btsarnia

A tribute to the life and work of Brian Torode

Palser Family of Wotton-under-Edge and the Parker Family of Bisley

  1. Palser Family of Wotton-under-Edge

  2. Parker Family of Bisley

 


Thomas Palser I

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Thomas Palser II

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Samuel Palser I (1636-) and Margaret Beale

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 Samuel Palser II (1664-) and Sarah Lusty

Shearman and clothier of Wotton-under-Edge

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George Palser (1686-) and Ann Davis

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Thomas Palser III (1719-) and Mary Parker (1720)

Cardmaker of Wotton-under-Edge

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William Palser (1750-) and Jane Kilminster

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Richard Palser (1773-1856) and Hannah Humphreys (1776c-1853)

Spinner and brick maker of Wotton-under-Edge

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 Hannah Palser (1806-1879) and Daniel Terrett

Cloth burler and cloth worker of Wotton-under-Edge and Kingswood

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 Henry Terrett and Ellen Smith

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William Edward Terrett and Grace Margaret Eley


THOMAS PALSER I, Great X Grandfather of Richard Barton

 

Father of Thomas Palser II

 

Also Father of Edith, Christian and John

 

Thomas Palser was born in about 15  .

He may be descended from the John Palser who received a bequest of an ox from the incumbent of Wotton-under-Edge in 1505 .


 

 THOMAS PALSER II, Great IX Grandfather of Richard Barton

 

Son of Thomas Palser I

 

Father of Samuel Palser I

 

Also Father of Thomas, Arthur, Christian, Mary, Elizabeth, William and Sarah

 

Thomas Palser II was the son of Thomas Palser I. He had children baptised between 1621 and 1636.


  

 

SAMUEL PALSER I, Great VIII Grandfather of Richard Barton

 

Son of Thomas Palser II

Husband of Margrett Beale

 

Father of Samuel Palser II

 

Also Father of Hester and Margrett

 

Samuel Palser I was baptised on 27th March 1636. He married Margrett Beale on 3rd February 1660. They had children.


 

SAMUEL PALSER II, Great VII Grandfather of Richard Barton

 

Son of Samuel Palser I and Margrett (nee Beale)

Husband of Sarah Lusty

 

Father of George Palser

 

Also Father of Samuel, Samuel, Elizabeth, Thomas and Daniel

 

Samuel Palser II was baptised on 2nd April 1664. Samuel Palsar married Sara Lusty on 29th April 1683. He was described as ‘a sherman’. Sarah, wife of Samuel Palser, clothier, was buried on 8th June 1698 at Wotton-under-Edge.


GEORGE PALSER, Great VI Grandfather of Richard Barton

 

Son of Samuel Palser and Sarah (nee Lusty)

Husband of Ann Davis

 

Father of Thomas Palser

 

Also Father of Mary, Hannah, Daniel, Sarah, Sampson, Samuel and Frances

 

George was baptised on 12th December 1686. He married Ann Davis on 12th September 1713 and had children.


THOMAS PALSER III, Great V Grandfather of Richard Barton

 

Son of George Palser and Ann (nee Davis)

Husband of Mary Parker

 

Father of William Palser

 

Also Father of Hannah, Richard Parker, Thomas, Ann, Frances, George and Hannah

 

Thomas was baptised on 1st September 1719. He was the son of George Palser and Ann Davis who married on 12th September 1713 at Wotton-under-Edge. George was baptised at Wotton on 12th December 1684.

Thomas married Mary Parker on 13th November 1742. She was the daughter of Richard and Hannah Parker of Bisley.

Thomas and Mary Palser had eight children who were all baptised at Wotton-under-Edge.

 

On 12th January 1759 his father-in-law, Richard Parker, a husbandman of Bisley made his will and left twenty shillings a year to his widow, Hannah, for her lifetime. The remainder of his estate was left to his grandson, Richard Parker Palser. The boy was only sixteen-years-old when Richard Parker died so his father, Thomas Palser, was appointed as his guardian and curator. On 12th June 1760 Richard Parker Palser appeared before the court. He was described as the lawful son of Thomas Palser, card maker of Wotton-under-Edge. The will was proved and Thomas was empowered to act in the name of his son.

MARY PALSER, Great V Grandmother of Richard Barton

 

Daughter of Richard Parker and Hannah (nee Swallow)

Wife of Thomas Palser

 

Mother of William Palser

 

Also Mother of Hannah, Richard Parker, Thomas, Ann, Frances, George and Hannah

 

Mary Parker was baptised on 21st November 1720 at Bisley. She married Thomas Palser at Wotton-under-Edge on 18th November 1742.

Thomas Palser was baptised on 1st September 1719. He was the son of George Palser and Ann Davis who married on 12th September 1713 at Wotton-under-Edge. George was baptised at Wotton on 12th December 1684.

Mary and Thomas Palser had eight children who were all baptised at Wotton-under-Edge.

 

On 12th January 1759 her father, Richard Parker, a husbandman of Bisley made his will and left twenty shillings a year to his widow, Hannah, for her lifetime. The remainder of his estate was left to his grandson, Richard Parker Palser. The boy was only sixteen-years-old when Richard Parker died so his father, Thomas Palser, was appointed as his guardian and curator. On 12th June 1760 Richard Parker Palser appeared before the court. He was described as the lawful son of Thomas Palser, card maker of Wotton-under-Edge. The will was proved and Thomas was empowered to act in the name of his son.


Their children were Great V Aunts and Uncles:

 

HANNAH PALSER, Infant Great V Aunt of Richard Barton

 

Hannah was baptised on 27th September 1743. She died before 1763

 


RICHARD PARKER PALSER, Great V Uncle of Richard Barton

 

Richard was baptised on 17th October 1744. He married Betty Blake on 26th April 1791. There was a marriage settlement.

Hannah died and on 4th February 1792 Richard Parker Palser was granted the administration of her estate which was valued at under £300. He was described as a card maker. The other administrator appointed was John Palser, a blacksmith.

On 8th March 1806 Richard Parker Palser made a will. He was clearly a religious man and this is reflected in the preamble of his will. The executrix appointed was Catherine his widow and the estate was valued at under £200. His property was to pass to his wife and them to his daughters. Sarah was to receive a gold watch, Mary a china safe and Elizabeth a silver watch. The witnesses were John Twyford and Thomas Lacey.

The will was proved on 14th July 1820.

The children of Richard and Catherine were cousins of Richard Palser:

 

SARAH SHORT PALSER, cousin of Richard Palser

 

Sarah was born on 22nd August 1795 and was baptised on 14th October 1795 by Rev. Rowland Hill at the Tabernacle. She was a beneficiary of her father’s will of 1806.

MARY PALSER, cousin of Richard Palser

 

Mary was born on 20th July 1797 and baptised at the Tabernacle by Rev. Cornelius Wick. She was a beneficiary of her father’s will of 1806.

ELIZABETH PALSER, cousin of Richard Palser

 

She was a beneficiary of her father’s will of 1806.

 


 

 

THOMAS PALSER, Great V Uncle of Richard Barton

 

Thomas was baptised on 7th February 1748. He married Susannah Bence in September 1769. His children were baptised at the Tabernacle by Rev. Rowland Hill.

Their children were cousins of Richard Palser:

 

JOSEPH PALSER, cousin of Richard Palser

 

Joseph was baptised on 8th April 1770. He married Mary Betteridge and they had children. In 1813 and in 1814 he was described as a stationer of Haw Street, Wotton-under-Edge.

In 1827 he was described in the baptismal register as a card maker of Haw Street

In the 1841 census forty-five-year-old Mary Palser was living at Haw Street, Wotton-under-Edge. With her was her son Joseph, a twenty-six-year-old card maker and Jane, aged twenty-two-years.

He was buried on 22nd January 1833, aged sixty-two-years at Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church as there is a gravestone.

 Pigot’s Directory for 1830: Wotton-under-Edge: Its ancient name was “Wotton-Under-Ridge”. The Lord of In the Parliamentary returns for 1821 the parish had 5,004 inhabitants – Alderley had 235 inhabitants and Kingswood 1,391 persons. PALSER  & Jas.        Blacksmith & Whitesmith       Old Town, Wotton under EdgePALSER John            Atlas Fire Off Agent               Hack Mill, Wotton under EdgePALSER Joseph         Card Maker – Paper                Haw St, Wotton under Edge

PALSER Joseph         Bristol Fire Off Agent            Haw St, Wotton under Edge

The will of Joseph Palser (PRO):

 

‘By the permission of almighty God I Joseph Palser of Wotton-under-Edge in the County of Gloucester card maker being of sound and xx mind memory and understanding but considering the uncertainty of this life I make publish and declare this my last will and testament in manner and form following that is to say first I give and bequeath unto my wife Mary the sum of twenty five pounds to be paid her by my executors therein after named immediately after my decease I also give and bequeath unto her my said wife all my household goods and furniture plate linen china glass pictures and print books and maps which I xxx possessed of for her own use and that of our children therein after named for and during the term of her natural life and immediately after her decease I give unto my executors herein after named the said household goods and furniture plate linen china glass pictures prints books and maps upon trust unto my – to divide the same into and equally between my said children. I give and bequeath to my father and each and every one of my brethren who shall be living at the time of my decease the sum of two guineas to be paid unto them by my executors immediately after my decease. I give unto my son Joseph my gold watch gold chain and xx next I give and bequeath unto my friends Samson Cary late of Barford in the County of Warwick Gentleman Abraham Bettridge of Tetbury in the said County of Gloucester Gentleman and John Palser of Wotton-under-Edge in the said County of Gloucester my trustees and executors therein after named the sum of five guineas each for the trouble  they may have in the xxx of the trusts of this my will I also give and bequeath unto them the said Samson Cary Abraham Bettridge and John Palser all that my leasehold messuage or dwelling house with the shops outhouses garden and appurtenances thereunto belonging situate and being in Haw Street in Wotton-under-Edge aforesaid and wherein I now dwell to hold unto them the said Samson Cary and joint executors herein after named their executors, adminstrators and assigns for all my estate and xxx and interest upon trust to apply the rents arising thereon to and for the use and benefit of my said wife and children therein after named for the term of her natural life and from and immediately after her decease then IO give the said dwelling house shops and I appoint unto my son Joseph his heirs executors  administrators and assigns I also give and bequeath unto them the said Samson Cary Abraham Bettridge and John Palser all those fields called or known by the several names of thousand acres Grindy Bank or Quarry Leaze with the buildings thereon situate and being in the tything of Sinwell and Bradley in the parish of Wotton-under-Edge aforesaid upon trust to and apply the rents arising thereto to and for the use and benefit of my said wife and children for and during the term of her natural life and from and immediately after her decease I give the two fields called the thousand acres and Grindy Bank with the buildings thereon unto my son Edwin his heirs executors administrators and assigns I give unto my son Robert his heirs executors administrators and assigns all that field called the Quarry Leaze I give unto the said Samson Cary and joint executors herein named all those four cottages workshops gardens and appurtenances being Nos 1 2 3 and 4 of a row of houses called Gloucester Row situate and being in part of a field commonly called or known by the name of  Burlington or Burlingam in the tything of Sinwell and Bradley aforesaid to hold unto them the said Samson Cary and joint executors and trustees therein named upon trust to apply the rents and proceeds arising thereof to and for the use of my said wife and children for and during the term of her natural life and from and immediately after her decease I give the said four cottages workshops and gardens and appurtenances to and for the disposal of in the manner following that is to say I give unto my daughter Emily her heirs executors administrators and assigns all those two cottages gardens and appurtenances thereunto respectively belonging being the first and second of the said row I give unto my daughter Jane her heirs executors administrators and assigns all those two cottages gardens and appurtenances thereunto respectively belonging being the third and fourth two cottages of the said row I give unto the said Samson Cary and joint executors and trustees herein named all the implements and tools of every sort and kind now used by me in the card making and past board manufactory together with all the rest residue and remainder of my chattels stock in trade book debts bonds bills monies in the funds monies in the house xxx at interest and securities for money and all other my personal estate and effects of whatever nature and kind or wheresoever situate not herein before disposed of my just debts including any balance of accounts which may be due on my account with the Bank of  Messrs Blossom and Player bankers Dursley and funeral expenses and the xxx of proving this my will being first paid and deducted thereout. Upon trust to and for the use of my said wife and children for and during her natural life provided nevertheless my will and meaning is that in case my said wife shall die before any or either of my said children shall have attained to the age of twenty one years then I direct that they my trustees and executors therein named do stand and be possessed of the property therein respectively bequeathed to each child or children who shall be under age upon trust to apply the rents and profits thereof to the use of such child or children respectively until they shall attain the aged of twenty one years and it is hereby my further will and meaning that the executors now revived or by me shall be continued to be carried on by my dear wife under the xxx of Mary Palser  and under the superintendence and assistance of my son joseph together with the assistance of any other of my children as my said wife shall think proper from time to time to employ until my said son Joseph shall have attained the age of five years and I will direct that after that time my said son joseph shall have an equal share of the said business with my said wife for and during the term of her natural life under the firm of Mary Palser and I further will and direct that immediately after her decease of my said wife my said son Joseph shall stand and be possessed of all my aforesaid implements and tools in trade to his own proper use and behalf lastly I will and direct that all the household goods and furniture plate linen china glass pictures prints books and maps and it is my further will and meaning and I do hereby declare that they my said trustees or either of them xxx or either of them …

Appointment of Executors etc.

Dated second day of December 1828 signed, sealed and delivered by Joseph Palser and witnessed by Revd Thomas BD, Adam Adams, James Cope Simmons

Proved at London 4th May 1833 before the Judge by the oaths of Abraham Bettridge and John Palser two of the executors to whom administration was granted having been first sworn by XXX duly to administer power reserved of making the like grant to Samson Cary the other executor.

Their children were second cousins of Hannah Terrett:

 

Joseph Bence Palser was born on 9th August 1811 and baptised on 18th December 1811 at Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church. In the 1841 census he was at home aged twenty-six-years and working as a card maker. He married Matilda Reeve and then Margaret Marie King

Jane Palser was baptised on 1st November 1814 at the Parish Church. She was at home, aged twenty-two years, in the 1841 census.

Emily Palser was baptised on 31st March 1813 at Wotton-under-Edge.

Edwin Palser was baptised in 1807. He married Elizabeth Fox and had children. Mr E.G.M. Palser wrote in 1984: ‘My line left Wotton with my great grandfather Edwin. Another line remained down to David Palser whom I knew well… I am in my 80th year…’

Robert Bettridge Palser was born on 31st January 1827 and was baptised at the Parish Church in Wotton-under-Edge on 17th April 1827 (Check!)  He married Dinah Cresswell

 

JOHN PALSER, cousin of Richard Palser

 

John was baptised on 16th September 1771 at Wotton-under-Edge.

He may have married Elizabeth (Betty) Terrett on 7th July 1793. John was described as being a spinner of Sinwell. They had children. When Eliza was baptised in 1815 he was described as a spinner of Sinwell.

In 1841 John Palser a seventy-two-year-old spinner was living with twenty-two-year-old Eliza Palser at Sinwell.

In the 1851 census a John Palser, aged seventy-nine-years, was at Miss Bearpacker’s almshouses and was described as a widower and as an alms widow servant (Domestic?)

John Palser was buried at the Parish Church on 28th January 1855. He was described as eighty-four-years-old and living at Bearpackers Hospital.

Their children were second cousins of Hannah Terrett:

 

George Palser was baptised on 21st September 1806 at Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church.

Eliza Palser was baptised on 25th December 1815 at Wotton-under-Edge. In 1841 a twenty-two-year-old Eliza Palser was living at Sinwell with John Palser a seventy-two-year-old spinner. At the time of the 1851 census an Eliza Palser was living at Sinwell with Thomas Millard, a forty-year-old farm labourer born in North Nibley. She was described as a thirty-year-old unmarried charwoman, born in Wotton. With them were her sons George Palser aged five years and Thomas Palser aged one year. Both were born in Wotton-under-Edge.

SAMUEL PALSER, cousin of Richard Palser

 

Samuel was baptised on 11th June 1773 at Wotton-under-Edge

THOMAS PALSER, infant cousin of Richard Palser

 

Thomas was baptised on 11th June 1773 by Rev. Rowland Hill at the Tabernacle.

THOMAS PALSER, cousin of Richard Palser

 

Thomas was born on 7th November 1774 and baptised on 23rd April 1775 by Rev Rowland Hill at the Tabernacle.

In the 1841 census Thomas Palser was a sixty-year-old paper maker of the Paper Mill. With him were his wife Mary, aged fifty-five-years and their children – Sarah, aged twenty-five-years; Mary, aged twenty years; Amelia aged twenty years and Charles, aged fifteen years, a doctor’s apprentice (? Check).

In the 1851 census a Thomas Palser was a papermaker of Market Street, aged seventy-six-years and born in Wotton-under-Edge. With him was his wife, aged seventy-years, and born in Wotton. Their son Llewellin, was aged thirty-years and working as a chemist.

In 1814, 1817 and in 1820 Thomas was a Papermaker of the Paper Mill in the baptismal register.

Thomas Palser was buried at the Parish Church on 21st April 1854. He was aged seventy-nine-years and was described as living at the General Hospital.

 

E.S. Lindley wrote in ‘Wotton-under-Edge’ page 301:

 

‘Nothing is known of its history (Hack Mill) except that it went through various business vicissitudes as a paper mill from before 1773 until at least 1847, much of the period in the hands of the Palser family. In 1774 it was for sale and described as a “very complete and new erected paper mill”, so then it must then have been recently converted from other work. The water of the stream carrying the waste of all the above mills and dyeworks as well as the town drainage, must have been quite unsuitable for the making of fine paper, and the only papers mentioned are “best press papers for clothiers and Sugar Loaf Blue and Brown Papers”…

Their children were second cousins of Hannah Terrett:

Llewelyn Palser was baptised on 3rd May 1803 (Check!)

Henry Palser was baptised on 9th April 1806 at the Parish Church.

Sarah Palser was baptised on 29th June 1808 at the Parish Church. She was aged twenty-five-years and at home for the 1841 census.

Mary Keziah Palser was baptised on 8th August 1810 at the Parish Church

Thomas Palser was born on 11th August and baptised on 9th September 1812 at the Parish Church.

Amelia Palser was baptised on 6th July 1814 at the Parish Church. She was aged twenty years and at home for the 1841 census.

Llewellin Palser was baptised on 24th September 1817 at Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church

Charles Palser was baptised on 6th August 1820 at Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church. In the 1841 census a Charles Palser was at home, aged fifteen years, a doctor’s apprentice (? check).

ISAAC PALSER, cousin of Richard Palser

 

Isaac Palser was baptised on 16th May 1776 by Rev Rowland Hill at the Tabernacle. He married Lucia (or Lucy – see baptisms 1809 and 1813). When their children John and Sarah were baptised in 1813 he was described as a wheelwright of the Chipping.

On 29th June 1825 Celia and her father Isaac Palser were committed to Court by Wm M. Adey and R.H. Dyer. Celia was described as a fifteen-year-old servant from Wotton-under-Edge. She was charged on the oath of Charles Cook of the parish of Wotton-under-Edge, Innholder, on suspicion of feloniously stealing on 28th day of June inst. At the parish aforesaid one half crown and five shillings of the current coin of the realm the property of the said Charles Cook. She was described as having dark brown hair, dark hazel eyes, dark complexion, long face, long nose, prominent mouth, dark eyebrows and eye lashes. She was slender made and could read and write. She was 5’1½” tall.

Isaac was described as a forty-nine-year-old Millwright of Wotton-under-Edge. He was charged with feloniously receiving on 28th June instant from Celia Palser one half crown and five shillings of current coin of the realm the property of the said Charles Cook, he the said Isaac Palser at the time of such receiving well knew the money to have been stolen. He was described as having dark hair, light brown eyes, dark complexion, with a long face, big nose, wide mouth, a scar on the upper lip, high forehead and very large scars on his breast from scald. He could read and write. He was 5’5¼” tall.

They appeared at the Trinity Assizes on 12th July 1825. Celia received one calendar month in the penitentiary and he received one year. Both were removed on 13th July 1825 and their conduct was described as orderly.

He may have married again to Sarah. When his child Edwin Paul was baptised in 1821 he was described as a Millwright of Back Lane.

The children of Isaac and Lucia were second cousins of Hannah Terrett:

 

Susannah Palser was baptised on 27th February 1805 at Wotton-under-Edge

Jemima Palser was baptised on 17th September 1806 at Wotton-under-Edge

Celia Palser was baptised on 25th June 1809 at Wotton-under-Edge. On 29th June 1825 Celia and her father Isaac Palser were committed to Court by Wm M. Adey and R.H. Dyer. Celia was described as a fifteen-year-old servant from Wotton-under-Edge. She was charged on the oath of Charles Cook of the parish of Wotton-under-Edge, Innholder, on suspicion of feloniously stealing on 28th day of June inst. At the parish aforesaid one half crown and five shillings of the current coin of the realm the property of the said Charles Cook. She was described as having dark brown hair, dark hazel eyes, dark complexion, long face, long nose, prominent mouth, dark eyebrows and eye lashes. She was slender made and could read and write. She was 5’1½” tall. They appeared at the Trinity Assizes on 12th July 1825. Celia received one calendar month in the penitentiary and he received one year. Both were removed on 13th July 1825 and their conduct was described as orderly.

John Palser was baptised on 21st July 1813 at Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church

Sarah Palser was baptised on 21st July 1813 at Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church

The child of Isaac and Sarah was a second cousin of Hannah Terrett:

Edwin Paul Palser was baptised on 2nd December 1821 at Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church.

BENJAMIN PALSER, cousin of Richard Palser

 

Benjamin was baptised on 29th December 1778 at Wotton-under-Edge. He may have married Elizabeth Trotman and had children

Their children were second cousins of Hannah Terrett:

 

Mary Ann Palser who was born on 2nd November 1808 and baptised on 24th July 1811 at Wotton-under-Edge

Benjamin Palser who was born on 29th June 1811 and baptised on 24th July 1811 at Wotton-under-Edge

 

 

LUKE PALSER, cousin of Richard Palser

 

Luke was born on 23rd March 1785 and was baptised on 23rd November 1785 at Wotton-under-Edge.

 

 


ANN PALSER, Great V Aunt of Richard Barton

 

Ann Palser was baptised on 5th March 1753 at Wotton-under-Edge


 

 

FRANCES PALSER, Great V Aunt of Richard Barton

 

Frances Palser was baptised on 18th May 1755 at Wotton-under-Edge

 


 

GEORGE PALSER, Great V Uncle of Richard Barton

 

George was baptised on 26th July 1760 at Wotton-under-Edge

 


 

HANNAH PALSER, Great V Aunt of Richard Barton

 

Hannah Palser was baptised on 8th June 1763 at Wotton-under-Edge


WILLIAM PALSER, Great IV Grandfather of Richard Barton

 

Son of Thomas Palser and Mary (nee Parker)

Husband of Jane Kilminster

Father of Richard Palser

 

Also Father of Mary, Jane, William, Ann

 

William Palser was baptised on 20th February 1750 at Wotton-under-Edge. He was the son of Thomas and Mary Palser. Thomas Palser was a card maker.

He married Jane Kilminster on 4th May 1772 at Wotton-under-Edge and they had children.

A Jane Kilmaster (Kilminster?) was baptised at Stroud on 1st June 1749, daughter of John. This John was probably the son of Richard Kilmister (sic) and was baptised at Stroud on 5th February 1719. His brother Richard was baptised on 20th September 1717.

A John Kilmaster married Elizabeth Reeve at St Peter’s, Gloucester on 17th September 1735 but this would make him rather young

Richard Kilmister married Kathren White at Minchinhampton on 29th August 1715.

Jane Palser was buried at Wotton-under-Edge on 14th January 1776.

In the burial register for St Mary’s Church, Wotton-under-Edge we read of the burial of Jane and Mary Palser on 29th December 1777. Is this the death of sisters or mother and daughter?

William could have married Mary Bruton at Wotton-under-Edge in 1779 or even a Sarah. There are baptismal entries to support this:

John of William and Sarah Palser born 20th April 1779 and baptised 12th May 1779

William of William and Mary Palser born 26th January 1782 and baptised on 9th August 1786

Mary of William and Mary Palser born 3rd February 1780 and baptised with William above

Robert of William and Ann Palser 1786

William Palser may have been buried at Wotton-under-Edge on 19th March 1795.


 

MARY PALSER, Great IV Aunt of Richard Barton

Mary was baptised on 5th February 1775 at Wotton-under-Edge. She may have been buried with her mother/sister on 29th December 1777.


 

(?) JANE PALSER, Great IV Aunt of Richard Barton

 

A Jane Palser was buried at Wotton on 14th January 1776. Is she another child of William and Jane?


WILLIAM PALSER, Great IV Uncle of Richard Barton

 

William Palser was baptised on 2nd October 1776 at Wotton-under-Edge


ANN PALSER, Great IV Aunt of Richard Barton

 

Ann Palser was baptised on 15 or 16th July 1777 at Wotton-under-Edge

 


RICHARD PALSER, Great III Grandfather of Richard Barton

 Son of William Palser and Jane (nee Kilminster)

Husband of Hannah Humphreyes

Father of Hannah Terrett

Also Father of Abraham, Elizabeth, Jane Lacey and Eliza

Richard Palser was born in about 1772. On 20th March 1773 he was baptised at Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church. On 24th January 1798 he married Hannah Humphreyes at Wotton Parish Church and Richard signed the marriage register. In 1819 he was described as a spinner of Bradley Street, Wotton. Three of their children were baptised at Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church between 1798 and 1819 and Hannah was baptised at Rowland Hill’s Tabernacle in 1808 but there are no references found yet to the baptisms of Jane or Samuel.

In the 1841 census return Richard and Hannah were living with their daughter Elizabeth at Rumskins in either the Sinwell or Bradley area of Wotton-under-Edge. Richard was described as a sixty-five-year-old brick maker and his wife was a sixty-five-year-old wool packer. Their daughter was a thirty-five-year-old cloth packer. All were born in Gloucestershire

The 1851 census return records that the family of Richard and Hannah Palser was living at Coomb Road. Richard was described as a pauper and brick maker aged seventy-eight years and Hannah, whose age was given as seventy-six, was like her husband born in Wotton-under-Edge. Richard and Hannah were then living next to Rowland Lacey and his wife Jane. Rowland Lacey was a Grocer and Tea Dealer.

Hannah suddenly died on 14th April 1853 ‘by the visitation from God’. At the time she was living at Pound’s Green.

Richard Palser survived his wife by three years and died on 2nd February 1856 at Wotton-under-Edge. The death certificate described him as an eighty-four-year-old, formerly a Brick Maker. The cause of death was given as Old Age – not certified. Edward Page, Registrar, registered the death on 5th February 1856 and the informant was Susan Fowler of Wotton-under-Edge who was present at the time of the death and she made her mark.

The Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church registers describe Ann Palser as a seventy-eight-year-old woman of Coombe Road when she was buried on 18th April 1853. She was buried at 17:2. Richard was buried in the same plot (2:17) on 8th February 1856. He was described as aged eighty-four-years and as living at London Road

The witnesses at the wedding of Daniel Terrett and Hannah Palser in 1831 were Richard Palser (who signed his name) and Jane Palser. Presumably they were her father and sister.


HANNAH PALSER, Great III Grandmother of Richard Barton

Daughter of Abraham Humphreys and Mary (nee Bennett)

Wife of Richard Palser

Mother of Hannah Terrett

Also Mother of Abraham, Elizabeth, Jane Lacey and Eliza

Hannah, daughter of Abraham and Mary Humphreys, was baptised at Wotton-under-Edge on 15th January 1775.

On 24th January 1798 Richard Palser married Hannah Humphreys at Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church and Richard signed the marriage register.

In the 1841 census return Richard and Hannah were living with their daughter Elizabeth at Rumskins in either the Sinwell or Bradley area of Wotton-under-Edge. Richard was described as a sixty-five-year-old brick maker and his wife was a sixty-five-year-old wool packer. Their daughter was a thirty-five-year-old cloth packer. All were born in Gloucestershire

The 1851 census records a family of Richard and Hannah Palser at Coomb Road. Richard was described as a pauper and brick maker, aged seventy-eight-years, and Hannah, whose age was given as seventy-six, was born in Wotton-under-Edge.

Hannah Palser died on 14th April 1853 at Pound’s Ground, Wotton-under-Edge. She was described on the death certificate as the seventy-seven-year-old Wife of Richard Palser a Labourer. The cause of death was given as – ‘sudden death by the visitation from God’. Edward Page, Registrar, registered the death on 16th April and the informant was W. Joyner Ellis, Coroner, of Berkeley.

Her husband, Richard Palser, survived her and died on 2nd February 1856, aged 84 years, of old age. He was described on his death certificate as ‘formerly a brick maker’.She was probably the mother of Hannah Terrett. Richard and Hannah were then living next to Rowland Lacey and his wife Jane. The witnesses at the wedding of Daniel Terrett and Hannah Palser in 1831 were Richard (who signed his name) and Jane Palser.

The Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church registers describe Ann Palser as a seventy-eight-year-old woman of Coombe Road when she was buried on 18th April 1853. She was buried at 17:2 . Richard was buried in the same plot (2:17) on 8th February 1856. He was described as aged eighty-four-years and as living at London Road.


 

Their children were Great III Aunts and Uncles:

 

ABRAHAM PALSER, Great III Uncle of Richard Barton

 

Abraham was baptised on 30th May 1798 at Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church. Like his father he was a brick maker of Wotton-under-Edge. He married Jane before 1824.

In the Parish Baptismal Register he was described as a spinner of Dursley in January 1824 and by May 1826 he was a shearman of Uley. By October 1831 Abraham was described as a brick maker of Wotton-under-Edge. This description occurs again in October 1834.

In 1841 Abraham was a forty-year-old brick maker of Haw Street. With him were Jane aged thirty; Elizabeth aged fifteen; Mary aged fourteen; Jane aged nine years and Pamela aged seven years.

On 15th November 1842 Abraham Palser, aged forty-four-years, of Wotton-under-Edge, was charged with feloniously stealing a door. He was described as having curly dark hair, hazel eyes, a long visage, dark complexion and a very great number of moles on the back and neck. He was a brick maker and 5’5” tall. He was committed by J.B.H. Burland esq. to answer the charged that on the oath of Cornelius Clarke he feloniously stole at Wotton-under-Edge on the 30th day of November one deal door the property of the said Cornelius Clarke. He appeared at the Epiphany Session on 3rd January 1843 and was discharged on 7th January 1843 having been sentenced to serve two calendar months in a penitentiary. His conduct was orderly.

Abraham Palser, a brick maker journeyman, aged fifty-one and born in Wotton, was living at Bear Street, Wotton, in the 1851 census return. His wife was forty-five-year-old Jane who was born in Dursley. Their children included Jane, aged nineteen, and Pamela, aged sixteen, both dressmakers, and Sindonia their one-year-old grandchild.

In the 1861 census he was described as a fifty-nine-year-old brick maker, living at the Steep, Wotton-under-Edge, and was born in the town. His wife, Jane, was fifty-six-years-old and born in Dursley. She worked as a linen bonnet maker. Their daughter Pamela, was a twenty-two-year-old linen bonnet maker, born in Wotton. With then were grandchildren Sindonia aged thirteen years, a scholar; William aged nine years and Frederick aged six years. All were born in Wotton-under-Edge.

In the 1871 census Abraham was a seventy-one-year-old brick maker of the Steep. His wife, Jane, was a sixty-seven-year-old dressmaker. Their daughter Pamela was aged thirty-four-years and working as a milliner. With them were grandchildren – Sindoney aged twenty years, a milliner; William aged eighteen years, a mason; Frederick aged fifteen years, a butcher, and Georgie aged six years.

Their children were cousins of Henry Terrett, Great Grandfather:

 

ELIZABETH PALSER, cousin of Henry Terrett

 

Elizabeth was born on 21st November and baptised at Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church on 6th January 1824. Her father was described as a spinner of Dursley. She was at home, aged fifteen years, at the time of the 1841 census.

MARY PALSER, cousin of Henry Terrett

Mary was born on 17th January 1826 and baptised on 14th May that year at Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church. She was at home, aged fourteen years, at the time of the 1841 census.

JANE PALSER, cousin of Henry Terrett

 

Jane was baptised on 2nd October 1831 at Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church. She was at home, aged nine years, at the time of the 1841 census. On 10th March 1850 her illegitimate daughter, Swindonia, was baptised at Wotton Parish Church. Jane was described in the parish register as a single woman of Bear Lane. A further child William was baptised on 16th February 1853. The register described Jane as a single woman of The Steep. Jane was at home, aged nineteen years, and working as a dressmaker at the time of the 1851 census.

Her daughter was a second cousin of William Edward Terrett:

Swindonia (Sindonia or even Sindoney) Palser was born in about 1848 at Wotton-under-Edge. She was aged one year and staying with her grandparents at the time of the 1851 census. In 1861 she was still there a thirteen-year-old scholar. In 1871 she was a twenty-year-old milliner and living with her grandparents.

William Palser was baptised on 13th February 1853 at Wotton Parish Church. He was aged nine years and living with his grandparents at the time of the 1861 census. In 1871 he was with his grandparents and described as an eighteen-year-old mason. He may have been buried at Rowland Hill Tabernacle. The grave inscription reads –

‘In loving memory of William Palser, died January 24th 1932, aged 87 years (?) also his wife Emma Palser died 1916 aged 70 (?). Their beloved son Daniel John Palser who died July 1917 aged 36 years’

PAMELA PALSER, cousin of Henry Terrett

 

Pamela was born in about 1833 at Wotton-under-Edge and baptised at the Parish Church there on 8th October 1834. She was at home aged seven years, at the time of the 1841 census. She was at home, aged sixteen years and described as a dressmaker at the time of the 1851 census. On 19th July 1857 her illegitimate son William was baptised at the Parish Church and on 13th October 1864 her illegitimate daughter Amelia Georgina was baptised there also. On both occasions Pamela was described as a single woman of The Steep. She was at home, aged twenty-two-years, and working as a linen bonnet maker at the time of the 1861 census.

Her children were second cousins of William Edward Terrett:

William Palser was baptised at Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church on 19th January 1857. Did he become Frederick?

Frederick Palser was born in Wotton-under-Edge in about 1855. He was aged six years and living with his grandparents at the time of the 1861 census. In 1871 he was with his grandparents, aged fifteen years and working as a butcher.

Amelia Georgina (Georgie) Palser was born in Wotton-under-Edge in about 1864. She was baptised on 13th October 1864 at the Parish Church. Her mother was described as a single woman of The Steep. She was aged six years and living with her grandparents at the time of the 1871 census.


 

 

ELIZABETH PALSER, Great III Aunt of Richard Barton

Elizabeth was born on 4th March 1802 and baptised on 29th September 1802 at Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church. In the 1841 census return Richard and Hannah were living with their daughter Elizabeth at Rumskins in either the Sinwell or Bradley area of Wotton-under-Edge. Richard was described as a sixty-five-year-old brick maker and his wife was a sixty-five-year-old wool packer. Their daughter was a thirty-five-year-old cloth packer. All were born in Gloucestershire

 

 

 


JANE LACEY, Great III Aunt of Richard Barton

 

Jane was born in about 1813 at Wotton-under-Edge. She married Rowland Lacey on 2nd December 1834 or 1835 (?) at Wotton Parish Church. Rowland was the son of Thomas (1778-1834) and Sarah Lacey (nee Hopkins). The witnesses were John Workman and Rhoda Morley. John Workman was possibly the father of her brother Samuel Palser’s second wife. He was a shoemaker in 1851.

 

Pigot’s Directory 1830: LACEY, Thomas, Saddle Tree Maker, Old Town, Wotton under Edge

The Lacey family were members of the Rowland Hill Tabernacle at Wotton-under-Edge. Rowland, son of Thomas and Sarah Lacey (nee Hopkins) was born on 5th April 1809 and he was baptised there on 30th August 1809 by Rev. Rowland Hill. His sister Mary Anne was born on 28th July 1807 and baptised on 25th September 1807 at the Tabernacle by Rev. Rowland Hill. His brother Newton Lacey was baptised on 24th May 1815 at the Parish Church and his father was on that occasion described as a saddle tree maker of Bear Lane, Wotton. His brother Henry Ratcliff was born on 21st December 1815 and baptised on 4th July 1817 at the Rowland Hill Tabernacle.

In 1841 Rowland’s brothers, Newton (aged twenty five) and Henry Lacey (aged twenty five), were working as saddle tree makers in Birmingham, next to 29 Horsefair, and Charlotte Lacey (aged thirty) was working as a milliner.

At the time of the 1841 census Rowland was a thirty-two-year-old smith living at Coomb Road. With him were his wife, Jane, aged twenty-six-years; Martha aged three years and Mary Jane aged a half a year.

Mary Jane Lacey was baptised on 14th February 1841 at Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church with her cousin Joseph Terrett.

Rowland and Jane seem to have lived in Coombe Road or London Road and both of these addresses occur in the registers of the Parish Church:

February 1841: Smith of London Road

May 1843: Smith of Coombe Road

July 1845: Smith of London Road

August 1847: Blacksmith of London Road

March 1850: Blacksmith of Coombe Road

June 1852: Smith of Coombe Road

June 1854: Smith of London Road

Rowland Lacey was a grocer and tea dealer of Coombe Road in the 1851 census and living next to his father-in-law. Jane Lacey died on 23rd March 1877 aged sixty-four-years.

In the 1861 census Rowland Lacey was a grocer and blacksmith of Long Street, Wotton-under-Edge, a premises situated next to the Vine Tavern. His wife Jane was described as a grocer’s shop woman. With them were their children – Julia V., Osborne who was described as a scholar, John N. and Jane. All of them were born in Wotton-under-Edge.

In Wotton Heritage Centre there is a document that sheds light on Rowland Lacey. Daniel Park of Sherwood House, 13 Ludgate Hill, Wickwar, a retired postmaster, entered into an agreement to lend £100 with interest to Rowland Lacey as security for  a house in the Steep known as Sherwood house. This was entered into jointly with Osborne Dauncey. The agreement was dated 27th July 1867.

In the 1871 census Rowland Lacey was living at the Steep, Wotton-under-Edge. He was described as a sixty-one-year-old assistant overseer and born in Wotton-under-Edge. His wife, Jane, was fifty-eight years, and their children at home included Osborne, a twenty-three-year-old grocer and tea dealer, and Jane a sixteen-year-old. All were born in Wotton-under-Edge.

From 1871-2 Rowland Lacey was Sergeant of the Borough of Wotton-under-Edge and E.S. Lindley described him as a Tax Collector.

Jane Lacey died on 23rd March 1877, aged sixty-four-years, and was buried at Rowland Hill Tabernacle.

In 1881 Rowland Lacey was still living at the Steep. By now he was a seventy-one-year-old assistant overseer and widower. With him were lodgers Joseph Brown, a carpenter, and his wife.

In 1891 Rowland Lacey was residing at Perry’s Hospital. He was described as an eighty-two-year-old retired assistant overseer. He died on 17th January 1892, aged eighty-two-years. He was buried at Rowland Hill Tabernacle

Lacey Family Gravestone at Rowland Hill Tabernacle:

 

Sacred to the memory of Mary Ann daughter of Thomas and Sarah Lacey who died June 26th 1824 aged 16 years.

Also of Martha Hopkins their daughter who died September 25th 1824 aged 2 years.

Also of Sarah Jane their daughter who died in her infancy.

Also of Thomas Lacey who died on July 14th 1834 aged 54 years.

Also of Sarah, widow of Thomas Lacey, who died January 25th 1842 aged 64 years.

Also of Martha Hopkins, sister of Sarah Lacey, who died January 28th 1861, aged 89 years.

She was a member of the adjoining Tabernacle for a period of 60 years.

Also of Jane, beloved wife of Rowland Lacey, who died March 23rd 1877, aged 64 years.

Also of Rowland Lacey who died January 17th 1892, aged 82 years, this end was peaceful.

Also of Julia Mary, beloved wife of John Newton Lacey, who died April 27th 1922, aged 70 years.

Rest in Peace.

Dursley Gazette Saturday 23rd January 1892:

 

‘Mr Rowland Lacey who attained a ripe age of eighty two was for about thirty years overseer and tax collector for the parish of Wotton and for some time of Nibley also. He retired about three years ago. His kind, humorous, and cheerful disposition well fitted him for carrying out the not too pleasant duties of his office.

For many years he was the leading bass voice of Wotton church choir, and in every capacity which he filled the same genial and pleasant character stood foremost. The funeral of Mr. R. Lacey took place in the family grave at the Wotton-under-Edge Tabernacle on Thursday afternoon.’

 

 

E.S. Lindley in ‘Wotton-under-Edge’, page 66:

 

‘A special appointment was that of bailiff, for direct collection of the market tolls instead of farming them out. This was decided by resolution in 1871, but auction of the lease was resumed in 1874, only to change back to bailiff next year, till the end of the borough. The only recognisable bailiff is Rowland Lacey, who is known to have started life in the cloth trade and later became an auctioneer among other things. He received a commission on what he collected, but the amounts are grouped in general items and cannot be distinguished.’

Ibid, page 110:

 

‘Lacey’s diary also has some account of the mild Chartist agitation of 1839. He (Henry Ratcliffe Lacey of the Tabernacle), with his brother Rowland (whom we meet in other connections) made themselves prominent, but their brother Newton had to keep quieter, being master of the British School. There was a large meeting on the Chipping, addressed by Henry Vincent, a noted national leader then out on bail, who was very soon gaoled at Monmouth over a great riot of the Newport miners. At half past five on Saturday morning brother Rowland came to tell Henry that Mr. Cogswell and two others were waiting for him downstairs, and he had a warrant served on him for attending an unlawful meeting. After telling his mother he was going for a walk, he persuaded Mr. Cogswell to go on and he would follow. A little down Nibley road a fly was waiting and he took them to Dursley for examination. Friends had brought bail, and it was accepted; at assizes on the Wednesday they succeeded in getting postponement till the Spring Assizes. The prosecution wanted them to come to terms, and their friends persuaded them to plead guilty and enter into recognizances to keep the peace for two years. Nothing more happened.’

Feb. 28 to Mar. 9: Bristol, Cirencester and Stroud

WEDNESDAY, March 6. — Weather cold — took coach for Wootton-under-Edge in Gloucestershire. A very heavy fall of snow commenced as the coach left Bath. We had a bitter cold ride. Arrived at Wootton by one o’clock. The snow had ceased falling. Dined with Remy Lacey, a real good Radical and founder of the Wootton Association. After dinner Burns and I walked to the room of the Association — spoke to the people briefly, and were loudly applauded. The Wootton people are very intelligent and will soon upset the aristocratic power of the neighbourhood. At three o’clock a procession was formed, consisting of about 3000 persons, headed by an excellent band of music, with beautiful banners, flags, &., and proceeded through the town up to the Chipping, where a wagon was placed as accomodation for the speakers. [Meeting chaired by Henry Lacey; Burns and Vincent spoke] We returned to our inn in procession, and spent the evening in the company of 200 ultra rads. “Fall, tyrants, fall” was sung by the whole company in famous style. We separated about eleven o’clock.

THURSDAY, March 7. — Rose at seven — broke our fast in the cottage of Richard Skelton. Skelton is a stout, sturdy, six-foot Radical. … At ten we left Wootton for Cirencester, Gloucestershire. We reached Cirencester about three. The town is very neat and clean — the population about 7000. A meeting was convened for six in the evening, in the Market-place. At six, Burns and myself walked to the place of meeting. We found upwards of 4000 persons assembled. The agricultural labourers poured in from the surrounding villages. The town was in a very excited state. One man said such a stir had not been created since the town was taken by Prince Rupert. …. Burns and myself addressed the meeting at great length. An attempt was made by half-a-dozen “gentlemen” to interrupt the meeting, by throwing stones at the speakers. I had one capital knock — it did me more good than an electric shock. The people soon silenced the “gentlemen”. Al the resolutions were carried unanimously, and measures were adopted for obtaining signatures to the petition, and for collecting the National Rent. Burns and myself were elected Delegates. We had a great number of ladies present. God bless them!

Henry Vincent, ‘Life and Rambles’, in the Western Vindicator , no.4 (16th March 1839), p.1

Teetotal Chartists 
Looking for the Charter “at the bottom of a glass of water”?

Both Lovett and Henry Vincent (an abstainer since 1836) appear to have been confirmed in their anti-alcohol beliefs by their experiences of prison, and in December 1840 Vincent would initiate an address arguing that the aristocracy ruled only because of the vices of the poor and that Chartists must therefore become teetotallers.

The address was widely disseminated, being published in full in the Northern Star, English Chartist Circular and the Odd Fellow, and it produced an enormous response, encouraging Chartists in many parts of the country to establish teetotal Chartist bodies alongside local branches of the National Charter Association, or to incorporate abstinence from alcohol within the objectives of their NCA branch.

Among the 135 signatories to the address were such other Chartist luminaries as Charles Neesom of the London Working Men’s Association, the bookseller and publisher John Cleave, and Henry Hetherington, the veteran campaigner against a stamped press and key ally of Lovett.

In “Teetotal Chartism”, a paper for the journal History (vol 58 no 193, June 1973) Brian Harrison wrote of the address:

“Judging by its signatories, Teetotal Chartism was strongest in the North of England. One hundred and thirty of the 135 signatories are known; of these, 48 came from Yorkshire, 26 from Lancashire, 20 from the Midlands, 13 from the Potteries, nine from London, four from Scotland, three from Ireland, two from Sunderland, two from Wotton-under-Edge and one from Brighton. But London had at least five Teetotal Chartist societies – at Bermondsey, Lambeth, Cheapside, Beak Street and East London.”

The East London Chartist total Abstinence and Mutual Instruction Society was led by Charles Neesom and his wife Elizabeth Neesom, who also founded the London Female Democratic Association and was the leading light in an East London Female Total Abstinence Society.

Teetotal Chartism was also strong in Scotland. In response to Vincent’s address, Scottish Chartists used the Chartist Circular of 9 January 1841 to issue their own call to “dedicate this year to total abstinence”. Their own address was signed by 101 Scottish Chartists, including some of the movement’s leading figures. All their names are set out here.

On the other side of the argument, Peter McDouall would condemn the teetotal movement at the National Charter Association’s 1842 convention as “more of a religious than a political body”.

His views were firmly in line with those of Feargus O’Connor, who in the face of a rapid advance by teetotal Chartism and Lovett’s New Move denounced church, teetotal, knowledge and household suffrage Chartism as “trick, farce, cheat or humbug”. All were, he warned, distractions and potentially divisive, raising the spectre that those who were not Christian Chartists or teetotal Chartists might be judged not good enough for the vote.

His intervention was enough to prevent Warrington Chartists establishing a teetotal body, but marked a decisive split with Lovett and his supporters.

But the anti-teetotal line was about more than the personalities of leading Chartists and their positions within the movement. More politically advanced Chartists believed that Chartism could triumph only by organising and confronting its opponents in the ruling class.

Much later, speaking in Manchester on 20 October 1850 after his release from prison, the Chartist leader Ernest Jones told the crowd: “Some will tell you that teetotalism will get you the Charter: the Charter don’t lie at the bottom of a glass of water.” In the same speech, he marked his change of political stance by warning the authorities that before his imprisonment, “I spoke of a green flag waving over Downing-street.  I have changed my colour since then—it shall be a red one now”.

Signatories to Henry Vincent’s address on teetotalism

Members of the late General Convention
Henry Vincent, late Resident in Oakham Gaol
John Cleave, 1 Shoe Lane, Fleet Street
Henry Hetherington, 126 Strand
C H Neesom, 76 Hare Street, Bethnal Green
W Rider, Leeds
J Harris, London (late of Brighton)

Political victims
Rev W J Jackson, now of Lancaster Castle
W Shellard of Ponty Pool, Wales; now resident in Oakham Gaol, Rutlandshire
W Edwards of Newport (Mon.) now in Oakham Gaol
G E Boggis, Brick Lane, London
Messrs Williams and Binns, Sunderland
Isaac Johnson, now resident in Chester Castle
RD Lacey, Wotton under Edge
H R Lacey, ditto
G M Bartlett, Bath
R Spurr, London

  1. Perry, ‘Wotton-under-Edge, Times Past – Time Present’, 1986, pages 136 –6:

‘Within a few years the desire for further reform found expression in the People’s Charter, calling for votes for all adults, the payment of M.P. s and the secret ballot. The driving course was the London Working Men’s Association. Henry Vincent, a fiery orator, was sent to do missionary work in the West of England and a Chartist newspaper, the Western Vindicator, published in Bristol, circulated in this district. Early in 1839 branches of the W.M.A. and its complement, the Radical Women’s Association, had been established in Wotton.

The moving spirits were Henry and Rowland Lacey, sons of a prosperous local family, and Joseph Witts, a weaver. On Whit Tuesday a great Chartist meeting was held on Selsley Common, near Stroud. The Wotton contingent marched there in good order led by a band and members banners inscribed ‘Liberty, Equal Rights and Equal Laws’, a slogan alarmingly reminiscent of the French Revolution though harmless enough to modern ears. The meeting was addressed by Witts, who stressed the importance of action within the law, and by Rowland Lacey, calling for economic sanctions such as the mass withdrawal of savings from banks and a general strike. At the close, the Wotton members reformed and marched home as a disciplined body.

Lord Segrave (Colonel Berkeley’s new title) wrote to the Home Office that Wotton was the stronghold of Chartism in Gloucestershire. Joseph Witts was busy founding Chartist branches in Uley and other villages. In July Henry Vincent came here to address meetings on Wotton Hill and in the Chipping; he belonged to that section of the Chartists advocating violent means. ‘Pull down the Palaces of Tyranny with your own hands… pull down their castles’. Lord Segrave, feeling himself threatened, wrote again to the home Office asking for leave to recruit a troop of Berkeley Yeomanry, to be commanded by Grantley, to combat ‘the spreading poison’ which was beginning to infect agricultural workers as well as unemployed weavers.

Henry Lacey and Joseph Witts were charged with attending an illegal meeting and were sent for trial to Gloucester, but the case was postponed until spring. Those leaders of the Wotton establishment, including Eusebius Foxwell and T.S. Childs of the Tabernacle, who had given evidence against them, were the objects of noisy demonstrations in the town; they were followed around by a crowd of up to two hundred persons, ‘abusing them in the coarsest terms’, kept within bounds only by the extraordinary authority of Rowland Lacey.

In the meantime Henry Vincent had been tried in Monmouth and committed to Newport Gaol. Chartists in Wotton were in daily expectation of a national rising. Three secret meetings were held at the Red Lion and a delegate was sent to the clandestine Chartist headquarters; the proceedings were reported by a government spy. Though there had been talk of joining, no one from Wotton took part in the Chartist march to Newport Gaol, in which twenty-four persons died. When, early in 1840, many Chartists involved in the Newport attack were imprisoned or transported, the movement in Wotton seems to have died. Though Chartism continued in the eighteen-forties, the emphasis was on peaceful propaganda; there is no information about its survival in Wotton. Henry Lacey and Joseph Witts were bound over to keep the peace.’



ELIZA PALSER, Great III Aunt of Richard Barton

 Eliza Palser was baptised on 27th October 1819 at Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church and her father was described as a spinner of Bradley Street, Wotton-under-Edge.


HANNAH TERRETT, Great II Grandmother of Richard Barton

Daughter of Richard Palser and Hannah (nee Humphreyes)

Wife of Daniel Terrett

Mother of Henry Terrett

 Also Mother of Eliza Grimes, Emily Millard, William, Julia, Joseph, Daniel and Daniel

 Hannah the daughter of Richard Paull (sic) and Hannah his wife was baptised at Rowland Hill’s Tabernacle at Wotton-under-Edge on 3rd August 1808. The entry in the register states that she was born on 21st July 1806. The other transcribed register reads ‘Hannah daughter of Richard and Hannah (no surname given) born on 21st July 1808 and baptised on 3rd August 1808’ by Rev. Wm Potter. Later census returns confirm that Hannah Palser was born in about 1807 at Wotton-under-Edge and she was described as a cloth worker in the census returns for 1841, 1851 and 1861. Her father, Richard Palser, was a spinner of Bradley Street in 1819 and a brickmaker of Coombe Road by 1851.

On 6th February 1831 Hannah Palser married Daniel Terrett at St Mary’s Church and the witnesses to their marriage were Richard and Jane Palser. Richard signed his name. Between 1831 and 1850 Daniel and Hannah had eight children. Only the elder Daniel died in infancy and the Wotton burial register states that he was buried in November 1844 aged one year eight months. His sister Julia died in 1859 aged twenty years.

From as early as September 1831, Daniel Terrett is described as an engineer of Wotton-under-Edge in the baptismal registers of the Parish Church. The registers also reveal that in February 1841 they were living at Ragwell and in May 1843 at Coombe Road. The baptisms of their sons Joseph and Daniel were joint christenings with two the children of Rowland and Jane Lacey.

In the 1841 census Daniel Terrett was described as a thirty-year-old engineer of Ragnal in Coombe, Wotton-under-Edge. His wife, Hannah, was a thirty-five-year-old cloth burler. Their children included Eliza aged nine years; Emily aged seven; William aged five, Julia aged three and Joseph aged six months. The whole family was recorded as born in the county. Their son Joseph was baptised on 14th February 1841 at Wotton-under-Edge Parish Church with his cousin Mary Jane Lacey.

In 1843 they were described as living in Coombe Road. The burial register for St Mary’s Church would suggest that by November 1844 they had moved to Kingswood but they still had their son Daniel baptised at Wotton in May 1846.

 In the 1851 census Daniel Terrett was again described as an engineer and he was living with his family in Kingswood. He was forty-one-years-old and his place of birth was given as Wotton-under-Edge. Hannah was a forty-one-year-old cloth worker and their children at home included William a sixteen-year-old apprentice Engineer who was born in Wotton-under-Edge; Jula aged thirteen and born in Wotton; Joseph an eleven-year-old scholar born in Wotton; Daniel a five-year-old scholar born in Kingswood and Henry aged two and born in Kingswood.

In the 1861 census Daniel Terrett was living with his wife and three children at Wotton Road, Kingswood. Their house was situated two up from the Turnpike House near to Vineyard Lane. Daniel was described as a fifty-two-years-old engineer smith born in Wotton-under-Edge. His wife Hannah was aged fifty-four-years, a woollen cloth worker, born in Wotton-under-Edge. Their children at home  included Joseph, a twenty-year-old engineer smith born in Wotton; Daniel, a fifteen-year-old engineer smith, born in Kingswood and Henry, a ten-year-old scholar, born in Kingswood.

In the 1871 census Daniel was described as a sixty-one-year-old millwright of Abbey Street, Kingswood, born in Wotton-under-Edge. Hannah was sixty-four-years and born in Wotton-under-Edge. Their son Joseph was living with them. He was described as a married millwright, aged thirty years, and born in Wotton.

As early as 1868 Slater’s directory refers to ‘David (sic) Terrett & Son, Millwright and Engineers’ of Kingswood. Four of his sons, William, Joseph, Daniel and Henry became involved with the family engineering business and were also local publicans. An 1871 directory refers to ‘Daniel Terrett & Son, Millwright and Engineers’.

Daniel Terrett died on 7th February 1876 at Kingswood. Hannah survived her husband by three years but died on 11th February 1879 at Kingswood. She was described as the seventy-three-year-old widow of Daniel Terrett, Millwright. The cause of death was given as Bronchitis and Benjamin Simmons M.R.C.S.L certified this. Her son Joseph Terrett of Kingswood was present at the death and informed the registrar, also Benjamin Simmons, on 14th February 1879.

Hannah survived her husband by three years but died of bronchitis on 11th February 1879 aged 73 years. She was buried with her husband and daughter, Julia, in the churchyard of St Mary’s, Wotton-under-Edge.

Hannah Terrett was buried with her husband and daughter, Julia, in the churchyard of St Mary’s, Wotton-under-Edge.

Gravestone at St Mary’s Churchyard, Wotton-under-Edge:

 ‘Julia, daughter of Daniel and Hannah Terrett of Kingswood, died January 17th 1859, aged 20 years. Daniel Terrett of Kingswood who died February 7th 1876, aged 67 years. Also Hannah his wife who died on February 11th 1879, aged 73.’


FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS FAMILY CONTACT: btsarnia@gmail.com


PARKER FAMILY OF BISLEY


Richard Parker (1683-1759) and Hannah Swallow

Husbandman of Bisley

 

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Mary Parker (1720-) and Thomas Palser III (1719-)

Cardmaker of Wotton-under-Edge

 

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William Palser (1750-) and Jane Kilminster

 

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Richard Palser (1773-1856) and Hannah Humphreys (1776c-1853)

Spinner and brick maker of Wotton-under-Edge

 

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Hannah Palser (1806-1879) and Daniel Terrett

Cloth burler and cloth worker of Wotton-under-Edge and Kingswood

 

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Henry Terrett and Ellen Smith

 

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 RICHARD PARKER, Great VI Grandfather of Richard Barton

 Husband of Hannah Swallow

Father of Mary Palser

 

Also Father of Hannah, Elizabeth and Richard

 

According to the burial register at Bisley Richard Parker was born in about 1683.

Were his parents Richard Parker of Bisley who married Katherine Peglar at Bisley in October 1683? Thomas son of Richard was baptised at Bisley on 1st May 1686 and William on 7th August 1689.

A Richard Parker married Hannah Swallow at Winstone on 7th February 1712. They were of the parish of Bisley.

Hannah could be daughter of Jeremiah and Elizabeth Swallow (nee Merik) of Standish who was baptised on 2nd October 1681. They were married at Standish on 1st October 1666 and had at least six other children baptised at Standish (check!):

Thomas Swallow 6th November 1670

John Swallow 13th August 1676

Elizabeth Swallow 1st December 1676

Nathaniel Swallow 1st December 1678

Nathaniel Swallow 7th August 1686

On 12th January 1759 Richard Parker, a husbandman of Bisley made his will and left twenty shillings a year to his widow, Hannah, for her lifetime. The remainder of his estate was left to his grandson, Richard Parker Palser. The boy was only sixteen-years-old when Richard Parker died so his father, Thomas Palser, was appointed as his guardian and curator. On 12th June 1760 Richard Parker Palser appeared before the court. He was described as the lawful son of Thomas Palser, card maker of Wotton-under-Edge. The will was proved and Thomas was empowered to act in the name of his son.

Richard Parker was buried at Bisley on 25th February 1759 aged seventy-six-years.


Their children were Great VI Aunts and Uncles:

 

ELIZABETH PARKER, Great VI Aunt of Richard Barton

 

An Elizabeth Parker, daughter of Richard, was baptised on 11th October 1713 at Bisley

 


ELIZABETH PARKER, Great VI Aunt of Richard Barton

An Elizabeth Parker, daughter of Richard, was baptised on 13th October 1714 at Bisley

 

 


 

 

HANNAH PARKER, Great VI Aunt of Richard Barton

 

Hannah Parker was baptised on 24th March 1716/17 at Bisley.


(?) RICHARD PARKER, Great VI Uncle of Richard Barton

 Problem – He is not mentioned in his father’s will

 

Richard Parker was baptised on 1st January 1723 at Bisley. On 7th December 1754 he married Hannah Lane by licence at Bisley. He was described as a gentleman and he signed his name and she made her mark. The witnesses were Abraham Harrison and Daniel Eberton.


MARY PALSER, Great V Grandmother of Richard Barton

 

Daughter of Richard Parker and Hannah (nee Swallow)

Wife of Thomas Palser

 

Mother of William Palser

 

Also Mother of Hannah, Richard Parker, Thomas, Ann, Frances, George and Hannah

 

Mary, daughter of Richard Parker, was baptised on 21st November 1720 at Bisley. She married Thomas Palser at Wotton-under-Edge on 18th November 1742.

Thomas Palser was baptised on 1st September 1719. He was the son of George Palser and Ann Davis who married on 12th September 1713 at Wotton-under-Edge. George was baptised at Wotton on 12th December 1684.

Mary and Thomas had eight children who were all baptised at Wotton-under-Edge.

On 12th January 1759 her father, Richard Parker, a husbandman of Bisley made his will and left twenty shillings a year to his widow, Hannah, for her lifetime. The remainder of his estate was left to his grandson, Richard Parker Palser. The boy was only sixteen-years-old when Richard Parker died so his father, Thomas Palser, was appointed as his guardian and curator. On 12th June 1760 Richard Parker Palser appeared before the court. He was described as the lawful son of Thomas Palser, card maker of Wotton-under-Edge. The will was proved and Thomas was empowered to act in the name of his son.


FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS FAMILY CONTACT: btsarnia@gmail.com

 

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