btsarnia

A tribute to the life and work of Brian Torode

Thomas Smith of Hill, Earthcott, Cromhall and Tytherington

THE SMITH FAMILY OF SOUTH GLOUCESTERSHIRE AND BRISTOL


William Smith (1769c-1845) and Ann (1770-1849)

Farmer of Hill, Butcher and Dealer (Higler) of Rockhampton

|

 Thomas Smith I (1805- ) and Ann Wilson (born 1806c-1842)

Carpenter of Hill and Compton Greenfield, Wheelwright of Bristol

|

 Thomas Smith II (1831c-1884) and Sarah Woodward (1833-1880)

Agricultural Labourer of Hill, Earthcott, Dealer of Cromhall and Labourer of Tytherington

 |

 Ellen Smith (1862-1930) and Henry Terrett (1850-1908)

Millwright, Engineer and Publican of Kingswood

 


 

THOMAS SMITH II, Great II Grandfather of Richard Barton

 Son of Thomas Smith I and Anne Wilson

Husband of Sarah Woodward

Father of Ellen Jones

 Also Father of Enoch, Charles, Alfred, Sarah Ann Harris, Augustus, Thyrza Newman, Edward, George, Joshua and Harry

 

On 13th October 1833 a Thomas, son of Thomas Smith, a Carpenter of Crossways, Thornbury, and his wife Anne, was baptised at Thornbury Parish Church. His sister Laura had been baptised at Thornbury on 16th November 1828 and at the time of her baptism their parents were living at Hill. Celia was baptised at Thornbury on 4th February 1838 and the family was still then at Crossways.

In 1841 Thomas’s parents were living at Compton Greenfield. Thomas was described as a thirty-two-year-old carpenter and his wife Ann was aged twenty-six years. The whole of the family were born in Gloucestershire. The children were listed as Agustus (sic) aged ten; Thos (sic) aged eight; Celea (sic) aged five and Elen (sic) aged two years. With then was Joseph Smith, aged twenty-five-years, an agricultural labourer, aged twenty-five-years, who only stayed one night.

 At the time of the 1851 census Thomas Smith was probably at Hill where we find a nineteen-year-old Farm Servant employed by and living with George Wetmore a farmer of 340 acres and with three labourers. On this occasion the boy gives his place of birth as Earthcott. We also find at the same farm his future wife, Sarah Woodward, who is described as a general Servant, aged twenty-years, and born in Hill. Another general servant was an Ann Smith who was also born in Hill. Was she perhaps a sister or cousin of Thomas Smith?

Thomas Smith II married Sarah Woodward on 29th December 1851 at Bedminster Parish Church. He is described as twenty-two-years-old, a bachelor, and labourer living with his bride at Little Paradise. His father was given on the certificate as Thomas Smith, a Carpenter. Neither the bride nor the bridegroom was able to sign their names and the witnesses were recorded as Thomas and Lucy Smith. It is highly likely that this couple were his father and stepmother and they were probably living at 39 Milk Street, St Paul’s, Bristol, at the time of the 1851 census.

At the time Sarah was only twenty-three-years-old and other details on the marriage certificate confirm that her father was Henry Woodward, a labourer of Hill. Sarah was unable to sign her name.

From these marriage details we can establish that Thomas Smith, Junior, was born in about 1829. Later census returns would indicate that the date could be as late as 1831.

Thomas and Sarah Smith had at least eleven children between 1852 and 1873 but little is known of what happened to some of them. Their son, George, who married his sister’s stepdaughter, was a merchant seaman. Joshua or Josiah fought in the Boer War whilst his older brothers, Enoch and Charles, were both labourers.

Their eldest son Enoch was baptised at Compton Greenfield, Henbury, on 22nd August 1852 and the child was listed in the register as the son of Thomas Smith, labourer of Compton in Henbury, and his wife Sarah. Their second son Charles Smith was baptised on 23rd July 1854 at Hill. His parents were described then as Thomas and Sarah Smith of The Gully, Ham, Berkeley, and his father’s occupation was given as labourer. The third child, Alfred, was baptised at St Helen’s Church, Alveston, on 1st February 1857 and now Thomas was described as a Labourer of Alveston.

The 1861 Census records that Thomas and Sarah were living at Earthcott, near Alveston. He is described as a thirty-one-year-old, born in Thornbury, and working as an agricultural labourer. His wife was aged thirty years and born in Hill. Four of their children were born before the night of the census and from the return we can glean that the two eldest sons, Enoch, aged nine years and Charles, aged seven, were born at Hill whilst Alfred, aged four, and Sarah Ann, aged one year, were born at Alveston.

Kelly’s Directory for 1870 lists Thomas Smith as a beer retailer of Cromhall and again in 1876. Also the baptismal register for Cromhall lists the baptism of George on 22nd March 1871. The register entry gives his father’s occupation as a beer house keeper. In those that followed in 1872 and 1873 he was described as a publican. The birth certificate for Joshua, who was born on 4th November 1871, records his father as a beer house keeper of Cromhall.

From the 1871 Census return we discover the family living at Weir Bridge, Cromhall. Thomas Smith, aged thirty-nine-years, was described as a Beer Shop Keeper and Dealer, and born in Thornbury. His wife Sarah was aged forty years and born in Hill. In this census the eldest son, Enoch, aged nineteen, was born in Henbury rather than Hill (1861 census). Charles was aged fourteen and born in Hill; Alfred aged thirteen was born in Alveston; Sarah aged eleven and born in Alveston; Ellen aged ten years and born in Alveston; Augustus was born in Alveston and aged five years; Thurza was aged four years and born in Alveston; Edwin was aged three years and born in Alveston. The youngest child, George Smith, in this census return was aged one year and born at Cromhall.

Sometime between 1875 and 1880 the family moved to Tower Hill, Tytherington. Here there was an established family of Smiths who had farmed there for generations. It is possible that they may have been distant cousins and the name Thurza occurs in their lineage. Sarah died at Tytherington and was buried there on 22nd December 1880 aged fifty-years.

Her death certificate reveals that Sarah Smith died on 16th December 1880 at Tytherington. She was fifty-years-old and the wife of Thomas Smith, a Pig Dealer. The cause of her death was Phthisis for one year – a cavity of the left lung and consolidation of the right and this was certified by Edward Roberson M.R.C.S. Thomas Smith was in attendance at Tytherington and made his mark as the widower of the deceased.

In the 1881 Census return the family is living at Tower Hill Cottages, Tytherington. He was living in the one nearest to Tower Hill Farm, which was at the time being farmed by Thomas E. Harding. Thomas Smith was described as a forty-nine-year-old widower, born in Thornbury, and working as an Agricultural Labourer. Living with him were his younger children – Augustus, aged sixteen years, and born in Alveston; Thurza aged fifteen years and born in Alveston; Edward aged thirteen years and born in Alveston; George aged eleven and born in Cromhall; Josiah aged nine years and born in Cromhall and Harry aged seven years and born in Cromhall.

Of his two elder daughters both had left home by the time of the 1881 census. Sarah was living at 9 Highgrove Street, Bedminster, Bristol, with the Brown Family. Mrs Brown, the wife of a house painter, had been born in Cromhall. Sarah was herself described as a twenty-year-old unmarried visitor, a domestic servant, born at Earthcott. Meanwhile at the time of the census her younger sister, Ellen, was working as a general domestic servant for Henry Terrett of Kingswood, a young widower with two daughters.

When Ellen Smith married Henry Terrett on 12th September 1881, at St Barnabas, Bedminster, the witnesses were her brother Alfred and sister Sarah. The bride and groom were residing at 17 Denbigh Street at the time of the marriage. It is likely that by 1881 Alfred had moved away from Tytherington to Bristol or Gloucester.

Ellen gave details of her father’s occupation for the marriage certificate as a Dealer but by the time of her second marriage in 1913 he was ‘deceased’. In 1897 Edward  said that his father was a deceased Dealer. In the marriage certificate of his son Augustus in 1890 and Josiah in 1898 he was described as ‘Labourer’. In 1893 at the time of the marriage of his son Alfred Smith, Thomas was described as a deceased cattle dealer and in 1903 Edward described his father as simply ‘deceased’. In the marriage certificate for his son George, dated 1910, Thomas Smith was described as a deceased horse dealer.

Thomas Smith died at Bristol Infirmary in 1884 and was buried at Tytherington on 10th March 1884. He was aged fifty-three-years.

The death certificate records that he died on 4th March 1884 at the Royal Infirmary. He was described as a fifty-three-year-old Farm Labourer of Rockhampton in Thornbury Union Registration District. He died of chronic Bright’s disease of the kidneys, which was certified by J. Paul Bush M.R.C.S. The informant was Harriet E. Broomsgrove of Bristol Royal Infirmary who was present at the death. The death was registered on 8th March 1884 at Bristol.

From the above information we can deduce that Thomas was the son of Thomas Smith, a carpenter, and that he was born sometime between 1829 and 1831 in the Thornbury area. There is a baptism at Thornbury on 13th October 1833 of Thomas Smith, son of Thomas Smith, a carpenter of Crossways and his wife Anne. In 1851 Thomas was working as a farm labourer in Hill with his wife-to-be and in the December of that year he married Sarah Woodward at Bedminster. In the following year Thomas and Sarah were living at Compton in Henbury Parish and then from 1854 at The Gully, Ham in Berkeley Parish, near to Hill. From 1857 they were living at Earthcott in Alveston Parish where they stayed until at least 1867. Sometime between 1867 and 1870 they moved to Cromhall where Thomas worked as a publican. The family then moved to Tower Hill Cottages, Tytherington, sometime between 1873 and 1880, the year in which Sarah died. Thomas remained in Tytherington until his own death at Bristol Infirmary in 1884. During the late 1860s and early 1870s Edwin White, the stepson of Thomas Smith’s father was blacksmith in Tytherington.


SARAH SMITH, Great II Grandmother of Richard Barton

Daughter of Henry Woodward and Joanna (nee Allen)

Wife of Thomas Smith II

Mother of Ellen Jones

 Also Mother of Enoch, Charles, Alfred, Sarah Ann Harris, Augustus, Thyrza Newman, Edward, George, Joshua and Harry

 

Sarah Woodward was baptised on 2nd June 1833 at Hill. She was the daughter of Henry Woodward and his wife Joanna Allen. Her mother died, aged forty-two years, when Sarah was only a few months old. Her father remarried and had further family.

In the 1841 census she was at home and described as eleven-years-old.

In the 1851 Census she is described as a General Servant, aged twenty years and born in Hill, living at the home of George Wetmore, a farmer of 340 acres with three labourers, at Hill. Also we find working on the farm on the night of the census Thomas Smith, a nineteen-year-old Farm Servant, and very likely her future husband. Another servant employed by the Wetmores was Ann Smith who was also born in Hill. Was she a sister or cousin of Thomas Smith?

Sarah Woodward married Thomas Smith at Bedminster Parish Church on 29th December 1851. At the time Sarah was only twenty-three-years-old and other details on the marriage certificate confirm that her father was Henry Woodward, a labourer. Sarah was unable to sign her name. Thomas Smith was described as twenty-two-years-old, a bachelor, and labourer living with his bride at Little Paradise. His father was given on the certificate as Thomas Smith, a Carpenter. Neither the bride nor the bridegroom was able to sign their names and the witnesses were recorded as Thomas and Lucy Smith. It is highly likely that this couple were his father and stepmother. They were living at 39 Milk Street, St Paul’s, Bristol, at the time of the 1851 census.

From these marriage details we can establish that Thomas Smith, Junior, was born in about 1829. Later census returns would indicate that the date could be as late as 1831.

Thomas and Sarah Smith had at least eleven children between 1852 and 1873 but little is known of what happened to some of them. Their son, George, who married his sister’s stepdaughter, was a merchant seaman. Joshua or Josiah fought in the Boer War whilst his older brothers, Enoch and Charles, were both labourers.

Their eldest son Enoch was baptised at Compton Greenfield, Henbury, on 22nd August 1852 and the child was listed in the register as the son of Thomas Smith, labourer of Compton in Henbury, and his wife Sarah. Their second son Charles Smith was baptised on 23rd July 1854 at Hill. His parents were described then as Thomas and Sarah Smith of The Gully, Ham, Berkeley, and his father’s occupation was given as labourer. The third child, Alfred, was baptised at St Helen’s Church, Alveston, on 1st February 1857 and now Thomas was described as a Labourer of Alveston.

The 1861 Census records that Thomas and Sarah were living at Earthcott, near Alveston. He is described as a thirty-one-year-old, born in Thornbury, and working as an agricultural labourer. His wife was aged thirty years and born in Hill. Four of their children were born before the night of the census and from the return we can glean that the two eldest sons, Enoch, aged nine years and Charles, aged seven, were born at Hill whilst Alfred, aged four, and Sarah Ann, aged one year, were born at Alveston.

In 1861 Edwin Charles Smith (sic) was lodging with a widow, Mary Hicks, at Earthcott a few doors away from his stepbrother Thomas Smith and his family. Edwin was described as an unmarried twenty-two-year-old blacksmith born at Sherborne, Dorset.

Western Daily Press Thursday February 20th 1862:

Thornbury Petty Sessions – Wednesday – Thomas Smith, Haulier, of Earthcott, parish of Olveston, was summoned by Mr. J. Bullen, agent of the Animals’ Friend Society etc. for working a horse in an unfit state in the parish of Lateridge, near Thornbury, on Wednesday, the 5th inst. He pleaded guilty and was fined 10s and costs, or ten day’s imprisonment, with hard labour. Also William Taylor, farmer of Earthcott, was summoned by Mr. J. Bullen for working two horses with sore shoulders. He pleaded guilty and was fined £5 and costs or 3 months imprisonment with hard labour.

Kelly’s Directory for 1870 lists Thomas Smith as a beer retailer of Cromhall and again in 1876. Also the baptismal register for Cromhall lists the baptism of George on 22nd March 1871. The register entry gives his father’s occupation as a beer house keeper. In those that followed in 1872 and 1873 he was described as a publican. The birth certificate for Joshua, who was born on 4th November 1871, records his father as a beer house keeper of Cromhall.

From the 1871 Census return we discover the family living at Weir Bridge, Cromhall. Thomas Smith, aged thirty-nine-years, was described as a Beer Shop Keeper and Dealer, and born in Thornbury. His wife Sarah was aged forty years and born in Hill. In this census the eldest son, Enoch, aged nineteen, was born in Henbury rather than Hill (1861 census). Charles was aged fourteen and born in Hill; Alfred aged thirteen was born in Alveston; Sarah aged eleven and born in Alveston; Ellen aged ten years and born in Alveston; Augustus was born in Alveston and aged five years; Thurza was aged four years and born in Alveston; Edwin was aged three years and born in Alveston. The youngest child, George Smith, in this census return was aged one year and born at Cromhall.

Sometime between 1874 and 1880 the family moved to Tower Hill, Tytherington. Here there was an established family of Smiths who had farmed there for generations. It is possible that they may have been distant cousins and the name Thurza occurs in their lineage. Sarah died at Tytherington and was buried there on 22nd December 1880 aged fifty-years.

Her death certificate reveals that Sarah Smith died on 16th December 1880 at Tytherington. She was fifty-years-old and the wife of Thomas Smith, a Pig Dealer. The cause of her death was Phthisis for one year – a cavity of the left lung and consolidation of the right and this was certified by Edward Roberson M.R.C.S.. Thomas Harney, Registrar registered the death on 18th December and the informant was her husband, Thomas Smith of Tytherington, who was in attendance at the time of the death and made his mark.


 

Their eleven children were Great II Aunts and Uncles:

 

  1. ENOCH SMITH, Great II Uncle

 

Enoch was the eldest of the children and according to census returns he was born in either Hill or Henbury in about 1852. According to one world tree he was born on 25th July 1852. Enoch was baptised at Compton Greenfield Church, in Henbury Parish, on on 22nd or 27th August 1852 and was described in the register as the son of Thomas Smith, a labourer of Compton in Henbury, and his wife Sarah. In the 1861 census return he was aged nine years and born in Hill. In 1871 he was nineteen, born in Henbury, living at home in Cromhall, and working as an agricultural labourer.

Enoch married Ellen Crook in Bristol during the second quarter of 1877. Ellen was the daughter of Anthony Crook, an agricultural labourer. According to the 1861 census she was living at home at Water Mill Cottage, Quedgeley, and was described as three-years-old and born at Hardwicke. In 1871 she was staying at Huntingford near Michaelwood and working as a domestic servant. She was the niece of William Smith, with whom she was staying, her age was given as fourteen years, and she was shown as born in Quedgeley.

In the 1881 census Enoch was a General Labourer of Bagstone, in the Parish of Wickwar. He was described as born at Compton and married to Ellen. Their children included Archie C. aged three years and born in Cromhall; Ina E. aged one year and born at Cromhall and Cicely aged three months and born at Bagstone.

In the 1891 census there was an Enoch Smith living at Bagstone Cottages, Wickwar. He was described as a thirty-eight-year-old quarryman born in Compton, Gloucestershire. His wife, Ellen was aged thirty-eight and born in Quedgeley. Children included Archie Caleb Smith, aged thirteen years and born in Cromhall; Ciceley aged ten years and born in Wickwar; Dora Daisy aged eight and born in Wickwar; Anthony aged seven years and born in Wickwar; Arthur aged five years and born in Wickwar; Leonard aged three years and born in Wickwar and George aged two years and born in Wickwar.

Enoch died during the first quarter of 1900 in Chipping Sodbury Registration District. He was buried at Wickwar and the register describes him as being buried on 19th February 1900 aged forty-eight-years and from Bagstone, Wickwar.

In the 1901 census we find Ellen, a widow, living at Bagstone Road, Wickwar. She was described as aged forty-four-years and born in Hardwicke. With her were her children – ‘Archibald’, aged twenty-four-years and born in Cromhall, a stone quarryman; Anthony, aged seventeen-years, born in Wickwar, a stone quarryman; Arthur aged fifteen, a stone quarryman; George aged eleven; Ellen M. aged nine; John L. aged eight; Amy L. aged six; Norman C. aged five and Edith E. aged three years.

In 1911 Ellen was living with her family in eight rooms at Wotton Road, Iron Acton. She was described as a fifty-three-year-old widow and General Haulier working on her own account and born in Harwicke (sic). Her children included George Smith, a twenty-two-year-old single man working as a farm labourer. Lawrence was listed as an eighteen-year-old single farm labourer; Cecil was listed as single, aged fifteen, and working as a farm labourer. Edith Ella was listed as a fifteen-year-old daughter. All the boys were born at Bagstone, Wickwar.

An Ellen Smith died during 1943 in Sodbury Registration District aged eighty-eight-years.

 

 

  1. CHARLES SMITH, Great II Uncle

 

Charles was born in 1854 at Berkeley although in the 1861 and 1871 census returns the place of birth was given as Hill. In 1911 we find Clapton. He was baptised on 23rd July 1854 at Hill. His parents were described as Thomas and Sarah Smith of The Gully, Ham, Berkeley and his father’s occupation was given as labourer. Charles was aged seven years in the 1861 census and fourteen in 1871. He had left home by the time of the 1881 census and married Susannah Carpenter during the first quarter of 1880 in Dursley Registration District.

In the 1881 census return ‘Chas’ was living at Under the Hill Cottages, Tytherington. He was described as a twenty-six-year-old agricultural labourer, born in Berkeley. His wife Susan, aged twenty-one-years, was born in Cam. Their child Laura was aged three months and born in Tytherington.

In the 1891 census he was at Hill Cottage, Tytherington. He was described as a thirty-seven-year-old farm labourer born in Berkeley. His wife, Susan, was aged thirty-nine-years and was born in Cam. Their children included Laura, aged ten-years, a scholar, born in Tytherington; Percy aged eight years and born in Tytherington and Augustus aged two years and born in Tytherington.

In 1901 Charles Smith was still in Tytherington and living at Station Road. He was described as a forty-five-year-old labourer on a farm, born at Aust. His wife Susannah, was aged forty-five-years and was born in Cam. The children included Laura aged twenty, Augustus aged twelve and Gordon aged three years. All were born in Tytherington.

In 1911 Charles Smith was living at Station Road, Tytherington. He was described as a fifty-four-year-old worker who had been married for thirty-one-years. He had six children of whom two had died. His occupation was given as a horseman on a farm – a Waggoner – and his place of birth was given as Clapton. His wife Susan was aged fifty-two-years-old and born at Cam. His children at home included Gordon Truey aged thirteen years, a scholar, born in Tytherington and Augustus William, aged twenty-one-years, and born in Tytherington. The family occupied three rooms.

Charles Smith worked as a labourer in Tytherington where he died in 1935 aged eighty-one-years. His wife died in 1951 aged ninety-two-years.

Julia Salter wrote in July 2009: ‘Mum did tell me that Gran ( Nellie )(1897-) used to cycle from Totterdown to Tytherington to see relatives.’

  1. ALFRED SMITH, Great II Uncle

 

Alfred was born in Alveston in about 1857 and baptised at St Helen’s Church on 1st February 1857. His parents were described as Thomas, a labourer of Alveston and Sarah, his wife. In 1861 he was at home aged four years and in 1871 aged thirteen. He had left home by 1881.

In the 1891 census there was a thirty-two-year-old blacksmith at 2 Kimbrose, St Owens, Gloucester called Alfred Smith, who stated that he was born at Earthcott (Eastcoat). With him was, Mary, who was aged thirty-eight-years and was born in Ashchurch. Nevill Downham, an adopted son, was living with them. He was aged seven years and born in Tewkesbury.

Nevile Downham

These details raise a number of problems but do, however, reveal an early link with the Downham Family. We know that Nevile Downham was born on 17th November 1883 at Oldbury, Tewkesbury. His mother was Clara Downham, a milliner. She registered the birth herself on 12th December.

At the time of the 1901 Nevile’s name appears to have changed to Neville Smith.

Nevile Downham married a Lillian Maud Coleman at St John’s Parish Church, Weymouth, on 16th October 1904. He was described as aged twenty-one, a fireman, of 1 Elsie Villas, Lennox Street, Weymouth, son of Alfred Downham, blacksmith. She was aged twenty-one, of 15 Alma Road, Westham, the daughter of a Charles Coleman, Chief Officer, Merchant Navy. The witnesses were J (?) Cox and M. Coleman.

On 6th January 1900 Nevile became an engine cleaner in Gloucester but from 12th May 1902 he was a shunter foreman at Weymouth. In September 1904 he was back in Gloucester and in 1906 was a third class fireman in Weymouth. In 1913 we find him in Tetbury and from 1920 in Oxford. He retired as a first class group fireman on 24th November 1945.

In 1911 Nevile Downham and his family were living in six rooms at 10 Napier Street, Gloucester. He was a twenty-seven-year-old Railway Engine Stoker employed by GWR and was born at Oldbury, Gloucestershire. His wife Lillian Maud was aged twenty-eight and born at Weymouth. The couple had three children and they had been married for six years. Children included Gladys Clara aged five, at school, born at Weymouth. Vere Madeline was aged four, at school, and born in Gloucester. Percival Nevile Downham was aged one year and born in Gloucester.

Neville Downham probably died during 1957 aged seventy-three-years at Abingdon.

On 18th September 1893 Alfred Smith married Clara Downham in St Nicholas’s Parish Church in Gloucester, after banns had been called. He was described as a thirty-five-year-old bachelor, a blacksmith, of 10 Priory Road, Gloucester. Alfred was described as the son of Thomas Smith, a deceased cattle dealer. The bride, Clara Downham, was aged thirty-three-years, a spinster of the same address and daughter of James Downham, a builder. The witnesses were Daniel Downham and Emma Eliza Downham.

Clara Downham was born in Brockworth some time between 1855 and 1859. In 1861 the family was living at Watermead, Brockworth. Her father James was then a thirty-four-year-old Carpenter from Croydon, Surrey, and her mother Mary was from Cranham. James and Mary had other children Albert, Elizabeth and William. Ten years later in 1871 Clara was a twelve-year-old scholar and further siblings included Harry, Daniel and James. In 1881 Clara was still at home at Watermead and Clara appears in the return as a twenty-one-years-old with no occupation. By this time James Downham, her father, was listed as a Carpenter and Master Builder employing three men and a boy. Her son, Nevile Downham, was born on 17th November 1883 at Oldbury, Tewkesbury. His mother was described as Clara Downham, a milliner. She registered the birth herself on 12th December.

In 1891 James Downham was not only described as a Carpenter but he was now also the Innkeeper of the Victoria Inn, Brockworth, and his daughter Clara was still living at home.

In 1901 Alfred Smith was living at 17 Priory Road, Gloucester. He was aged forty years and was described as a Journeyman Blacksmith born in Gloucester. With him were his wife Clara, aged forty-one-years and born in Gloucester. With them were Neville Smith, son, aged seventeen-years, an Engine Cleaner, born in Gloucester.

At the time of the 1911 census return Alfred Smith was living in four rooms at 134 Millbrook Street, Gloucester. He was described as a fifty-one-year-old blacksmith, a carriage worker – possibly ‘Healing’. Hs wife Clare was forty-nine-years-old and both she and her husband were described as being born in Gloucestershire. They had been married for nineteen years and had had four children of whom two had already died. Their children at home included Beatrice aged nine years and Lizzie aged eight years. Both were born in Gloucester.

In 1930 Alfred Smith was described as ‘of Gloucester’ in his sister Ellen Jones’s obituary.

An Alfred Smith died in 1944 in Gloucester Rural Registration District aged eighty-six-years and a Clara Smith died in Gloucester City Registration District in 1937 aged seventy-five-years.

Private Wagons in Gloucester area – website

The Gloucester RCW Official Photograph of Samuel Healing & Sons fleet number 5 dated January 1900 shows a seven plank wagon with two side doors only capable of carrying 10 tons with a tare of 6-1-2. Like the model, the legend to the left of the number 5 reads “Empty to Netherseal Colliery near Burton-on-Trent” but the Official Photograph also shows white wall tyres and two G-Plates on the wooden solebar, ine inside the brake gear V- hanger and another just to the left.

Borough Flour Mills were situated at Quay Pit on the River Avon to the west of Tewkesbury High Street. After 1844 it was served by a siding – always worked by horse power – off the Bristol & Gloucester Railway’s Tewkesbury Branch. The mill produced both flour and animal feeds and, being worked by steam, required coal. Samuel Healing & Son hired two wagons from Gloucester RCW in November 1869 and sporadically hired and bought other wagons for the rest of the 19th Century and as recently as 1920. Grain, however, was brought upstream from Avonmouth via Gloucester along the River Severn and at one time Samuel Healing & Sons owned their own steamship and several powered barges.

  1. SARAH ANN HARRIS, Great II Aunt

 

Sarah Ann Smith was born in Alveston in about 1859. Her name appears in the birth register index for Thornbury in the second quarter of 1860. She was baptised on 13th May 1860 at St Helen’s Church, Alveston. In the 1861 census she was called Sarah Ann and was one-year-old. In 1871 she was simply Sarah, at home, aged eleven.

 

 

 

Bristol Mercury 2nd July 1870

 

Highway Robbery by a boy – an incorrigible boy named Greenman, whose friends live at Crossways, near Thornbury, on Friday met two little girls aged 8 and 11 respectively the daughters of Mr. Thomas Smith of Cromhall, going toward Thornbury and immediately pounced on them, threw down the eldest child and rifled her pockets, taking there from in money 4s 6d. The young culprit, who is only 12 or 13 years of age, a short time since lived for several days in Prest Wood, a large covert belonging to Earl Ducie, and for food caught very young rabbits, skinned and cooked them. He is now in the custody of the Thornbury police, who will at the earnest request of the young vagabond’s friends ask the magistrate to send him to a reformatory school.

 

She had left home by 1881. In the census she was listed as Sarah Smith and visiting at 9 Highgrove Street, Bedminster, Bristol. She was described as a twenty-year-old unmarried, visitor, a domestic servant, born at Earthcott. Her hosts were Charles and Catharine Brown. He was a forty-one-year-old house painter born in Cirencester and she was a forty-four-year-old born in Cromhall. Catharine may be the reason for various great aunts and uncles ending up in Totterdown.

The Browns of Highgrove Street

Ten years later in 1891 Catherine Brown, a forty-year-old widow, was living at 18 Highgrove Street with her sister Sarah Capprell (sp?), married, aged thirty-two-years, both were shown as born in Cromhall. With them was Henry Smith, an eighteen-year-old lodger and bottle washer, born in Cromhall – Sarah Ann’s youngest brother! Also living with them was William Desmond, a twenty-two-year-old Cattle Drover from Cork. Back in 1871 Charles and Catherine Brown were living at 20 Redcliffe Mead Lane, Redcliffe. He was a thirty-one-year-old house painter, born Cirencester, and she was aged thirty years and born in Cromwell (sic). In the 1890 Wright’s Directory Charles Brown, Painter and Glazier, was living at 18 Highgrove Street.

 

Sarah Ann witnessed the marriage of her sister, Ellen Smith in 1881 and Thyrza Smith, in 1889.

In 1891 a Sarah A. Smith, aged thirty years, was living with the Martin Family at 10 Upper Belgrave Road, Clifton, and working as a Cook there and the return stated that she was born somewhere in Gloucestershire.

On 9th October 1893 Sarah Anne Smith, aged thirty-three-years, a spinster of Emmanuel Parish, Clifton, Bristol, daughter of Thomas Smith, cattle dealer, married Edward William Harris, aged thirty-seven, a publican and bachelor, of Kingswood, son of Charles Harris, Farmer. Both signed their names and the witnesses were Alfred Smith, Ellen Terrett and Edward Charles Neal.

In 1891 Edward Harris, aged thirty-six-years, was Licensee and Victualler of the Dog and Badger Inn at Kingswood. He was described as born at Westerleigh and living with him was his sister, Elizabeth Harris. This public house was situated near to that of Daniel and Ann Terrett.

Edward William Harris was baptised at Westerleigh on 14th September 1856. He was the son of Charles and Elizabeth Harris.

In 1861 his parents were farming 186 acres at Henfield, Westerleigh, and Edward William, aged five, was then one of seven children.

In 1871 Charles Harris, aged fifty-two-years, was an innkeeper on Wickwar Road, Kingswood. With him were five of his children including Edward W. Harris, aged fourteen years.

In 1881 Edward William Harris, aged twenty-four-years, was staying with his brother, Charles at 62 Litchurch Street, Litchurch, Derby. Charles Harris, aged thirty-six, was married to Catherine, a native of Derby, and he was working as a goods guard. Edward William was described as a pointsman. Also staying in the house was Joseph Harris, aged nineteen, a younger brother, who was a horse driver or carter. All three brothers had been born in Westerleigh.

Hilda Blanche Harris was baptised at St Mary’s Church, Kingswood, on 2nd December 1894 and her father was described as a Publican.

The Bristol Mercury for 3rd August 1896 reported that the license for the Dog and Badger had been transferred from E. Harris.

 

Their second child, Harold Edward Harris, was baptised at St James’ Church, Mangotsfield, on 7th May 1899.

In 1901 Edward and Sarah Ann Harris were living in five rooms at Wharfe, Curdworth, Warwickshire. He was described as a forty-five-year-old General Farm Labourer and she was aged forty-one. Their places of birth were given as not known. Hilda Blanche was aged six and born at Kingswood, Gloucestershire, and Harold Edward, aged two, was born at Mangotsfield.

In 1911 Edward William Harris, widower, aged fifty-four-years, was living at 6 Woodlands, Kingsbury, Tamworth. He was described as a General Labourer above ground and born at Westerleigh. His son Harold Edward was aged twelve years.

 

  1. AUGUSTUS SMITH, Great II Uncle

 

Augustus Smith was born at Alveston and baptised at St Helen’s Church on 22nd May 1864. In the 1871 census return he was aged five years and at home. In the 1881 census he was described as a sixteen-year-old agricultural labourer, born in Alveston, who was living with his father at Tower Hill Cottages.

On 24th March 1890 he married Mary Anne Liveall, a thirty-two-year-old spinster of Tytherington, daughter of Richard Liveall, a labourer. Augustus was described as a twenty-six-year-old labourer of Tytherington, son of Thomas Smith, a labourer. The witnesses were George Livall and Mary Ann Godwin.

They had at least three children but the parentage of the Livall children is unsure. In the 1881 census return for Thornbury Union Work House was Mary A. Livall, an unmarried domestic servant. She was aged twenty-five-years and born in Tytherington. Her children were Emily Livall aged four, a scholar born in Tytherington; Edwin Livall aged two years, a scholar and born in Tytherington and William G. Livall aged one year and born in Thornbury. A

In the 1891 census Augustus was living with his family at Under Hill Cottage, Tytherington. He was described as a twenty-four-year-old farm worker who was born in Iron Acton. His wife, Mary Ann, was aged thirty-two-years and born in Tytherington. Their daughter Frances E. Smith was aged one year and born in Tytherington. With them was his stepson, Mary Ann’s son, Edwin Livall who was an eleven-year-old farm labourer.

Augustus died in 1898 at Tytherington at the age of thirty-four-years.

In 1901 Mary Smith, his widow, was aged forty-four-years and living in Tytherington with her family. With her were her children Nellie Smith aged ten years and Annie Smith aged seven years. Also living with them were her sons William, aged twenty-years, and Edwin Livall, aged twenty-two-years who were both working as stone quarrymen born in Tytherington. Other members of the Livall family were boarding with her.

In 1911 Mary Ann Smith was living in three rooms at Tytherington. She was described in the census return as aged fifty-six-years and a widow, born in Tytherington. Boarding with her were Walter Hillier a forty-five-year-old single Labourer working in Asphalt and born in Stroud. Her nephew, sixteen-year-old William Livall, was living with them and he was described as a blacksmith’s striker – manufacturing.

In 1911 Edwin Livall was a thirty-four-year-old labourer in a stone quarry and living in Tytherington. His children included Augusta Annie aged nine years; Celia May aged eight years; Hubert A.E. aged six years; E. Rose aged four years and Catherine M. aged three years. Living with the Livalls was William Livall, Edwin’s cousin, a blacksmith’s striker who was born in Milbury Heath.

Mary Ann Smith died in 1932 in the Bristol Royal Infirmary and her younger son, William Livall, died in 1956. An entry for a Mary A. Smith in 1932 for Bristol Registration District gives an age for her of seventy-years.

ianmorrison5@hotmail.com:

My mother was Gwyneth Jean Livell b.1929.
Her father was Edgar Charles Livell b. 1904.
His father was Edgar Livell b. 1882.
His father was Edwin Livell b. 1857. Brother of Mary Ann Livell b. 1855 and she married Augustus Smith b. 1867c.

Thornbury Roots: 77 High Street:

William and Bessie Livall –  when the house was put up for sale in 1938 (following the death of Charlotte and Ann Wise) it was occupied by William and Bessie Livall.

William was born in Tytherington in 1895.  He appears to have been the son of William Henry Livall and his wife, Louisa (nee Pritchard).  They had married in 1893 and had two children, Florence May born in late 1893 and William Henry in 1895, before Louisa died aged only 22 and she was buried on 28th January 1897.  The family had been living at The Hackett at the time of Louisa’s death.

Life must have been very hard for young William.  The 1901 census shows that his widowed father then aged 31 was working as a labourer at the quarry and looking after his two young children.   They were sharing the house in Tytherington with Mary Smith.

In 1915 William married Bessie White.   Bessie had been baptised on 16th February 1898, the daughter of Charles White, a labourer and his wife, Harriett. They had at least two children: Lily Mary born on 20th April 1916, Violet Joan born on 30th July 1920.

The Livalls were living in St Mary Street when Lily was baptised on 7th November 1917 at which time William was described as being a blacksmith.  We assume that they were living with Bessie’s parents who were living at 27 St Mary Street.  The 1927 electoral register lists William Livall as living with Charles White in St Mary Street and later registers up to 1935 show that they continued to live in St Mary Street.

By 1938 William and Bessie were at 77 High Street.  Their daughter, Lily May married Leslie George Thomas Stephens of Alveston in 1938.  They moved to live in Lower Almondsbury.

William and Bessie carried on living at 77 High Street until their deaths.  William died on 9th April 1954 aged 59.  Bessie died on 22nd February 1955 aged 59.

  1. THYRZA NEWMAN, Great II Aunt

 

Thyrza was born at Alveston and baptised at St Helen’s Church on 18th March 1866. In the 1871 census return she was aged four years. She was living with the family in 1881 at Tower Hill Cottages, Tytherington. She was described as a fifteen-year-old born in Alveston.

She married William Newman during the fourth quarter of 1889 in Bristol Registration District.

On 28th October 1889 Thyrza Smith, a twenty-three-year-old spinster of 11 Pembroke Road, Clifton, married William Newman of 19 Plummer Street, Stapleton Road, Bristol, a twenty-three-year-old bachelor, a labourer in a cocoa factory. They were married at Broadmead Meeting House according to the rites of the Baptists. She was described as the daughter of Thomas Smith, a deceased farmer, and he was the son of James Newman, a labourer. The witnesses were Sarah Ann Smith and Albert Henry Dudbridge,

In 1871 William Newman was listed as being at home with his parents James and Sarah Newman at Bratton. He was described as aged four and born at Bratton, near Westbury, Wiltshire. His father was a thirty-one-year-old agricultural labourer.

At the time of the census of 1881 he was a fourteen-year-old agricultural labourer at home with his parents James and Sarah, in Bratton and his father was again listed as an agricultural labourer.

In 1891 William and Thyrza (sic) were living at 7 Hatherley Brow, Horfield, Bristol. She was aged twenty-five and born in Earthcott, Gloucester. Her husband William Newman was described as a twenty-four-year-old general labourer born in Bratton, Wiltshire. Their child Florence T. was aged eight months and was born in Bishopston, Bristol.

In 1901 the family had moved to ‘Llandaff’, 41 Rosebery Road, Moorfields, Bristol. William was a thirty-four-year-old chocolate work labourer born in Bratton. Thirza (sic) was now thirty-five and again born at Earthcott. Their children included Florence T. Newman who was aged ten and born in Horfield; William M. Newman aged three years and born in St George and Dorothy aged two months was also born at St George..

In 1911 the family was living at in seven rooms at 49 Rosebery Road. William Newman was described as a forty-four-year-old house decorator working on his own account and born at Bratton, Westbury, Wiltshire. Thyrza was aged forty-five-years and was listed as born at Earthcott, Gloucestershire. She had been married for twenty-one-years with eight children born alive and still alive. The children included Florence Newman aged twenty, assisting at home, and born at Horfield; William Morly aged thirteen and born in St George’s Bristol; Dorothy Lillian aged ten and

born in St George’s; Clifford Percy aged seven and born at Brislington; Gerald Ivor aged six years and born in St George’s; Phyllis Mabel aged four years and born in St George’s; Elsie Muriel aged three and born in St George’s and Reginald George aged ten months and born in St George’s.

In 1908 Mr W. Newman of Bristol attended the funeral of Henry Terrett with his brothers-in-law Messrs. E. J. and H. Smith. Both William and Thurza attended Ellen Jones’s funeral in 1930.

In about 1900 a William Newman was living at 15 Gilbert Road, Redfield. In 1903 a William Newman was listed at 43 Roseberry Road in Wright’s Directory. From 1905 until 1912 there was one at 49 Roseberry Road. From 1913 until 1917 a William Newman was at 218 Whitehall Road and from 1917 until 1950 at 30 Hill Street, Totterdown.

According to probate records Reginald George Newman of The Limes, Hanham, Gloucestershire, died on 20th December 1933. Adminstration was granted at Bristol to his father, William Newman, house decorator, on 12th January 1934. His effects were valued at £140-1-3d.

According to probate records William Newman of 38 Nag’s Head Hill, St George, Bristol, died on 10th December 1935. Probate was granted at Bristol to Clifford Newman, decorator, Leonard Bailey commercial traveller and Henry Wilmott Wickham Atchley. The effects were valued at £13, 496. 6. 8d.

According to probate records Thirza Newman of Porthtowan, Nag’s Head Hill, St George, Bristol, widow, died on 2nd October 1948. Administration was granted at Bristol on 22nd November 1948 to Clifford Percy Newman, house property repairer. The effects were valued at £452.12.11d.

 

  1. EDWIN or EDWARD SMITH, Great II Uncle

Edwin was born on 11th April 1868 in Thornbury Registration District and was baptised at St Helen’s Church, Alveston, on 10th May 1868. He was aged three years and at home for the 1871 census and his name was given as Edwin.

He was living at Tower Hill Cottages with the family at the time of the 1881 census. He was then described as a thirteen-year-old, born in Alveston, a scholar, and his name is now given as ‘Edward’.

In the 1891 census return an Edward Smith was lodging with Aaron Stiles at 112 Mead Road, Bedminster East but his age was given as twenty-six-years and his place of birth was given as Thornbury.

On 31st January 1897 Edward Smith married Ada Evans at the Church of St Luke in Bedminster. He was described as a twenty-eight-year-old bachelor and Labourer of 37 Weare Street, Bedminster, (the home of Thomas Shute, a shopkeeper, according to Wright’s Directory). He was the son of Thomas Smith, a deceased Dealer. Ada was a twenty-seven-year-old spinster of the same address, the daughter of William Fowles Evans, a deceased foreman. Both bride and groom signed their names as did the witnesses William Newman and Rose Dagger.

Ada Evans was born on 20th August 1869 in Bedminster Registration District. Ada’s parents were William Farmer EVANS (Born 3 May 1827, Died 30 Jan 1891) and Amelia DIX (Born 23 Jan 1827, Died 30 Mar 1899).In 1871 we find her, aged two-years and born in Bedminster, at home with her parents William and Amelia. Her father was a forty-five-year-old Clerk and native of St Nicholas Parish in Worcester and her mother was forty-five and born in Bedminster. Their address was either Princes or Francis Street (sp?), Bedminster. By 1891 Ada, now twenty-one-years-old, was living at 88 Park Street, Bedminster, with her mother, a sixty-four-year-old Widow.

In the 1901 census Edward and Ada were living at 23 Windsor Terrace, Knowle, Bristol. He was described as a thirty-two-year-old flour mill warehouse foreman, a worker, born in Earthcott. His wife, Ada, was aged thirty-one-years and born in Bristol. Their children were Nellie M. Smith, aged three years and born in Bristol and Harry, aged two years and born in Bristol.

In the 1911 census return Edward Smith and his family were living in five rooms at 23 Windsor Terrace, Totterdown. He was described as forty-two-years-old, married for fourteen years with six children of whom one had already died. His occupation was given as formerly a warehouse foreman in a flour mill and his place of birth was given as Alveston. His wife Ada was forty-one-years and born in Bedminster. Children included Nellie Muriel aged thirteen and at school; Harry aged twelve who was described as at school but also a baker’s boy (worker); Hilda Blanche aged nine years; Leonard George aged six years and Ernest Albert aged five years. All the children were born in Bedminster.

So far I have been unable to locate the baptisms of their children in the obvious local Anglican parishes but Ada referred to Oxford Street Chapel in her will of 1946.

Edward attended Henry Terrett’s funeral in 1908 and also his sister, Ellen Jones’s funeral in 1930 and was still of Bristol.

Edward Smith died on 8th May 1941 but he is shown as the householder at 23 Windsor Terrace right up until 1947 according to Wright’s Directories. Ada Smith died on 7 Apr 1952.

Will of Ada Smith:

 

December 1946

My Will.  I wish all my loose money to be used to pay Dr’s expenses also Funeral expenses and 5£ to Oxford St Chapel the rest to be divided amongst my 4 Children also Bank money likewise. Ada Smith – Hilda, Leonard, Ernest, Nellie.

Julie Salter: ‘Edward had a terrible work accident. I don’t know the year but mum seems to think he was working for a company called ‘ Humphries Bobbets ‘ with premises on the Halfpenny bridge in Bristol. I don’t know what they made but apparently he was on the first floor trying to mend a belt in a belt shaft which went between the two floors. Somehow he fell through the shaft and was crippled as a result.’

  1. GEORGE SMITH, Great II Uncle also Brother-in-Law of William Edward Terrett

 

George Smith was born in about 1870 at Cromhall. He was baptised on 22nd March 1871 at Cromhall. In the 1871 census return he was described as one-year-old. In the 1881 census return he was at home with his father at Tower Hill, aged eleven years. He became a sailor and worked on the clipper ships probably from about 1882 until his marriage. He married Great Aunt Edith Jane Terrett at Kingswood Parish Church on 31st August 1910.

 

Dursley Gazette 3rd September 1910 (notes):

 

Interesting Wedding at Kingswood. On Wednesday last at the Parish Church, Kingswood, Miss Edith Jane Terrett, eldest daughter of the late Mr. Henry Terrett of Kingswood was united in matrimony to Mr. George Smith of Bristol and late of Sydney, New South Wales.

The wedding was of a quiet character… (description of dresses) . The bride was attended by one bridesmaid, her cousin Miss Alice Terrett of Wotton-under-Edge. Mr. Daniel Terrett of Wotton-under-Edge, the bride’s uncle gave her away. Mr. F. Winder of Bristol (friend of Groom) was the best man. The service was conducted by Rev. Chas R. Cottell.

The Reception followed at Rose Villa, residence of Mrs. W. Terrett, the bride’s aunt, with whom she had resided for some years. The honeymoon took place in Clevedon. Presents…

He retired from being a merchant sailor and was a farmer of Rose Villa, Kingswood. In the 1911 census he was listed as a forty-one-year-old retired seaman who had been married for less than a year and was living with his wife in eight rooms at Rose Villa, Kingswood. His place-of-birth was given as Cromhall. Edith Jane was aged thirty-five-years and born at Kingswood.

My mother remembers him rearing his pigs and cattle and having an array of exotic furnishings and curiosities from foreign parts. He died on 21st December 1948 aged seventy-five-years.

Edith died on 8th October 1950 and was buried at Kingswood on 11th October.

Donald Emes wrote in 1983:

 

‘Of course I knew George Terrett (sic) (should be Smith) and his wife. I can see her now passing our house at Kingswood taking flowers to the grave of their only child who died aged seven years.’

  1. JOSHUA or JOSIAH SMITH, Great II Uncle

Joshua Smith was born on 4th November 1871 at Cromhall. The birth certificate records his father as a beer house keeper of Cromhall. He was baptised on 29th May 1872 at Cromhall. His name appeared as Josiah in the 1881 census. He was at home, aged nine years, and born at Cromhall at the time of the 1881 census. Uncle George Terrett said that he served in the Boer War and later lived in Bristol.

On 17th December 1898 Josiah Smith married Hester Sheppard at the Church of the Holy Nativity in Knowle, Bristol. He was described as a twenty-seven-year-old bachelor and ‘Keymaker’ (indecipherable?), the son of Thomas Smith, a Labourer. Hester was a twenty-six-year-old Spinster, the daughter of John Sheppard, a Packer. They were both living at 13 Highgrove Street at the time of the wedding and the witnesses were the bride’s brother and sister Henry Charles and Rosa Elizabeth Sheppard. Rosa was later to marry Josiah’s brother Harry in 1903.

In 1881 the Sheppard Family were living at 32 Highgrove Street, Totterdown. John was a thirty-seven-year-old Glass – Labourer at a Bottle Works and born at Whitchurch. His wife Selina was aged forty-three-years and a native of Chewton, Keynsham. Their children were Henry, a fourteen-year-old scholar born in Whitchurch; Rosa, an eleven-year-old scholar born in Bristol and Hester aged eight years, a scholar and born in Bristol. Ten years later the Sheppards were at 13 Highgrove Street. By then John was a forty-eight-year-old General Labourer; Selina was aged fifty years; and with them were Henry C. and Hester. He was aged twenty and she was aged eighteen years and born in Totterdown.

At the time of the 1901 census Josiah and Hester were living at 13 Highgrove Street, Totterdown, with her parents. John Sheppard was a fifty-seven-year-old Packer in a Glass Works born at Whitchurch; Selena was a sixty-four-year-old born in Chewton, Keynsham; Josiah was a twenty-nine-year-old Packer at a Glass Works, born in Cromhall and Hester was twenty-eight-years-old and born in Bristol.

Three of their children were baptised at Holy Nativity, Knowle, between 1901 and 1906. The eldest, Albert Edward, was baptised on 19th April 1901 and was described as the child of Josiah Smith, a Packer, and Esther, his wife, of 13 Highgrove Street. By 1903 Josiah was a Packer and living with the family at 12 Park Terrace, Windmill Hill. In 1906 they were living at 12 Somerset Terrace, Windmill Hill and Josiah was described as a (word indecipherable) Maker. From 1911 until 1944 Josiah was living at 3 Somerset Terrace, Windmill Hill, but had gone by 1947 (Wright’s Directories). In 1926 Josiah was described as an Iron Worker.

In 1911 the family was at 3 Somerset Terrace, Windmill hill living in five rooms. Josiah was a thirty-nine-year-old Iron Maker in a paint factory, a worker, born at Cromhall. His wife Hester was aged thirty-eight-years and had been married for twelve years and had three children. She was born in Totterdown. Their children included Albert Edward Smith aged nine years and born at Totterdown; Phyllis Mary Smith aged seven years and born at Bedminster and Glenville George Smith who was aged four and born at Bedminster. Lodging with them was Alfred White a general labourer born in Jersey.

Josiah attended Henry Terrett’s funeral in 1908 and he and his wife attended Ellen Jones’s funeral in 1930. They were described as of Bristol. There was a wreath from ‘Josh, Hetty and Family’.

During 1961 an eighty-nine-year-old Joshua Smith died in Bristol Registration District.

 

  1. HARRY SMITH, Great II Uncle

 

Harry was born in about 1873 at Cromhall. He was baptised at Cromhall on 29th June 1873. He was described as a seven-year-old scholar and born in Cromhall in the 1881 Census.

In 1891 we find a Henry Smith lodging at 18 Highgrove Street with Catherine Brown, a Widow, and Sarah Comnell (sp?), aged thirty-two-years. , All three were listed as born in Cromhall. Henry Smith was described as an eighteen-year-old lodger and bottle washer. Also living with them was William Desmond, a twenty-two-year-old Cattle Drover from Cork.

Henry’s sister Sarah Ann was living with the Browns in 1881 at 9 Highgrove Street, Totterdown. Her hosts then were the Charles and Catharine Brown. He was a forty-one-year-old house painter born in Cirencester and she was a forty-four-year-old born in Cromhall. Back in 1871 Charles and Catherine Brown were living at Mead Lane, Redcliffe.

On 25th June 1903 Harry Smith married Rosa Elizabeth Sheppard at the Church of Holy Nativity, Knowle. He was described as a thirty-year-old Bachelor and Baker of 13 Highgrove Street and the son of Thomas Smith, a labourer. The bride was aged thirty-three-years, a Spinster, of the same address, and daughter of John Sheppard, a Packer. The witnesses were the bride’s brother H.C. Sheppard and the bridegroom’s brother J. Smith.

In 1881 the Sheppard Family was living at 32 Highgrove Street, Totterdown. John was a thirty-seven-year-old Glass – Labourer at a Bottle Works and born at Whitchurch. His wife Selina was aged forty-three-years and a native of Chewton, Keynsham. Their children were Henry, a fourteen-year-old scholar born in Whitchurch; Rosa, an eleven-year-old scholar born in Bristol and Hester aged eight years, a scholar and born in Bristol. Ten years later the Sheppards were at 13 Highgrove Street. By then John was a forty-eight-year-old General Labourer; Selina was aged fifty years; and with them were Henry C. and Hester. He was aged twenty and she was aged eighteen years and born in Totterdown.

In 1898 Hester Sheppard married Josiah Smith and they were living at 13 Highgrove Street until at least 1901. This meant that Henry and Josiah had married sisters.

Between 1906 and 1912 three baptisms took place at Holy Nativity, Knowle of children of Harry and Rosa. In the entries in the register for all three Henry was working as a Baker and living with his family at 13 Highgrove Street, Totterdown.

Harry attended Henry Terrett’s funeral in 1908 and also that of his sister, Ellen Jones, in 1930. There was a wreath at Ellen Jones’s funeral from ‘Harry, Rose and Family’.

In 1911 John Sheppard aged sixty-eight-years was living at 13 Highgrove Street. He was described as a packer born at Whitchurch, Somerset. In the same house lived Harry Smith aged thirty-seven-years, a baker’s deliverer and worker born at Cromhall. His wife Rose Elizabeth Smith was aged forty-one-years, married eight years with three children and born at Totterdown. Their children included Reginald Herbert aged seven, Frederick Charles aged four and Leonard George aged two years. All the children were born in Totterdown. The family lived in six rooms.

Before 1915 the householder of 13 Highgrove Street was Harry’s father-in-law, John Shepherd but from 1915 until 1931 Harry was the householder according to Wright’s Directories. From 1932 until 1947 it was his wife, Mrs Rosa Eliz. Smith. Harry Smith probably died in 1931 and was referred to as deceased – Baker’s Assistant at the time of his daughter’s wedding in 1937.

The death of a Harry Smith, aged fifty-seven-years, is recorded in the index for Bristol Registration district for 1931.

From 1950 until 1953 we find Stanley Harry Smith but he had gone by 1956 and in 1964 was at 10 Gatehouse Close, Withywood. Whether he was a relative is uncertain.


 

 

  1. ELLEN JONES, Great Grandmother of Richard Barton

 

Daughter of Thomas Smith and Sarah (nee Woodward)

Wife of Henry Terrett

Mother of William Edward Terrett

 

Also Mother of Frederick Henry, Edward Frank, Lucy Ethel Terrett, Alice Maud Herrick, Florence Emily Milner and Sidney George

 

Also Wife of Thomas Fitzherbert Jones

 

Ellen Smith was born on 13th October 1862 at Earthcott, Alveston and baptised on 16th November 1862 at St Helen’s Church, Alveston. Her parents were described in the church register as Thomas Smith, a labourer of Alveston, and his wife Sarah. She was actually their fifth child and second daughter and her father was variously described as an agricultural labourer, pig dealer and horse dealer.

By 1871 the family was living at Weir Bridge, Cromhall and her father was described in the census return as a beer shop keeper and dealer.

Bristol Mercury 2nd July 1870

 

Highway Robbery by a boy – an incorrigible boy named Greenman, whose friends live at Crossways, near Thornbury, on Friday met two little girls aged 8 and 11 respectively the daughters of Mr. Thomas Smith of Cromhall, going toward Thornbury and immediately pounced on them, threw down the eldest child and rifled her pockets, taking there from in money 4s 6d. The young culprit, who is only 12 or 13 years of age, a short time since lived for several days in Prest Wood, a large covert belonging to Earl Ducie, and for food caught very young rabbits, skinned and cooked them. He is now in the custody of the Thornbury police, who will at the earnest request of the young vagabond’s friends ask the magistrate to send him to a reformatory school.

Ellen would have been eighteen-years-old when her mother, Sarah Smith, died on 16th December 1880 at Tytherington. She was fifty-years-old and described on her death certificate as the wife of Thomas Smith, a pig dealer.

By the time of the 1881 census her father was working as an agricultural labourer and living at Tower Hill Cottages, Tytherington. This same census reveals that his daughter, Ellen, was employed as a General Domestic Servant in the home of Henry Terrett after his wife Clara died. Ellen was a first cousin of the wife of Daniel Terrett, Henry’s brother, so the families were connected from as early as their marriage in 1870.

On 12th September 1881 Ellen married Henry Terrett, her former employer, at the Parish Church of St Barnabas in the City of Bristol. He was then thirty-one-years-old and she was ten years younger than him. Their address was given on the marriage certificate as 17 Denbigh Street, Bristol. The witnesses were Alfred and Sarah Smith, presumably her brother and sister.

Henry and Ellen Terrett were to have seven children between 1882 and 1902. Their second son, Edward Frank Terrett, was buried at Kingswood on 25th October 1887, aged two years and six months.

In the 1891 census Henry was a Publican and Millwright of the Star Inn, Kingswood. He was aged forty-years. His wife, Ellen, was aged twenty-eight-years and born at Earthcott. Their children were Edith aged fifteen; Annie aged eleven; Frederick aged nine; Ethel aged three years and Alice M. aged seven months.

In the 1901 census Henry Terrett was described as a Millwright and Innkeeper of the Chipping, Kingswood. He was shown on the return as a fifty-one-year-old employer, born in Kingswood. His wife, Ellen, was aged thirty-eight-years, she ran the pub and was born at Earthcott. His children were Annie, aged twenty-one-years; Ethel aged thirteen; Maud aged ten; Florence aged seven and William aged three years. All of them were born at Kingswood.

Henry Terrett died on 27th October 1908. Mr E.J.H. Smith and Mr W. Newman of Bristol (brothers-in-law) attended the funeral. Perhaps I misread this and it should be Messrs. E.J. and H. Smith!)

After Henry Terrett’s death his widow, Ellen Terrett, continued at The Star, Kingswood, and in the directories for 1911 and 1914 she was listed as a Beer Retailer. In September 1909 Ellen’s daughter, Lucy Terrett, married her cousin Albert Terrett and in August of the following year Ellen’s own brother, George Smith, married her step-daughter, Edith Terrett.

In 1911Ellen Terrett was living at the Star Inn, Kingswood. She was described as a forty-eight-year-old widow who was married for 24 years living in eleven rooms. She revealed that she was the mother of seven children, six of whom were still living. She was herself the landlady of a public house working at home but did not know where she was born believing it to be somewhere towards Bristol. Living with her were her daughter Maud Alice Herrick aged twenty and who had been married for less than a year. She was born in Kingswood. Her daughter Florence Emily was seventeen-years-old, a draper’s assistant and born in Kingswood. Her son William Edward was aged thirteen years, a printer’s apprentice at Letter Press and born at Kingswood. Also living with her was her son George Sidney, aged nine years and born at Kingswood. Also Elliott Alfred Herrick, her son-in-law, aged twenty-one-years, a Printer of Letter Press working on his own account and born in Wotton-under-Edge.

Extract from the Sale Papers of Terrett Bros in 1920:

‘And whereas the said Ellen Terrett and Frederick Henry Terrett executors to the division… in the said will of the said Henry Terrett to the said Edith Jane Terrett and the said F. H. Terrett as…executor of the said will doth hereby acknowledge’

On 16th August 1913 Ellen Terrett married Thomas Humphrey Fitzherbert Jones at Bedminster Parish Church, Bristol. He was described on the marriage certificate as a thirty-nine-year-old bachelor, a Dealer of 16 Hebron Road. His father was given as Thomas Humphrey Fitzherbert Jones, a Postman. Ellen was a forty-nine-year-old widow of the same address, daughter of Thomas Smith, deceased, a Dealer. The witnesses were Thomas Baylis Leach and his wife Alice Caroline Leach (nee Ward) of 16 Hebron Road. There seems to be no connection with either the bride or groom. Thomas Baylis Leach was in 1911 a fifty-five-year-old Railway Clerk born at King’s Stanley and living in six rooms.

After their marriage the couple settled at The Star at Kingswood.

Gloucester Journal, 14th February 1914

District Brewster Sessions – Wotton-under-Edge. License of the Star Inn, Kingswood, to Mr. Thomas Jones, he having married Mrs. Terrett, the present licensee.

Thomas Fitzherbert Jones was born in about 1874 at Berkeley. In the 1881 census he was at home with his parents Thomas and Julia Jones at Stones Cottages, Wotton Road, Kingswood. His father was described as a thirty-three-year-old baker, born in Luckington, Wiltshire. Julia was a thirty-four-year-old woman born in King Stanley. Their children were Alice aged eleven, a scholar, born in Bristol; Thomas, a scholar, aged seven and born at Berkeley; Hounds (sic) aged nine, a scholar, born in Bristol; Lucy aged five, a scholar, born in Kingswood and Kate aged fourteen months and born in Kingswood.

Ten years later in 1891 Thomas H.F. Jones was a baker of Charfield Road, Kingswood. His wife, Julia, was with him and six of their children. These included Fownes F. Jones, a clerk in an elastic factory; Thomas, a braid worker; Lucy, Kate, John and Mabel. The four younger children were all born in Kingswood.

In 1901 Thomas F. Jones was a fifty-three-year-old baker of Hillesley Road, Kingswood. His wife Julia was fifty-four and their children at home included Thomas F. Jones, a twenty-seven-year-old elastic web maker, born in Berkeley; John F. Jones an eighteen year-old elastic web maker and Mabel F. Jones a fifteen-year-old assistant teacher at the school.

Ellen Jones died on 16th September 1930 and was buried on 20th September at Kingswood.

On the death certificate Ellen was described as having died at The Chipping, Kingswood, aged sixty-eight-years. She was the wife of Thomas Humphrey Fitzherbert Jones an elastic braider. The cause of death was given as Uraemia and Chronic Interstitial Nephritis. No post mortem took place and the death was certified by Charles Davies M.R.C.S.. Ellen Meek, Registrar, registered the death on 17th September 1930 and the informant was A.M. Herrick, her daughter, of The Chipping, Wotton-under-Edge, who was present at the death.

Dursley Gazette 20th September 1930:

 

A loss to Kingswood – Kingswood has to mourn the loss of Mrs. T.H.F. Jones whose death occurred at the Star Inn on Tuesday after an illness of about 6 weeks duration. Mrs. Jones has lived in Kingswood for the past 50 years and was held in high respect and esteem by all. The funeral has been fixed for this afternoon.

Dursley Gazette 27th September 1930:

 

Largely attended Kingswood Funeral. The Late Mrs. T.H.F. Jones

There was a large attendance at the funeral at Kingswood Church on Saturday of Mrs. Jones, wife of Mr. Thomas H.F. Jones of whose death at the age of 63 years was recorded in last week’s Gazette. Rev. P.R. Ormsby (Rector) officiated.

Principal Mourners: Mr. T.H.F. Jones (widower); Messrs. Fred; William and George Terrett (sons);

Mrs. G. Smith, Mrs G. Werrett of Warmley, Mrs A. Terrett of Bath, Mrs E. Herrick of Wotton-under-Edge and Mrs. G. Milner of Meare (daughters); Messrs G. Werrett and E. Herrick (sons-in-law); Messrs. G. Smith, Edward Smith of Bristol, Alfred Smith of Gloucester and Josiah Smith of Bristol (brothers); Mrs. William Newman of Bristol (sister); Mr William Newman, Mr Fownes Jones and Mr. Jack Jones (brothers-in-law) and Mrs Josiah Smith (sister-in-law); Messrs. Dan Terrett and Edward Terrett (nephews); Mr Jim Terrett (grandson) and Sid Terrett, Stanley Jones and Lawrie Jones (nephews) …

Wreaths: Husband Tom; Her beloved children; Elly and children (Wotton); Lilly, Gracie and Family; Dan, Emily and Family; Ted, Lill and Family; Josh, Hetty and Family; Harry, Rose and Family; Uncle Tom and Aunty Alice; Fownes, Eva and Family; Will, Walt and Lottie (Mountain Ash); Mr and Mrs Hedley Mogg; Hilda, Denis and Hubert (Derby); Mrs Cornock and Family (Hawkesbury Upton); H. Bennett and Mr. And Mrs. Pockett; Mrs Evans; Mr and Mrs Neil and Family; Mabel and Walter; Mr and Mrs M. Always; S. Always and M. Lewis; Mr and Mrs H. Pearce; Mr and Mrs H. Organ; and a few friends. Committee and Members of Kingswood Branch of the Women’s Unionist Conservative Association.

On 29th December 1941 Thomas Fitzherbert-Jones married a widow, Eva Matilda Blick, of 28 Lower Street, Stroud, at Holy Trinity Church, Stroud. She was the daughter of Alfred Davis, a cloth worker. Thomas Fitzherbert-Jones died on 9th June 1951 aged seventy-seven-years and was buried on 14th June 1951 at Kingswood. His widow, Eva, died on 17th June 1959, aged eighty-one-years, at Uplands, Stroud.


See Thomas Smith, Carpenter of Bristol


FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS FAMILY CONTACT: btsarnia@gmail.com

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on June 3, 2016 by in Smith and tagged , , , , , , , , , , .
%d bloggers like this: