btsarnia

A tribute to the life and work of Brian Torode

Thomas Duffell of Kempley, King’s Caple and Llanbaddock

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Thomas Duffell

 


(?) Charles Duffield and Mary Seville

of Flaxley

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  Charles Duffield alias Sevill (1755-1830) and Elizabeth Williams (1761-1843)

of Littledean and a Nailor of Newent

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 James Duffield or Duffold (1792- ) and Anne Goode (1792- )

Labourer of Oxenhall, transported to Van Dieman’s Land

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 Mary Shott (1817-1908)

of Aston Ingham, Kilcot and Walford

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 Thomas Duffell alias Bundy (1836-1880) and Mary Preece (1843-1897)

Farm Labourer of Kempley, King’s Caple and Llanbaddock

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Ann Duffell (1866-1938) and Arthur John Noad

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 Florence Noad and Edward Percy Barton

 


THOMAS DUFFELL (alias BUNDY), Great II Grandfather of Richard Barton

Son of Mary Shott (nee Duffell)

Husband of Mary Preece

Father of Anne Noad

 

Also Father of William, Thomas and Elizabeth Harris

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Thomas Duffell

On 4th December 1836 Mary Duffall (sic) took her baby, Thomas, to Kempley Parish Church for baptism. In the register he is described as her illegitimate son and her name is spelt ‘Duffall’. Thomas was one of four illegitimate children baptised by the curate, Richard Brooke, in Kempley during that year. Only two other baptisms in that year were of legitimate children!

Mary Duffall was the daughter of James Duffold (sic) and his wife Anne Goode. They were married in Oxenhall on 27th June 1814. Her brothers were James, who was baptised from Church House, Oxenhall, on 16th July 1814, and Thomas who was baptised in 1818. Their father was then described as a labourer of Pool Hill. I have yet to find Mary’s baptism but she would appear to have been born in about 1815/16. Mary’s mother’s family lived in Oxenhall and in 1841 her seventy-five-year-old grandfather, Thomas Goode, was living at the Church House with ten other family members.

In 1815 Mary’s father, James Duffold (sic), was arrested and tried for Larceny but was found not guilty and acquitted. Four years later he was arrested again, found guilty and transported to Van Dieman’s Land in January 1820 for seven years. He arrived in Sydney on the Neptune on 27th July 1820 and was deployed at Liverpool with twelve others allocated to Mr Jas Chukan. I have not been able to trace whether James returned from Australia with any certainty; in any case, his wife Anne died in 1830, and son James died in 1833. Younger son Thomas had died in 1819 before his father was transported, leaving only his daughter Mary to live a long life until 1908.

Returning to Mary she married Thomas Shott on 25th October 1841 at the Church of St Nicholas in Westgate Street, Gloucester. He was described as a twenty-three-year-old bachelor, a labourer, son of Edward Shott, labourer. Mary Duffield was described as a twenty-five-year-old spinster, servant, daughter of James Duffield, labourer. They both made their marks and the witnesses were Andrew and Hannah Syson. I can find neither Thomas Shott nor Mary Duffield in the 1841 census return.

What of young Thomas? It would seem that he went to live with his great aunt and great uncle in Kempley. Ann Duffell (1797-1867), daughter of Charles and Elizabeth Duffield, and sister of James, married Richard Bundy at Redmarley D’Abitot on 3rd April 1822. The Bundys moved to Kempley Green where we find them living with seven children in 1841. The second youngest child was recorded in the return as Thomas ‘Bundy’ aged four years.

Richard Bundy 60 Agricultural Labourer Not born in county

Ann Bundy 45 Born in county

Maria 15, William 12, Jane 9, Charlotte 6, Thomas 4, James 2

In the 1851 census return Mary’s illegitimate son, Thomas Duffell, was then fifteen years old and was working as a farm servant at Matthews Farm, a one hundred and twenty acre farm at Kempley run by Mr. Cummins. Thomas gave his place of birth as Kempley. Meanwhile the Bundys had moved from Kempley to Sollershope and there is no Thomas Bundy listed in the 1851 census.

There is no record of a Thomas Duffell who would fit our ancestor in the 1861 census return but at Mill Ditch, King’s Caple, we find a Thomas Bunday (sic) lodging with a groom William Morris. Thomas was described as unmarried, twenty-five-years-old, an Agricultural Labourer, born at ‘Oxnal’ (sic – Oxenhall). William Morris was a thirty-six-year-old groom and he had a wife Anne and son John.

On 26th May 1864 Thomas Duffell married Mary Preece at King’s Caple Church in Herefordshire. Mary was described as a twenty-one-year-old spinster of Kings Caple, the daughter of William Preece, a labourer. She was baptised at Kingsland on 12th February 1843. Thomas Duffel (sic) was described as a twenty-seven-year-old Labourer of Kings Caple, son of ‘Thomas Duffel, Labourer’ – but he was unable to sign his own name. The witnesses were William Morris and Alice Davis. The William Morris was presumably the groom Thomas was lodging with in 1861 and Alice Davi(e)s was the local blacksmith’s daughter.

From 1864 until the 1871 census Thomas and Mary Duffell were living at High House, King’s Caple and Thomas was working as an Agricultural Labourer. Thomas and Mary had four children between 1865 and 1870. When Ann was born on 8th August 1866 at High House, Kings Caple, she was described as the daughter of Thomas Duffell (sic) and Mary Duffell, formerly Preece. Her father’s occupation was given as a farm labourer and her mother was the informant when the event was registered on 13th September.

The 1871 census return lists the family as still living at High House, Kings Caple. Thomas was described as a thirty-three-year-old Farm Labourer, born in Kempley. His wife Mary was twenty-eight-years-old and born in Kingsland. The four children had all been born in King’s Caple – William a six-year-old scholar; Anne aged four; Thomas aged two and Elizabeth aged ten months. At this time James Bundy and his young family were living close by at Churchfield Cottage, Kings Caple.

Their eldest son, William Duffell, died between April and June 1877, aged twelve years, in the Pontypool Registration District, which would suggest that the family had moved to Llanbaddock, near Usk, by that time.

It was here at Llanbaddock, that Thomas Duffell died on 16th February 1880, aged forty-one years. In the death certificate he was described as a Labourer of Llanbaddock and his widow, Mary, was present at the death. The cause of death was given as Bronchitis for three months and Syncope, and D.H. Boulton M.R.C.S certified this. William Jerome, Registrar, registered the death on 18th February.

The burial took place on 21st February at Llanbaddock Church and in the church burial register he was described as Thomas Duffell, aged forty-one-years, a resident of Rhadyr.

The Duffell Family Bible gives the date of his death as February 1878 and his age as forty and there is a family tradition that he was a Farm bailiff and that he was gored by a bull.

By this time the Bundys were living at Sollershope where Thomas Duffell’s great uncle died in 1859 and great aunt in 1867. James Bundy, their youngest son, had moved on from King’s Caple and was listed in the 1911 census return, three years before his death, as a road contractor in Hoarwithy.

Thomas Duffell’s mother settled in Aston Ingham before moving to Walford. Thomas and Mary Shott had at least seven children. Thomas Shott died in 1879 and Mary lived on at Hope Mansell until 1908 when she died aged about ninety-two years, seven years older than was claimed on her death certificate. We can only speculate as to whether Mary and her son, Thomas Duffell, were in contact with each other. It seems likely that they were when we consider the close proximity between the homes of Mary Shott and her aunt Ann Bundy. Her aunt had clearly come to her help when she was faced with being an unmarried mother back in 1836.

 

MARY DUFFELL, Great II Grandmother of Richard Barton

 

Daughter of William Preece and Mary (nee Rollings)

Wife of Thomas Duffell

Mother of Anne Noad

 

Also Mother of William, Thomas Duffell and Elizabeth Harris

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Mary Duffell

 

Mary Preece was born at 10am on 18th January 1843 at Kingsland, the daughter of William Preece and his wife Mary Preece, formerly Rollings. Her father, a labourer, was the informant and he was unable to sign his name. Richard Powell, Registrar, registered the birth on 26th March. Mary was baptised on 12th February 1843 at Kingsland Parish Church.

Mary Preece was the second child and eldest daughter of William and Mary. According to notes written in a Family Bible by Thomas Preece, her brother, in 1866 Mary was born on 10th January 1841 but this is clearly inaccurate information.

Her parents, William and Mary Preece, at the time of the 1841census, were living at Aston in Kingsland Parish. William Preece was then employed as an Agricultural Labourer.

By the time of the 1851 Census the family had moved to Moreton in the Parish of Eye and William was described as a forty-four-year-old Farm Labourer who had been born at Byton in Herefordshire. He was working for William Yates who was farming 135 acres with twenty-four labourers. Mary Preece, his wife, was described as thirty-four and born in Kingsland. The children included John, aged ten; Mary, aged eight; William, aged five and Elizabeth, aged two. All of the children were recorded as born in Kingsland.

The Preeces can only have lived at Eye for a period between November 1848 and October 1854 and no children seem to have been born there. From the 1861 census return we discover that the family had been living at Stoke Prior since about 1854.

In the 1861 census return Mary was working at Bury Farm, Stoke Prior, as a House Maid – servant. The farm had 320 acres and was owned by forty-nine-year-old William Hinton. Mary was described as eighteen-years-old and born in Kingsland.

On 26th May 1864 Thomas Duffell married Mary Preece at King’s Caple Church in Herefordshire. Mary was described as a twenty-one-year-old spinster of Kings Caple, the daughter of William Preece, a labourer. She was baptised at Kingsland on 12th February 1843. Thomas Duffel (sic) was described as a twenty-seven-year-old Labourer of Kings Caple, son of ‘Thomas Duffel, Labourer’ – but he was unable to sign his own name. The witnesses were William Morris and Alice Davis

From 1864 until the 1871 census Thomas and Mary Duffell were living at High House, King’s Caple and Thomas was working as an Agricultural Labourer. Thomas and Mary had four children between 1865 and 1870. When Ann was born on 8th August 1866 at High House, Kings Caple, she was described as the daughter of Thomas Duffell (sic) and Mary Duffell, formerly Preece. Her father’s occupation was given as a farm labourer and her mother was the informant when the event was registered on 13th September.

Their eldest son, William Duffell, died between April and June 1877, aged twelve years, in the Pontypool Registration District which would suggest that the family had moved to Llanbaddock, near Usk, by that time.

Thomas Duffell died at Llanbaddock on 16th February 1880, aged forty-one years. In the death certificate he was described as a Labourer and his widow, Mary, was present at the death.

 In the 1881 census return Mary, now described as a widow, was working as a Washer Woman at Little Heurue (sp?) Lllanbaddock and her age was given as thirty-eight years. Her place of birth was given as Kingsland. Two of her children were still at school and Annie was by then in service in Usk.

In the 1891 census return Mary was living at 24 Bridge Street, Usk, with Elizabeth Williams a sixty-eight-year-old widow who was employed as a Caretaker. Mary was employed as a general domestic servant. Her age was given as fifty and she was described as a widow.

Mary Duffell died on 15th March 1897 at the Crown Inn, Lyndhurst, Hants, and her age was given as fifty-four-years on the Death Certificate. She was described as the Widow of Thomas Duffell, a Farm Labourer, and the cause of death was given as Phthisis pulmoralis. Her son, Thomas Duffell of Marton Hall, Baschurch, Shropshire, was the informant. The death was registered on 18th March by William Holloway, Registrar.

Lyndhurst – A Brief History and Guide, by Georgina Babey and Peter Roberts, 2003:

‘Crossing the Romsey Road junction, the pavement narrows considerably and then mounts steps to the Crown Hotel. In front of the Crown there is a plaque carrying the date 1600. This is, possibly, when the Crown was first established, not the date of the current building which is late 19th Century…

By the eighteenth century the Crown was well established as the place where much Forest business was done… Extended a number of times as trade increased the last major rebuild was in 1896/7 when Mrs Mary Jones was the Hotel keeper.’


  1. WILLIAM DUFFELL, Great II Uncle of Richard Barton

 

William Preece was born in the second quarter of 1865 at King’s Caple. He was described as a six-year-old scholar in the 1871 census return. He probably died between April and June 1877 in the Pontypool Registration District, aged twelve-years.


  1. THOMAS DUFFELL, Great II Uncle of Richard Barton

 

Thomas Duffell was born on 22nd August 1868 at King’s Caple. He was at home on the night of the 1871 census and was described as a two-year-old born in King’s Caple. In the 1881 census he was thirteen and a scholar, living with his widowed mother and younger sister at Llanbaddock. His place of birth was given as King’s Caple.

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Ten years later, in 1891, he was living at Castle Stable, Llangibby, Monmouth, and working as a groom. The census return describes him as twenty-two and born in Usk. His companion was given as Arthur Williams a twenty-year-old groom.

He became a London coachman and then in 1897 he was at Marton Hall, Baschurch, Salop.

 Thomas Duffell married Edith Elizabeth Cope in 1900. She was born in the second quarter of 1875 in Nottingham. In 1881 she was living at home with her parents at 7 Kelly Court, St Mary’s Parish, Nottingham. Her father was John Cope a thirty-nine-year-old blacksmith and her mother Sarah Ann was a thirty-seven-year-old lace maker u/w. Her siblings included John Gilbert a fourteen-year-old errand boy and Henry aged twelve; Evan H.S. aged eight; Edith Elizabeth aged five and Harriet Frances aged three years.

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Ten years later in 1891 Edith and her sister Harriet were inmates in the 22 Friar Street Midland Orphanage Girls Training House in Lenton Parish, Nottingham. Edith was aged fifteen years and Harriet aged thirteen years and both born in Nottingham.

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The 1901 census return records that Thomas and Edith were still at Morton Hall. He was described as a thirty-two-year-old coachman and groom, who was born in Herefordshire. Edith, his wife, was aged twenty-five and she was born in Nottinghamshire

In 1902 Thomas Duffell was a chauffeur for George Granville Lancaster at Kelmarsh Hall, which although situated near Northampton (postal address) is actually in the Registration District of Market Harborough, Leicestershire.

In 1911 Thomas Duffell was living in a private house situated between the Top Porter’s Lodge and the Stables at Kelmarsh and working as a coachman (Domestic). He was described as aged forty-three-years, and born at Kings Caple, Hereford. He had been married to his wife for eleven years and of their two children one was still alive. His wife Edith Elizabeth Duffell was aged thirty-seven-years, born in Nottingham and married for eleven years. Their daughter Edith Frances Duffell was aged four years, at school, and born at Kelmarsh. Staying with them were two visitors who were working as Grooms (Domestic) – Thomas Williams and Tom Williams. The former was married and aged fifty-years, a native of Gloucester whilst the latter was single, aged twenty-one-years, and born in Sedgfield, Durham

Thomas Duffell died in 1954.

Family Bible entries:

 

Thomas Duffell born 1838

Mary Duffell born 1843

William son born 1865

Anne daughter born 1866

Thomas son born 1868

Elizabeth daughter born 1870

Elizabeth daughter born 1870

Elizabeth

Thomas Duffell born 1868 married Edith Elizabeth Cope

Auntie Frannie Edith Frances Duffell born March 9th 1907

Thomas Gilbert Duffell born February 24th 1910

Died March 18th 1910 RIP

Dad William Duffell born January 14th 1912

Married Charlotte Florence Staple, born 13th February 1908

Gordon Herl Duffell born November 28th 1940

Married Patricia Jessopp born 1941

Elizabeth Julia born 30th April 1962 High Wycombe

Jacqueline born Australia

Edmund Mark born Swindon 26th February 1973.’

Letters from Edith Duffell to Florence Barton:

 

From Kelmarsh Hall, Northampton to 1 Osborne Road, Clifton. (January 1908?)

 

My dearest Niece,

Just a few lines to wish you a happy New Year. I am a little late in doing it, but better late than never. We have all been so bad with these influenza colds and Uncle has got it very bad. Just now it makes him look very ill, but I hope it will soon leave him. The weather is so foggy and with him being out such a lot with the carriage.

Well dear I must thank you very much for your photo, it makes a beautiful picture. We should love to see you. Your Uncle says we should never no (sic) one another, it is a pity we are so far away. We was sorry you could not go home for Xmas, it is nice when one can spend the Xmas at home but its not very often one can in service as there is generally plenty of company at them times. I had a very nice letter from your Mother at Xmas. I am pleased they are all keeping well.

Well dear Florrie I think I must close. With fondest love from Aunty, Uncle and darling baby. You would love to see her, she gets so interesting & so pretty, such a lot of fair wavy hair, but I am determined to have her photos taken when the nice weather comes. You must have one. From you ever loving Aunty Edith.

 

From Kelmarsh Hall, Northampton to 2 Caledonia Place, Clifton, Bristol (January 1910,1911?)

My dear Florrie,

Just a few lines to wish you a happy New Year. Iwas so sorry I could not write for Xmas, but I was so busy & not feeling very well, I only wrote two letters, one to your Mother & one to Aunty Bessie. Well dear I must thank you very much for baby’s bricks. They are very good & a puzzle for her, for when she gets them out she has a job to get them back again, bu they have done the pictures as was on the paper.

Well dear what sort of a Xmas did you spend, I hope a jolly one. I had been very quiet here. I think the weather has a lot to do with it, with it being so mild, for its nothing but rain week after week. There seems to be a lot of sickness about especially with children. I am glad to say we are all keeping well. Uncle Tom has not been very grand but he has got about alright again. We should very much like to see you and Bessie again. Anytime you could make it convenient to come. I doubt we should no (sic) you you will have altered so.

Well dear I think I must close. With fondest love from all from your ever loving Aunty Edith.

Frances is writing you a letter. She is busy but I will put it inside. What do you think of it. (Enclosed is a piece of paper with spidery scribble on it, in pen and pencil, although there are some recognisable letter shapes in it.)

From Kelmarsh Hall, Northampton to 2 Caledonia Place, Clifton, Bristol

My dear Florrie,

You will think me a long time answering your nice letter, but the time seems to go so quickly, there’s no time hanging on ones hands the same as before I had the children. We are so sorry dear to think as your Mother & Father has not been well but I hope they have got alright again.

Well dear what time in August do you think you might be coming, for our people go to France about the 20th of this month for three weeks. We thought we might be away all bank holiday week, that is the only few days we can get off, or else we should like to see you and Percy. Perhaps you might be able to tell us in your next letter.

We had a letter from Aunty Bessie yesterday, pleased to say they are keeping well. I must tell you as Francie goes to school, it is only just at the top of the drive, not 5 minutes walk. We are having her taught the piano & she is getting on well with it.

I must close with fondest love from all. Your loving Aunty Edith.

Let us no (sic) when you think you will have your holiday.

From Kelmarsh Hall, Northampton to 8 The Avenue, Clifton, Bristol   (1913)

My dear Florrie,

I know you will think I am never going to write. I have been going to write for long enough to you and your Mother to send one of Willie’s photos, but I don’t seem as if there is time for anything. I have sent one to Bessie also Aunty Bessie, that is the only two I have sent. I have got a dozen to send, I don’t know when they will all get them for I have had them now just on three months. Willie seems a little tarter, all bodys work, and yet looks as strong as a little pony. It looks exactly like him in the photo.

I hope dear you are keeping quite well and I hope they are all quite well at home. The children has had colds but that seems quite a complaint going about. We had to take Willie to the doctors three times with his teething, he has cut them so hard he had a lot of pain in his head and ears. We have to syringe them every day. He does not care much about them being done.

I must tell you as your Uncle has started to drive a car, he has had 3 weeks now, he seems to be mastering it alright.

Well dear I must close. Just want to drop a few lines to your Mother, if chance. With love from Uncle and Aunty & kisses from the children, xxxxxxx

(enclosed is a photograph of Willie, aged c. one, sitting in a wicker chair. Taken in the photographic studio of T.A. Kay, and made into a postcard)


4. ELIZABETH HARRIS, Great II Aunt of Richard Barton

Elizabeth Duffell was born in the second quarter of 1870 at King’s Caple. The 1871 census return describes her as a ten-month-old baby and as born in King’s Caple. She was described in the 1881 census return as aged eleven and living at home at Llanbaddock with her widowed mother and brother. Her place of birth was given as King’s Caple and her status was given as scholar.

The 1891 census return reveals that she was working as a scullery maid at Babworth Hall, East Retford, Nottinghamshire, home of Lt. Col. Henry Denison. She was described as a twenty-year-old born in Hereford City. Ten years later in 1901 Elizabeth was the housekeeper – domestic worker – at Manor, Fawkham, Dartford, Kent, the home of Henry Hohler esq. She was described as a thirty-three-year-old born in King’s Caple.

In about 1903 Elizabeth Duffell married Frederick Thomas Harris. In 1909 Fred Harris was a Fireman of Essex Road, Longfield, Essex and by 1911 they were living at Victoria Terrace, Essex Road.

In 1901 Fred Harris was living at Station Road, Longfield with his cousin Robert Gilham and his family. Robert Gilham was a builder and employer but Fred was a forty-three-year-old wheelwright, a worker, born at Boughton. In 1891 he was living at Colonel’s Lane, Boughton under Blean with his parents. His father was Thomas Harris a sixty-year-old agricultural labourer born in Hernhill. His mother was Ann J. Harris a fifty-eight-year-old wife born in Boughton under Blean. Frederick Thomas was aged thirty-three-years, a wheelwright, born in Boughton under Blean. Ten years earlier in 1881 the Harrises were living at the Street in Boughton under Blean and again Frederick Thomas was a twenty-three-year-old wheelwright. His brother Thomas R. Harris was at home aged eighteen and a bricklayer. In 1871 Frederick Thomas was again at home in the Street working as an agricultural labourer aged thirteen years. His siblings included ten-year-old Eliza Ann and eight-year-old Thomas R. who were both at school

At the time of the 1911 census they were living in five rooms at Victoria Terrace, Essex Road, Longfield, Dartford, Kent. Frederick Thomas Harris was fifty-three-years-old and working for a builder as a wheelwright. He was born at Boughton near Faversham, Kent. Elizabeth was aged forty years, married for eight years, and born in Herefordshire. They were married for eight years with no children.

 

Letters and Postcards from Elizabeth Harris to Florence Barton: (of nine firemen)

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Postmarked: Longfield May 6th 1909 (?) to Miss Noad, 1 Osborne Road, Clifton, Bristol

 

Dear F,

What do you think of uncle. He is in the middle holding the stand pipe. I do think its good of them all. I will send Bessie one next week and much love let me know soon.

 

From Essex Road, Longfield, Kent to Miss Noad, 2 Caledonia Place, Clifton (of Dell Bridge and Village Schools, Port Sunlight)

 

My dear Florrie,

Just a line to thank you for parcel received last night. Things fit beautifully. I am so pleased with them – we have had a very happy time. Much love from E.Harris. Write soon and tell me what presents you have had this year.

From Victoria Terrace, Essex Road, Longfield, Kent to 8 The Avenue, Clifton, Bristol (Between Oct 1912 and Summer 1913)

 

My dearest Florrie,

I am so sorry I have not answered your very kind letter, and good birthday wishes before this, but really dear I have only just got straight with spring cleaning. Uncle has papered my kitchen and done my scullery and all is nice and clean once more. I wrote home last week to Mother and I quite thought I was going to tell you that I had seen Bessie on yesterday Sunday, but I was very disappointed on Saturday morning to say she could not come as they had got the Lady’s sister and her husband coming to stay (the) weekend. So we have not seen her yet, been disappointed twice. I do hope next time she will be able to come unless they will be off back to the country.

Now dear Florrie, I was so pleased to hear that Percy had been to see you, and that you do enjoy your outings so much together. He does seem so kind to you, I expect he has been to see you again by this time. You must write to me soon and tell me all news of you both.

Uncle Fred has been to a Furineal (funeral?) this afternoon, has just come back, and now gone down to the Fire Station. The Fire men were called out Saturday evening to Mr. Martin’s rough stuff near the Brickfields. Never came home till half past 11 0’clock and off again yesterday at six in the morning till when he finished. So now he goes to see the pipes in case they are called out again. It generally happens in the hot weather, a spark from the train set it light.

Well dear Florrie what a spell of fine weather we have had. I am afraid our potatoes won’t come to much if we don’t get a nice rain soon. They look as if they are curling up the leaves. Uncle is afraid it is Blight coming in them for the want of rain. Tell Percy the 14 rows of early potatoes are looking the best – the Gloucester Kidneys. I hope they will all turn out better than we expect at the finish, but everybody’s is going off alike now. We have got e few nice flowers in our garden and a good onion bed so far.

So I suppose you are not coming to see us this year. It is a pity the journey is so expensive and so far. I must tell you they have put us a platform on the bridge, where the onion bed was, for to go to Gravesend. There are 11 trains a day to & fro to Swanley. Mrs. Longhurst and her married daughter has gone in today, 8d return. You can go in by one and out by the next if one wanted to. They say it is paying well, they call it Longfield Hall (Halt surely!). Such a lot goes in on a Saturday.

Mrs. Vench’s Gertie, the lively one, has gone out in service in London, the same place her Aunty is parlourmaid. Gertie is Housemaid, and they are going to give her £16 to start. Isn’t that good, and she is getting on so well, and so happy. She has been away about 3 months, or nearly so. Went for a holiday at first, now gone as housemaid. She is more lively than ever, she won’t be 16 till the 1st of January. She is a lucky girl don’t you think.

Florrie is still at dressmaking. She begins to want to go away but her Mother doesn’t want her to go just yet. The 2 boys want to come down to stay a day or two. I think perhaps they will come on Saturday and stay till Monday night as Willie has got 3 weeks holiday. Harold is a dear little chap. He wants to come and sleep in my bed at Longfield.

My kitchen paper has still got a red flower in it with green. It is lighter than the last one but everybody likes it very much. Make haste and you & Percy come and see it. Now remember us both to Percy. Much love to you, we remain your ever loving Uncle and Aunty. Write to me soon and tell me all (your) news, xxxxx

Bessie gave me a post card album for my birthday.

 


ANN(E) NOAD, Great Grandmother of Richard Barton

 

Daughter of Thomas Duffell and Mary Preece

Wife of Arthur John Noad

Mother of Florence Barton

 

Also Mother of Bessie Cashmore, Arthur, Mary Cuff, William, Henry, Thomas, Edith Evans and Evelyn James

Anne or Ann Duffell was born on 8th August 1866 at High House, Kings Caple, in Herefordshire. She was the elder daughter of Thomas Duffell, a Farm Labourer, and his wife Mary (nee Preece). John Parsons, Registrar, registered the baptism on 13th September and her mother was the informant.

In the 1871 census return Anne was at home at Kings Caple and described as a four-year-old child, born in King’s Caple.

Sometime between 1871 and 1880 the family moved to Llanbaddock near Usk. Her father died there when she was only fourteen years old and at the time of the 1881 census Annie was described as a Domestic Servant in the home of Jno. T. Cherry of Usk. She later became a servant at Cambridge House, Cambridge, Glos, where she presumably met Arthur John Noad. Later she was in service at 7, Gloucester Row, Clifton which is situated close to the Clifton Suspension Bridge.

Anne Duffell married Arthur John Noad on 29th June 1889 at Christchurch, Clifton, which was situated within sight of 7 Gloucester Row, Clifton. The bridegroom was described on the marriage certificate as a twenty-seven-year-old Wheelwright of Slimbridge, son of James Noad, a Labourer, and the bride was the twenty-three-year-old, daughter of Thomas Duffell, a Labourer. The witnesses were her brother Thomas Duffell and Annie Morris.

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The young couple settled in Slimbridge where John worked as a Carpenter and Wheelwright. Between 1890 and 1913 they had nine children, all of whom survived childhood. My father referred to their home at Churchend as being nicknamed ‘Starlings Castle’.

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In the 1891 census they were described as Arthur J. Noad, aged twenty-eight-years. Annie was aged twenty-four-years and born at ‘Kington, Hfds’. Their child Bessie was aged ten months. With them was John’s mother, Sarah Noad, aged sixty-seven-years and born in Cam.

On 9th February 1895 she was present when her mother-in-law died and informed the registrar of the death on 13th February, signing her name.

1901 census of Slimbridge Part 2 Entry number 69 Gossington  4 rooms

’A. John Noad  Head  M  38  Wheelwright & Carpenter  Worker (as opposed to
Employer/Working at Home etc) born Slimbridge

Annie Noad   Wife  M  34   born at Kings Caple, Herefordshire

Children: Bessie 10, Florence 9, Arthur 7, Mary 5 and William 3 all born at
Slimbridge’

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Their eldest son, Arthur Noad enlisted in the10th Battalion, Gloucestershire Regiment, and died in action at the Battle of Loos on the 13th October 1915, aged twenty-two-years. He was buried at Dud Corner Cemetery, Loos; Grave ref./ Panel no. IV.E.19.

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Anne Noad was a friend of the Hurd family of Slimbridge. When this family moved to the west side of the River Severn, Annie’s grand-daughter, Marian Barton, and her youngest daughter, Evelyn Noad, would stay with them.

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After her husband’s death, in 1938, she sold Victoria Cottage, Gossington, and bought ‘Kilmaur’, 5 Lawrence Grove, Dursley, where she lived with her recently widowed daughter, Bessie, and her grandson, John Cashmore. Thomas Duffell Noad, her youngest son, died on 18th March 1941 at Gloucester Infirmary aged thirty-seven-years.

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Anne Noad died on 22nd December 1943 aged seventy-seven-years at ‘Kilmaur’, Lawrence Grove, Dursley, The death certificate described her as the Widow of Arthur John Noad, Carpenter and Wheelwright. The cause of death was given as atypical Pneumonia and Influenza and was certified by B.W.D. Fayle M.B. R.S. Barnard, Registrar, registered the death on 23rd December and the informant was her daughter, B. Cashmore, who lived at the same address.

Anne Noad was buried with her husband at Slimbridge on 24th December.

Inscription on Gravestone:

 

‘In Loving Memory of Arthur John, Noad. Died April 29th 1938 Aged 75 years. Also Anne his Wife, Died Dec 22nd 1943 Aged 77 years. May they rest in peace’

In Memoriam card:

‘In affectionate remembrance of Anne Noad who departed this life December 22nd 1943 and was interred at the Church of St John, the Evangelist, Slimbridge, Dec 24th. “Kilmaur”, Lawrence Grove, Kingshill, Dursley, Glos. With the family’s kind regards. Farewell dear children, my life is past, I dearly loved you to the last; Weep not for me, nor sorrow take, but love each other for my sake.’

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Letters from A. John Noad and Annie Noad to their daughter Florence:

 

Gossington

28th July 1911

2 Caledonia Place

Clifton

Bristol

Dear Florrie,

I am sending you a line to tell you we heard from Bessie yesterday. She is giving her notice today & coming home.

I came home yesterday. I had a week down there & last Saturday we took him to a nursing home about 3 miles from Newport nearer Cardiff. Uncle said when I was with him he should very much like to see you both, so I think the best thing for you to do would be to go & see him the first opportunity as there is no certainty about how long he is going to last.

Aunt she is very poorly, she had to go to bed the day I came away. Mary she is with her, she seems to get on alright with her now.

I think I have told you all for now. We remain your ever affectionate B & S & F & M.

Annie & J. Noad

(written on the back of the above letter)

Dear Florrie,

I don’t think you will understand Dad’s letter very well unless I write you a few lines.

Mrs Taylor the woman in Uncle’s house sent to ask me to let Mary go down as the work was to (sic) much for her. So Mary went last Saturday week, and I am inclosing the only letter I got from Dad but he came back on Monday. I sent his letter to Bessie, got back on Monday. I wanted him to write to you Monday night but he was so tired out and looked ill from worry, and I have been so busy. The other Sow had 13 (?) little ones while Dad was away, all doing well, but one of the three died Monday 5 weeks old; we were sorry for that.

Please send the two letters back that I have inclosed (sic). Has Percy sent you the piece put in the paper about Harry’s death. I have sent it to Bessie and am sending it on to Mary. I will ask her to send it on to you if you have not seen (it) and you let me know. I think your name is in it, Dad only said 6 when he came to it, Arthur and Willie looked at me in a bit of surprise.

Please write soon. Hoping this will find you well. Bessie said it was off between Fred & her. Dad said that was a good thing.


FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS FAMILY CONTACT: btsarnia@gmail.com

One comment on “Thomas Duffell of Kempley, King’s Caple and Llanbaddock

  1. Pingback: Noad Family of Slimbridge | btsarnia

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This entry was posted on May 24, 2016 by in Duffell and tagged , , , , , , , , , , .
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