btsarnia

A tribute to the life and work of Brian Torode

Barton Family of Slimbridge

The Barton Family of the Vale of Berkeley

Blacksmiths and Farmers of Slimbridge 


Robert Barton (1604(?)-1663) and Susannah Holway (-1684)

Yeoman of Thornbury

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John Barton I (1636-1687) and Mary Thurston (1645-1691)

 Yeoman of Thornbury

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 John Barton II (1672-1727) and Sarah Winstone (1679/80-1745)

Butcher of Thornbury

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Thomas Barton (1714-1774) and Sarah Giles (Fosket) (-1788)

Butcher of Thornbury

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Richard Barton (1741-1801) and Hannah Watts (1757c-1820)

Farmer of North Nibley

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 William Barton I (1784-1842) and Mary Dommett (1789-1870)

Farmer and Butcher of Churchstanton, Woodford, Easton-in-Gordano

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John Barton III (1818-1878) and Sarah Perrott (1820c-1909)

Blacksmith of Cambridge and Slimbridge

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William Barton II (1854-1936) and Ellen Pick (1857-1930)

Blacksmith of Slimbridge

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Edward Percy Barton (1891-1977) and Florence Noad (1891-1968)

Blacksmith of Slimbridge and Farmer of Cambridge

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MARY BARTON, Great III Grandmother of Richard Barton

Daughter of William Dommett and Mary (nee Trood)

Wife of William Barton I

Mother of John Barton III

Also Mother of William, Elizabeth, George, Elizabeth, Eliza, Henry and Richard

Mary Dommett, was born in about 1788 (death certificate). She was almost certainly the daughter of William and Mary Dommett and if so was baptised on 19th July 1789 at Churchstanton. Baptism Book 2, Entry 874: ‘Mary Dommett daughter of William and Mary’.

William and Mary Dommett also had a son, Robert Dommett, who was born in July 1790 and later became a Yeoman of Willand, Churchstanton. Both William and his son, Robert Dommett, died in 1847.

(Another Mary was baptised at Churchstanton on 30th August 1789. Baptism Book 2, Entry 876: Mary Bowerman, bastard daughter of Joan Domatt. A Mary Bowerman married Richard Wyatt on 13th February 1810 (banns 21stJanuary) at Upottery.)

On 12th November 1811 Mary Dommett, married William Barton, by now a twenty-six-year-old farmer at Churchstanton, Devon (now Somerset). The Rector, Buckland Bluet married the couple by licence and both of them signed their names and were described as of the parish. One of the witnesses was a Robert Dommett but this may not be significant as Robert Dommett and Joan Dommett witnessed other Churchstanton weddings at this time.

The couple had at least seven children between about 1812 and 1831. By 1818 her husband was a farmer and later a butcher of Woodford, Berkeley, but there is no further reference to Mary (except for her death) or her family in Gloucestershire after the burial at North Nibley of her son, Richard, on 16th December 1835, aged four years.

In the 1841 census return Mary was living with her husband and son, Henry, at Easton-in-Gordano. She was described as fifty-years-old. During the following year she is mentioned in relation to her husband’s tragic death.

In the 1851 census return we find a Mary Barton, a widow and servant, living at Blindmore, Buckland St Mary, Somerset. She was described as fifty-eight-years-old and born in Church Stanton, Devon. Her employer was Samuel Pym, aged thirty-eight-years, who was farming sixty-eight acres.

In 1861 Mary was still at Buckland St Mary. She was described as a sixty-three-year-old housekeeper to Samuel Pym who farmed fifty acres at North Blindmore. His age was given as forty-four-years-old. By 1871 Samuel Pym had married Lucy. By then Mary had left the farm and returned to Gloucestershire. Samuel was described in the 1871 census return as a fifty-four-year-old farmer of Little Blindmore with sixty acres, and his wife was shown as two years older and born at Pitminster.

Mary Barton died, aged eighty-two-years, on 16th September 1870 at Slimbridge. The death certificate described her as the eighty-two-year-old Widow of William Barton, Butcher. The cause of death was given as ‘Gangrena Senilis and this was certified. George Leonard, Registrar, registered the death on 19th September and the informant was (her daughter-in-law), Sarah Barton of Slimbridge, who was present at the time of the death.


JOHN BARTON III, Great II Grandfather of Richard Barton

Son of William Barton I and Mary nee Dommett

Husband of Sarah Perrett

Father of William Barton II

 Also Father of Mary Woodward, George Perrett, Henry, Elizabeth Perrett Cookley, Eliza Powell, Louisa Merrett, Fanny Drinkwater, David, John and Henry

Throughout his life John Barton stated that he was a native of Morton, Thornbury, that he was born some time between 1815 and 1817 and that he was the son of William Barton.

He was baptised on 14th January 1818 at Berkeley Parish Church and was described in the register as the son of William Barton, a Farmer of Woodford, Berkeley, and his wife Mary.

His mother Mary Dommett was a native of Churchstanton on the Devon/Somerset border and she had married William Barton in 1811. Their eldest child William was baptised there in 1812; Elizabeth was baptised in1813 (and buried six weeks later) and George was baptised in 1815. William and Mary Barton moved back to Gloucestershire some time between 1815 and 1817 perhaps a year or so before John was born.

His uncle, Henry Barton, a farmer of North Nibley, made his will on 8th January 1819 and in which we find the following reference -‘Upon Trust for my nephews namely…John and George sons of my Brother William Barton…’

Further baptisms of children of William and Mary followed at Berkeley – Elizabeth in 1820 and Eliza in 1821. This time William, their father, was described as a Butcher of Woodford.

It is possible that the family moved to Wickwar for a time but by 1829 they were living in North Nibley (possibly Wick) where William pursued the trade of Butcher. In that year Henry was baptised and then in 1835 Richard was baptised and buried at the age of four years. By 1841 John’s parents had moved to Easton-in-Gordano in Somerset.

During the year 1839 John would have received a substantial legacy from his Uncle Henry’s estate having reached the age of twenty-one-years.

The 1841 Census for North Nibley lists John Barton as a Labourer for John Gabb, Nailsmith of Pitcourt, North Nibley. His age is given as twenty-three-years. Ten years later, In the 1851 census, John Gabb was described as a Master Blacksmith of North Nibley, aged fifty-one-years. His wife Ann was born at Stone and was the same age as her husband. Their children were John, aged twenty-one, a journeyman blacksmith; Thomas an eighteen-year-old blacksmith; Samuel a sixteen-year-old agricultural labourer; George aged fourteen; Ann aged eleven and Charlotte, aged eight.

Apprenticeship Roll for North Nibley:

11/11/1824 for 7 years, William Pick, son of John Pick, to John Gabb of North Nibley, blacksmith

On 22nd April 1842 John Barton, a blacksmith of North Nibley, married Sarah Perrett at St Martin’s Church, North Nibley. She was recorded as the daughter of William Perrett and John was recorded as the son of William Barton, a labourer. Both were of North Nibley and were of full age. Neither the bride nor groom could sign their names. The witnesses were Adam Perrett and Henry Organ. Adam was the bride’s eldest brother. On 26th April John’s father was found drowned in the River Avon having been missing since 25th February.

John and Sarah had eleven children in total of whom eight survived into adulthood.  Their eldest children Mary (1842-1902), George Perrett (1844-1851) and Henry (1845-1846) were all baptised at North Nibley. In about 1847 the family moved to Cambridge in the parish of Slimbridge. Their daughter Elizabeth Perrett was baptised at Slimbridge Parish Church on 23rd January 1848.

In 1841 the blacksmith in Cambridge was Charles Mabbett (1803-1892). Ten years later he had moved to Cam and the return reveals that his children were born at Cambridge between the years 1831 and 1845 which would confirm the proposition that he was succeeded by John Barton. The year before Charles Mabbett died he was still living in Cam and referred to as ‘Retired Blacksmith’.

The move to Cambridge may have been influenced by the deaths of four members of Sarah’s family during the year 1847. Sarah’s brother, Jacob, was buried, aged seventeen years, on 26th January and he was followed to the grave by their grandmother on 4th February and then both of their parents. On 10th April her father died at Break Hart Hill, North Nibley, and the cause of death was given on his death certificate as Consumption. and finally her mother, Rebecca, ‘who drowned herself in the tub being of unsound mind’ on the night of the 11th to 12th December.

Interestingly the leading figure in Cambridge was Samuel Hadley, timber merchant and farmer of Cambridge Mills, and he was himself born in North Nibley and a noted Methodist. In 1863 he built the Cambridge Wesleyan School for pupils of all ages. This comprised one room and was staffed by one qualified teacher, Alfred Gibson, and opened with 25 pupils on April 16th (or 13th April check!). John Barton’s eldest son, William Barton, joined the School from the May of that year. He was the thirtieth child to be admitted to the school and he stayed there until January 23rd 1865.

Apprenticeship Roll for North Nibley:

1/4/1847 for 7 years, Joseph Mason, nephew of Robert Mason, to John Barton, of Cambridge, Slimbridge, blacksmith

The Parish Rate Book for Slimbridge, dated 18th April 1849, lists John Barton as the occupier of a house, garden and shop at Cambridge, belonging to W.C. Grafton. William Chandler Grafton was a landed Proprietor of Cheltenham. In 1841 he was living at Oxyntal (sp?) House situated between Blenheim Terrace and Sussex Villas but from 1851 his address was given as 7 Pittville Villas and shown as born in the City of Gloucester in about 1800.

The Smithy was situated between the White Horse Inn and the Bell Inn near to the home of Samuel Hadley (opposite). In 1861 we know that the Smithy was situated at Wellington Cottage, situated between the Bell Inn and Waterloo Cottage and in the 1861 Valuation Noah Smith occupied a house and garden together with the blacksmith’s shop owned by John Leonard. Other houses in the same terrace were built in 1857 (‘1857 J+L’ (John Leonard?)) but although of a similar style they are of a later date and not constructed out of the same hand-made bricks. It is likely that Charles Mabbett, John Barton and Noah Smith all occupied the same premises. Noah Smith was blacksmith in the census returns up to 1891 when he is listed as occupying Nelson Cottage. In 1901 Rowland and Arthur Workman were the blacksmiths of Cambridge.

In the 1851 census return we find John Barton working as a smith at Cambridge. He was aged thirty-five-years and was born at Morton. His wife, Sarah, was aged thirty-years and born at North Nibley. Their children were Mary aged eight years and born at North Nibley; Elizabeth aged three years and born at Cambridge and Eliza aged one year and born at Cambridge. John Gazard was a two-year-old visitor and born in Cambridge. He may have been a child of Sarah’s elder sister, Esther and her husband George Gazard of North Nibley. Joseph Mason was his eighteen-year-old apprentice born in North Nibley.

Probably the Barton Family moved from the Forge at Cambridge to the Forge at Churchend, Slimbridge in about 1852 following the death of the previous blacksmith, Charles Burley (1784-1852). Charles Burley was the son of Thomas Burley, blacksmith of Newport and himself a native of Slimbridge.

Charles Burley snr married Elizabeth Manning in Slimbridge in 1809. In that same year he mortgaged the property at Churchend  to Daniel Long and it was then described as a dwelling place or tenement at Churchend formerly in the tenure of John Pearce then since of Joseph Pearce and then of Alice Pearce his widow, adjoining a dwelling place or tenement late in the occupation of Miles Pearce, together with the penthouse room over the workshop garden and orchard. Charles Burley seems to have remained in the property even though he had mortgaged it for £200.

Both the 1841 and 1851 census returns find Charles Burley at the Forge and working as the blacksmith. His age was given as fifty and he was assisted at the Forge by his sons Charles (1811c-1872) and Edward (1825c-1870). In 1861 Charles Burley jnr. was a blacksmith of Cambridge but by 1871 he was working for Thomas King, blacksmith of Canonbury Street, Berkeley. His brother, Edward Burley was in 1861 listed as the servant to a beer retailer of Purton Road, Hinton.

The move from Cambridge to Churchend is further confirmed by the 1861 Valuation for the parish, which describes John Barton as the occupier of a house, blacksmith’s shop (588), garden (589) and orchard (590) at Church End, belonging to Samuel Martin.

This Samuel Martin was the husband of Sarah Long who in turn was the grand-daughter of Daniel Long who had acquired the property in 1809. Daniel made a will in 1821 and he referred to her as one of the seven daughters of his son John Long.

In 1851 Samuel Martin the elder was farming 168 acres at Bullerwell Farm, Haresfield, next to the Vicarage. He was then fifty-one-years-old, married to Cambridge-born Sarah (nee Long) and he was the father of Samuel Martin the younger their twenty-one-year-old son. Thirty years later, in 1881, the Martins were still farming at Lower Green Farm, Haresfield. The census return for 1891 lists Samuel Martin the younger at Lynthorp, Barnwood Road, Gloucester and described him as a Retired Farmer. With him was his ninety-one-year-old widowed mother Sarah, his second wife Augusta and daughters Celia and Hester. The Martin Family owned the Forge at Slimbridge until they sold the property to the Bartons in 1897, the year following the death of Samuel Martin the younger. Samuel Martin the younger is buried with both of his wives in the churchyard at Haresfield.

John Barton, Blacksmith of Slimbridge, had witnessed the will of Thomas Bailey on 2nd April 1860.

In the 1861 Census John and Sarah were living at Churchend with six of their children. He was described as a forty-six-year-old blacksmith, born in Moreton (sic) and Sarah was aged forty-three-years and born in North Nibley. Their children were Elizabeth aged thirteen; Alice (Eliza) aged eleven years; Lucy (Louisa) aged nine years; William aged seven years; Fanny aged four years and David aged two years.

Their youngest sons, John and Henry, were twins and they were born on 27th November 1861. Henry survived but John was baptised on the same day and was buried on 28th having lived only thirty-four hours.

On 10th May 1866 his eldest daughter, Mary, married Joseph Alfred Woodward at the Church of St John the Evangelist, Slimbridge and her father was to live to see three more of his daughters married two of them in Slimbridge.

On 16th September 1870 Mary Barton, the widow of William Barton, butcher, died in Slimbridge aged eighty-two-years. The informant of her death was Sarah Barton, presumably her daughter-in-law. Mary Barton had worked for some years as a housekeeper in Buckland St Mary, Somerset and had probably come to live in Slimbridge with her son John at the end of her life.

In the 1871 census John Barton was again living with his wife and four of their children at Churchend, Slimbridge. He was described as a blacksmith, fifty-six-years-old, and born at Morton and Sarah was aged fifty-four-years and born in North Nibley. Their children at home were Louisa aged nineteen, William, a blacksmith’s assistant, aged sixteen years, David aged twelve years, a scholar and Henry aged nine years. The children were born in Slimbridge. There were only two houses between the Forge and the home of the Noad Family.

In 1871 two of the girls were staying with Henry Perrett of Wotton-under-Edge. He was a first cousin of Sarah and was living at Nibley Road or Bournstream where they ran the brewery. Eliza Barton, aged twenty-two-years was working as a general domestic servant and Fanny aged fourteen was working as a nurse.

From as early as 1871 his eldest surviving son William was working with his father in the Forge. William Barton married Ellen Pick on 1st May 1877 at Slimbridge. On the certificate William was described as a blacksmith, the son of John Barton, blacksmith. Both of the surviving younger sons, David and Henry, trained as blacksmiths too.

John Barton died at Slimbridge on 4th February 1878 at Slimbridge. He was described as a sixty-year-old Blacksmith. The cause of death was given as ‘Stricture  – Retention of Urine’ and this was certified by D. Dutton M.R.C.S.E. George Leonard, Registrar, registered the death on 8th February 1878 and the informant was Sarah Barton, Widow of Slimbridge, who made her mark, and was present at the death.

On 11th February 1878 John Barton was buried at Slimbridge.

The Trustees of the Will of Mr Samuel Martin to Mr William Barton Conveyance of a Messuage and premises at Slimbridge in Gloucestershire Dated 11th August 1897:

‘This Indenture made the Eleventh  day of August One thousand eight hundred and ninety seven Between George Cooper Chandler of Haresfield in Gloucestershire Farmer and Frederick Hawkins Bretherton of the City of Gloucester Solicitor (who are hereinafter called the Vendors) of the one part and William Barton of Slimbridge in Gloucestershire Blacksmith of the other part. Whereas by an Indenture dated the Seventeenth day of August One thousand eight hundred and seventy two and made between Edward Phillimore of the first part Sarah Martin of the second part and Samuel Martin of the third part the Messuage land and hereditaments hereinafter described were duly conveyed and assured unto and to the use of the said  Samuel Martin his executors administrators and assigns for the residue of a term of one thousand years. And whereas the said Samuel Martin duly made his last will on the Thirtieth day of April One thousand eight hundred and ninety whereby after making a devise not affecting the said hereditaments he gave all the rest of his real estate unto the Vendors upon trust as soon as conveniently could be after his decease to sell the same and apply the proceeds thereof as directed in the said will of which he appointed the vendors joint executors. And whereas the said Samuel Martin died on the First day of June last and his said will with a codicil thereto not affecting the said hereditaments was duly proved at Gloucester by the vendors and whereas by a deed poll dated the day before this indenture the vendors enlarged the said term of years into an estate in fee simple.


SARAH BARTON, Great II Grandmother of Richard Barton

Daughter of William Perrett and Rebecca nee Fisher

Wife of John Barton III

Mother of William Barton II

 Also Mother of Mary Woodward, George Perrett, Henry, Elizabeth Perrett Cookley, Eliza Sims (Powell), Louisa Merrett, Fanny Drinkwater, David, John and Henry

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Sarah Barton (nee Perrett) (1818-1909) together with her daughter, Fanny Drinkwater (1856-1937)

Sarah Barton (nee Perrett) (1818-1909), Great II Grandmother, together with her daughter, Fanny Drinkwater (1856-1937).

Sarah Perrett was born on 17th March 1818, the second daughter of William and Rebecca Perrett of North Nibley. In 1841 her father was a farmer of Break Hart Hill.

The family had lived for many generations in North Nibley and were engaged in the cloth industry. Sarah was baptised at Wotton-under-Edge Tabernacle on 11th June 1818 by the Rev Theophilus Jones.

Simon Herrick, ‘Rowley’ and ‘The Spot I love’: Rowland Hill and the Wotton Tabernacle,

 ‘In 1814 at the age of 70, Rowland Hill began to feel a little tired, so he engaged a young Welsh preacher, Theophilus Jones, to succeed him eventually at Wotton, but it was not to be for another nineteen years that Jones would have the chance to do so. When at last he did, the succession lasted only two weeks – by the cruellest of ironies the Welshman died of pneumonia contracted at Rowland Hill’s funeral in London.’

In the 1841 census she was working as a female servant in the home of Charles Cook Brown and his wife Rebecca at Dursley. He was an attorney’s clerk and they lived near to the junction of Prospect Place and Slade Lane, close to the school run by Richard Goodrich. She was described as twenty-years-old

John Barton, a blacksmith of North Nibley, married Sarah Perrett at St Martin’s Church, North Nibley on 22nd April 1842. She was recorded as the daughter of William Perrett, farmer, and John was recorded as the son of William Barton, a labourer. Both were of North Nibley and were of full age. Neither the bride nor groom could sign their names. The witnesses were Adam Perrett and Henry Organ. Adam was the bride’s eldest brother.

John and Sarah had eleven children in total of whom eight survived into adulthood.  Their eldest children Mary (1842-1902), George Perrett (1844-1851) and Henry (1845-1846) were all baptised at North Nibley. In about 1847 the family moved to Cambridge in the parish of Slimbridge. Their daughter Elizabeth Perrett was baptised at Slimbridge Parish Church on 23rd January 1848.

The move to Cambridge may have been influenced by the deaths of four members of Sarah’s family during the year 1847. Sarah’s brother, Jacob, was buried, aged seventeen years, on 26th January and he was followed to the grave by their grandmother on 4th February and then both of their parents. On 10th April her father died at Break Hart Hill, North Nibley, and the cause of death was given on his death certificate as Consumption. and finally her mother, Rebecca, ‘who drowned herself in the tub being of unsound mind’ on the night of the 11th to 12th December.

The Parish Rate Book for Slimbridge, dated 18th April 1849, lists John Barton as the occupier of a house, garden and shop at Cambridge, belonging to W.C. Grafton.

In the 1851 census return we find John Barton working as a smith at Cambridge. He was aged thirty-five-years and was born at Morton. His wife, Sarah, was aged thirty-years and born at North Nibley. Their children were Mary aged eight years and born at North Nibley; Elizabeth aged three years and born at Cambridge and Eliza aged one year and born at Cambridge. John Gazard was a two-year-old visitor and born in Cambridge. He may have been a child of Sarah’s elder sister, Esther and her husband George Gazard of North Nibley. Joseph Mason was his eighteen-year-old apprentice born in North Nibley.

In about 1852 the Barton Family had moved from the Forge at Cambridge to the Forge at Churchend, Slimbridge.

The move to Churchend is confirmed by the 1861 Valuation for the parish, which describes John Barton as the occupier of a house, blacksmith’s shop (588), garden (589) and orchard (590) at Church End, belonging to Samuel Martin.

In the 1861 Census John and Sarah were living at Churchend with six of their children. He was described as a forty-six-year-old blacksmith, born in Moreton and Sarah was aged forty-three-years and born in North Nibley. Their children were Elizabeth aged thirteen; Alice (Eliza) aged eleven years; Lucy (Louisa) aged nine years; William aged seven years; Fanny aged four years and David aged two years.

Their youngest sons, John and Henry, were twins and they were born on 27th November 1861. Henry survived but John was baptised on the same day and was buried on 28th having lived only thirty-four hours.

On 10th May 1866 her eldest daughter, Mary, married Joseph Alfred Woodward at the Church of St John the Evangelist, Slimbridge.

On 16th September 1870 Mary Barton, the widow of William Barton, butcher, died in Slimbridge aged eighty-two-years. The informant of her death was Sarah Barton, presumably her daughter-in-law. Mary Barton had worked for some years as a housekeeper in Buckland St Mary, Somerset and had probably come to live in Slimbridge with her son John at the end of her life.

In the 1871 census John Barton was again living with his wife and four of their children at Churchend, Slimbridge. He was described as a blacksmith, fifty-six-years-old, and born at Morton and Sarah was aged fifty-four-years and born in North Nibley. Their children at home were Louisa aged nineteen, William, a blacksmith’s assistant, aged sixteen years, David aged twelve years, a scholar and Henry aged nine years. The children were born in Slimbridge. There were only two houses between the Forge and the home of the Noad Family.

In 1871 two of the girls were staying with Henry Perrett of Wotton-under-Edge. He was a first cousin of Sarah and was living at Nibley Road or Bournstream where they ran the brewery. Eliza Barton, aged twenty-two-years was working as a general domestic servant and Fanny aged fourteen was working as a nurse.

From as early as 1871 their eldest surviving son William was working with his father in the Forge. William Barton married Ellen Pick on 1st May 1877 at Slimbridge. On the certificate William was described as a blacksmith, the son of John Barton, blacksmith. Both of the surviving younger sons, David and Henry, trained as blacksmiths too.

On 4th February 1878 John Barton died and was buried at Slimbridge, at the age of 60 years. After the death of her husband, John Barton, Sarah moved around her children.

At the time of the 1881 census she was living with her daughter Mary at Bush Street Farm, North Nibley. Her son-in-law, Joseph Woodward, farmed ninety acres. Joseph A. Woodward was described as thirty-nine-years-old and born in Stinchcombe and his wife, Mary, was aged thirty-eight-years and born in North Nibley. Their children were Frederick, Charles, Joseph, William, James, John and Fanny. Sarah Barton was described as mother-in-law, aged sixty-one-years and born in North Nibley.

Ten years in the 1891 Census Return she was living at Dauncey’s Farm, Halmore, with her daughter Louisa Merrett. Seymour was aged thirty-seven-years and born at Berkeley and his wife Louisa was aged thirty-nine-years and born at Slimbridge. George was aged twelve-years and born at Slimbridge; Margaret aged six years and born at Berkeley; Ada and Alice were both aged four years and Millicent aged eight months. Louisa’s mother, Sarah Barton, was described as seventy-two-years-old and born at North Nibley.

In the 1901 census her daughter, Eliza Powell was farming Clarke’s Farm, Hardwicke. Also in residence was eighty-two-year-old Sarah Barton, who was living on her own means and was born at Nibley. Also living with them were her grandsons Alfred John Sims an eighteen-year-old farmer, born in Slimbridge, and Arthur Elton Sims, a sixteen-year-old Apprentice Carpenter and Joiner, born in Slimbridge. Also staying with them, as visitors from Birmingham, were Ann and her husband George James Drinkwater. Ann was described as twenty-six-years-old and born in Slimbridge whilst George was thirty-three-years-old, born in Hardwicke and working as a Toolmaker at Kynocks Ammunition Works. Their two children were with them Ernest Tom and Albert Sims Drinkwater.

Sarah died on 24th March 1909 at Clarkes Farm (sic), Hardwicke, home of her daughter, Eliza Powell. On the death certificate Sarah Barton was described as aged ninety-one-years and the Widow of John Barton a Blacksmith. The cause of death was given as Senile Decay. Joseph Moore, Registrar, registered the death on 29th March and the informant, J. Etheridge of Clarkes Farm, Hardwicke, was present at the time of the death.

The Dursley Gazette for 27th March 1909:

 Barton – March 25th at Clark’s Farm, Hardwick, Sarah, widow of the late John Barton, aged 91 years. Funeral at Slimbridge Church at 2.30pm No flowers by request.

Sarah was buried at Slimbridge Parish Church.

Cheltenham Chronicle, 1st January 1910

Obituaries (during 1909) – Nonagenarians – Sarah Barton (91) Hardwicke


Their children were Great II Aunts and Uncles

 

  1. MARY WOODWARD, Great II Aunt of Richard Barton

 

Mary Barton was baptised on 23rd August 1842 at North Nibley, the eldest child of John and Sarah Barton. In the 1861 census she was working as a house maid for the Rev Sir George Prevost at Stinchcombe. She was described as an eighteen-year-old servant born in North Nibley. In the same household was an Edward Woodward who was a twenty-four-year-old footman born in Stinchcombe. On 10th May 1866 she married Joseph Alfred Woodward at the Church of St John the Evangelist, Slimbridge. Her husband was a gardener of Stinchcombe, son of George Woodward, a farmer.

George Woodward was in 1851 a farmer and native of Stinchcombe. He was aged fifty-eight-years and farmed fifteen-acres. His wife Sarah was born at Berkeley and described as a forty-seven-year-old farmer’s wife. Their children included George aged eighteen; Sarah aged fourteen; Arabella aged twelve; Joseph aged nine; Henry aged six and Jane aged two years. All were born in Stinchcombe. George and Sarah were at the time employed on the farm. Ten years later in 1861 Joseph, now nineteen, was at home with his family and was described as working as a general servant. At this time his father was farming twelve acres.

In the 1871 census Joseph Woodward was farming twelve acres with a boy at Purnells Farm, North Nibley. Joseph was aged twenty-nine-years and born in Stinchcombe and his wife Mary, a farmer’s wife, was aged twenty-eight-years and born in North Nibley. Their children were Frederick aged four years and born in Stinchcombe; Charles aged three years and born in Stinchcombe; Joseph aged one year and born in North Nibley and a month old infant born in North Nibley. In the same census his father George Woodward was farming at Standall Green, Stinchcombe. He was described as a sixty-nine-year-old widower and farmer of thirteen acres. With him was his son Henry Woodward, aged twenty-six-years, a farmer’s son and his daughter Harriet J. Woodward, aged twenty-two-years, a farmer’s daughter.

In 1881 the family was living at Bush Street Farm, North Nibley, where Joseph farmed ninety acres. Joseph A. Woodward was described as thirty-nine-years-old and born in Stinchcombe and his wife, Mary, was aged thirty-eight-years and born in North Nibley. Their children were Frederick, a farmer’s son, aged fourteen-years and born in Stinchcombe; Charles, aged thirteen-years, a scholar, born in North Nibley; Joseph  aged eleven years, a scholar, born in North Nibley; William aged ten years, a scholar, born in North Nibley; James aged nine years, a scholar, born in North Nibley; John aged seven years, a scholar, born in North Nibley; and Fanny aged five-years, a scholar, born in Huntingford. Living with them was Joseph Woodward’s mother-in-law, Sarah Barton, aged sixty-one-years and born in North Nibley.

In the same 1881 census Joseph’s father, George Woodward, was farming eighteen and a half acres at Standall Farm, Stinchcombe. He was described as seventy-nine-years-old. Living with him was his forty-four-year-old daughter Sarah Woodward who was occupied as his housekeeper and his son Henry Woodward who was thirty-five-years-old, single, farming fifty-eight-acres and employing a man and a boy. George Woodward died in the last quarter of 1882 aged eighty-one-years and his son Henry married Julia Pitcher Powell during the second quarter of 1883 in Dursley Registration District. Her parents George and Sarah Powell were farming Coldharbour Farm, Uley, in 1881.

In 1891 Joseph A. Woodward was farming at Rye Farm, Berrow in Worcestershire. He was described as forty-nine-years-old and born in Stinchcombe. Mary, his wife, was aged forty-eight-years and born in North Nibley. Frederick G. was aged twenty-three-years and born in Stinchcombe; Joseph aged twenty-one-years and born in North Nibley; William aged twenty years and born in North Nibley; James aged nineteen years and born in North Nibley; Fanny was aged fifteen years and born at Huntingford. Mary was aged nine years and born at North Nibley.

In 1901 the family was still at Rye Court Farm, Berrow. Joseph Woodward was now fifty-nine-years old and born at Stimchcombe and Mary was born at North Nibley. Joseph and his brothers were all described as farmer’s sons and born in North Nibley. They included Joseph aged thirty-one; William aged thirty; James aged twenty-nine; and John aged twenty-seven. Fanny was aged twenty-five-years and born in Huntingford and Mary aged nineteen and born in North Nibley.

In 1911 Joseph Alfred Woodward was aged sixty-nine-years and farming at Rye Court, Berrow, Ledbury. He was a widower and had had eight children of whom all were still living. His place of birth was given at Stinchcombe. Children at home were all single and they included Joseph aged forty-one and born in North Nibley; William aged forty and born in North Nibley; James aged thirty-nine and born in North Nibley; Fanny aged thirty-five and born at Huntingford and Mary aged twenty-nine and born at North Nibley. The sons were all working on the farm and the daughters were engaged in dairy work. The farm house had nine rooms.

Joseph Alfred Woodward was Churchwarden of Berrow. Mary died there on 18th July 1902 aged sixty-years and her husband died on 2nd April 1924 aged eighty-two-years. They are both buried at Berrow.

Amongst the personal papers of his nephew Frank Cookley, deposited in Gloucestershire Archives, we find the following obituary card:

‘In Loving Memory of Joseph Alfred Woodward of Rye Court, Berrow, who passed peacefully away, April 2nd, 1924, Aged 82 years. Interred in Berrow Churchyard April 7th. For ever with the Lord. Peace, perfect peace, with loved ones far away, In Jesus keeping we are safe and they.’


 

  1. GEORGE PERRETT BARTON, Infant Great II Uncle of Richard Barton

 

George Perrett was baptised on 23rd June 1844 at North Nibley and died during the last quarter of 1845 in Dursley Registration District.

 


  1. HENRY BARTON, Infant Great II Uncle of Richard Barton

 

The first child Henry was baptised on 15th March 1846 at North Nibley and was buried on 26th December 1846 aged thirteen months.


  1. ELIZABETH PERRETT COOKLEY, Great II Aunt of Richard Barton

 

Elizabeth Perrett Barton was baptised on 23rd January 1848, the second daughter of John and Sarah Barton. The 1891 census reveals that she was born at Cambridge.

In 1871 Elizabeth was working as a Cook at Langton House, Cheltenham. She was described as twenty-four-years-old and born at Cambridge, Glos. Her employer was George Skelton, a sixty-year-old Madras Civil Servant.

She married James Cookley a painter and decorator of Cheltenham. At the time of the 1871 census he was living with his mother at 15 Hereford Place, Cheltenham. James Cokeley (sic) was a painter born in Cheltenham. His mother, Margaret, was a sixty-year-old Charwoman from Ireland. His brother Dennis was a thirty-year-old Grocer’s Porter.

From November 1873 to 1876 they were living at Charlton Kings. In February 1878 they were at 6 St Paul’s Terrace, Cheltenham, in August 1879 at 17 Prince’s Street,

Cheltenham.

At the time of the 1881 census James and Elizabeth were living at The Theatre, Montpellier Street, Cheltenham James was described as a thirty-four-year-old House Decorator, born in Cheltenham. Elizabeth P. Cookley, his wife, was a thirty-two-year-old Box Office Keeper born at Cambridge, Glos. Their children were Frank E. aged seven, a scholar, born in Charlton Kings; Nora E. aged five years born in Earlhampstead, Berks, and Percy J. aged two years and born in Cheltenham.

Gloucestershire Echo Gloucestershire, England

25 Sep 1886

UNSUCCESSFUL OBJECTION. James Cookley, resident box-keeper at the Theatre, was objected to by the Conservatives, on the ground that had broken the conditions of the Service Franchise. In answer to Mr Waghorne, Mr Cookley said he had been resident box-keeper at the Theatre for ten years. He went to the sea-side in June last for the benefit of his health, but left his furniture and everything else at the Theatre, and was in entire occupation of the premises. His wife in the meantime went to keep house in Bath-road for her late mistress. She was not paid for minding the house, but did it out of courtesy. Objection over-ruled and expenses allowed.

Anthea Jones: ‘A Short History of the First Cheltenham Spa in Bayshill…’1988,  Page 17:

‘At some point Onley himself converted the (Royal Wells Music) Hall into the Theatre Royal, adding a horseshoe-shaped gallery and an upper “sixpenny” gallery, and blacking out the large windows with paint. All the curtains, “machinery and apparatus” were still there when the theatre was leased by the Ladies’ College in 1887. Onley and his family lived for some time in the adjoining house; in 1861 he described himself as architect and surveyor, employing six men, and in 1871 as architect and theatre proprietor. By 1881 the house had been converted into licensed premises, the Royal Victoria Stores. Both theatre and public house were purchased by the College in 1890… The Princess Hall which was built between 1895 and 1897 was designed to echo the old theatre…’

In August 1884 the Cookley Family was still living at Old Well, Cheltenham.

The 1891 census return reveals that James Cookley was living at 7 Victoria Terrace, Cheltenham. He was described as a forty-five-year-old foreman decorator born in Cheltenham. His wife Elizabeth P. Cookley was aged forty-three-years and born in Cambridge, Glos. Their children were Frank Ernest, aged seventeen-years, a sculptor’s apprentice, born in Charlton Kings; Nora Emily aged fifteen a school teacher born in East Hampstead; Percy Talbot Cookley a twelve-year-old scholar and Ida Psyche a seven-year-old daughter.

James Cookley made his will on 29th April 1896. He died on 15th June in that year and was buried at Cheltenham Cemetery. The will was proved on 21st July 1896:

‘This is the last will and testament of James Cookley, of 7, Victoria Terrace, Cheltenham, in the County of Gloucester, painter and decorator. This revokes all previous wills.

I appoint Elizabeth Perrett Cookley of Victoria Terrace, Cheltenham, to be sole executrix of this my will. I direct my executrix to pay my just debts and funeral and testamentary expenses, and I give and bequeath her all my household furniture and effects and all interest in the property, Beaufort House, Beaufort Lodge and Beaufrot Cottage, situated in London Road, Cheltenham. And also the money falling due to me on my death from the Hearts of Oak Benefit Society. And I give to my son Frank Ernest my silver lever watch and my son Percy Talbot my silver watch chain and my writing desk. Dated this 29th day of April 1896. Witnesses, William Drinkwater, Hay and Corn (coal?) Merchant, Hardwicke and Fanny Drinkwater.’

In 1901 Elizabeth Cookley was living at Beaufort House, London Road, Cheltenham. She was described as a fifty-three-year-old tobacconist born in Cambridge, Glos. With her were two of her children, Nora who was a twenty-five-year-old school teacher born in East Hempstead; Percy a twenty-two-year-old solicitor’s clerk, born in Cheltenham; Ida a seventeen-year-old mother’s help.

On the night of the 2nd April, for the 1911 census, Elizabeth Perrett Cookley was still living in five rooms at Beaufort House, London Road, Cheltenham. She was described as a sixty-three-year-old widow, with five children, one of whom had died. She was born in North Nibley and was a Shopkeeper (Tobacconist) on her own account. Her children at home included Nora Em’ly aged thirty-five, a certificated elementary school teacher, single and born in East Hampstead, Berkshire; Percy Talbot a single thirty-two-year-old Solicitor’s Clerk, born in Cheltenham and Ida Psyche a single twenty-seven-year-old born in Cheltenham.

In 1927 Elizabeth was described in a trade directory as a shopkeeper of London Road, Cheltenham She made a will on 24th May 1932, which was proved on 8th November in that year. She died on 27th May 1932 aged 84 years and is buried at Cheltenham Cemetery.

‘I Elizabeth Perrett Cookley made Frank Cookley and Ida Cookley the executors of my will and I give and bequeath to Frank and Ida the whole of my belongings. Witnesses Ada Slade and Lena Thomas’

Gravestone in Cheltenham Cemetery:

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‘James Cookley died 15th June 1896 aged 47 years. Elizabeth Perrett Cookley, Widow of James, died May 27th 1932.’


  1. ELIZA POWELL, Great II Aunt of Richard Barton

Eliza Barton was born on 25th November 1848 at Cambridge and was baptised on 1st January 1850 at Slimbridge, the third daughter of John and Sarah Barton. She appeared on the 1861 census return for Slimbridge aged eleven years.

In the 1871 census she was described as a general domestic servant for their mother’s first cousin, Henry Perrett of Nibley Road, Wotton-under-Edge. She was described as twenty-two-years-old and born in Cambridge, Glos. Eliza was there with her younger sister Fanny who was aged fourteen years and working as a nurse.

On 3rd February 1872 she married Charles Sims at Slimbridge. He was described as a son of Robert Harding, labourer. The witnesses were Louisa Barton, Betty Harding Sims, Albert Miles and William Barton.

Charles Sims was baptised on 27th April 1845 at Slimbridge, the son of Robert Harding and his housekeeper, Mary Sims. His parents Robert Harding and Mary Sims were actually married on 6th August 1863 at Mangotsfield Parish Church. Robert was described as a farmer, son of William Harding, a farmer, and Mary was the daughter of John Sims a Labourer. The witnesses were C. and Annie Payne and J. Harding.

Charles Sims was a bachelor before his own marriage and was later a witness to William and Ellen Barton’s wedding in 1877. He appeared on the 1861 and 1871 census returns aged 15 and 24 years respectively. His father, Robert Harding, moved from the Moorend Estate to Shepherd’s Patch Hotel sometime between 1871 and 1876. When Robert died in June 1879 his son, Charles, took over as Innkeeper.

In the 1881 Census for Slimbridge Eliza is given as the wife of Charles Sims and the couple were living at the Patch Hotel with Charles’s mother, Mary Sims (Harding), his sister, Betty Harding Sims and her son Ernest. Their own children were listed as Ann (aged 5), Fanny (aged 3) and Charles (aged 3 months). Charles was listed as the Farm Bailiff and hotelkeeper.

 A “disturbing” event (death of man at Inn) caused Charles and Eliza to move from the hotel and take up farming at Clarke’s Farm, Hardwicke. This was after the death of their daughter Fanny in July 1885. After this they had no more children. Charles drank heavily and subsequently committed suicide (noted as suicide morally in church records) at home at Hardwicke. He died in February 1889 and was buried on 1st March 1889 at Slimbridge.

In the 1891 census Eliza Sims was described as a widow of Clark’s Farm, Longney Road, Hardwicke and is living with her four children and her nephew, John Woodward. Eliza was described as a forty-year-old farmer born in Slimbridge. Her children were Ann aged fifteen years; Henry C. Sims aged ten years; Alfred J. aged seven years and Arthur E. aged six years. All were born in Slimbridge. John Woodward, her seventeen-year-old nephew was a farmer’s son, born in North Nibley. Also in this census we find Daniel Joseph Powell, a widower of the Reformatory Cottage.  He was a fifty-four year old land bailiff and the labour master at the reformatory school in Hardwicke. His wife Mary Anne had recently died and he had at least two sons Edward and Daniel.

Eliza Sims married Daniel Joseph Powell in 1891 and by 1897 he was entered in the Trade Directory as the farmer of Clark’s Farm, Hardwicke.

She was registered as Mrs Eliza Powell, Farmer of that property, in the 1894 Kelly’s Trade Directory. Daniel Powell died in 1901 and was buried in Hardwicke churchyard with his first wife.

In the 1901 census Eliza Powell was still farming Clark’s Farm. She was aged forty-eight-years and born in Cambridge. With her were her sons Alfred John Sims an eighteen-year-old farmer, born in Slimbridge, and Arthur Elton Sims, a sixteen-year-old Apprentice Carpenter and Joiner, born in Slimbridge. Also staying with them as visitors were Ann and her husband George James Drinkwater. Ann was described as twenty-six-years-old and born in Slimbridge whilst George was thirty-three-years-old, born in Hardwicke and working as a Toolmaker at Kynocks Ammunition Works, which was probably in Birmingham. With them were their two children Ernest Tom, aged four years, and Albert Sims Drinkwater, aged one year. Both grandchildren were born in Birmingham.  Also in residence was eighty-two-year-old Sarah Barton, Eliza’s mother, who was living on her own means and born at Nibley.

In 1911 Eliza Powell was farming at Clark’s Farm, Madam’s End, Hardwicke and living in six rooms. She was described as a sixty-year-old widow who had borne six children, four of whom were still alive. She was listed as having been born at Slimbridge. Her lodger was William Etheradge, a forty-one-year-old single farmer and fruit merchant who was born at Elmore. Also listed at Clark’s Farm was Thomas Drinkwater, her fifteen-year-old grandson, who was assisting on the farm and who was born in Birmingham.

Eliza stayed on at the farm until some time between 1910 and 1914 (at which point a new owner is shown in the trade directory). She retired to Gloucester where she lived at 173 Bristol Road and 121 Southgate Street with her sister Fanny Drinkwater. She died on 29th October 1939 and was buried at Slimbridge.


Harding’s Royal Steam Bakery

Eliza’s nephew Ernest set up Harding’s Royal Steam Bakery in Yardley, Birmingham  with Frank Thornhill and she used to visit twice a year to collect her share dividends and to visit the family. Various members of the Sims and Barton families were employed there including her sons, Harry and Fred, and her nephews, Bert and Burland Barton. In later years Ernest lived at Packwood Grange, Dorridge, and was a benefactor of the Methodist Church in Hay Mills.

Ernest Sims was the son of Eliza’s sister-in-law, Betty Harding Sims. Ernest was born on 12th August 1874 in Slimbridge (no father known) He married Amy Minna Plested on 17th.September 1908 in the Wesleyan Chapel in Castle Street, Stroud. He was twenty-seven-years-old and she was twenty-five. Amy`s father was a Grocer in Stroud and she had two brothers William Ingram born 1880 and Henry born 1881.Her mother was Sarah Ann Terrett, born in Stroud.

Ernest’s mother, Betty Harding Sims, moved to Birmingham to help her son to set up the bakery in Berkeley Road. She was known to the family as ‘Mrs Harding’, and May Walker remembers going to see her. She also remembers her grandfather, William Barton, looking after Ernest and his mother because they were on their own.

Betty Harding Sims married Martin Tudor on 28th June 1891 at St.Aldate`s Church in Gloucester. She was then thirty-seven-years-old and he was thirty. Betty Tudor died in 1918 and was buried in Slimbridge.


 

The Citizen, November 3rd 1939

 

‘Slimbridge Funeral. The funeral of Mrs. Eliza Powell of 173, Bristol Road, Gloucester, took place at Slimbridge Church on Thursday. The Rev. W.H. Thomas (Rector) officiated. Mrs. Thomas was at the organ and the hymn, “Abide with Me” was sung and the 90th Psalm chanted.

The principal mourners were Messrs. Harry, Elton and Fred Sims (sons), Mr. H. Barton (brother), Mrs. H. Sims and Mrs. E. Sims (daughters-in-law), Mr and Mrs. B. Drinkwater (grandchildren), Miss Rita Sims (grand-daughter), Miss E. Barton, Miss Fanny Barton, and Mrs. Drinkwater (nieces), Mr and Mrs Taylor (nephew and niece), Mr and Mrs Walkley and Mr and Mrs Hill (nephews and nieces), Maurice and Roy Barton (nephews), Miss M. Merrett and Mrs. L. Steel (nieces), Mr. E.P. Barton, Mr. and Mrs. Sales and Mrs. Kingston. The bearers were Messrs, H. Barton, J. Woodward, F. Barton and C. Drinkwater.

Wreaths were sent by:

Sons and Daughters-in-Law

Mrs Dimery and Family

Brother Harry and Family

Doris and Ben

Rita and Mick

Alice

Bert

Maud and Jim

Gert and Sid

Harry, Ada and Ann

Clara and Gertie

Amy, Jim and Eileen

Mr and Mrs Kingston and Denzil

Jack and Annie

Mr and Mrs Morton

Jim, Nora and Stuart

Mrs Jennings

Ada, Millie and George

Mr and Mrs Folks

Margaret and Olive

Mr and Mrs Nash

Charlie, Bessie and Family

Ida

Mr and Mrs Harding

Family of the late W. Barton

Frank and Maud

Funeral arrangements by Ernest Cocks & Sons, 46 Blomfield Road, Gloucester

Newspaper report:

 

‘The funeral of Mrs Eliza Powell of 173 Bristol Road, Gloucester, took place at Slimbridge Parish Church on Thursday in last week. Mrs Powell, who was in her 90th year, was a native of Slimbridge and was the sister of a well-known local blacksmith, Mr W. Barton. Chief mourners: Messrs Harry, Elton and Fred Sims (sons), Mr H. Barton, Mrs H. Sims and Mrs E. Sims (daughters-in-law), Mr and Mrs B. Drinkwater and Miss R. Sims (granddaughter), Miss E. Barton, Miss F Barton, Mrs Drinkwater, Mr and Mrs Taylor, Mr and Mrs Walkley, Mr and Mrs Hall, Mr M. Barton, Mr P. Barton, Miss M. Merrett, and Mrs L. Steel (nieces and nephews), Mr E.P. Barton, Mr and Mrs Sales and Mrs Kinston. Bearers: Messrs. H. Barton, J. Woodward, F. Barton C. Drinkwater.’

‘Suicide of another farmer. Another painful suicide is reported near Gloucester, the victim again being a middle-aged farmer. The deceased, Charles Sims, who was 42 years of age and lived at Clarke’s Farm, Hardwicke, had been in a low desponding state of mind for the past fortnight, consequent upon drinking heavily, and on Monday morning rose at seven o’clock, complaining to his wife that he felt sick, and that his head was bad. He went downstairs and shortly afterwards his wife heard the report of a gun, and on following him downstairs she found him sitting in an easy chair dead, with a gun resting on the ground in front of him, the barrel of which he had placed in his mouth. The police were summoned, and he was found to have shot himself, through the head. The coroner having been communicated with, the inquest will be held at the residence of the deceased, where the body lies at 3.30 this afternoon.’

‘Suicide of another Gloucestershire farmer. An inquiry was held before Mr R.H. Smith, deputy-coroner, on Tuesday afternoon, on the body of Charles Sims, farmer, aged 42, of Clarke’s Farm, Hardwicke, at the residence of the deceased, who committed suicide under the following distressing circumstances on Monday. The following evidence was taken:- Mrs Eliza Sims, wife of the deceased, said that her husband took to drinking several years ago, after the sudden death, which affected him, of a man on their premises when the kept a public-house. He had drunk very heavily for some years, and had occasionally had delirium tremens, which was followed by fits of extreme despondency. He had a worse attack than usual about twelve months ago, and Dr Weller attended him, and told witness that if he had another such attack as that it would kill him. He had been pretty well from that time until a fortnight ago, when he became very much depressed in mind, and during the last fortnight had complained of violent pains in his head, but had not had an attack of delirium. He had drunk nothing but cider to her knowledge for the last fortnight, and not enough of that to intoxicate him. He had got gradually worse day by day, but she did not send for the doctor, as she did not think it necessary. On Monday morning he rose at about his usual time – seven o’clock, and complained of being sick, and of his head. She told him he would be better after taking a cup of tea, and he went down stairs, which was not unusual for him. About five minutes elapsed before she heard the report of a gun, upon which she at once went downstairs, and into the sitting room, where she found him sitting in his arm chair, with a gun between his knees, and the barrel pointing to his mouth. No one could have been in the room beside himself. There were only three children and herself in the house.

 By a Juryman: He was not more restless than usual during Sunday night.

PC Brookes said he was called to the house about 8.15 a.m. on Monday, and found the deceased as described by the last witness, dead. The gun produced was between his knees with the stock on the ground, the barrel in his left hand pointing into his mouth, and a piece of string (produced) in his right hand. The left barrel was empty, and an empty cartridge in the right barrel. The mouth was very much injured, and his head very much shattered, so much so that witness had to place a napkin round it to hold it together. He found three pieces of brain – one on the floor, one on the window-sill and the other on the sideboard near, while the window-blind, ceiling, wall, and floor were bespattered with blood. The body was not cold. There was not the slightest doubt he had shot himself.

William Drinkwater, brother-in-law of the deceased, corroborated Mrs Sims’s evidence with regard to the deceased’s drinking habits, which he continued up to the last. Witness had never seen deceased intoxicated. Witness was with him on Saturday when he did not drink much, but witness had thought previously that he was getting worn out through drink, and half-suspected he would destroy himself.

The Coroner said it was clear that the deceased was in a fearful state. From the evidence they saw that notwithstanding the warning of the medical gentlemen twelve months ago that another attack so severe as that which he had at that time would end fatally, still he went on drinking as much as ever. He had no doubt that the despondency and pains in the head of the last fortnight were symptoms of another approaching attack of delirium tremens, and the pains which a man in such a condition suffered in the head were most excruciating, and he believed it was sufficient to cause temporary insanity. It was for the jury to decide whether the deceased committed suicide whilst in his right senses, or whether he was temporarily insane at the time, and the jury returned a verdict of suicide whilst temporarily insane, and gave their fees to the Infirmary.’

 

Letter from Eliza Powell to Alfred John Sims and Emma Sims ( Possible date 1937)

                                                                                              121 Southgate Street

My Dear Fred & Pem.

I hope this will find you all well. I wish you many Happy Returns of the day and hope you will be spared to see many more. I have sent a little present I know will be useful. I hope you are having your holidays soon and will come to Gloucester. Is Kate still with you as I hear nothing about her. Am sorry to say my sight is getting very bad I can`t see the lines to write very well. I have been to Berrow for a few days. Your Aunt Fan is here she is going to Nora. I shall go to Moreton to your Uncle Harry`s for change I did not see much of Harry and Dot. I went to Berrow with them at all at 173 and your Aunt Fan joins me in kind Love to Both Family Believe me To remain your loving mother

                                    E.Powell xx

                                                                        Shall have some news when you come

Alfred John Sims

Born May 31 1883                                          Love to Harry

Notes:-

Eliza lived at 121 Southgate Street after moving from Clarke`s Farm. Her sister Fanny lived there for a while after her husband died in November 1936 until her death in October 1937.

Moreton is Moreton Valance which is near Hardwicke and Eliza`s brother Harry had a farm there.

Berrow is in Worcestershire near Ledbury. Eliza`s sister Mary Woodward`s family lived there. Mary was dead by the date of letter but some of her children still lived there.

“Them at 173” refers to Eliza`s son Elton and family who lived at 173, Bristol Road, Gloucester.

“Love to Harry” refers to her son Harry who lived near to Fred in Yardley.

“Kate” referred to is Kate Sims daughter of Fred and Pem (Emma) She married in January 1938 so was still at home then.

 

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Eliza (right) with Fanny


  1. LOUISA MERRETT, Great II Aunt of Richard Barton

 

Louisa Barton was the fourth daughter of John and Sarah Barton of Slimbridge. She was baptised on 9th April 1852. She was aged nineteen years and at home at the time of the 1871 census. In the first quarter of 1878, in the Gloucester Registration District, she married James Seymour Merrett. In 1879 Seymour was described as a Mason and in 1881 as of The Lynch.

James Seymour Merrett was baptised on 4th June 1854 at Berkeley and was described as the son of Joseph Merrett, a Mason of Berkeley, and his wife Sarah Ann. His parents were married on 29th May 1849 at Berkeley. Joseph was described as the son of William Merrett a Mason, and his bride, Sarah Ann, was the daughter of William Cope, a Pargeter. The witnesses at the wedding were William Cope and E. Cope.

6-barton-iv-gt-9-3-6-b

 Joseph Merrett was baptised at Berkeley on 22nd May 1824 and his parents, William and Hannah Merrett, were listed in the 1841 census for Canonbury Street, Berkeley. William was then a fifty-two-year-old Mason and his son Joseph, was aged fifteen years.

 In 1861 Seymour Merrett was at home with his family in Salter Street, Berkeley, aged six years, and his father Joseph, was described in the census return as a bricklayer.

Ten years later, in 1871, Seymour Merrett had left home in Berkeley and was staying with his uncle and aunt at Whitehall, Slimbridge. His uncle was Edward Davis who was a fifty-year-old farmer of eleven acres, employing one boy, and a native of Slimbridge. Seymour’s aunt, Jane Davis, was forty-nine-years-old and born in Berkeley. Seymour was described as a seventeen-year-old farm servant (indoor).

In the 1881 census return James Seymour and Louisa Merrett were living at Ashthorpe Farm, Hamfallow, Berkeley where they farmed eleven and a half acres of land. Seymour was then aged twenty-seven-years and born in Berkeley and his wife was twenty-nine-years and born in Slimbridge. Their children were George, aged two years and born in Slimbridge and James aged nine months and born in Berkeley.

In 1885 the Merretts were at Hook Street, Hamfellow; at Purton in 1887 and at Middleton, Halmore in 1889.

At the time of the 1891 Census the family was living at Dauncey’s Farm, Halmore. Seymour was aged thirty-seven-years and born at Berkeley and his wife Louisa was aged thirty-nine-years and born at Slimbridge. George was aged twelve-years and born at Slimbridge; Margaret aged six years and born at Berkeley; Ada and Alice were both aged four years and Millicent aged eight months. Louisa’s mother, Sarah Barton, was living with them and was described as seventy-two-years-old and born at North Nibley.

In 1894 Seymour and Louisa Merrett were living at Whitehall Farm, Slimbridge.

Sadly Louisa died during the following year and she was buried at Slimbridge on 7th April 1895 aged forty-three-years.

During the third quarter of 1897 James Seymour Merrett married Sarah Ann Robins in Barnstaple Registration District. Sarah Ann was born during the final quarter of 1851 in Barnstaple Registration District. In 1861 she was at home with her parents Henry and Elizabeth Robins in the town of Combe Martin. Henry Robins was a forty-three-year-old agricultural labourer born in Bittadon, Devon whilst her mother was born in Bramstock. Sarah Ann was aged nine at the time of this census and she had a younger brother and sister. In 1881 Sarah Ann was employed as a Housemaid at Stoke Lodge, Westbury-on-Trym and in 1891 she was working as the Cook at 8 Harley Place, Clifton.

At the time of the 1901 census the Merrett family was still at White Hall Farm in Slimbridge. James S. Merrett was described as a forty-seven-year-old Farmer and born in Berkeley. His new wife, Sarah, was aged forty-nine-years and born in Combe Martin. His children were Alice aged thirteen years and Millicent aged eleven years. Both girls were born in Berkeley.

On the night of the 2nd April, for the 1911 census, James Seymour Merrett was living in five rooms at White Hall Farm, Slimbridge. He was described as a fifty-seven-year-old farmer, an employer, who had been married for thirteen years with no children of that marriage. His wife Sarah Merrett was aged fifty-eight-years, and born in Combe Martin.

Sarah Ann Merrett died on 31st March 1926, aged seventy-four-years, at Slimbridge. She was then living at Whitehall Farm, Slimbridge, and was buried on 3rd April.

Seymour Merrett made his will on 14th February 1914 but he survived until 17th March 1934 when he was buried on 21st March at Slimbridge aged seventy-nine-years. His will was proved on 12th May 1934.

Summary of the Will of James Seymour Merrett of Slimbridge, Farmer:

My daughters Margaret & Ada to be the Executors. I give to my son George, £50 free of duty. All the residue of my estate real & personal, subject to death expenses, to my daughters Margaret, Ada , Alice and Millicent in equal shares. Dated 14th February 1914. Witnesses H.J. Francillon, Dursley, Solicitor and P.W.Baston his Clerk.

In Memoriam Card:

6-barton-iv-gt-9-3-6-c

‘In Loving Memory of James Seymour Merrett, who entered into rest, March 17th 1934, aged 79 years. We cannot Lord Thy purpose see But all is well that’s done by Thee  Churchend, Slimbridge, March, 1934.’

Gloucester Citizen Gloucestershire, England

12 Jan 1905

‘Mr. Joseph Merrett, of Berkeley, Gloucestershire, who died November 2nd, appointed as his executors his sons, Mr. James Seymour Merrett, of Gloucester, farmer, Mr. Fred Merrett, of Hookstreet, near Berkeley, farmer, and Mr. Frank Merrett, of Berkeley…’

Gloucestershire Echo Gloucestershire, England

12 Jan 1905

  1. J. MERRETT. The gross value of the estate of Mr. Joseph Merrett, retired mason, who died his residence at Berkeley, on November 2nd. has been sworn by his sons, Mr. James SeymourMerrett, Slimbridge, farmer, Mr. Fred Merrett, of Hook-street, near Berkeley, Farmer and Mr. Frank Merrett, of Berkeley, at £717.18.3d.

In ‘Around Dursley in old photographs’ by All Wilson and David Evans we read:

‘Seymour Merret (sic) at Whitehall Farm, Cambridge (sic). Before moving here he farmed at Hornshill. One of his daughters married Lionel Steel of Cam Bakery.’

From the Gazette:

6-barton-iv-gt-9-3-6-a

‘This picture, kindly lent by Mr A.E. Morgan of The Chantry, Quedgeley, and formerly of Slimbridge shows the Slimbridge Committee arranged at King Edward’s Coronation… S. Merrett …’


  1. FANNY DRINKWATER, Great II Aunt of Richard Barton

 

Fanny Barton was the youngest daughter of John and Sarah Barton of Slimbridge. She was baptised at Slimbridge Parish Church on 21st September 1856.

In the 1871 Census she was a nurse at the home of her mother’s first cousin, Henry Perrett of Nibley Road, Wotton-under-Edge where her sister Eliza was a general domestic servant. She was aged fourteen and born in Slimbridge and her sister was aged twenty-two-years and born in Cambridge.

Later Fanny became a cook at Hardwicke Vicarage. On 20th September 1877 she married William Drinkwater, a coal merchant, at Slimbridge. William was born in Ashleworth in about 1854. When he married his father, James Drinkwater, was a hay dealer. William’s younger brother, George James Drinkwater, who was born in 1867 at Hardwicke, married Fanny’s niece, Ann Sims.

The parents of William and George James Drinkwater were James and Eliza Drinkwater of Ashleworth. In 1851 James was a twenty-eight-year-old boat owner, born in Ashleworth and his wife was aged twenty-nine-years and born in Ashleworth. Ten years later in 1861 James Drinkwater, a thirty-nine-year-old Master of a Boat who was with his boat at Lower Milton, Kidderminster on the night of the census. With him was John Mason, a twenty-year-old. His wife Eliza Drinkwater, a boatman’s wife, was at Nupend, Ashleworth, with her six-year-old son, William Drinkwater. In 1871 James and Eliza had moved to Layne (sp?) Farm, Hardwicke. He was described as a forty-eight-year-old coal merchant and she was aged forty-seven, both born in Ashleworth. Their children included William aged sixteen; Alfie aged nine years; Emma aged six years; and George aged three years. All the children were born in Ashleworth except for the youngest, George, who was recorded as born in Hardwicke. In 1881 James was back at the Cottage, Nupend, Ashleworth. He was then aged fifty-nine-years and was described as formerly a coal merchant. His new wife, Harriet, was aged fifty-nine-years, both were born in Ashleworth and with them were his daughter Emma aged thirteen years, born in Ashleworth, and his youngest son, George J. Drinkwater, aged thirteen years who was shown as born in Ashleworth. In 1891 Emma Drinkwater, the sister, was working as a serving maid at Yarkhill Vicarage.

In 1881 William and Fanny Drinkwater were living at Hardwicke and he was working as a coal merchant. William was aged twenty-six-years and born at Ashleworth whilst his wife Fanny was aged twenty-four-years and born in Slimbridge. Their children were Annie aged two years and William j. aged one year. Both were born at Hardwicke.

In 1891 William and Fanny were living at Stank Lane, Hardwicke. William was aged Thirty-six-years, a coal merchant, born in Ashleworth. Fanny was aged thirty-four-years and born in Slimbridge. The children were Annie E. aged twelve years, a scholar; William J. aged eleven years; Charles B. aged nine years; Nora E. aged seven years; Clara M. aged six years and Gertrude A. aged two years. All of them were born at Hardwicke.

By 1891 William was a coal merchant and hay merchant of Hardwicke living at Wharf Cottage. In later years the family lived at Fairview House, Hardwicke.

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In 1901 William and Fanny were at Fairview House and he was described as a forty-six-year-old Coal and Hay Merchant and Farmer, an employer, born at Ashleworth. Fanny was aged forty-four-years and born at Slimbridge. Their children at home included Annie aged twenty-two; Nora aged seventeen years; Clara aged sixteen years; Gertrude aged thirteen years and William a twenty-one-year-old assistant in the Coal Business. All of the younger generation were born at Hardwicke.

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In 1911 William Drinkwater and his family were living at Fairview House, Hardwicke, Gloucester. He was described as a fifty-six-year-old Hay Dealer, born in Ashleworth and married for thirty-three years with six children who had all survived. Fanny was fifty-four-years and born in Slimbridge. Clara, their single daughter, was at home aged twenty-six-years and born in Hardwicke. Next door were living his daughter Annie Taylor and at Bridge Cottage the Cottles.

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Later the Drinkwaters lived at Tuffley Avenue, Gloucester; Elm Villa; The Laurels, Quedgeley, and finally 121 Southgate Street, Gloucester. William died in 1936 aged 82 years and his will was proved on 27th November 1936. Fanny died a year later on 26th October 1937 aged 81 years.

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Doris Bootman wrote in 1973:

‘Another of mother’s uncles was a certain Harry (sic) Drinkwater – his name was apparently a family joke because he was a heavy drinker and I don’t mean a water drinker. Incidentally in the wedding picture of Mother and Dad only Harry Drinkwater has a smiling face! Mother said it was such a bitterly cold day and the photographer took so long to line everyone up – all across Grandad’s orchard – that they were all miserable – except Harry Drinkwater.’

Newspapers Cuttings:

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A Quedgeley Golden Wedding – Mr and Mrs W. Drinkwater, of Quedgeley, who recently celebrated their golden wedding, with members of their family.

Mr and Mrs William Drinkwater, of the Laurels, Quedgeley, have celebrated their golden wedding, a gathering of relations and friends having been held at their house to mark the event.

Mr and Mrs Drinkwater were married on September 20th, 1877, at Slimbridge, where Mrs Drinkwater, who was Miss Fanny Barton before marriage, then lived. The major portion of their married life has been spent at Hardwicke, where for many years Mr Drinkwater carried on business as a hay and coal merchant. He retired from active business several years ago. There are two sons and four daughters of the marriage.

Born at Ashleworth 73 years ago, Mr Drinkwater, who appears to be very fit, informed a Press representative that he still enjoyed an occasional swim, and had several times this year dived into the Canal at Two Mile Bend. At the end of last year and at the beginning of this Mr Drinkwater took a pleasant trip to Australia and New Zealand. He went to school in his early days under Mr J. Ricketts at Greyfriars, walking to and from Hardwicke with the late Mr D.G. Sterry, formerly of the firm of Messrs. Sterry and Morris.

Mr and Mrs Drinkwater have been …numerous messages …gifts.’

Hardwicke Funeral – The funeral of Mr William Drinkwater (82), for many years a well-known hay and coal merchant, late of Hardwicke, took place at Hardwicke Church on Saturday. The Rev T.D. Jenkins officiated.

The principal mourners were Mr William J. Drinkwater (son); Mr and Mrs C.B. Drinkwater (son and daughter-in-law); Mr and Mrs E.E. Taylor, Mr and Mrs James Walkley (sons-in-law and daughter); Mrs James Gray and Mrs G.A. Cottle (daughters); Misses D. and M. Drinkwater, Messrs V. and N. Drinkwater and Mr Stewart Walkley (grandchildren); Mr and Mrs Elton Sims (nephew and niece); Mr H. Sims (nephew); the Misses F. and N. Barton (nieces); Miss K. Hurcomb, Mrs Cole, Mrs Fredericks and others.

The widow was unable to attend owing to ill-health.

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The funeral arrangements were carried out by Messrs Ernest Cocks and Sons, 46 Bloomfield Road, Gloucester.’

Mrs F. Drinkwater – Funeral Service in Gloucester – The funeral service of Mrs Fanny Drinkwater of  121 Southgate Street, Gloucester, took place on Saturday. The first part of the service was held in Hardwicke Church, the interment followed in the churchyard. The Rev E. Jenkins officiated throughout.

Principal mourners were Mr William Drinkwater, Mr C. Drinkwater (sons), Mrs E. Taylor, Mrs Walkley, Mrs J. Gray, Mrs Cottle, (daughters), Mr H. Barton (brother), Mr R. Drinkwater, Mr S. Walkley, Mr V. Drinkwater (grandsons), Miss M. Drinkwater (grand-daughter), Mr and Mrs E. Sims (nephew and niece), Mr H. Sims, Mr J. Woodward (nephew), Mr E. Taylor (son-in-law), Mr J. Walkley (son-in-law), Miss N. Barton (niece), Mrs Hall (niece) and Mrs. C. Drinkwater (daughter-in-law).

Wreaths were sent by the family: Clara; Gertie; Sister Eliza and family; Mr and Mrs H. Barton; Jack; Ralph; Eileen; Bessie and George (Wolverhampton); Niece Ida; Maggie Partridge (Wolverhampton); Kathleen; Mrs Coole and brothers; Mr and Mrs Jennings; Mr and Mrs Welchman; nephews and nieces Barton “Slymbridge”; Mr and Mrs Herbert and family; and Jack.

The funeral arrangements were carried out by the Gloucester Co-operative Society funeral service.’


  1. DAVID BARTON, Great II Uncle of Richard Barton

 

David Barton was born on 22nd December 1858 at Slimbridge, the fourth son of John and Sarah Barton. He was baptised at the Parish Church on 23rd March 1859. In the 1871 census he was with his family in Slimbridge, aged twelve years.

He joined the Metropolitan Police as a Police Constable on 2nd August 1880 and was given the Warrant No. 64841 (MEPO 4/335/64841). In the 1881 census return he was lodging in single men’s quarters at the Police Station near Bradfield Terrace, Fulham. He was described as aged twenty-two, a Police Constable, born in Slimbridge, Gloucestershire.

He married Laura Lucas on 19th August 1886 at St Luke’s Church in Chelsea. David was described on the wedding certificate as a twenty-seven-year-old bachelor and Police Constable, of 36 Ivy (sp?) Road, son of John Barton (deceased), a farrier. Laura was aged twenty-six, a spinster of the same address, daughter of Lucius Lucas, a carpenter. Both signed their names and the witnesses were William Tilbury and Sarah Church.

Who was Laura Lucas?

Laura Lucas was born in Slimbridge on 14th March 1860 and she was the daughter of Lucus (alias Lucius) and Anne Lucas. Her father was a carpenter and wheelwright of Slimbridge Street, Slimbridge. She was baptised on 27th May 1860 and born in the Dursley Registration District during the second quarter of 1860. In the 1861 census she is listed as one-year-old and her parents were twenty-five-years and eighteen respectively. Her father, Lucius, was born in Wells, Somerset.

In 1871 Laura was in Slimbridge with her family and aged eleven years. Her parents were given as Lucius aged thirty-six-years, a carpenter and joiner, born in Wells, Somerset, and her mother Anne was born in Slimbridge aged twenty-eight-years. Siblings included John W.J. aged eight-years; Arthur E. aged seven years and Clement E. aged two years. All the children were born in Slimbridge.

On 21st May 1886 Arthur Lucas, aged twenty-one, was charged with grievously wounding Charles Hurd with the intent to do him grievous bodily harm on February 22nd. Arthur was then described as a blacksmith of Slimbridge. He was sentenced to six months hard labour.

In 1881 Laura Lucas was an unmarried servant, namely a cook (domestic) at Stanley Villa, Brunswick Road, Epsom, Sutton, the home of Joseph Gray, a first class clerk in the Board Trade.

Turning to her father, Lucas Lucas we find further details concerning Laura’s ancestry. In 1841 Laura’s father Lucas Lucus, was aged seven years and living at home in St Cuthbert’s Parish, Wells, aged seven-years-old, with his mother Sarah Lucus and two-year-old brother, John. Sarah Lucas was aged forty-years and listed as independent. Moving forward sixty years, in 1901 Lucas Lucas was a sixty-six-year-old joiner carpenter, a worker, born at Wells, Somerset, and living at 81 Cedar Grove, Toxteth Park. With him were three children namely Frank, aged twenty-four-years, a baker (bread maker); Charles G. aged twelve-years, a grocer’s assistant, and Agnes C., aged twenty-six-years. All three were born in Slimbridge.

David Barton was dismissed from the Metropolitan Police on 16th May 1887 and he returned to Gloucestershire. In 1888 he was working as a blacksmith in Purton and from about 1889 until 1890 he was in Gloucester.

In 1891 the family was living at 2 Ryecroft Street, Gloucester or possibly as a second family at No 3. He was described as a thirty-two-year-old Farrier Smith born in Slimbridge. Laura was aged thirty-one and born at Slimbridge, Harold aged five and born at Purton, Stanley aged one and born in Gloucester and Cyril E. aged two months and born in Gloucester.

From about 1893 until 1897 they family was living in Nailsworth. In 1913 they were at ‘The Steps, Nailsworth’ and by 1896 at ‘Shortwood’. In 1898 David Barton was a Blacksmith at Langridge, in Sheepscombe Parish. From 1901 until 1903 we find him at Stephen’s Yard, Westgate Street, Gloucester.

In the 1901 census return David Barton was described as a forty-two-year-old blacksmith of 6 Stephens Court Gloucester. His place of birth was given as Slimbridge. His wife Laura was forty-one and again from Slimbridge. Their children were listed as Stanley, aged eleven, and Cyril, aged ten, both born in Gloucester. Myrtle, aged seven, and Victor, aged four, were born in Nailsworth and Sarah, aged two years, at ‘Longredge’ (sp?)

From about 1910 until 1914 he was living at 7 Barbican Place, Gloucester, and from 1914 until 1925 at 35 Victory Road, Gloucester.

Gloucester Journal, Saturday 27th April 1907 and The Citizen, 25th April, 1907;

 

Lydney Petty Sessions

 

‘For embezzling the sum of 3s 10d from Thomas Griffiths, builder, Lydney, a blacksmith of Gloucester, named David Barton, was sent to prison for 14 days in default of paying a fine of 5s and 30s costs.

In the 1911 census David Barton was lodging at Egg Tump, Berrow, near Ledbury. The head of the household was Edith Young, a sixty-three-year-old widow and charwoman who was born at Redmarley. Living in the house was her daughter Ellen Young, aged twenty-one-years, a single cook, born in Redmarley. David Barton was described a married, a blacksmith-wheelwright, a worker, born in Gloucester. No age was given for him.

In 1911 David’s wife, Laura Barton, was at home in Gloucester living at 7 Barbican Place, Barbican Road. She was described as a fifty-one-year-old woman, married for twenty-four-years with seven children six of whom were still living. She was a dressmaker working on her own account at home having been born in Slimbridge. Living with her were her children Cyril E. Barton, aged twenty-years, a single engine cleaner a worker born in Gloucester. Also Victor W. Barton a fourteen-year-old moulder apprentice born in Nailsworth and Louisa Barton a twelve-year-old school girl born in Painswick. They were living in three rooms.

Gloucester Journal Gloucestershire, England

24 Jul 1915

ENLISTED

Gloucester’s Roll of Honour – The following is a list of the additional recruits obtained for the Regular Army , 5th Gloucester Regiment (Depot Company), the 3rd Line Depot, 5th Divisional Cycling Corps, the 3rd Royal Gloucestershire Hussars and the Gloucestershire Royal Field Artillery

JULY 21st. Barton, David, 7, Barbican-place, A.S.C. (shoeing smith).

In 1916 David Barton was described as a blacksmith and in 1920 as a corporation employee (sp?) and in 1922 as a labourer.

On 16th December 1925 he was admitted as the porter at St Bartholomew’s Hospital in Gloucester. He was described as Inmate No 396, Barton, David, aged 67 years, of 35, Victory Road, Gloucester, Shoeing Smith. He died at this almshouse on 15th October 1937, aged 79 years, and was buried at Gloucester Cemetery on 20th October.

Laura Barton died on 1st April 1934 in Gloucester Registration District aged seventy-four-years.

David does not appear in any family photographs or at any family gatherings. The only link seems to be the use of Willoughby which he and his brother, Henry, use as a second name for one of their children.

Gloucester Citizen Gloucestershire, England

1 Apr 1935

‘IN MEMORIAM – BARTON—In loving memory of my dear Wife and Mother. Laura Barton, who passed peacefully away April 1st 1934. In Heaven, dear Mother, we’ll find you, When God’s will is done; We’ll stand once more beside you, When he calls us one by one. Ever remembered by her Husband, Sons and Daughters.

BARTON – In loving memory of my dear Mother, Laura Barton, who passed away April 1st 1934. On earth you did your very best, God grant to you eternal rest. From Son Vic, Daughter-in-Law Violet and Roy.

 

Gloucester Citizen Gloucestershire, England

1 Apr 1936

IN MEMORIAM – BARTON – In loving memory of my dear Wife and Mother. Laura Barton who passed away April 1st 1934. From her loving Husband and Daughters, Myrt and Louie. Her memory is as deal To-day. As in the hour she passed away.

BARTON – Treasured memories of my dear Mother, Laura Barton, who fell asleep April 1st 1934. Resting where no shadow falls In perfect peace she awaits us all. Lovingly remembered by Vic and Vi and Grandson Roy.

Also 1937 and 1939…

 

Gloucester Journal Gloucestershire, England

23 Oct 1937

DEATHS – BARTON —October 16 at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, Gloucester. David Barton, aged 79.

 


 

  1. JOHN BARTON, Infant Great II Uncle

 

John Barton was a twin son of John and Sarah Barton of Slimbridge. He was born on 27th November 1861 and baptised on the same day. His burial took place on 28th November, he having died aged 34 hours.

 

 


 

 

  1. HENRY BARTON, Great II Uncle of Richard Barton

 

Henry was a son of John and Sarah Barton of Slimbridge. He was born on 27th November 1861 and baptised on 4th December 1861 at Slimbridge. He was the twin of John Barton but unlike his brother he survived. At the time of the 1871 census he was at home and aged nine years.

In the 1881 census his brother, William Barton, was described as a twenty-seven-year-old blacksmith of Churchend, Slimbridge. His wife, Ellen, was aged twenty-three-years and born in Berkeley. Their children were Maud aged three years and Frank William aged one year. Both were born in Slimbridge. With them was Henry Barton who was aged nineteen, a blacksmith, and born in Slimbridge.

Henry married Fanny Kate Boulton of The Castle, Moreton Valence during the third quarter of 1887. She was the daughter of Thomas Boulton, a canal man, and she worked as a schoolmistress at Hardwicke.

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Fanny’s father, Thomas Boulton, was born in about 1824 at Frampton-upon Severn. His own father and mother were quite probably Isaac and Hester Boulton, he an agricultural labourer of Frampton-upon Severn. Isaac and Hester were the parents of Hannah, William and Edward. The eldest, Edward Boulton, born in about 1819, was the grandfather of Norah Kate Boulton who married Alfred Robert Yarnold.

Thomas Boulton was a sixteen-year-old man servant in Fretherne in 1841. Ten years later he was a twenty-seven-year-old general labourer of Frampton married to twenty-four-year-old Maria. With them were their eldest child Eliza aged two months. In 1871 Thomas Boulton was a forty-six-year-old Bridge Keeper of Parkend Bridge, Standish, born in Frampton, who was living there with his forty-four-year-old wife Maria and their three children – John aged twelve years; Annie R. aged seven years and Fanny Kate aged three years and all these children were born in Standish. In 1881 Thomas was still Bridge Keeper at Parkend, Standish. He was aged fifty-four-years; Maria aged fifty-three; Annie aged seventeen and Fanny aged thirteen. By 1891 Thomas, now aged sixty-seven-years, and Anna Maria his wife, were at Bridgeman House, Moreton Valance, where he was the Bridge keeper.

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The return for 1891 lists Henry Barton as a twenty-eight-year-old hay and coal merchant of Castle House, Moreton Valence. He was born at Slimbridge. His wife was Fanny Kate who was aged twenty-three-years and born in Standish. Their daughter was Florence Annie who was aged eight months and born in Standish.

In 1901 Henry was farming at Green Farm, Standish. He was described as a thirty-nine-year-old employer who was born at Slimbridge. His wife, Fanny, was aged thirty-three-years and born at Standish. Their children were Florence, aged ten years and born in Standish; Elsie aged eight years and born in Standish; Harry aged five years and born in Moreton Valance and Percy aged four years and born in Moreton Valance.

In 1911 the Bartons were still at Green Farm, Standish living in six rooms. Henry was now aged forty-nine-years, a Farmer and employer, born in Slimbridge. His wife Fanny Kate was forty-two and born in Standish. They had been married for twenty-three-years and of the five children of the marriage one had died. The children were Harry Reginald was aged sixteen years and working on the farm; Percy Willoughby was aged fourteen and working on the farm and Elsie Louise was aged eighteen and doing dairy work. All the children were born in Standish.

Later Henry became a farmer of Yew Tree Farm from 1923. Doris Bootman remembers him living at ‘The White House’.

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Fanny Barton died on 20th November 1943, aged seventy-five-years, and her husband Henry, died on 22nd December 1946, aged eighty-four-years. They are buried together at ST Stephen’s Church, Moreton Valance.

Newspaper: ‘Deaths – Barton – November 20, at Yew Trees, Moreton Valence, Fanny, beloved wife of Henry Barton (suddenly), aged 76 years. Funeral 2.30 Wednesday, Morton Valence.’

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Gloucester Citizen, 3rd January 1947:

Funeral at Moreton Valance. The funeral of Mr. Henry Barton of the Yew Tree Farm, Moreton Valance, a well-known farmer has taken place. He died aged 85, having lived in the parish for over 60 years.

The service at Moreton Valance Church was conducted by the Rev. H. Drysdale, Miss Dance played the organ. The hymns were “Abide with me” and “Jesu, lover of my soul.”

The family mourners were:

Miss Elsie Barton (daughter), Mr and Mrs Harry Barton (son and daughter-in-law), Mrs. Percy Barton (daughter-in-law), Kathleen and Peter Barton, Peggy and John Gilbert, George Tarr and Irene Barton (grand-children). Mr and Mrs A. Dickman and R. Dickman, Mr F.Barton, Mr. P. Barton, Mr E. Sims, Mr H. Sims, Mr and Mrs C. Drinkwater, Mr and Mrs J. Taylor, Mr and Mrs F. Hall, Miss Nora Barton, Mr Steuart (sic) Walkley, and Mr Jack Knott (nephews and nieces.)

Others present…

 

 


WILLIAM BARTON, Great Grandfather of Richard Barton

 Son of John Barton III and Sarah (nee Perrett)

Husband of Ellen Pick

Father of Edward Percy Barton

Also Father of Maud Walker, Frank William, Fanny, Elsie Mary Rush, Henry John, Mabel Louisa, Albert Edgar, Morris George, Burland Oswald, Winifred Annie Hall, Wilfred James and Nora Ellen Marsh

My Great Grandfather, William Barton, was born on 7th April 1854 at Cambridge, Gloucestershire. He was the third son of John Barton, who was the local Blacksmith, and his wife Sarah. William was baptised at Slimbridge Parish Church on 22nd July 1854. In 1856 the family moved to the Forge at Church End, Slimbridge. In 1861 William is shown as the eldest son and it would seem that both of his elder brothers, George Perrett and Henry, had died.

In 1863 Mr. Samuel Hadley, timber merchant and farmer of Cambridge Mill, built the Cambridge Wesleyan School for pupils of all ages. This comprised one room and was staffed by one qualified teacher, Alfred Gibson, and opened with 25 pupils on April 16th (or 13th April check!). William Barton joined the School from the May of that year. He was the thirtieth child to be admitted to the school and he stayed there until January 23rd 1865.

Women’s Institute: ‘The Story of Slimbridge’ – March 1958

‘Attendance was very irregular but on September 21st that year there were 57 present. Reading, writing, arithmetic, geography and drawing were the chief lessons. The School was often visited by Inspectors and the grants for its upkeep depended on the attainments of the children as displayed to these Inspectors. Holidays were given for potato lifting, haymaking, blackberry picking etc. and it was no uncommon thing for children to be away working in the fields all the summer months and to return to the school at the beginning of the winter…’

In the 1871 census William is described as aged sixteen years and as working as a blacksmith’s assistant.

William Barton married Ellen Pick on 1st May 1877 at Slimbridge. The bride was described as the daughter of Isaac Pick, a labourer, and the bridegroom as a blacksmith, the son of John Barton, blacksmith. Both William and Ellen were residing in the parish of Slimbridge at the time of the wedding.

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The Forge, Slimbridge, showing Great Grandfather, William Barton (1854-1936) in about 1884. To the right standing in the doorway of the house, is his wife Ellen (1857-1930) with their four eldest children, namely Maud, Frank William, Fanny and Elsie.

On 11th February 1878 John Barton, died aged sixty years and his son, William, became the village blacksmith.

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William and Ellen Barton with their four eldest children, Maud, Frank William, Fanny and Elsie (1884c)

William and Ellen were to have thirteen children and these included the youngest son, Wilfred James, who died aged six months in 1900.

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This photograph of Great Grandfather William Barton (1854-1936), his wife Ellen (nee Pick) (1857-1930) and ten of their children outside the Forge in about 1895. Note that the windows have been changed since 1884. Left to right back row: Elsie, Frank William, Fanny. Middle row: William, Edward Percy, Ellen, Mabel, Maud, Henry John. Front row: Albert Edgar, Morris George, Burland Oswald

In the 1881 census William was described as a twenty-seven-year-old blacksmith of Churchend, Slimbridge. Ellen was aged twenty-three-years and born in Berkeley. Their children were Maud aged three years and Frank William aged one year. Both were recorded as born in Slimbridge. Living with them was William’s brother, Henry Barton, who was aged nineteen, a blacksmith, born in Slimbridge.

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This photograph of Great Grandfather William Barton (1854-1936), his wife Ellen (nee Pick) (1857-1930) and twelve of their children outside the ‘Wedding Shed’ at the rear of the Forge in about 1901. Left to right back row: Henry John, Fanny, Frank William, Elsie. Middle row: Maud, Morris George, William, Edward Percy, Ellen, Maud, Albert Edgar, Burland Oswald.Front row: Winifred Annie, Nora Ellen.

In the 1891 census return William was described as thirty-six-years-old blacksmith. His wife Ellen was thirty-four-years-old and was born in Purton. Their children were Maud aged thirteen; Frank W. aged eleven; Fanny aged nine; Elsie M. aged seven; Henry J. aged five; Mabel L. aged three and Albert E. aged one year.

A Conveyance dated 11th August 1897 records the acquisition by William Barton of messuage and premises at Slimbridge in Gloucestershire from the Trustees of the Will of Mr Samuel Martin for the sum of £200. We also find a Statutory Mortgage dated 11th August 1897 of a Messuage land and premises at Slimbridge in Gloucestershire to secure £140 with interest at £4 per cent. This Mortgage was between Mr William Barton and Mrs Elizabeth Grimes and Mr F.H. Bretherton.

In 1901 William was described as a forty-six-year-old blacksmith born in Slimbridge. Ellen was forty-three-years-old and born in Purton Their children were Elsie, aged seventeen; Henry aged fifteen years who was listed as the son of a blacksmith; Mabel aged thirteen; Albert aged eleven; Percy aged nine; Maurice aged seven; Burland aged five and Winifred aged three years. All the children were born in Slimbridge.

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This photograph of Great Grandfather William Barton (1854-1936), his wife Ellen (nee Pick) (1857-1930) and three of their children, namely Mabel, Burland and Nora outside the Forge in about 1905. Winnie may be at the upstairs window.

By the year 1910 William Barton was assisted in the Forge by at least two of his sons. These were Harry or Henry John, who tragically died, aged twenty-five-years, in 1911 and Edward Percy who acquired the tenancy of Narles Farm, Cambridge, in 1927.

At the time of the 1911 census William Barton was a fifty-six-year-old blacksmith working on his own account and born in Slimbridge. He was father of thirteen children of whom eleven were still living. Ellen was aged fifty-three-years and born in Purton. Children at home included Mabel aged twenty-three and sons Percy aged nineteen, Maurice aged seventeen, Burland aged fifteen who were all working and Nora aged ten years who was still at school. The Forge had five rooms.

On 21st August 1913 Percy eventually married Florence Noad at the Church of St John the Evangelist, Slimbridge and the newly weds moved into the cottage next to the Forge at Churchend which his father purchased for £260. On the marriage certificate Edward Percy was described as a blacksmith, son of William Barton, blacksmith. Florence was described as a domestic servant the daughter of John Noad a wheelwright. Related to this purchase is a Reconveyance, dated 23rd July 1913, signed by Elizabeth Grimes and Mr. Bretherton. On the following day a new mortgage was signed by William Barton and Daniel Crump for two messuages at Slimbridge in Gloucestershire so as to secure £300 with interest at four pounds per cent.

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William and Ellen Barton of Slimbridge

His farrier’s account book for the period of 1921 to 1935 is preserved in the Gloucestershire Archives collection ref. no.D3751/1 – one volume.

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William Barton with his Grandson, William Leonard Walker (1906c-1994) in about 1912

On 26th May 1926 Percy Barton purchased ‘The Tyning’ at Churchend a field consisting of 4.325 acres. From 9th April 1927 he took on the tenancy of Narles Farm, Cambridge and the house next to the Forge was sold to Ernest Tudor.

On 27th September 1927 William Barton made his will and, interestingly, there is no mention of Percy either as a beneficiary or as an executor. The executors were to be Ellen Barton, Frank Barton and Burland Barton. A codicil to the will was signed on 9th September 1929.

According to probate records William Barton of Slimbridge died on 17th October 1936 and probate was granted at Gloucester on 1st December 1936 to Frank William Barton, milk retailer and Burland Oswald Barton, baker. Effects were valued at £578-17-0d.

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Women’s Institute: ‘The Story of Slimbridge’ – March 1958

‘Mention must be made of the Smithy at Cambridge and at Slimbridge, the last of the smiths being Mr. R. Workman and Mr. W. Barton. Shoeing of horses for farm work and hunting was done at their anvils.’

Ellen Barton died on 13th March 1930 at The Forge, Slimbridge. She was described on her death certificate as the seventy-two-year-old wife of William Barton a Blacksmith (Master). The cause of death was given as ‘1a Progressive Muscular Atrophy. No P.M.’ and was certified by C. Dale Roberts M.B.. E.N. Morgan, Registrar, registered the death on 14th March 1930 and the informant was N.E. Barton, daughter, of  The Forge, Slimbridge. Ellen’s burial took place at Slimbridge on 17th March.

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William Barton died on 17th October 1936 at The Forge, Slimbridge. He was described on his death certificate as an eighty-two-year-old Retired Blacksmith (Master). The cause of death was given as ‘1a Carcinomatosis Cachexia, 1b Carcinoma of the liver – Certified by B.W. day Fayle MB.’ E.A. Morgan, Registrar, registered the death on 17th October and the informant was N.E. Barton, daughter of the Forge, Slimbridge, who was present at death.

‘Judge’ Barton was laid to rest on 21st October in the churchyard at Slimbridge with his wife and son, Harry.

The will and codicil were proved at Gloucester on 1st December 1936 and Frank and Burland were sworn as the surviving executors. The gross value of the estate was £578.17.0d.

Account: The Late Miss (Louisa) Drew to Wm Barton, Slimbridge 1891:

January 31st 1 shoe 8d

February 19th 2 shoes 2 removes 2s –0d

April 6th 1 eye and hook on cart 8d

April 20th 4 shoes 2s-8d (debt 6s-0d)

June 2nd 4 removes 1s-4d

June 29th 4 shoes 2s 8d (4s-0d)

Total: 10s-0d Settled August 26th 1891 William Barton

Mr Morgan of the Patch supplied goods to local builders:

1898 – Oct 14th Mr W. Barton 1x 2ft length of 52 spouting 8d paid

1900 – Feb 20th Mr W. Barton 19 and a half lbs of sheet lead at 3d 4s 10d

1902 – July 8th Mr W. Barton 34 ft run of match board 6” x five eighths. Paid

1904 – May 14th Mr W. Barton 1x 4” Angle 9d Paid some time

Mike Morgan re above: “Mr Morgan of the Patch” – Henry John Morgan of Cypress House, Shepherd’s Patch, Slimbridge (the house still exists). My great grand-father and per the 1901 Census a builder (see Ancestry).

 

The Trustees of the Will of Mr Samuel Martin to Mr William Barton Conveyance of a Messuage and premises at Slimbridge in Gloucestershire Dated 11th August 1897:

‘This Indenture made the Eleventh  day of August One thousand eight hundred and ninety seven Between George Cooper Chandler of Haresfield in Gloucestershire Farmer and Frederick Hawkins Bretherton of the City of Gloucester Solicitor (who are hereinafter called the Vendors) of the one part and William Barton of Slimbridge in Gloucestershire Blacksmith of the other part. Whereas by an Indenture dated the Seventeenth day of August One thousand eight hundred and seventy two and made between Edward Phillimore of the first part Sarah Martin of the second part and Samuel Martin of the third part the Messuage land and hereditaments hereinafter described were duly conveyed and assured unto and to the use of the said  Samuel Martin his executors administrators and assigns for the residue of a term of one thousand years. And whereas the said Samuel Martin duly made his last will on the Thirtieth day of April One thousand eight hundred and ninety whereby after making a devise not affecting the said hereditaments he gave all the rest of his real estate unto the Vendors upon trust as soon as conveniently could be after his decease to sell the same and apply the proceeds thereof as directed in the said will of which he appointed the vendors joint executors. And whereas the said Samuel Martin died on the First day of June last and his said will with a codicil thereto not affecting the said hereditaments was duly proved at Gloucester by the vendors and whereas by a deed poll dated the day before this indenture the vendors enlarged the said term of years into an estate in fee simple.  And whereas the Vendors in execution of the aforesaid trust for sale have contracted with the said William Barton for the sale to him of the said Messuage land and hereditaments for the sum of Two hundred pounds. Now this Indenture witnesseth that in consideration of Two hundred pounds sterling paid by the said William Barton to the vendors the receipt whereof they hereby acknowledge the vendors as such trustees as aforesaid hereby convey unto the said William Barton All that Messuage or Dwellinghouse situate nearly opposite the Parish Churchyard in the Village and Parish of Slimbridge in Gloucestershire with the Blacksmith’s shop garden and small orchard thereto adjoining and belonging bounded on the North East side thereof by the High road through the village and at the back on the South West side partly by the garden of a Messuage belonging to George Nicholls and partly by land forming part of The Malthouse Farm on the North West side by the said Messuage belonging to George Nicholls and the aforesaid garden thereof and on the South East side partly by a Messuage and garden belonging to William Drinkwater and partly by a private roadway leading out of the said High Road to the said land belonging to the Malthouse Farm. And which said Messuage land and hereditaments hereby conveyed were formerly in the occupation of John Pearce, Joseph Pearce and Alice Pearce successively but have been now for many years past in the occupation of the said William Barton as tenant thereof. To hold the same unto and to the use of the said William Barton in simple fee. In witness whereof the said parties to these presents have hereunto set their hands and seals the day and year hereinbefore written.

Geo Cooper Chandler

Fred H. Bretherton

Signed sealed and delivered by the above named George Cooper Chandler and Frederick Hawkins Bretherton in the presence of me.

Thos. S. Bennett, Clerk to Bretherton Son & Boughton, Solrs, Gloucester.’

Statutory Mortgage of a Messuage land and premises at Slimbridge in Gloucestershire to secure £140 with interest at £4 per cent. Mr William Barton to Mrs Elizabeth Grimes and Mr F.H. Bretherton Dated 11th August 1897. To Mr William Barton Reconveyance Dated 23rd July 1913.

This Indenture made by way of Statutory Mortgage this Eleventh day of August One thousand eight hundred and ninety seven between William Barton of Slimbridge in Gloucestershire Blacksmith of the one part and Elizabeth Grimes Widow and Frederick Hawkins Bretherton Solicitor both of the City of Gloucester and hereinafter referred to as the Mortgagees of the other part. Witnesseth that in consideration of One hundred and forty pounds sterling lent and paid by the Mortgagees out of moneys belonging to them on a joint account to the said William Barton the receipt whereof he acknowledges He the said William Barton as Mortgagor and Beneficial Owner hereby conveys unto the Mortgagees All that All that Messuage or Dwellinghouse situate nearly opposite the Parish Churchyard in the Village and Parish of Slimbridge in Gloucestershire with the Blacksmith’s shop garden and small orchard thereto adjoining and belonging bounded on the North East side thereof by the High road through the village and at the back on the South West side partly by the garden of a Messuage belonging to George Nicholls and partly by land forming part of The Malthouse Farm on the North West side by the said Messuage belonging to George Nicholls and the aforesaid garden thereof and on the South East side partly by a Messuage and garden belonging to William Drinkwater and partly by a private roadway leading out of the said High Road to the said land belonging to the Malthouse Farm. And which said Messuage land and hereditaments hereby conveyed were formerly in the occupation of John Pearce, Joseph Pearce and Alice Pearce successively but have been now for many years past in the occupation of the said William Barton as tenant and have now by an Indenture bearing even date herewith been duly conveyed to him in simple fee by the Trustees of the Will of the late owner thereof namely Samuel Martin.  To hold the same unto and to the use of the Mortgagees in simple fee by way of mortgage for securing payment on the Eleventh day of February next of the principal sum of One hundred and forty pounds as the mortgage money with interest thereon at the rate of Four pounds per centum per annum. And the said William Barton hereby covenants with the Mortgagees that he will forthwith insure the said Messuage and buildings in the Law Union and Crown Fire and Life Insurance company or in some other Insuarance Office in England to be approved of by the Mortgagees in his and their joint names to the amount of at least One hundred and fifty pounds and continue the same so insured whilst the said sum of One hundred and forty pounds or any part thereof shall remain due on this security. And that in the event of any accident by fire happening to the said Messuage and buildings the Mortgagees shall receive the money to become payable by virtue of such insurance to the extent or on account of the money which shall be then due on this security. In witness whereof the said parties to these presents have hereunto set their hands and seals the day and year first herein before. William Barton. Signed sealed and delivered by the above named William Barton in the presence of me Gilbert D. Dix, Clerk to Bretherton Son & Boughton, solrs, Gloicester.

This Indenture made by way of Statutory re-conveyance of Mortgage the twenty third day of July Nineteen hundred and thirteen Between Elizabeth Grimes and Frederick Hawkins Bretherton to the named and described in the foregoing Indenture of one part and the above named William Barton of the other part. Witnesseth that in consideration of all principal money and interest due under that Indenture having been paid of which principal and interest the same Elizabeth Grimes and Frederick Hawkins Bretherton hereby acknowledge the receipt They the Mortgagees hereby convey to the said William Barton All the land and Hereditaments now vested in the said Elizabeth Grimes and Frederick Hawkins Bretherton under the said Indenture To hold to and to the use of the said William Barton in fee simple discharged  from all principal money and interest incurred by and from all claims and demands under the same Indenture. In witness whereof the said parties to these present have hereunto set their hands and seals the day and year first before written.

Elizabeth Grimes

Frederick H. Bretherton

Signed sealed and delivered by the above named Elizabeth Grimes in the presence of me

Elizabeth Grimes – (illegible)

Signed sealed and delivered by the above named Frederick Hawkins Bretherton in presence of  Frank S. Bretherton, Solr., Gloster.

Mr William Barton to Mr Daniel Crump Mortgage of 2 messuages at Slimbridge in Gloucestershire to secure £300 with interest at Four pounds per cent. Dated 24th July 1913.

This Indenture made the twenty fourth day of July nineteen hundred and thirteen Between William Barton of Slimbridge in Gloucestershire Blacksmith of one part and Daniel Crump of Avoca Cottage Blackrock in the County of Dublin in Ireland Gentleman (hereinafter called the Mortgager) of the other part. Whereas by an Indenture dated the same day as this Indenture and made between George Hathaway of one part and the said William Barton of the other part the hereditaments first hereinafter described have been conveyed to and to the use of the said William Barton in fee simple. And whereas he is also seized for an estate in fee simple free from incumbrances of the hereditaments secondly hereinafter described. And whereas the mortgager has agreed to advance and lend to the said William Barton the sum of Three hundred pounds upon security of a mortgage of the said hereditaments first and secondly hereinafter described. Now the Indenture witnesseth that in consideration of Three hundred pounds sterling lent and paid by the mortgager to the said William Barton of which he hereby acknowledges the receipt the said William Barton as Mortgagor hereby conveys to the mortgager First all that cottage or tenement with the garden and small orchard adjoining and belonging to it and occupied with it situated in the main street of the Village of Slimbridge in Gloucestershire lately occupied by George Nicholls (recently deceased) and bounded on the North East by the said Street and adjacent also to the hereditaments secondly hereinafter described And secondly all that messuage situated nearly opposite the Parish Churchyard in the Village of Slimbridge aforesaid with the Blacksmith’s shop garden and small orchard thereto adjoining and belonging all occupied by the said William Barton being bounded on the North East side thereof by the aforesaid main street of the village and at the back on the South West side partly by the garden of a Messuage hereinbefore described and partly by land forming part of The Malthouse Farm on the North West side by the said Messuage and garden first hereinbefore described and on the South East partly  by a Messuage belonging to William Drinkwater and partly by a private roadway leading to the Malthouse Farm. To hold to and to the use of the mortgagee in fee simple by way of mortgage to secure payment on the twenty fourth day of January next of the principal sum of Three hundred pounds as the mortgage money with interest thereon at the rate of Four pounds per centum per annum. And the said William Barton hereby covenants with the mortgagee that he will forthwith insure and while any money remains due on this security keep insured the said messuages hereinbefore described in the Law Union and Rock Insurance Office or in some other office approved by the Mortgagee for not less or sum than Three hundred pounds and that in case of accident by fire happening thereto the motgagee shall be entitled to receive the money payable under such insurance to the extent or on account of any money then due on this security. In witness whereof the said parties to these presents have hereunto set their hands and seals the day and year first before written.

William Barton

Signed sealed and delivered by the before named William Barton in the presence of me Fred H. Bretherton Solr. Gloster.

Letter from Percy Barton to Florence Noad:

‘May 22nd 1912…I shall be pleased to see you Sunday if the Captain does not come back but if he should let me know in time to let Maud know or they would be wondering where I was. Will drove the family & Mabel to Thornbury last Sunday & Maurice drove Mother & Nora to meet them there. Father wanted me to bike down to my cousins at Standall so I took Maurice’s bike round to your home & took Arthur for a ride. Well we soon got to Standell then we went on to Thornbury it took us some time to find out where they had put up & when we did find it we were told they had gone to the Coffee Tavern for a tea. We then soon found them, we had our tea there they had just finished & afterwards we thought of moving homewards. We started from Thornbury 5.30 your home 6.30 so I think we did very well.’

Sale Particulars for the Cottage next to the Forge 1913:

Slimbridge, Gloucestershire. Luce, Young & Alpass Are instructed to sell by auction (subject to conditions), at the White Lion, Cambridge, on Friday 20th June, 1913, at 6 o’clock p.m., All that valuable freehold cottage, garden and orchard with pigstye (sic), situate at Slimbridge, Glos., lately occupied by Mr G. Nicholls, deceased. The Orchard is well stocked with Fruit Trees. The Garden is productive and there is a supply of Water on the premises. To view apply to Mr. S. Merrett, Slimbridge, and for further particulars to the Auctioneers, Berkeley and Thornbury or to Messrs. Wood & Awdry, Solicitors, Chippenham.’

Letter from Percy Barton to Florence Noad:

‘June 22nd 1913…Many thanks for your letter which I am always most pleased to receive. You may guess I wish I was going to be with you today but no such luck. I am very much looking forward for the time to come for your holiday. I am sure we have happier times together every time we meet. Fancy you starting your house linen do you begin to think dearest that you will soon require it. Well dearest if you have not already heard you will be surprised to hear I have got a house. Father bought George Nicholl’s property Friday it cost £260 we have Harry Hurd to thank for the last £60 he came over Monday & Father asked him if he was going in for it & he said he did not think so as he said it would be worth much more to us than anyone else & in the finish he was the very one to run against us. I shall never think but very little of him now. Dearest you will be able to have some fowls & flower borders & I shall be able to keep a pig so when next year comes I think if you are willing we shall be able to make a start. I have been ringing this morning. Arthur went to Wickwar ringing yesterday we are very busy so I could not get off. I started mowing my new orchard last night…’

Receipt Dated 26th July 1929:

We Gracella Annie Crump of “The Bijou” Kingsholm Road in the City of Gloucester Widow and Olive Grace Barbour the wife of Stanley Reginald Barbour a Lieutenant of the Royal Air Force both of “The Bijou” aforesaid the Personal Representatives of the within named Daniel Crump who died on the Thirty first day of July One thousand nine hundred and twenty seven and to whose Estate Letters of Administration (with the will annexed) were granted to us on the twenty fourth day of August following out of the Gloucester District Probate Registry hereby acknowledge that we have this Twenty sixth day of July One thousand nine hundred and twenty-nine received the sum of Three hundred pounds representing the principal money secured by the within written Mortgage together with all interest and costs the payment having been made by the within named William Barton of Slimbridge in the County of Gloucester. In witness whereof we have hereunto set our hands and seals the day and year first above written.

Signed sealed and delivered by the said Gracella Annie Crump in the presence of (illegible) Solicitor Gloucester

Signed sealed and delivered by the said Olive Grace Barbour in the presence of (illegible) 6 Pall Mall London SW1 Bank Clerk

Pencil Note: The premises first described in the Mortgage have been sold but Messrs Grimes Co (sp?) omitted to put a memo of the sale on this deed.

The Will and Codicil of William Barton:

‘This is the Last Will and Testament of me William Barton of Slimbridge in Gloucestershire Blacksmith of which I appoint my Wife Ellen Barton and my sons Frank William Barton and Burland Oswald Barton to be the Executors and Trustees. I bequeath to my said Wife a legacy of Fifty Pounds to be paid as soon as can be after

my decease and I bequeath the rest of my personal estate to my said Trustees upon trust for my said Wife during her life. At her decease I bequeath my household furniture and effects to my daughter Winifred Annie Barton absolutely and I direct my surviving Trustees to convert the residue of my personal estate into money and after payment there-out to my said daughter of a legacy of one hundred pounds to pay and divide the remaining money to and between her and my five daughters namely Maud Walker, Fanny Barton, Elsie Mary Rush, Mabel Louise Barton and Nora Ellen Barton (or such of my said six daughters as shall survive me) in equal shares. I devise all my real estate to my said Trustees upon trust to sell the same as soon as may be after my decease (but during my Wife’s life only with her consent) and to stand possessed of the nett proceeds of such sale and of the rents and profits thereof  until sale for my said Wife during her life and after her death upon trust to pay and divide the same to and equally between my said six daughters or such of them as shall survive me. And I declare that the issue living at my death of any of my said daughters who shall predecease me shall take equally between them the shares of my personal estate and of the proceeds of sale of my real estate which their deceased parent would have taken had such parent me. In witness whereof I hereto subscribe my name this Twenty eighth day of  September Nineteen hundred and twenty seven.

Signed by the Testator in presence of us who in his and each other’s presence at the same time hereto subscribe our names as witnesses. William Barton. Percival J. Bretherton, Solicitor, Gloucester. Nora D. James, his Clerk.

This is a codicil to the foregoing will of me William Barton I revoke the bequest of my household furniture and effects to my daughter Winifred Annie Barton and bequeath the same to her and to my daughter Norah Ellen Barton in equal shares and in case of any dispute or difference arising as to the division thereof  I declare that my Executors shall decide between them I also revoke the legacy of one hundred pounds to the said Winifred Annie Barton and instead I bequeath legacies of Fifty pounds each to her and the said Norah Ellen Barton. In witness whereof I hereto subscribe my name this Ninth day of September Nineteen hundred and twenty nine.

Signed by the Testator in presence of us who in his and each other’s presence at the same time hereto subscribe our names as witnesses. William Barton. Basil P. Peplow, William J. Merrett, Clerks to Messrs Bretherton & sons Solrs, Gloucester.

Testator died at Slimbridge on 17th October 1936

Said Will and Codicil proved at Gloucester on 1st Dec. 1936 by said F.W. Barton of Filsdown (sic) near Dursley, Glos, Milk Retailer and sd B.O. Barton of 130 Stuarts Road, Yardley, B’ham, Baker, surviving Exors above named.

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Newspaper 1933:

‘Mr William Barton of Slimbridge with his daughter, Mrs Walker, Mr Walker (grandson) and Mr Dennis Walker (great-grandson)’

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William Barton with his son-in-law, William Thomas Walker (1877-1955) and grandson, William Leonard Walker (1906c-1994) in about 1934

 

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Gravestone inscription:

 (West face) In loving memory of Henry John Barton who fell asleep Feb 9th 1911 Aged 25 years. ‘Though gone from sight To memory ever dear’. (East) In loving memory of William Barton who departed this life October 17th 1936 Aged 82 years ‘Eternal Joy – Eternal Rest’. (South) In loving memory of Ellen the beloved wife of William Barton who departed this life March 13th 1930 aged 72 years ‘I waited for the Lord’.

Description: White Marble Cross on a three-tiered base with a decorated cross. Ivy leaf design on West face with a dove in the centre of the cross.

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William Barton with his youngest daughter Nora Ellen Marsh (1901-1980s) and eldest daughter Maud Walker (1877-1955).

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Gloucester Journal, Saturday October 24th, 1936

‘Aged Slimbridge Resident. At Slimbridge Parish Church on Wednesday the remains of Mr. William Barton, locally known as “Judge”, were laid to rest. He was 82 years of age. Mr. Barton had been a resident of Slimbridge all his life. Respected and loved by all who knew him, he carried on the village Smithy for several years, and leaves several sons and daughters, among them Mr. Frank Barton, who is a well-known in the hunting field and Mr. Percy Barton of the Narles Farm, Cambridge. There was a very large attendance and the bearers were four nephews. The newly-inducted rector (the Rev. W.H. Thomas officiated.’

Obituary 1936:

‘Blacksmith for over 50 years – Funeral at Slimbridge of Mr W. Barton – The funeral of Mr William Barton, a well-known Slimbridge resident, took place at Slimbridge Parish Church on Wednesday. The Rev. W.H. Thomas, vicar, officiated and Mrs Thomas presided at the organ.

Mr Barton, who was 82 years of age, carried on business as a blacksmith, which he took over from his father, for over fifty years. He retired four or five years ago and kept in good health until the earlier part of this year.

Among the principal mourners present at the funeral were Mrs Walker, Mrs Rush, Mrs Hall, Miss F. Barton, Miss M. Barton, Mr F. Barton, Mr A. Barton, Mr P Barton, Mr m. Barton, and Mr B. Barton (daughters and sons), Mrs A. Barton, Mrs M. Barton, Mrs P. Barton, Mr W. Walker, and Mr F. Hall (daughters-in-law and sons-in-law), Mr and Mrs Barton (brother and sister-in-law), Mr H. Barton (grandson), Mr and Mrs J. Taylor, Mr G. Merrett, Mr J. Walkley, Miss Merrett (nephews and nieces).

Included in the general congregation were Major H.W. Morgan and Mr Godfrey-Morgan, Mrs F. Cobb, Mr R.C. Hill, Mr P.J. Brotherton (sic), Gloucester, Miss Tudor and Mrs H.T. Tudor, Mr G. Morgan, Mr J. Noad, Mr H. Stone, Mr A.H. Smith, Mr F.W. Brinkworth, Mr N. Cornock, Mr F. Harris, Mr J. Goodrich, Mr T. Richards, Mr J. Merrett, Mrs J. Noad, Mrs G. Tudor, Mrs Osbourne, Mr and Mrs Thornhill.

There were no floral tributes by Mr Barton’s special request. It was his wish that anyone intending to send flowere should make a donation to the Gloucester Royal Infirmary instead.

The bearers were four nephews – Messrs F. Cookley, J Woodward, E. Sims and H. Barton and the funeral arrangements were carried out by Mr W.H. Stone of Slimbridge.

Among those who were unable to attend but who sent messages were Dr B.W.D. Fayle, Mr J. Shipp, Mr E. Cullimore and Mr R.J. Hawkins.’

Mike Morgan re above: Major H W Morgan – Henry William, one of Alfred Edward Morgan’s (q. v.) siblings.

Advertisement 1936:

‘The Forge, Slimbridge, Glos. Situated on the ‘Bus Route about 4 miles from Dursley and 12 from Gloucester. A substantial freehold property which J. Pearce Pope & Sons have received instructions from the Executors of the late William Barton to sell by Auction on Wednesday November 18th, 1936, at 2 o’clock sharp.

Comprising three bedrooms and attic, two living rooms, scullery, larder, coal house and E.C. Adjoining the house is the Blacksmith’s Shop complete with forge and bellows. Ample outbuildings, good supply of water, productive garden and a young orchard.

Following the sale of Property the surplus household furniture, outdoor effects, 50 small head of poultry and blacksmith’s tools will be sold. Further particulars from Messrs. Bretherton and Son, Solicitors, Clarence Street, or the Auctioneers, St Aldate Chambers, Gloucester.’

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William Barton with his son-in-law, Frank Hall and grandson, Thomas William Hall in about 1934

Further Poster Advertisement

First Paragraph as above with additional details:

‘Comprising a Sitting Room with grate and corner cupboard; Living Room fitted with useful cupboard, open grate and baking oven; Scullery fitted with sink and pump; Larder and Coal House. Three bedrooms and attic over.

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Outside are Wash House with boiler, E.C.; Two pigsties; Meal House and Boiler; Large Shed built of timber with galvanized iron roof; Fowl House with Shed attached; and two more small sheds.

Productive Garden with concrete paths. Well with ample supply of water and Tool Shed.

Well maintained Pasture Orchard having a separate entrance to the road, and planted with about 50 trees, in all about 2 Roods 24 Poles.

Adjoining the House is The Blacksmith’s Shop complete with forge and bellows.

Note:- The shoeing business which is the only one in the district has been carried out until the last few years by the late owner: and a good opening for this type of business is still assured.’

Final paragraph as above.

Conveyance of a messuage or dwellinghouse together with the Blacksmith’s Shop known as “The Forge”, Slimbridge in the County of Gloucester. Scott & Fowler, Gloucester, Dated 18th December 1936. The Personal Representatives of Mr William Barton to Mr. Lionel Thornhill.

This Conveyance made the Eighteenth day of December One thousand nine hundred and thirty six between Frank William Barton of Tilsdown near Dursley in the County of Gloucester Milk Retailer and Burland Oswald Barton of Number 130 Stuarts Road, Fordley, Birmingham, Baker (hereinafter called “the Vendors”) of the one part and Lewis Thornhill of Hams Hill Coaley in the County of Gloucester Retired Railway Signalman (hereinafter called “the Purchaser”) of the other part Whereas:

  • William Barton being at his death seised in fee simple in possession of the property hereinafter described free from incumbrances died on the seventeenth day of October One thousand nine hundred and thirty six having by his will dated the Twenty eighth day of September One thousand nine hundred and twenty seven appointed the Vendors to be his Executors who on the First day of December One thousand nine hundred and thirty six duly proved his said will together with the codicil thereto (which did not affect the said appointment of executors) at the Gloucester District Probate Registry.
  • The vendors (who have not made any previous Conveyance or Assent as respects the legal estate hereinafter conveyed) as the Personal Representatives of the said William Barton deceased have agreed to sell to the Purchaser the property hereinafter described and the fee simple thereof in possession free from incumbrances at the price of Five hundred and ten pounds. Now in pursuance of the said agreement and in consideration of the sum of  Five hundred and ten pounds now paid by the Purchaser to the Vendors as such Personal Representatives as aforesaid (the receipt of which sum the Vendors hereby acknowledge)

This deed witnesseth as follows:- The Vendors or Personal Representatives of the said William Barton deceased hereby convey unto the Purchaser All that Messuage or Dwellinghouse situate nearly opposite the Parish Churchyard in the Village and Parish of Slimbridge in Gloucestershire with the Blacksmith’s shop garden and small orchard thereto adjoining and belonging bounded on the North East by the high road through the village and at the back on the South West side partly by the garden of a Messuage belonging to Ernest Tudor and partly by land forming part of The Malthouse Farm on the North West by the said Messuage and garden now or lately belonging to Ernest Tudor and on the South East side partly by a Messuage and garden belonging to William Drinkwater and partly by a private roadway leading out of the said High Road to the said land belonging to the Malthouse Farm.Which said Messuageand land were formerly in the occupation of  the said William Barton but are now void and are intended for occupation by the Purchaser to hold unto the Purchaser in fee simple. And the Vendors hereby acknowledge the right of the Purchaser to production of the Probate of the Will and Codicil of the said William Barton and to delivery of copies thereof.

In witness whereof the said parties to these presents have hereunto set their hands and seals the day and year first before written.

Signed sealed and delivered by the said Frank William Barton in the presence of L.R. Steel, Baker, Slimbridge.

Signed sealed and delivered by the said Burland Oswald Barton in the presence of A. Harding, Baker & Confectioner, Royal Steam Bakery, Yardley, Birmingham.

Reminiscences of her Grandparents and Slimbridge by Doris Bootman, daughter of Elsie Barton:

‘I don’t remember the first time I came to my grandparents but I was always reminded that when I was 2 I put my tongue out at my granddad – quite reprehensible behaviour 80 years ago. However, we continued to come once a year or more, at first, Mother, my brother Wilfrid and myself – my father never had a whole weeks holiday until after the Second World War. As Wilfrid grew older he stayed at home with Dad but it may not have been his choice. As for me, with cousins next door to the Forge it was a perfect holiday. I was happy too with the jobs I collected – in the morning I fetched milk from Malthouse Farm, we had breakfast, then I went up the garden to the orchard with Grandad. On the first day I had to count the fowl as Grandad slowly let them out of the fowl house. The first job in August though was to pick up all the fallen apples before the pigs and fowl were let out. There were mostly white Wyandoltes but a few ‘Indian Game’ from eggs given to him. Regular jobs for me included weeding in the front or back garden – elevensies was always a mug of cider at the end of a row. Also with my own small axe I provided a constant supply of sticks to boil the kettle – hung over the grate – for afternoon tea. One of my early vivid memories is of me yelling on the grass because Uncle Percy’s sow was snuffling me after I had fallen off the gate between the two orchards. Grandad took me in his pony and trap to the Doctor who put a  wooden splint on my broken wrist and gave me a penny to go on the horses at the Fair.

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As I grew up I spent a lot of time with my cousin Marian when not being involved in hay-making harvesting or other jobs, we walked parts of the countryside. We went to Whiteway Colony. (I was) particularly pleased to get there because it was off the only map we had! We found the monument in Nibley to the very first man who translated the Bible into English. We went to Sharpness along the tow-path, earlier there had been a boat to Gloucester but that stopped. It was fascinating going round the Docks, ships from Scandinavia and Russia with cargoes of wood. Up the hill too was a playground overlooking the junction of the river and the canal.

We went often to the New Grounds – given homemade lemonade and cake by Mrs Bowditch before we paddled, sometimes riskily because of the gullies or went on the breakwater. There were many, many shorter walks sometimes in the evening getting a lift back from our cousin Mark Steele, returning from his bakery in Cam. We went in the ‘Dickie’ seat.

Days were busy not Sundays though only the animals were fed. After the midday meal Grandad fetched the family Bible and read himself a chapter – when Grandma was bed ridden he took the Bible upstairs and read with her.

I remember at least one Christmas at Slimbridge Grandad played Naf with me by the light of the oil lamp. There was a New Yeqar’s Eve Party at the White Lion in Cambridge run by two sisters – Doris and ‘Chick’ Moss. I remember we walked home through the fields while the bells were still ringing out.

Grandad’s cottage was against the Forge which had wide doors open to the road. Grandad had really retired but, at least once, I had to jump up and down with the arm to keep the fire going in the hearth. Outside was the big grind-stone for sharpening scythes and sickles – it seemed a long job turning the handle.

There was quite a big living room in the (cottage) with an iron grate and oven as well as a big long oven. Grandad had made for Grandma to bake all the bread she had to make for all the family – six boys and six girls over the years.

The Pump in the Scullery brought water from the well but for washing ourselves we fetched a pan of water from the barrel of rainwater outside the back shed. My mother said that she remembered the door being cut through  – previously as with many country cottages there had only been one door. There was also a little room, always clean and tidy and only used on special occasions.

My mother went to Grandad’s during the illness of Grandma and later Grandad so that her sister at home could have a month’s holiday but in Worcester. So we were always there in August and picked the orchard fruit trees.’


ELLEN BARTON, Great Grandmother of Richard Barton

Daughter of Isaac Pick and Selena (nee Cook)

Wife of William Barton II

Mother of Edward Percy Barton

Also Mother of Maud Walker, Frank William, Fanny, Elsie Mary Rush, Henry John, Mabel Louisa, Albert Edgar, Morris George, Burland Oswald, Winifred Annie Hall, Wilfred James and Nora Ellen Marsh

Ellen Pick was born on 20th November 1857 at Purton, the second daughter of Isaac Pick and his wife Selena.  She was baptised at Berkeley on 3rd January 1858. Her father was an agricultural labourer of Prior’s Wood having worked earlier as a shoemaker of Purton.

In the 1861 census she was at home with her parents and sister and was described as three-years-old and born in Berkeley.

Tragedy hit the family because her father died on 26th February 1862 aged thirty-three-years and, on 10th March, Ellen’s sister, Mary, died aged six years. Ellen’s mother Selena eventually re-married and she became the wife of John Carter a coal merchant of Wanswell in 1875. Her new husband, John Carter, died three years later. At the time of his death he was described as a sixty-five-year-old grocer of Purton.

In 1871 Ellen Pick was working as a domestic servant at Church Farm, Breadstone (although it would not have been called that then as St Michael’s tin church was not opened until 1878). She was described as a thirteen-year-old unmarried servant born at Purton. Her employer was Charles Harris, a thirty-year-old farmer of ninety-eight acres who employed one labourer and was himself born at Cam. His thirty-one-year-old wife Elizabeth was born at Rangeworthy and their child Frederick was aged two years and born at Breadstone. The farm labourer was Cam born Thomas Jones and he was still with the family at Church Farm in 1891.

Ellen married William Barton on 1st May 1877 at Slimbridge. The bride was described on the marriage certificate as the daughter of Isaac Pick, a labourer, and the bridegroom as a blacksmith, son of John Barton, blacksmith. Bother the William and Ellen were living in the parish of Slimbridge at the time of the wedding.

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Great Grandmother Ellen Barton (nee Pick) (1857-1930) with her eldest child Maud (1877-1955) in about 1878

 

During the following year the young couple took over the running of the Forge at Churchend on the death of her father-in-law, John Barton on 4th February 1878. When her step father, John Carter, died on 17th October 1878, the informant was his ‘daughter in law’ (sic) Ellen Barton of Purton, Berkeley, who was present at the death.

William and Ellen Barton brought up thirteen children. The youngest son, Wilfred James, died aged six months in 1900 and their second son, Henry John, died aged twenty-five years in 1911.

In the 1881 census William was described as a twenty-seven-year-old blacksmith of Churchend, Slimbridge. Ellen was aged twenty-three-years and born in Berkeley. Their children were Maud aged three years and Frank William aged one year. Both were born in Slimbridge. With them was William’s brother, Henry Barton, who was aged nineteen, a blacksmith, born in Slimbridge.

In the 1891 census return William was described as thirty-six-years-old blacksmith. His wife Ellen was thirty-four-years-old and was born in Purton. Their children were Maud aged thirteen; Frank W. aged eleven; Fanny aged nine; Elsie M. aged seven; Henry J. aged five; Mabel L. aged three and Albert E. aged one year.

In 1901 William was described as a forty-six-year-old blacksmith born in Slimbridge. Ellen was forty-three-years-old and born in Purton Their children were Elsie, aged seventeen; Henry aged fifteen years who was listed as the son of a blacksmith; Mabel aged thirteen; Albert aged eleven; Percy aged nine; Maurice aged seven; Burland aged five and Winifred aged three years. All the children were born in Slimbridge.

The marriages at Slimbridge of her eldest daughter, Maud in 1904 and that of Elsie in 1912 were major celebrations and were the excuses for large family photographs.

At the time of the 1911 census William Barton was a fifty-six-year-old blacksmith working on his own account and born in Slimbridge. He was father of thirteen children of whom eleven were still living. Ellen was aged fifty-three-years and born in Purton. Children at home included Mabel aged twenty-three and sons Percy aged nineteen, Maurice aged seventeen, Burland aged fifteen who were all working and Nora aged ten years who was still at school. The Forge had five rooms.

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Ellen Barton with one of her daughters (1920’s)

Ellen Barton died on 13th March 1930 at The Forge, Slimbridge. She was described on her death certificate as the seventy-two-year-old Wife of William Barton a Blacksmith (Master). The cause of death was given as ‘1a Progressive Muscular Atrophy. No P.M.’ and was certified by C. Dale Roberts M.B.. E.N. Morgan, Registrar, registered the death on 14th March 1930 and the informant was N.E. Barton, daughter, of  The Forge, Slimbridge.

Ellen’s burial took place at Slimbridge on 17th March. She was described in the church register as of ‘The Forge, Slimbridge’.

Obituary March 1930:

‘The Late Mrs W. Barton – There was a large attendance at Slimbridge Parish Church on Monday at the funeral of Mrs W. Barton, wife of Mr W. Barton of Slimbridge, who died on Thursday last in her seventy-third year. She had been in failing health for several years.

The Rev R. H. Sutch officiated and the principal mourners present were Mr W. Barton (husband), Messrs. F.W., A, E.P., M.G., and B.O. Barton (sons), Mrs Walker, Mrs Rush, Mrs Hall, Misses F.M. and N. Barton (daughters), Mr Walker and Mr Hall (sons-in-law), Mrs A.E. Barton, Mrs E.P. Barton, and Mrs M.G. Barton (daughters-in-law), Mrs Powell, Mrs Drinkwater (sisters-in-law), Mr H. Barton (brother-in-law), Mr J. Walkley, Miss Merret(sic),Messrs G. Morgan, C Hawkins, N. Cornock, A. W. Pearce, J. Goodrich, H. White, L. Steele, D. Moss, C. Allen, S. Viney, D. Collard, W. Collard, Miss L. Morgan, Miss Workman, Mr P. Bray, Mr W. Nicholls, Mr H. Cobb, Mrs Deacon, Mrs Robins, Mrs Lewis and Mrs Hillier, Mr m. Merret (sic) and many others.

The bearers were Messrs Joe Woodward, H. Barton, E. Sims, and Frank Cookley (nephews) and Mr W. Stone, Slimbridge, carried out the funeral arrangements.

Wreaths were sent from Her Sorrowing Husband; Maud, Will and family; Frank and Maud;  Fanny, Mabel and Nora; Elsie and Jack; Bert, Mary, Sophie and family; Percy, Florrie and family; Morris and Muriel; Burland, Lily and little Bernard; Winnie, Frank and little Tom; Len, Evie and May; Wilfred and Doris; Seymour and family; Aunt Eliza; Rye Court; Fanny and William Drinkwater; All at Moreton Valence; Mrs Collard; Mrs Shipp; Mr Levy (Birmingham); Mr and Mrs Harding and family (Birmingham), Mr and Mrs Hartley Tudor and family; Nurse Smith; Mr Healey and family (Birmingham); Mr and Mrs Smith and Jack (Worcester); Edith Thompson; Mr and Mrs Ernest Tudor and Mrs Lane; Mr and Mrs t. Hawkins; Mr and Mrs D. Moss and family.’


FRANK WILLIAM BARTON, Great Uncle of Richard Barton

 

Frank Barton was born on 25th October 1879 and baptised on 7th December 1879 at Slimbridge, the eldest son of William and Ellen Barton. He was at home and aged eleven years at the time of the 1891 census. He joined the Royal Gloucestershire Hussars soon after the outbreak of the Second Boer War and when he returned home he received a hero’s welcome. In 1902 he and his brother Harry were bell-ringers at Slimbridge.

Newspaper Articles from 1902:
 ‘Enthusiastic Reception at Berkeley – Triumphal Progress from Berkeley Road Station.
Last (Friday) evening the Berkeley contingent of the Gloucestershire Imperial Yeomanry received a hearty welcome on arriving home.
As our readers are well aware, immediately it became known that the local men were on their way back from south Africa, an influential committee was formed at Berkeley to arrange to give them a reception worthy of the occasion. It consisted of Mr Peter, Mr W. Legge, Dr Awdry, Mr G. Clark, Mr W. Harding, Mr R. Bailey, Mr W. Mackintosh, Mr G. Griffiths, Mr R. G.Turner and Mr C.A. Arkell.
Mr Mackintosh accepted the position of hon. Secretary, and an appeal which was made speedily resulted in no less than £70 being subscribed for the purpose of doing honour to the men who had done such good service in the nation’s time of need.
Last night’s proceedings were a sequel to an interesting scene witnessed at Berkeley Road on 8th January 1900.
On this date nine local men were given a hearty send-off to the war. Of the number who left these shores soon after, four have died in their country’s service, one was invalided home, another reached Wotton-under-Edge last week, and the remainder had a hearty welcome back to the fruitful Berkeley Valle last evening.
The names of the returned Yeoman are – Sergeant –Major B.W. Neale, Berkeley, Trooper R. Neale, Berkeley, Shoeingsmith Barton, Slimbridge. The first two young fellows are brothers and the interesting letters of the Sergeant-Major, published in the Gazette from time to time, have been read with the greatest avidity by their many friends.
Long before the arrival of the train, due at Berkeley Road at-3, a large crowd had gathered to meet the heroes. A number had come in by means of vehicles, which were gaily decorated with the Union Jack, others came on cycles, while a number made their way on foot. Scarcely had the khaki-clad men time to alight on the platform than they were besieged with a large crowd of riends, and a deal of hand shaking and embracing took place, amid much -.
The Dursley Volunteer Band struck up “See the Conquering Hero Comes,” and the men were shouldered over the bridge, where the hand shaking was renewed. A halt was made before leaving the station, the band playing “Should old acquaintance be forgot.” A procession was then formed, consisting of vehicles, of which there were about a dozen, cyclists, and pedestrians, and proceeded to Berkeley. Along the road they were eagerly saluted, and flags were displayed at almost every house.
On reaching Berkeley they were met by a very large throng who heartily cheered. A large number of school children were assembled at the school, each waving a Union Jack. The town was freely decorated with flags, bunting etc., and bore a most striking aspect. Almost every window was filled with onlookers and pocket handkerchiefs were freely waved. On the arrival at the market place a halt was made, and several short speeches were delivered amid much rejoicing and many hurrahs.
Alderman Bailey said, to have such men in their midst was an honour. They had brought the Yeomanry of the country into more prominence than had ever been done previously. They had fought well for their King and country, and he felt sure it would be impossible for any words of his to describe what they had gone through (hear, hear). It was impossible for him to tell what they had done. Still, he was proud to see them back home again.
Mr William Legge said he had been deputed to say a few words of welcome to those who had gone out to fight for King and country and had done so in such a splendid manner. They had responded to the call made when the Empire was in danger, and had gone out and braved the dangers of that great country. They had encountered hardships which were not known of at home. One had been able to read of treking 3,700 miles, and for days together being without hadly any food or drink. They had also been under fire for 65 days, which was enough to upset any man’s nerves. They had done honour to their country. The Yeomanry were now looked upon as the finest force in the Empire. He hoped their future would be a prosperous one on their return to civil employment.
Dr Awdry added a few words.
Brief responses having been given, an adjournment was made to the “Berkeley Arms”, where the heroes were supplied with refreshments.
Alderman Bailey proposed the toast of the Gloucester Yeomanry, coupling with the toast the names of the returned Yeomen, and he also made touching reference to the absent ones, some of whom he much regretted to say, would never return.
The toast met with hearty response.’
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And another:
‘Gloucestershire Imperial Yeomanry – Presentation to the Berkeley Troop – As a result of the local subscription some £70 was subscribed and at a luncheon on Tuesday at the Berkeley Arms Hotel the returned members of the Berkeley troop were each presented with a silver tankard, with suitable inscription viz., Sergeant-Major B.W. Neale, Quartermaster-Sergeant Victor C. Young, Lance-Corporal Toulmin, Shoeing-smith Barton, Troopers R. Neale, A. Laver, M.G.-ton, A.E. Morgan, F. Jones, and King (the two latter being unavoidably absent). Lord Fitzhardinge presided, the vice-chair being occupied by Mr T.B. Croome, and the attendance numbered about 60. His lordship proposed “The King” following which Mr W. Legge gave “The Bishop and Clergy and Ministers of all Denominations.” The Rev. Canon Stackhouse responded. Mr C. Scott proposed “The Navy, Army, and Reserved Forces,” to which Sergeant John Cornock replied. Lord Fitzhardinge then proposed “Our Guests,” and said that everybody was delighted to see them back again, looking so fit and well, and if they were a fair sample of the Imperial Yeomanry he did not wonder they had done so well as everybody said they had, it being admitted from all quarters that the Imperial Yeomanry had saved the situation. He then presented the cups to the men, but asked them to leave them to have the inscriptions put on. Sergeant-Major Neale and Quartermaster-Sergeant Young returned tanks on behalf of themselves and their comrades. Mr T. B.Croome proposed the health of Lord and Lady Fitzhardinge, to which his lordship replied. Mr Croome responding. Mr J. Peter gave the health of the hon. Sec. of the fund. Mr W. Mackintosh, who acknowledged the toast. Quartermaster-Sergeant V. Young proposed “The Old Gloucestershire Hussars,” to which Sergeants Martin, Pearce and G. Adams responded.’

Frank was entitled to the Queen’s South Africa Medal under the Army Order 233 issued on 1st October 1902. He was described as Shoeing Smith 5528 F.W. Barton in the 3rd Company of the Infantry Yeomanry and he was also entitled to the date clasp South Africa 1901.

Before the First World War he emigrated and worked on a Canadian Cattle Ranch. In the Canadian Passenger Lists there is record of No 40857 Frank W. Barton, aged thirty years, on 12th June 1909, travelling on the Tunisian from Liverpool to Quebec with £25 in his pocket. He was engaged in farming, C of E. and was heading for Pincher Creek, Alberta. Pincher Creek was near Fort Macleod, south of Calgary.

Pincher Creek: ‘These pinchers depict how we got our name …. The pinchers (a farrier’s tool for trimming a horse’s hooves) were found on the creek bank by a group of prospectors in 1868 and they dubbed the Town, Pincher Creek. Situated in the heart of the Rocky Mountains, Pincher Creek is a spectacular mountain community that today offers everything from skiing to rock climbing, kayaking to fly fishing all year long.

On 9th February 1915 Frank William Barton was attested as a soldier in the Canadian Over-Seas Expeditionary Forces at Macleod taking his oaths before C.W. Jones J.P. He was described as born on 25th October 1880 (sic) and born at Slimbridge, Stonehouse, Gloucestershire. His nearest kin was given as his father W. Barton and Frank was listed as an unmarried Farrier. He said that he had spent ten years in the Gloucester Troop Yeomanry and of that had had fifteen months active service in South Africa.

He was described as Church of England, 5’9 ½ ” tall, with fair complexion, blue eyes, dark brown hair,  with a 38 inch chest when fully expanded with a 4 ½ inch range of expansion. His Medical examination was conducted by W.W. Milburn at Macleod and he was assessed as fit for service in the Expeditionary Forces.

Frank served with the Canadian Cavalry in France during World War I. He married Ada Maud Lord in Dursley Registration District between July and September 1916.

Again in the Canadian Passenger List for 28th June 1919 we find a Frank W. Barton travelling on the Saturnia from Glasgow to Quebec. He was described as Number 55 22 53 Corporal in the CRCR Regt, RCD Unit, 13 CWR, who had a wife as his dependent, was C of E. and was heading for McLeod. On 3rd September 1919 No 50, Frank W. Barton, a farmer of Tillsdown, Dursley, aged thirty-nine-years, travelled from Montreal to Glasgow on the Corsican – Steamship Line the Canadian Pacific Ocean Services Ltd.

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Sometime after the First World War Frank returned home and set up a milk round. He lived at Tilsdown, Dursley. Ada Maud died on 21st March 1951 at Tilsdown and Frank William Barton died on 15th December 1965, aged 86 years, and was buried on 20th December in Dursley Cemetery.

 

 


 

EDWARD PERCY BARTON, Grandfather of Richard Barton

Son of William Barton II and Ellen (nee Pick)

Husband of Florence Noad

Father of Five children

Edward Percy Barton was born on 30th April 1891. He was the fourth son of William and Ellen Barton. He was educated at the old Slimbridge Parochial School (the Church School opposite St John’s) where he sat next to Florence Noad who used to do his Maths homework and was to become his wife. Their teacher was Miss Thuza Pick who held the post of Head Teacher at Slimbridge from as early as February 1877.

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He worked for his father who was the village blacksmith and he also worked with his brother Harry until he died in 1911 aged 25 years. As a young man Percy was a bell-ringer and he kept pigs and fowl. From September 1910 he cycled down to Bristol to see Florence who was in service in Clifton.

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At the time of the 1911 census William Barton was a fifty-six-year-old blacksmith working on his own account and born in Slimbridge. He was father of thirteen children of whom eleven were still living. Ellen was aged fifty-three-years and born in Purton. Children at home included Mabel aged twenty-three and sons Percy aged nineteen, Maurice aged seventeen, Burland aged fifteen who were all working and Nora aged ten years who was still at school. The Forge had five rooms.

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On 21st August 1913 Percy married Florence at the Church of St John the Evangelist, Slimbridge and the newly weds moved into the cottage next to the Forge at Churchend which his father purchased for £260. On the marriage certificate Edward Percy was described as a blacksmith, son of William Barton, blacksmith. Florence was described as a domestic servant the daughter of John Noad a wheelwright.

Dursley Gazette 23rd August 1913:

‘An interesting wedding at St John the Evangelist’s Church, Slimbridge, on Thursday last. The contracting parties were Mr. Edward Percy Barton (4th son of Mr. And Mrs. William Barton of Slimbridge) and Miss Florence Noad (2nd daughter of Mr. And Mrs. John Noad of Gossington. The service was conducted by Rev. J.O.H. Carter M.A. Rector. The Bride was given away by her father. Miss Mary Noad (sister of bride) and Miss Winifred Barton (sister of bridegroom) acted as bridesmaids. Mr. Maurice (sic) Barton (brother of the bridegroom) carried out the duties of best man… A merry peal of bells rang out as they left… Numerous and useful presents.’

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Percy was a master shoeing-smith or farrier and blacksmith and farmed in a small way, keeping sheep, pigs and one or two cows. On 8th October 1924 he was accepted as a tenant of the Sharpness New Docks and Gloucester and Birmingham Navigation Company for twelve acres of land at Shepherd’s Patch extending from Patch Bridge to Gilgal Brook and also land enclosed by the new Kingston Rhine at a rental of £5 per annum. Percy also purchased land and buildings adjoining the Gloucester and Berkeley Canal as well as an orchard at Kingston. On 26th May 1926 he purchased ‘The Tyning’ at Churchend a field consisting of 4.325 acres. From 9th April 1927 Percy took on the tenancy of Narles Farm, Cambridge.

Florence Barton died on 21st April 1968 at Standish Hospital, Standish. She was aged seventy-six-years and described on the death certificate as ‘of Narles Farm, Cambridge, Slimbridge, Dursley, the wife of Edward Percy Barton a farmer’.

 Percy died on 20th January 1977 at Berkeley Hospital and was buried on 26th January at Slimbridge Church.


FLORENCE BARTON, Grandmother of Richard Barton

Daughter of Arthur John Noad and Anne (nee Duffell)

Wife of Edward Percy Barton

Mother of William John Barton

Mother of Five children

Florence Noad was born on 27th November 1891 at Slimbridge and baptised on 7th February 1892 at Slimbridge Parish Church. She was the second eldest daughter of Arthur John Noad and his wife Anne. Having attended Slimbridge Parochial School she went into service in Bristol.

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A postcard was sent to her by her sister Bessie, postmarked 9th March 1906 to her at West Royd (Royal?), Kempsey, Worcestershire. In a letter that was probably written in January 1908, she was at 1 Osborne Road, Clifton. From August 1910 until the summer of 1912 she was with Mrs King (census suggests Mrs Danbury), an elderly lady of 2 Caledonia Place, Clifton and from October 1912 she was with a Mrs. Weston of 8 The Avenue, Clifton.  At one point she spoke of going to work in an Infirmary nearer to home but nothing came of that. During this time she received regular letters and visits from Percy Barton and this culminated in their marriage.

At the time of the 1911 census Florence was living at 2 Caledonia Place, Clifton a house consisting of twelve rooms. The head was Mary Louisa Danbury a seventy-seven-year-old widow living from private means and born in Brighton. With her was her daughter Mabel Agnes Danbury a forty-one-year-old single woman born in Chelsea, London. The staff included Jemima Robbins s sixty-two-year-old cook, Elizabeth Bru…(?) the fifty-six-year-old French maid born in Boulogne and Florence Noad a nineteen-year-old Parlour maid (domestic) born at Slymbridge

The couple married at Slimbridge Parish Church on 21st August 1913 and they settled in the house next to the Forge at Churchend, Slimbridge. Here their five children were born between 1914 and 1924 and brought up. On the marriage certificate Edward Percy was described as a blacksmith, son of William Barton, blacksmith. Florence was described as a domestic servant the daughter of John Noad a wheelwright.

Dursley Gazette 23rd August 1913:

 

‘An interesting wedding at St John the Evangelist’s Church, Slimbridge, on Thursday last. The contracting parties were Mr. Edward Percy Barton (4th son of Mr. And Mrs. William Barton of Slimbridge) and Miss Florence Noad (2nd daughter of Mr. And Mrs. John Noad of Gossington. The service was conducted by Rev. J.O.H. Carter M.A. Rector. The Bride was given away by her father. Miss Mary Noad (sister of bride) and Miss Winifred Barton (sister of bridegroom) acted as bridesmaids. Mr. Maurice (sic) Barton (brother of the bridegroom) carried out the duties of best man… A merry peal of bells rang out as they left… Numerous and useful presents.’

During 1927 (1929?) the family moved to Narles Farm, Cambridge.

Florence Barton died on 21st April 1968 at Standish Hospital, Standish. She was aged seventy-six-years and described on the death certificate as ‘of Narles Farm, Cambridge, Slimbridge, Dursley, the wife of Edward Percy Barton a farmer’.


FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS FAMILY CONTACT: btsarnia@gmail.com

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