 at Wilnecote, Warwickshire.

Their child:

Hilda I Shakespeare. She was born in 1919 and married John Orton Shakespeare at Sutton Coldfield in 1945.


The eight children of Ellen and Henry Terrett

See my blog:

Terrett Engineers of Kingswood

https://wp.me/p4BX9P-E1


The three children of Augustus and Mary Anne Smith:

1. FRANCES ELLEN WOODWARD

Frances was baptised at Tytherington on 29th June 1890. Nellie was aged ten years and at home for the 1901 census. In 1911 she was employed as a Cook (Domestic) in the home of the Reverend Henry Herbert Arkell at Tytherington. She was aged twenty-years and born in Tytherington.

She married Thomas Henry Woodward at Tytherington on 29th November 1913. He was described as a twenty-seven-year-old quarryman of Tytherington, son of William Thomas Edwin Oliver Woodward a quarryman. Frances Ellen was aged twenty-three-years, a spinster of Tytherington and daughter of Augustus Smith, a deceased labourer. Her witnesses were Annie Smith and William Albert Livall.

A Frances E. Woodward died during 1963 aged seventy-two-years in Thornbury Registration District and a Thomas H. Woodward in 1953 aged sixty-seven-years.

According to probate records Thomas Henry Woodward of 1 Station Road, Tytherington, died 21st December 1953. Administration was granted on 30th March to Frances Ellen Woodward, widow. Effects were valued at £445-4-2d.

  1. ANNIE SMITH

Annie was baptised at Tytherington on 4th March 1894. She was aged seven years and at home for the 1901 census. At the time of the 1911 census Annie was employed as a Parlour Maid in the home of the Reverend Henry Herbert Arkell of Tytherington. She was described as seventeen-years-old and born in Tytherington.

  1. LILIAN MARY SMITH, cousin of William Edward Terrett

Lillian was baptised on 2nd May 1897 and died at the age of eight months


The 8 children of Thryza and William Newman:

  1. FLORENCE THYRZA NEWMAN

Florence was born in the third quarter of 1890 at Bishopston, in Barton Regis Registration District. She was described as aged eight months in the 1891 census and ten years in the 1901 census. In 1911 Florence Newman was at home aged twenty, assisting at home, and described as born at Horfield.

A Florence T. Newman died during the final quarter of 1934 in Bristol Registration District aged forty-four-years.

  1. WILLIAM MORLEY NEWMAN

William was born in the second quarter of 1898 in Barton Regis Registration District in St George’s, Bristol. He was aged three years in the 1901 census. In 1911 William Morly Newman was at home aged thirteen and born in St George’s Bristol.

He may have married Beatrice Maggs in Bristol Registration District during the third quarter of 1922.

William Morley Newman of Lyndhurst, Bryants Hill, St George’s, Bristol, died on 19th June 1934 at Rock House, Bethel Road, St George. Administration was granted at Bristol on 1st April 1935 to Beatrice Newman, widow. His effects were valued at £323-0-4d.

  1. DOROTHY LILIAN NEWMAN

Dorothy was born in the first quarter of 1901 in St George’s Bristol. She was aged two months in the 1901 census. In 1911 Dorothy Lillian Newman was at home aged ten and born in St George’s.

Clifford Percy Newman of 93 Shellards Way, Longwell Green, near Bristol, died on 16th September 1863. Probate was granted to Dorothy Lilian Newman, spinster, on 17th December 1965 at Bristol. His effects were valued at £17,888.

During 1974 a Dorothy Lilian Newman died in Bristol Registration District with a date of birth of 17th February 1901.

  1. CLIFFORD PERCY NEWMAN

Clifford Percy was born in about 1903. At the time of the 1911 census Clifford Percy was at home aged seven and born at Brislington, Somerset.

A Clifford Percy Newman was born in the Keynsham Registration District during the last quarter of 1903.

According to probate records William Newman of 38 Nag’s Head Hill, St George, Bristol, died on 10th December 1935. Probate was granted at Bristol to Clifford Newman, decorator, Leonard Bailey commercial traveller and Henry Wilmott Wickham Atchley. The effects were valued at £13, 496. 6. 8d.

According to probate records Thirza Newman of Porthtowan, Nag’s Head Hill, St George, Bristol, widow, died on 2nd October 1948. Administration was granted at Bristol on 22nd November 1948 to Clifford Percy Newman, house property repairer. The effects were valued at £452.12.11d.

A Clifford P. Newman born in about 1903 died in Kingswood Registration District during the third quarter of 1965.

Clifford Percy Newman of 93 Shellards Way, Longwell Green, near Bristol, died on 16th September 1863. Probate was granted to Dorothy Lilian Newman, spinster, on 17th December 1965 at Bristol. His effects were valued at £17,888.

  1. GERALD IVOR NEWMAN

Gerald Ivor was born in about 1904. A birth of Gerald Ivan was registered in Bristol during the second quarter of 1905. At the time of the 1911 census he was at home aged six years and born in St George’s. He probably died during the first quarter of 1922 in Keynsham Registration District aged seventeen years.

  1. PHYLLIS MABEL BAILEY

Phyllis Mabel was born in about 1906. During the last quarter of 1906 a Phyllis Mabel was registered at Bristol. At the time of the 1911 census she was at home aged four years and born in St George’s. She married Leonard O. Bailey during the second quarter of 1932 in Bristol Registration District.

Leonard Osmond Bailey was born during the first quarter of 1906 in Bristol Registration District. In 1911 Leonard was at home living in 5 rooms at 13 Ash Road, Horfield, Bristol. His father, Frederick W. Bailey, had been married for fourteen years, was aged thirty-eight and was described as a carpenter, born in Bristol. His mother Beatrice was born in St Austell. Leonard was one of four children.

According to probate records William Newman of 38 Nag’s Head Hill, St George, Bristol, died on 10th December 1935. Probate was granted at Bristol to Clifford Newman, decorator, Leonard Bailey commercial traveller and Henry Wilmott Wickham Atchley. The effects were valued at £13, 496. 6. 8d.

  1. ELSIE MURIEL NEWMAN

Elsie Muriel was born in about 1907. During the second quarter of 1908 an Elsie Muriel was registered in Bristol. At the time of the 1911 census she was at home aged three and born in St George’s.

  1. REGINALD GEORGE NEWMAN

Reginald George was born in 1910. During the third quarter of 1910 a Reginald G. Newman was registered at Bristol. At the time of the 1911 census he was at home aged ten months and born in St George’s. He probably died during the last quarter of 1933 in Keynsham Registration District. According to probate records Reginald George Newman of The Limes, Hanham, Gloucestershire, died on 20th December 1933. Adminstration was granted at Bristol to his father, William Newman, house decorator, on 12th January 1934. His effects were valued at £140-1-3d.


The six children of Edward and Ada Smith: 

  1. NELLIE MURIEL LAWRANCE

Nellie was born on 13th November 1897 in the Bedminster Registration District. She was aged three in the 1901 census return. In 1911 she was still at home, aged thirteen years and at school.

From Julia Salter:

Nellie married Charles William Theodore Lawrance in July 1920. Charles was born on 21st February 1897 and died on 1st February 1952. He was badly injured in the battle of the Somme in World War II and had been left for dead by the British medics. He was found by two older German soldiers on their way to surrender and luckily for him they took him with them. Although I never knew him he had a ‘ claw’ hand where the shrapnal had severed the nerves in the upper arm / shoulder.

They had five children, my mother, Patricia being the youngest. Two have passed away and two remain living in Bristol.

Nellie Lawrance died on 4th May 1986

I’m afraid that I haven’t got much information to pass on but here it is:-

  1. HARRY SMITH

Harry was born on 4th December 1898 in Bristol. He was aged two years in the 1901 census return. In 1911 he was at home, aged twelve years, at school but working as a baker’s boy. His place of birth was given as Bedminster. Harry emigrated to Canada shortly after world war II having served in the Merchant Navy working the Atlantic crossing during the war. He worked in the Logging Industry for many years and settled in Victoria, BC. He never married and died on 13 Mar 1979 in Canada

A George Henry C. Smith was born in the Bedminster Registration District during the last quarter of 1898.

Julia Salter, 20th July 2009:

Harry  – Born 4 Dec 1898 Died 13 Mar 1979 in Canada. Harry emigrated to Canada shortly after world war II having served in the Merchant Navy working the Atlantic crossing during the war. He worked in the Logging Industry for many years and settled in Victoria, BC. He never married.

  1. HILDA BLANCHE SMITH, cousin of William Edward Terrett

Hilda Blanche Smith was born on 24th June 1901. In the 1911 census return she was listed as still at home, nine-years-old and born in Bedminster. Hilda never married (most of the men having been killed in world war I ). She worked all her working life for Spears Bros & Clarke Ltd in Broad Plain, Bristol, retiring in June 1961. She lived in Windsor Terrace most of her life until a few years before her death when she went into a Nursing Home. She died on 23rd April 1989.

From 1953 until 1973 Miss Hilda Smith was the householder of 23 Windsor Terrace, according to Wright’s Directories.

Julia Salter, 20th July 2009:

Hilda Blanche – Born 24 Jun 1901, Died 23 Apr 1989. Hilda never married ( most of the men having been killed in world war I ). She worked all her working life for SPEARS Bros & CLARKE Ltd in Broad Plain, Bristol, retiring in June 1961. She lived in Windsor Terrace most of her life  until a few years before her death when she went into a Nursing Home.

  1. LEONARD GEORGE SMITH, cousin of William Edward Terrett

Leonard George Smith was born on 13th (or 15th?) June 1904 within the Bristol Registration District. In the 1911 census he was listed as at home, aged six-years-old and born in Bedminster. He married Hilda E. Dix in the third quarter of 1932 in Bristol Registration District. Leonard George died in 1970 in Bristol Registration District

Julia Slater, 29th July 2009:

With regards to Nellie’s brother, Leonard, he married a woman called Hilda ? and they had a girl they called Mary. Ernest was known as Jim and worked as a chauffeur for a Distillery company in Bristol called E.C.L. Apparently both brothers took their father’s view on Nellie and weren’t particularly nice to her either.

Their daughter was a second cousin of Claire Marguerite Barbara Barton:

Mary Smith was born in the second quarter of 1939 in the Bristol Registration District.

  1. ERNEST ALBERT SMITH

Ernest or Jim Smith was born on 3rd March 1906. In the 1911 census return he was listed as at home, five-years-old and born in Bedminster. He worked for a distillery company in Bristol called E.C.L..

Julia Slater, 29th July 2009:

With regards to Nellie’s brother, Leonard, he married a woman called Hilda ? and they had a girl they called Mary. Ernest was known as Jim and worked as a chauffeur for a Distillery company in Bristol called E.C.L. Apparently both brothers took their father’s view on Nellie and weren’t particularly nice to her either.

  1. UNKNOWN SMITH, cousin of William Edward Terrett

Referred to as having died by the time of the 1911 census.


The child of George and Edith Smith:

  1. WILLIAM GEORGE SMITH

Their son William George Smith was a cousin of my grandfather and also of my mother. He was born in 1912 and died on 14th September 1920 of Diphtheria. He is buried at Kingswood.

Dursley Gazette 25th September 1920:

The sympathy felt for Mr and Mrs George Smith of ‘Rose Villa’, Kingswood, in the death of their only child Willie has been most marked. Following an attack of diptheria the little fellow appeared to be going on favourably but the heart failed and death occurring on 14th inst. He was only 8 years of age, full of promise and a general favourite.

There was a large attendance at the funeral conducted at St Mary’s Church by Dr. Irwin. Among those who followed to the graveside were Mr George Smith (father), Messrs. Fred Terrett, Harry Grimes, William Holloway, Tom Jones, Dan Terrett, Edward Terrett and E. Herrick (uncles). Miss Alice Terrett and Mrs. D. Terrett (aunts), Messrs. George and William Terrett (cousins) and Mrs Fred Ellery, Mrs Newman, Mr George Lovell, Mr Fred Lovell etc…

Four school friends and playmates acted as bearers, namely Berty Pearce, Raymond Musty, Hubert Jones and Stanley Vines.

Beautiful wreaths and crosses –

Mother and Dad; Grannie and family; Fred, Meg and children; Maud, elly and children; Annie, George and Henry (Warmley; Flo, George and Mary (Mear); Aunt and Alice (Sunnyside); Dan and Emily (Walk Mills); Mrs Heyward and Mabel; Sidney Oakhill; Capt and Mrs Alston; Willie Simmonds; Mr and Mrs Ellery; Chum George and sisters; Mr Pollard; Olive and May; Emily and Cissie; Nurse; Doctor; Mr and Mrs Boulton; Lily; Mr Rufus Cook and family; Aunt Ethel and children (Bath).

Dursley Gazette October 1920:

Mr and Mrs George Smith, Kingswood, Wotton-under-Edge, return thanks for kind enquiries and sympathy in their sad bereavement and also for beautiful flowers sent.


 

The three children of Josiah and Hester Smith: 

  1. ALBERT EDWARD SMITH

An Albert Edward Smith who was born on 10th April 1901 died in the Bristol Registration District during February 1984.

Albert Edward was privately baptised on 19th April 1901 and received into the Church of Holy Nativity Knowle on 9th June 1901. At the time of the 1911 census Albert Edward Smith was aged nine years and born at Totterdown. On 27th November 1926 he married Elsie Mabel Hazell at Holy Nativity Knowle. He was described as a twenty-five-year-old Iron Worker, of 3 Somerset Terrace, Victoria Park, son of Josiah Smith, an Iron Worker. His bride was a twenty-six-year-old Tobacco Worker, of 31 Hawthorne Street, the daughter of Albert Hazell, a Tanner. The witnesses were Glenville George Smith and Albert Hazell. Bert was remembered by his cousin George Terrett.

  1. PHYLLIS (PHILLIS) MARY LIDDEATT

Phyllis Mary Smith was born on 14th May 1903 (death record) in Bedminster. This child, Phillis (sic) Mary, was baptised at the Church of the Holy Nativity on 21st June 1903. At the time of the 1911 census Phyllis Mary was at home aged seven years and born at Bedminster. She was remembered by her cousin George Terrett

This Phyllis Mary Smith probably married William Liddeatt in Bristol Registration District during the third quarter of 1931. William Liddeatt (29th August 1897-1983) was the son of George Charles and Elizabeth Liddeatt. During the third quarter of 1922 he had previously married Edna Brailey (1899-1929) in Bristol Registration District and had two children by her. Edna was the daughter of Eli and Anne Brailey, he being a twenty-six-year-old stonemason’s labourer of 15 Merioneth Street, in St John’s Parish, Bedminster.

In the 1958 telephone directory W. Liddeatt was living at 18 Tyning Road, Bristol 3.

A Phyllis Mary Liddeatt, born on 14th May 1903, died in Canterbury Registration District during 1981 and William Liddeatt died on 26th February 1983 also in Canterbury Registration District.

Examining the British Army WWI Service Records, 1914-1920 for the Territorial Force record William Liddeatt’s address as 109 Cotswold Road, Bedminster.

From Denise Brailey, Perth, West Australia, April 2010:

Alwyn married Margaret (?) in the early forties and I have photos of them at the Windmill Hill Church in Bristol.  They were with the Boys Brigade there, as was my father Royston Brailey. As children we would often visit the Liddeatt family as we were told we were distantly related.

Margaret and Alwyn had three children: John Liddeatt, Mary and one other…..  I actually spoke to Alwyn by phone last year and have his details.  Margaret died some years ago.

The children are now retired.  I think John was a Policeman.

Edna Elsie Brailey (born 1899 – d 1932 in Bedminster)

Edna was Roy Brailey’s (my father) sister.  Edna married William Liddeatt (b 1895 in Bedminster) around 1920.

Her parents were Eli and Alice Brailey of 31 Windmill Hill, Bedminster.

William and Edna had two children: Alwyn (b 1925) and Barbara (b 1927)

Alice Brailey was pregnant with Roy (in 1921, b 1922), 3 years before Edna (her daughter) was pregnant with Alwyn, so the Uncle and the Nephew were as close as siblings because Dad’s brothers and sisters were mostly grown up.

Alwyn married Margaret and had three children:  John, Mary and I think David (?)

And on 6th April 2010:

How amazing that all this history is coming to life and involves our own families.  I find it all very intriguing.  When I was in Bristol last year I retraced the steps of my great great grandparents around Queen Victoria Street and Holly Lane and also of course Windmill Hill.  I also found the home where my maternal great grandparents lived on my mother’s side of the family and the home is still being lived in.  Another home exists where my great grandmother worked as a maid.

  1. GLENVILLE GEORGE SMITH

Glenville George was born on 30th July 1906 and baptised at the Church of the Holy Nativity, Knowle, on 16th September 1906. At the time of the 1911 census Glenville George was at home aged four and born at Bedminster. He witnessed his brother’s wedding in 1926. ‘Glenny’ was remembered by his cousin George Terrett.

Glenville George Smith was living at 66 St Peter’s Rise, Bishopsworth, in 1966 with Rose Smith but had left by 1973. During the third quarter of 1971 Glenville G. Smith married Norah Smith in Bristol Registration District. He died in April 1986 in Bristol Registration District, aged seventy-nine-years.


 

The five children of Harry and Rose Smith:

  1. REGINALD HERBERT SMITH

Reginald Herbert was born on 24th March 1904 and registered in the second quarter of that year at Bristol. At the time of the 1911 census Reginald Herbert was at home aged seven years and born in Totterdown.

On 3rd September 1927 Reginald Herbert married Lillian Frances Church at Bedminster. He was aged twenty-three-years and she was aged twenty-four-years, daughter of Harry Dallimore and Florence Annie Church. Lillian Frances was born on 25th July 1903 and baptised at Bedminster on 16th August in that year.

Reginald Herbert died during 1971 in Bristol Registration District.

  1. FREDERICK CHARLES SMITH

Frederick Charles was baptised at Holy Nativity, Knowle, on 16th September 1906. In 1911 he was living at home aged four and born in Totterdown.

Ian Boulton 3-4-2018

Hi Richard,

I feel your pain about tracing the Smiths.  My Grandfather died before I was born and I grew up knowing very little about him.  He suffered from multiple sclerosis and had limited mobility for much of his life – and I get the impression that he found it difficult to keep in regular contact with his family though his brother Stan did give Mum away when she got married.  I can find out if he is the Stanley who you found living in Withywood.

Mum remembers Highgrove Street, (which has since been demolished), and does remember going to visit Josiah when she was a young girl.  She knew him as Uncle Josh and recalls him as a little old man- she also remembers some sort of family scandal about him marrying a relative- she thought she was a niece or step-daughter… and so marrying his brother’s sister-in-law seems reassuringly respectable by comparison.

  1. LEONARD GEORGE SMITH

Leonard George was baptised at Holy Nativity, Knowle, on 11th April 1909. At the time of the 1911 census he was living at home aged two years and born in Totterdown.

A Leonard George Smith was at Lower Ashley Road until 1936 and then at 56 Headley Park Avenue from 1936 until 1956.

A Leonard George Smith, who was born on 11th March 1909, died within Shipton-on-Stour Registration district during 1979.

  1. OLIVE GRACE PORTCH

Olive Grace Smith was born on 31st December 1911 (death record) and she was baptised at Holy Nativity, Knowle, on 18th February 1912.

On 30th June 1937 she married Frank Herbert Patch (sic) at Holy Nativity, Knowle. The marriage index gives the surname as Portch. Frank Herbert was described as a twenty-six-year-old bachelor and Greengrocer of 1 The Square, Knowle Park, the son of Frank Patch (sic), a Printer. Olive was a twenty-five-year-old spinster of 13 Highgrove Street, the daughter of Henry Smith, deceased, a Baker’s Assistant.

Olive Grace died in February 1992 in Bristol Registration District and Frank Herbert Portch died in February 2000 in Bristol and his date-of-birth was given in the index as 13th November 1910. He was born in Frome, Somerset.

  1. STANLEY HARRY SMITH, cousin of William Edward Terrett

Before 1915 the householder of 13 Highgrove Street was Harry’s father-in-law, John Shepherd but from 1915 until 1931 Harry was the householder according to Wright’s Directories. From 1932 until 1947 it was his wife, Mrs Rosa Eliz. Smith. Harry Smith probably died in 1931 and was referred to as deceased – Baker’s Assistant at the time of his daughter’s wedding in 1937.

The death of a Harry Smith, aged fifty-seven-years, is recorded in the index for Bristol Registration district for 1931.

From 1950 until 1953 we find Stanley Harry Smith but he had gone by 1956 and in 1964 was at 10 Gatehouse Close, Withywood.


 

For more information see my blog:

Thomas Smith (1805-1859), Carpenter of Hill, Compton Greenfield and Bristol

https://wp.me/p4BX9P-o5


FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS FAMILY CONTACT: btsarnia@gmail.com

One comment on “Thomas and Sarah Smith of Hill, Earthcott, Cromhall and Tytherington

  1. Richard Barton
    April 2, 2018

    From Ian Boulton:

    Dear Richard, I thought I’d just drop you a line to say thank you for your amazing website. My late Grandfather was Frederick Charles Smith – and with a name like Fred Smith I never thought I’d be able to meaningfully trace his roots…. however you have done it for me and completed the jigsaw of my four grandparents. I have shared your website with my mother and cousins who are all equally excited to study your findings. Once again, thank you for sharing your fantastic work.

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