btsarnia

A tribute to the life and work of Brian Torode

James Henry Yarnold (1833-1912), Carpenter and Joiner of Gloucester

 

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James Henry and Selena Yarnold



The Yarnold Family of Worcester, Ledbury and Gloucester

 


Joseph Yarnold and Mary of St Helen’s Parish, Worcester

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 Charles Yarnold I (1751-1824) and Ann Lench (1746-1818 )

Glazier of St Helen’s Parish, Worcester

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Charles Yarnold II (1781-1836) and Frances or Fanny Hussey (1781-1852)

Plumber, Glazier and Painter of St Martin’s Parish, Worcester and Ledbury

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 Ann Yarnold (Frith) (?) of Ledbury and Gloucester

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 James Henry Yarnold (1833-1912) and Frances Brown (1831-1879)

Foreman Joiner of Gloucester

 


JAMES HENRY (or HENRY JAMES) YARNOLD, Great II Grandfather 

 Husband of Frances Brown

Father of Emily Eley

 Also Father of Frances Mary, William Henry, Alice Maddicks, Florence, Charles Frederick, Alfred Robert and Albert

Also Husband of Sarah Cullen

James Henry Yarnold was born in about 1834. In his marriage certificate of 1856 he claimed to be the son of Charles Yarnold, a painter. The certificate for his second marriage of 1884 records that his father was Charles Yarnold a deceased house painter. In the census returns he states that he was born in Worcester (except in 1861 when his place of birth is given as Gloucester). In the 1891 census return James H. Yarnold stated that he was born at Ledbury in Herefordshire but in 1901 he again said Worcester.

It is likely that James Henry was a member of the family of Yarnold of Worcester, which included the painter and glazier, and once soldier, Charles Yarnold (1781-1836). This Charles was trading as a glazier in Ledbury, Herefordshire from before 1828 and was very likely James Henry Yarnold’s grandfather.

On 21st January 1833 James the base born son of Ann Yarnold of Homend, a spinster, was baptised at Ledbury Parish Church.

Then on 8th October 1833 we find the baptism of a Henry, base born son of Frances Yarnold, of Bishop Street, Ledbury. The latter was probably a member of the Bishop Street family of Ledbury but it is just possible that baby Henry was the son of young Frances Yarnold, daughter of Charles and Fanny of Homend.

Regarding the first baptism, the mother, Ann Yarnold, was born in about 1813 in Portsmouth, the eldest (known) daughter of Charles and Fanny Yarnold. She was probably the mother of James Henry Yarnold but had left Ledbury before 1838 to live with William Frith, a widower, who she eventually married in 1848. In the late 1830s they were living near Pontypool and by 1841 in Gloucester. They had a large number of children many of whom lived in Gloucester.

The 1841 census return for Homend, Ledbury, reveals that James Yarnold, aged about ten years, born in Herefordshire, was living at Homend, Ledbury. Staying with him was Elizabeth Cole (aged sixty-five). Where was his grandmother, uncles and aunt on the census night?

In the 1851 census return James’s grandmother, Fanny Yarnold, was described as a seventy-year-old widow, born in Honiton, Devon and living on the west side of Homend Street, Ledbury. Living with her were her son Benjamin and her grandson, James Yarnold. Benjamin was then aged thirty-years, a glazier journeyman, whose place of birth was given as Worcester. Young James, aged seventeen years, a baker’s assistant, was also described as born in Worcester.

His grandmother, Fanny Yarnold, died on 7th January 1852 at Homend Street, Ledbury. Her death certificate records her age as the seventy-one-year-old Widow of Charles Yarnold, Painter. The cause of her death was given as ‘Old Age – not certified’. Wm Thomas, Registrar registered the death on 13th January and the informant was James Yarnold of Homend Street, Ledbury, who was present at the death. Fanny was buried four days later from the Parish Church.

In conclusion we have here in Ledbury a James Yarnold, who was a grandson of Charles Yarnold, a house painter, born in Worcester in about 1833. In the 1891 census he stated that he was actually born at Ledbury. At the age of eighteen having buried his grandmother and we can imagine him leaving Ledbury to begin a trade as a carpenter. After all, his uncle, Benjamin Yarnold, was a journeyman.

Did James Henry Yarnold head for Gloucester? His possible mother, Ann Frith, was living in the city with her family and tailor husband in Longsmith Street and later Blackfriars Square.

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If the Ledbury connection proves to be false then we still have the following details: James Henry or Henry James Yarnold, son of Charles Yarnold, House Painter, born between 21st February and14th July 1833 (by deduction from death and second marriage certificates),  ‘who came out of Worcester about fifty years ago (obituary 1912)’.

Lt Col. Anthony Yarnold, his great, grandson, has written:

‘Tracing the life of James Henry covers a lot of ground. To Census takers he stated that he was born in Worcester. In both his wedding certificates he entered his Father’s name as Charles Yarnold, a painter. By deduction his birth date was probably between 21st February and 14th July 1833.

Unswervingly James followed his chosen trade as a craftsman in wood progressing from his travels as a Joiner Journeyman to Carpenter, to Saw Mill Manager, to Foreman Joiner.

In his early days he worked in Saint Pancras and in Cardiff. His first daughter and first son were born in Cardiff. In his twenties he settled in Gloucester first living with his Father-in-law, Robert Brown, then in Hampden Place, Barton St Michael, (now Wellington Street) and then – for more than forty years – in the Bristol Road area close to the wagon-building companies and timber yards of his employment.’

James Henry Yarnold married twice, both times in Cheltenham. He married his first wife, Frances Brown on 26th June 1856 at Cheltenham Parish Church. Both were described as of full age and James Henry was working as a Carpenter. He was living at St Pancras, London and Frances was living at Northfield Terrace, Cheltenham (off North Place, behind the south side of Clarence Square. Marked on 1834 map as North Field Terrace, part of an ancient footpath across the field). The fathers were given as Charles Yarnold, a painter, and Robert Brown, a watchmaker. The witnesses were Robert and Ellen Brown.

Frances Brown, his wife, came from Bolt Lane or Bull Lane, off Longsmith Street in Gloucester. As early as 1851 she was living in Cheltenham. We do not know if the couple met in Gloucester or in Cheltenham.

Frances Mary Yarnold, their eldest child, was born on 24th August 1857 in Longsmith Street, Gloucester (District of St John the Baptist). She was described as the daughter of James Henry Yarnold, Joiner Journeyman, and Frances Yarnold, formerly Brown. Her mother informed the registrar of the birth on 9th September 1857 and her address was recorded as Longsmith Street, Gloucester. Frances Mary Yarnold died in Cardiff on 24th December 1857 at 17 Tindal Street. The cause of death was given as inflammation of the lung.

.On 23rd April 1859 Henry James (sic) and Frances, who were living at 28 Eclipse Street, Roath, Cardiff, registered the birth of their next child, William Henry. His father was described on the certificate as a joiner journeyman.

In his obituary in ‘The Citizen’, written in 1912, we read, ‘Mr. J.H. Yarnold came from Worcester about 50 years ago and started work at Eassie’s (now the Gloucester Wagon Co.), and later was with Messrs. Moreland and Ashbee and Son, retiring ten years since.’

Eassie’s: William Eassie was born in Scotland in about 1805 and in 1833 he was living at Tyarthon Lacher with his wife Jane. By 1841 he was working as a Joiner at Charlton upon Medlock in Manchester. By 1851 he had settled in Bristol Road, Gloucester and was working as a Railway Contractor. Their premises seem to have been situated about four properties down from Sudbrook, near to the junction with Stroud Road.

Business blossomed and ten years later William Eassie Snr. was described as a Contractor and Builder living at High Orchard House, near to Eassie’s Yard in South Hamlets. William and Jane had two sons, William Jnr. (1833-) and Peter Boyd (1835-). In 1861 William Jnr. was living at Theresa Place, No 1, Bristol Road and he was described as a Contractor employing between 100 and 150 men at Eassie & Sons. This son was to leave Gloucester by 1881 for he was working as an Engineer of Child’s Hill, Hendon, Middlesex. His younger brother, P.B. Eassie was in 1861 living at home with his parents but ten years later he was listed in the census return as living in Midland Road, Gloucester, and as managing 150 hands.

In the Victoria County History Volume for the City of Gloucester we read the following:

‘The Bristol Road works stood next to William Eassie’s joinery workshops and that business continued after Eassie’s death in 1861 by his sons… Eassie’s received an injection of capital from the wagon company’s directors in 1866. Production at Eassie & Co. was increasingly dominated by orders for the wagon company, which in 1875 bought the business, thereby doubling the size of the Bristol Road works.’

‘Gloucester Railway Carriage & Wagon Company Ltd: Early in January, 1860, one hundred years ago this year, a group of Gloucester merchants came together to discuss the formation of a joint stock company for the manufacture of railway wagons. They were all local men, of local firms – Richard Potter of Fife and Company, Edmund Walton of Walton and Sons, W.C. Lucy of W.C. Lucy and Company, William Nicks of Nicks and Baxter – although they brought in two outside men with special knowledge of railways, J.N. Brown, General Manager of the South Staffordshire, and Richard Tew Smith, Goods Agent of the Great Western. They were all substantial citizens, ‘warm men’, and it is unlikely that they entered into this new venture without giving it long and careful thought…’ (A History of the Gloucester Railway Carriage & Wagon Company Ltd 1960).

‘In 1874 the company workforce was 800c.’ (Victoria County History)

S.J. Moreland & Sons Ltd: ‘During the Spring of 1867 an indenture was made which established a match manufacturing concern at premises adjoining the Gloucester and Berkeley Canal on the outskirts of Gloucester. This was the beginning of what is now a century-old continuous relationship between the Moreland family, the City of Gloucester and match making.

In many parts of the United Kingdom and in particular in the Midlands, Wales, Lincolnshire and the South West, the names of S.J. Moreland & Sons Ltd. and of England’s Glory matches are more than household words. They have a ring of individuality and history about them. They also have a place in the affections of the people, and an economic significance which has been maintained through many vicissitudes from the time when Samuel John Moreland – the founder of the Company – first started making lucifers in his small factory in 1867…

Several match making factories stemmed from the prosperous timber trade in Gloucester in the 1860s and 1870s. but by 1880 Moreland’s appears to have been the sole survivor. Not only was S.J. Moreland a prodigious worker and completely absorbed in his factory, but he had chosen his site carefully, close to the Gloucester and Berkeley canal which brought him raw materials cheaply and took away the finished products quickly…

By 1897, thirty years after he had started match making, S.J. Moreland employed 450 people…’ (A Hundred Years of Match Making 1867 The Moreland Story 1967)

Ashbee & Son: Ashbees started in the hamlet of Hawkesbury Upton where in 1841 John Ashbee, a sixty-year-old Mason, was living with his two sons, Henry and John, who also shared their father’s trade.

By 1881 the younger son, John, aged now fifty-eight, was described as a Timber Merchant and Manufacturer, and was living at 14 Spa Road, Gloucester. Ten years later John had moved to 2 Sherborne Villas, South Hamlets, and was still working as a Timber Merchant.

John Ashbee’s son, Allan, became involved in the business and in 1891 he was a timber merchant living at Nunsley House, Seymour Road, Tuffley, where he was still living in 1901 when we find him described as a Timber Merchant and Employer.

At the time of the 1861 census Henry Yarnold (sic) and his wife were living in St Mary de Crypt Parish at Bolt Lane, Gloucester, with Fanny’s parents, Robert and Mary Brown. Henry was described as a thirty-year-old carpenter, born in Gloucester; Fanny was thirty-years-old and their son, William, was aged two-years.

On 7th November 1861 the family was living at Hampden Place, Barton St Michael, Gloucester, when they registered their daughter, Alice. Alice was born on 26th October 1861. She was baptised on 8th December 1861 at the Church of St Mary de Lode in Gloucester. Her parents were recorded in the register as James Henry Yarnold, a joiner, and his wife, Frances Yarnold, of Barton St Michael.

From 1862-1864 James Henry Yarnold was listed in the Elector’s list as living at Hampden Place. On 6th February 1865 they were at London Road, Gloucester, when Frances registered the birth of her daughter, Emily.

Alfred Robert Yarnold was born on 11th June 1870. He was baptised by the Reverend W. Balfour, the incumbent, at St Nicholas’s Church, Gloucester, on 4th September 1870. Alfred Robert was described as the son of Henry James and Frances Yarnold of St Luke’s Parish, Gloucester. His father was described as a joiner.

At the time of the 1871 census the family was living at St Philip Street, St Luke’s, South Hamlets, Gloucester. Henry J. Yarnold was a thirty-eight-year-old carpenter’s foreman, born at Worcester; Frances was aged thirty-nine-years and born in Gloucester; William J. was aged twelve-years and born in Cardiff; Alice was aged nine years; Florence was aged four years and Alfred R. was aged nine months. All the younger children were born in Gloucester.

Frances Yarnold died on 14th February 1879 at 4 Berkeley Villas, Wotton St Mary, Gloucester, leaving four young children, the youngest only five years. She was described as the forty-one-year-old wife of James Henry Yarnold, a joiner’s foreman. The cause of death was given as disease of the brain for two months and Apoplexy for one day and this was certified by Thomas Hickes, M.R.C.S. Her husband was present at the death and was the informant. The death was registered on 15th February by Benjamin Thurston.

As early as 1871 their daughter, Emily, was staying with her Uncle James Brown and his wife, Jane, in Wotton-under-Edge. She was described in the census return as a six-year-old scholar and her uncle was a watchmaker. Emily was only thirteen-years-old when her mother died and by the time of the 1881 census she was working as a shop assistant for her uncle, James Brown, by then a Watchmaker of Long Street, Wotton-under-Edge.

It is believed that after the death of her mother Alice did much in the running of the household until the advent of Sarah Cullen, James Henry’s second wife.

At the time of the 1881 census James H. Yarnold, a widower and house joiner, was living at Berkeley Villas, Bristol Road, Wotton St Mary, Gloucester. He was shown as forty-nine-years-old and born in Worcester. Alice was aged nineteen years; Florence aged fourteen; Alfred aged ten years and Albert aged six years.

On 14th July 1884 James remarried at Salem Baptist Chapel, Clarence Parade, Cheltenham. James Henry was described as a fifty-one-year-old widower working as a cabinet maker’s foreman. He was living at 4 Berkeley Villas, Gloucester, son of Charles Yarnold a deceased house painter. His bride, Sarah Cullen, of 25 Park Street Cheltenham was a forty-year-old daughter of Robert Cullen, a deceased bootmaker. The witnesses were James Cullen and Caroline Smith, Horatio Wilkins was the minister and William Fowles the registrar.


Who was Sarah Cullen?

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Sarah Cullen was born in 1843. In the 1851 census return she was living with her parents at 5 Russell Place, Cheltenham. Robert was described as a forty-five-year-old shoemaker, born in Shepton Mallet. Sarah, her mother, was aged forty-years and born at Woodchester. Richard, her brother, a shoemaker, was aged nineteen years; Sarah was a seven-year-old scholar; James was aged four years and Elizabeth aged one year. All the children were born in Cheltenham. Sarah’s maternal grandmother, Sarah Havard, was staying with them. She was aged seventy-nine-years and born at Sandhurst.

In 1861 Sarah was a seventeen-year-old house servant, working for John Lamb, a seventy-one-year-old non-practising Surgeon of 5 Promenade Terrace, Cheltenham. She was again described as born in Cheltenham

In 1871 Sarah Callen (sic) was living with her family at 17 Mitre Street, Cheltenham. Her mother, head of the household, was a sixty-one-year-old seamstress; Sarah was a twenty-seven-year-old fitter; James a labourer and Elizabeth was a twenty-four-year-old machinist.

In 1881 the Cullen Family was living at 25 Lower Park Street. Sarah’s mother was head of the household, seventy-years-old and working as a domestic. Sarah was a thirty-seven-year-old shopkeeper’s assistant and her brother, James, was a thirty-four-year-old plasterer and labourer. His wife, Mary A. Cullen, was a thirty-two-year-old laundress. All the younger generation were described as born in Cheltenham.


In the 1891 census return James H. Yarnold and his family were living at 11 Hillview Villas, Bristol Road, Gloucester. He was described as fifty-eight-years-old carpenter and born at Ledbury (this is very significant!). His wife, Sarah, was forty-seven-years-old and born in Cheltenham. Residing with them were Alfred R. Yarnold, aged twenty-years, a carpenter like his father and born in Gloucester; Albert, a seventeen-year-old apprentice born in Gloucester and Alice, aged twenty-nine-years and born in Gloucester.

The 1901 census return describes James Yarnold as a sixty-seven-year-old Joiner Foreman and he was living at 65 Clegram Street, Gloucester. His place of birth was given as born at Worcester. Sarah Yarnold, his wife, was aged fifty-six-years and born in Cheltenham. It was at this address that Sarah died, aged sixty-one-years, on 12th March 1904. She was described on the death certificate as the wife of James Henry Yarnold, a Retired Foreman Joiner. The cause of death was given as Heart Disease and Gangrene of the foot for seven days. The death was registered on 12th March by Robert Yarnold, her step son, and the registrar was G.F. Jeans.

James Henry’s grandchildren remember him as dignified and particularly aware of the dangers of eating sweetmeats from unhygienic premises – “He always insisted that we ate boiled sweets!” For fourteen years he served as a Sidesman at Saint Luke’s, Southgate Street, Gloucester. This church which was actually situated in High Orchard was begun in 1838 and Consecrated in 1841. The church was endowed by Samuel Lysons and the architect was Thomas Fulljames. It was extended in 1874 when a new vestry was built but it became increasingly hemmed in by engineering works. St Luke’s was actually closed down in 1934 and then demolished shortly afterwards (V.C.H.).

At the time of the 1911 census James Henry Yarnold was a seventy-eight-year-old boarder living at Albert House, 153 Bristol Road, Gloucester. The house consisted of six rooms and James Henry Yarnold was described as a widower who had been married for forty-three-years, a retired joiner who had worked for a timber merchant and his place-of-birth was given as Worcester. The householders were John and Elizabeth Margetts. John was seventy-one, married for forty-two-years, with no children, a retired carpenter and joiner with a timber merchant on a pension. His wife was aged seventy and a pensioner. Both of them were born at Withington.

On 21st February 1912 James Henry Yarnold died at Albert House, Bristol Road, Gloucester, aged seventy-eight-years. On the death certificate he was described as a retired foreman joiner. The cause of death was given as Uraemia Coma and was certified by H. Norreys Coleman B.C. The witness was Alfred R.Yarnold, his son, of 48 Frampton Road, Gloucester, who was present at the time of the death. Francis Farmer registered the death on 22nd February 1912.

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James Henry Yarnold was buried at Gloucester Cemetery in a grave that he shared   with Sarah, his second wife, and close to the grave of his first wife, Frances.

The administration of James’s small estate, effects valued at £179-10-4d, was granted to William Henry Yarnold, Watchmaker and Jeweller, his eldest son on 13th March 1912. The deceased was described as James Henry Yarnold of Albert House, Bristol Road, Gloucester, who died on 21st February1912.

Two sons, Alfred (Bob) and Albert followed James into woodworking trades. Alfred of 48 Frampton Road, Gloucester, became Foreman Joiner to Gloucestershire County Council; Albert moved to Bournville to work for the Cadburys organisation. One daughter, Frances Mary died as an infant in 1857; one son, Charles died as an infant in 1869. Alice, born 1861, married; Emily, born c 1866, married a farmer; Florence, born 1867, entered domestic service, died in 1890.’

James Henry Yarnold was tall, over six feet. His great grandson has a photograph of him together with a framed sketch and an apprentice piece.

Known Places of Residence which have documentary support:

1833 Homend, Ledbury

1841 Homend, Ledbury

1851 Homend, Ledbury

1852 Homend, Ledbury

1856 Saint Pancras on his first Wedding Certificate

1857 Longsmith Street, Gloucester on Birth Certificate of Frannces Mary Yarnold

1857 17 Tindal Street, Cardiff on Death Certificate of Frances Mary Yarnold

1859 28 Eclipse Street, Roath, Cardiff in the Birth Certificate of William Henry Yarnold

1861 at Bolt Lane, Westgate Street, Gloucester in the 1861 Census Return

1861 at Hampden Place, Gloucester (Wellington Street) in Birth Certificate of Alice

1865 at London Road, Gloucester in Birth Certificate of Emily

1869 at 2 Philip Street, Gloucester in the Death Certificate of Charles Frederick

1870 in St Luke’s Parish

1871 at 2 Philip Street, St Luke’s, South Hamlets, Gloucester in the 1871 Census Return

1879 at 4 Berkeley Villas, Wotton St Mary, Gloucester, on Death Certificate of Frances

1881 at Berkeley Villas, Bristol Road, Wotton St Mary, Gloucester in the 1881 Census Return

1884 at 4 Berkeley Villas, Wotton St Mary, Gloucester, on Wedding Certificate of Sarah

1891 at 11 Hillview Villas, Gloucester, in the 1891 Census Return

1901 at 65 Clegram Street, Gloucester, in the 1901 Census Return

1904 at 65 Clegram Road, Gloucester, in Death Report of Sarah Cullen

1911 at Albert House, 153 Bristol Road, Gloucester, in the 1911 Census Return

1912 at Albert House, Bristol Road, Gloucester on his Death Certificate

 Occupations as given:

 1851 Baker’s Assistant

1856 Carpenter

1857 Joiner Journeyman

1859 Joiner Journeyman

1861 Carpenter (Journeyman)

1861 Joiner

1865 Carpenter

1870 Joiner

1879 A Joiner’s Foreman

1884 Cabinet Maker’s Foreman

1891 Foreman Joiner

1893 A builder

1896 Foreman

1901 Joiner Foreman Carpenter

1904 Retired Foreman Joiner

1908 Builder’s Manager

1911 Retired Joiner employed by a timber merchant

1912 Foreman Joiner (Retired)

Gloucester Journal, Saturday March 2, 1912:

Funeral of  the Late Mr. James Henry Yarnold

The funeral of the late Mr. James Henry Yarnold of Albert House, Bristol-road, took place at Gloucester Cemetery on Saturday afternoon. The Reverend H.E. Emmet officiated, the first part of the service being held at St Luke’s Parish Church, where the deceased had attended for the past 40 years, and for the last 14 years had been sidesman. The churchwardens (Messrs. Madge and Blackwell) and other friends, with many of the deceased’s old fellow-workers, were present.

Wreaths were sent by the churchwardens, friends and family.

Mr. J.H. Yarnold came from Worcester about 50 years ago and started work at Eassie’s (now the Gloucester Wagon Co.) and later was with Messrs. Moreland and Ashbee and Son retiring ten years since.

He leaves three sons and two daughters. The coffin was of polished elm and oak; the plate being engraved:

“James Henry Yarnold, died February 21st, 1912, aged 78 years.” Messrs. Leat and Son were the undertakers.’

The Citizen Monday 26th February 1912:

 ‘Funeral of the Late Mr. James Henry Yarnold. The funeral of the late Mr. James Henry Yarnold of Albert House, Bristol Road, took place at Gloucester Cemetery on Saturday afternoon. The Rev. H.R. Emmet officiated, the first part of the service being held at St. Luke’s Parish Church, where the deceased had attended for the past 40 years, and for the last 14 years had been sidesman. The churchwardens (Messrs. Madge and Blackwell) and other friends, with many of the deceased’s old fellow workers, were present. Wreaths were sent by the churchwardens, friends and family. Mr. J.H. Yarnold came from Worcester about 50 years ago and started work at Eassie’s (now the Gloucester Wagon Co.), and later was with Messrs. Moreland and Ashbee and Son, retiring ten years since. He leaves three sons and two daughters. The coffin was of polished elm and oak, the plate being engraved: “James Henry Yarnold, died February 21st, 1912, aged 78 years.” Messrs Leat and Son were the undertakers.’

In Memoriam Card:

‘In Affectionate Remembrance of James Henry Yarnold who died 21st Day of February, 1912, Aged 78 years. Interred at Gloucester Cemetery, February 24th

See Gloucester Journal: 24th February 1912 p.12 c.6 and 2nd March p.3 c.6

 


 

FRANCES YARNOLD, Great II Grandmother

 Daughter of Robert Brown and Mary (nee Bird)

Wife of James Henry Yarnold

Mother of Emily Eley

Also Mother of Frances Mary, William Henry, Alice Maddicks, Florence, Charles Frederick, Alfred Robert and Albert

Frances Brown was baptised on 19th June 1831 at St Nicholas, Gloucester. She was the ninth child and fourth daughter of Robert Brown and his wife May. Her father was a watchmaker of Bolt Lane, Westgate Street, Gloucester. Robert had trained as a watchmaker and, after a spell in Cheltenham, set up business in Gloucester in the Westgate community of watermen, foundrymen and other trades associated with the nearby docks and river. In the 1841 census return Frances Brown was at home with her parents in Bolt Lane, Gloucester.

At the time of the 1851 census she was living as a lodger along with her sisters Mary and Ellen at Oriel House, Bath Road, Cheltenham. The head of the household was Robert Hewer, a stonemason. All three Brown sisters were described as dressmakers and born in Gloucester. Mary was aged thirty-one-years; Hellen (sic) aged twenty-one years and Fanny aged nineteen years.

Frances married James Henry Yarnold on 26th June 1856 at Cheltenham Parish Church. Both were described as of full age and James Henry was working as a Carpenter. He was living at St Pancras, London and Frances was living at Northfield Terrace, Cheltenham (off North Place, behind the south side of Clarence Square. Marked on 1834 map as North Field Terrace, part of an ancient footpath across the field). Their fathers were given as Charles Yarnold, a painter, and Robert Brown, a watchmaker. The witnesses were Robert and Ellen Brown.

Frances Mary Yarnold, their eldest child, was born on 24th August 1857 in Longsmith Street, Gloucester (District of St John the Baptist). She was described as the daughter of James Henry Yarnold, Joiner Journeyman, and Frances Yarnold, formerly Brown. Her mother informed the registrar of the birth on 9th September 1857 and her address was recorded as Longsmith Street, Gloucester. Frances Mary Yarnold died in Cardiff on 24th December 1857 at 17 Tindal Street. The cause of death was given as inflammation of the lung.

On 23rd April 1859 Henry James (sic) and Frances, were living at 28 Eclipse Street, Roath, Cardiff, and they registered the birth of their next child, William Henry. His father was described on the certificate as a joiner journeyman.

At the time of the 1861 census Henry Yarnold (sic) and his wife were living in St Mary de Crypt Parish at Bolt Lane, Gloucester, with Fanny’s parents, Robert and Mary Brown. Henry was described as a thirty-year-old carpenter, born in Gloucester; Fanny was thirty-years-old and their son, William, was aged two-years.

On 7th November 1861 the family was living at Hampden Place, Barton St Michael, Gloucester, when they registered their daughter, Alice. Alice was born on 26th October 1861. She was baptised on 8th December 1861 at the Church of St Mary de Lode in Gloucester. Her parents were recorded in the register as James Henry Yarnold, a joiner, and his wife, Frances Yarnold, of Barton St Michael.

From 1862-1864 James Henry Yarnold was listed in the Elector’s list as living at Hampden Place. On 6th February 1865 they were at London Road, Gloucester, when Frances registered the birth of her daughter, Emily.

Alfred Robert Yarnold was born on 11th June 1870. He was baptised by the Reverend W. Balfour, the incumbent, at St Nicholas’s Church, Gloucester, on 4th September 1870. Alfred Robert was described as the son of Henry James and Frances Yarnold of St Luke’s Parish, Gloucester. His father was described as a joiner.

At the time of the 1871 census the family was living at St Philip Street, St Luke’s, South Hamlets, Gloucester. Henry J. Yarnold was a thirty-eight-year-old carpenter’s foreman, born at Worcester; Frances was aged thirty-nine-years and born in Gloucester; William J. was aged twelve-years and born in Cardiff; Alice was aged nine years; Florence was aged four years and Alfred R. was aged nine months. All the younger children were born in Gloucester.

As early as 1871 her daughter, Emily, was staying with her uncle, James Brown, and his wife, Jane, in Wotton-under-Edge. She was described as a six-year-old scholar and her uncle was a watchmaker. Emily was only thirteen years old when her mother died and by the time of the 1881 census she was working as a shop assistant for her uncle, James Brown, by then a Watchmaker of Long Street, Wotton-under-Edge.

Frances Yarnold died on 14th February 1879 at 4 Berkeley Villas, Wotton St Mary, Gloucester, leaving four young children, the youngest only five years. She was described as on the death certificate as the forty-one-year-old wife of James Henry Yarnold, a joiner’s foreman. The cause of death was given as disease of the brain for two months and Apoplexy for one day. This was certified by Thomas Hickes, M.R.C.S.. Her husband, who was present at the time of the death, was the informant when Benjamin Thurston registered the death on 15th February.

It is believed that after the death of her mother Alice did much in the running of the household until the advent of Sarah Cullen, James Henry’s second wife.


 

The children of James Henry and Frances Yarnold were Great II Aunts and Uncles:

 

1. FRANCES MARY YARNOLD, Infant Great II Aunt 

Frances Mary Yarnold, their eldest child, was born on 24th August 1857 in Longsmith Street, Gloucester (District of St John the Baptist). She was described as the daughter of James Henry Yarnold, Joiner Journeyman, and Frances Yarnold, formerly Brown. Her mother informed the registrar of the birth on 9th September 1857 and her address was recorded as Longsmith Street, Gloucester. Frances Mary Yarnold died in Cardiff on 24th December 1857 at 17 Tindal Street. The cause of death was given as inflammation of the lung.


2. WILLIAM HENRY YARNOLD, Great II Uncle

‘William Henry Yarnold was born on 13 March 1859 at 28 Eclipse Street, Roath Park, Cardiff, one of his father’s short-term addresses. He was baptised on 26th June 1859 at St Mary’s Cardiff. He was to follow in his grandfather Robert Brown’s footsteps and became a skilled watchmaker and jeweller.

At the time of the 1861 census his parents were living in St Mary de Crypt Parish at Bolt Lane, Gloucester, with his maternal grandparents, Robert and Mary Brown. William, was aged two-years.

At the time of the 1871 census he was living at St Philip Street, South Hamlets, Gloucester with his family. William J. was aged twelve-years and born in Cardiff.

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Apprenticed to the firm of W.C. Mann in Gloucester he eventually established his own business in High Street, Thornbury in 1880.

By the 1881 Census William then aged twenty-two-years had moved to Thornbury and the Census shows him lodging with Esther Morgan “an eating house keeper” in the High Street. He married Ella Jane Riddiford on 3rd November 1881.

About this time William Henry was courting Ella Jane Riddiford, daughter of a Bristol grocer. The Riddifords are a Thornbury family and it is likely that the Caerwent branch originated from the locality. Her nephew, Charles Riddiford, was at Stone Mill, Stone. On 3 November 1881 William And Ella married in William’s boyhood hometown of Gloucester at the Register Office.

Ella Jane was born on 3 September 1861 at Caerwent, Monmouthshire. Her father, Charles Riddiford (1833-1872), had presumably gone over to Caerwent to work and he married Jane (1837- ), daughter of Jonathan and Margaret Wise, and they married in Woolos Church on 24th January 1861. They had four daughters Ella Jane Riddiford, (1861- ); Lilla Elizabeth (1865-1867); Margaret Ann (1868- ) and Maud who was born on 11th June 1872.Charles Riddiford was a master tailor but in the 1871 census for Caerwent he appears as a tailor and grocer. Charles Riddiford died of tuberculosis on 10th April 1872 followed by his wife, Jane, on 10th August 1872 and then baby Maud who died on 1st November 1872 at an orphanage house at No 2 Ashley Down, Bristol, aged four years twenty-nine days. Margaret married Thomas J. Lyons in 1907 in the Thornbury area. He was a wheelwright, born at West Harptree, Somerset. In 1911 they were living with his parents Charles and Amelia Lyons at Nibley (?) near Bristol. They probably had no children.

Ella Jane Riddiford, like her husband to be, she had a great liking for music. William became a member of the Thornbury Gleemen and there is a photograph of him with other members hanging in the Stroud and Swindon Building Society Office. Ella Jane sang to entertain her children and her grandchildren, accompanying herself on the ukulele; and she also gained a local reputation for walking considerable distances in and around Thornbury. William Henry and Ella Jane loved children and their love was returned, and the boisterous play of three generations of Yarnolds has long been remembered in the family.

The 1891 Census shows that William Yarnold then aged thirty-two-years and described as watchmaker and jeweller was living with his wife Ella in the High Street. At that time their children were; Percy aged four, Frederick aged two and Victor Gerald aged less than one month.

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In the 1901 census return William Yarnold was described as a forty-two-year-old watchmaker and shopkeeper of High Street, Thornbury. He was born in Cardiff. His wife Ella was aged thirty-nine-years and born in Caerwent. Their children were Frederick W. an eighteen-year-old watchmaker’s apprentice; Percy, a fourteen-year-old outfitter’s apprentice; Victor G. a ten-year-old; Reginald aged five years; Mabel A. aged three years and Albert E. aged one month. All of them were born in Thornbury. Sarah J. Rugman, aged seventeen years, was their domestic servant and born in Rudgeway.

In 1911 William Yarnold was described as a fifty-two-year-old Watch and Clock Repairer who had been married for thirty years and with ten children three of whom had died. He was working on his own account at home and was born at Cardiff. Ella Jane was aged forty-nine-years, was a shopkeeper and was born at Caerwent, Monmouth. The children at home were all born in Thornbury and included Victor Gerald a twenty-year-old watch and clock repairer’s assistant employed but working at home; Reginald Harry aged fifteen years; Mabel Annie was aged thirteen; Albert Edward ten years and Dorothy Kathleen seven years. The family lived in seven rooms.

William Henry gradually expanded his business interests. As his sons came of age he acquired premises for them in Gloucestershire, Wiltshire and Somerset where they themselves could set up in business. Rents were charged; all the businesses were eventually firmly established and probably the transfer on titles was mutually agreed.

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In 1926 William Henry retired and his son Victor Gerald took on the highly successful business At “The Noted House” in High Street, Thornbury. For a number of years William Henry and Ella Jane enjoyed their retirement in a modern house they named ‘Caerwent’ on the Bristol Road at Alveston. But the call of Thornbury proved strong and they moved back and lived in one of the older houses on the opposite side of High Street to the business.

Ella Jane died on 12 February 1945. Two years later on 6 January 1947 William Henry died. The newspaper report on his death, echoing the report of his father’s death, commented on his keenness as a churchman and noted that he had served as a sidesman.

Names of the people on their Golden Wedding photograph, 3rd November 1931:

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Standing (L.-R.): Mabel Annie; Dorothy Kathleen; Francis William; Floss; Albert Edward; Frederick William; Dorothy Gertrude; Dan Savery; Marjorie; Florence Marian; Percy, Florence Mary.

Seated: Mrs Woodcock (Aunty Kitty’s mother); William Henry; Anthony Gordon; Ella Jane; Kate Isidora

Writing on the Shop Front in Thornbury:

 ‘The Noted House for Watches, Clocks, Spectacles, Wedding & Keeping Rings – W. Yarnold – Watchmaker’ – (and) ‘Spectacles to suit all sights’ (on the door)

See Thornbury Roots Website: No 6 St Mary Street

From 1885 to 1910 number 6 was owned by William Yarnold.  William was a watch and clock maker trading on the High Street.  We don’t know how long William owned the house.

See Thornbury Roots Website: Thornbury War Memorial

See Thornbury Roots – No 6 St Mary Street, Thornbury:

See Thornbury Roots: Clockmakers:

William Henry Yarnold. William was born in 1859 and died in 1947. A clock by W Yarnold is on display in Thornbury Museum. The photograph shown below left is a thumbnail image. Please click on it for a larger version.

Obituary Notice:

‘Mr. W. Yarnold at Thornbury. The funeral took place at St. Mary’s Church, Thornbury, on Monday, of Mr. William Yarnold (87), of High Street, Thornbury. Mr. Yarnold came to Thornbury from Gloucester in 1880 and set up in business as a watch maker and jeweller. He was a skilled craftsman and a sound business man. Mr. Yarnold was a keen churchman and served for a time as sidesman at the parish church. He was also a former member of the Thornbury Gleemen. He retired from business in 1926 when his son, Mr. V. Yarnold succeeded him. The funeral service was conducted by the Rev. R. G. Rawstorne (Vicar).

The principal mourners were Mr. P. Yarnold, Mr. V. Yarnold and Mr. R. Yarnold (sons), Mr. F. Yarnold (grandson), Mr. D. Davery (son-in-law), Mrs. P. Yarnold and Mrs. V. Yarnold (daughters-in-law) Mr. Ernest Eley (brother-in-law), Mr. Jack Eley (nephew), Mrs. Isaacs (cousin) and Miss Vowles.

The general mourners included: Mr. S.H. Gayner, Mr. C. Browning, Mr. And Mrs. J.G. Wicks, Mr. C.P. Taylor, Miss R. Baker, Mrs. A. Riddiford, J.P., Mr. T. Pearce, Mr. P.H. Grace, Mr. W.T. Harries, Mrs. F.H. Burchell and others.

The funeral arrangements were carried out by Messrs. Tucker Bros., Thornbury’

Family Gravestone at Thornbury Parish Church:

‘Charles James Yarnold born March 29th 1884 died January 2nd 1891. Herbert Henry Yarnold born February 18th 1889 died January 18th 1891.’

Family Gravestones at Thornbury Cemetery:

‘In loving memory of Ella Jane Yarnold who died February 12th 1945 aged 83 years. Also William Yarnold husband of the above who died January 6th 1947 aged 87 years. At Rest.’

‘In loving memory of Florence Ella Yarnold born March 15th 1893 died March 17th 1898.’


 

The ten children of William and Ella Yarnold:

1. FREDERICK WILLIAM YARNOLD 

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Percy and Frederick Yarnold

Frederick William Yarnold was born on 9th June 1882. He was baptised on 5th July at Thornbury. In the 1901 census return he was at home, aged eighteen years, a watchmaker’s apprentice and born in Thornbury. He married Florence Maud Mary Ball (1885-1972) of Tavistock. He was a Watchmaker of Malmesbury, Wiltshire.

Frederick William died in Malmesbury Registration District during 1944. His wife was cremated at Swindon on 23rd April 1972.

2. CHARLES JAMES YARNOLD

Charles James Yarnold was born on 29th March 1884 and was baptised on 9th October 1884 at Thornbury. He died on 2nd January 1891 aged six. His death was recorded in the Council School log book. Sadly he had died of complications after he contracted measles in the epidemic in Thornbury that year.

Family Gravestone at Thornbury Parish Church:

‘Charles James Yarnold born March 29th 1884 died January 2nd 1891. Herbert Henry Yarnold born February 18th 1889 died January 18th 1891.

3. PERCY YARNOLD

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Percy Yarnold was born on 30th July 1886 and baptised at Thornbury on 25th August 1886. In the 1901 census return he was at home, aged fourteen years, an outfitter’s apprentice and born in Thornbury.

See separate blog:

Percy Yarnold of Nailsworth

https://wp.me/p4BX9P-1qK

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4. HERBERT HENRY YARNOLD 

Herbert Henry Yarnold was born on 18th February 1889 and died on 10th or 18th January 1891. He was baptised at Thornbury on 13th March 1889.

Family Gravestone at Thornbury Parish Church:

‘Charles James Yarnold born March 29th 1884 died January 2nd 1891. Herbert Henry Yarnold born February 18th 1889 died January 18th 1891.’

5. VICTOR GERALD YARNOLD

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 Victor Yarnold was born on 26th March 1891 and baptised at Thornbury on 15th April 1891. In the 1901 census return he was at home, aged ten years, and born in Thornbury. In 1911 the children at home, who were all born in Thornbury, included Victor Gerald a twenty-year-old watch and clock repairer’s assistant employed but working at home. His later war record refers to his trade as ‘motor power’ but this record  is not entirely legible

He served in the Army Service Corps during the Great War enlisting on 2nd June 1915, joining at Grove Park the next day, and serving until 27th June 1919 when he was transferred to the Army Reserves. He served in the Expeditionary Forces in France from 17th June 1915 until 1919. He served in the Royal Army Service Corps as an Ambulance Driver and Despatch Rider. He was described as sober, very reliable, very intelligent and a good mechanic. From 5th December until 29th March 1919 he was again described as a good field ambulance motorcyclist riding a Triumph. From 9th April 1919 he was in No 5 VRP Montieres, on 14th May 1919 in the 21st Sanitary Section as a motor cyclist and from 15th May 1919 until 25th May he was serving in the 5th Corps Troops, M.T. Company, again described as a good Triumph motor cyclist. He received the three war medals at the conclusion of the war. I have a photograph of him in uniform.

He became a Watchmaker of Thornbury and took over his Father’s business in 1926. Victor married Kate Isidora Woodcock (1895-1983) during 1926. They retired to Chulmleigh in Devon. Victor died on 25th July 1981.

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Percy Yarnold with Kate and Vic Yarnold in Chulmleigh

 

Thornbury Roots:

In September 1926 he married Kate Isidora Woodcock the head mistress of the Infants’ Department of the Council School whom Pam Lewis remembered as being “a nice kind lady.” Kate was born 20th February 1895. The couple were married in Hyde, where Kate’s mother, a widow, was living. They returned to live in Thornbury after their marriage. Victor took over the business after his father’s death. Victor Yarnold took over the family watchmaking business, although it seems to have traded as William Yarnold until about 1935. After this period the Trade directories show only Victor Yarnold. In 1946 and 1950 Electoral Rolls Victor and Kate were living at a house they called Caerwent in the High Street. By 1954 their address was 7 High Street and in 1958 it was 16 High Street. They did not appear in the Electoral Rolls of 1961. In 1981 Victor died in the Okehampton area. Kate died in the Barnstaple area in 1983.

Thornbury Roots Website: Christmas Gifts for the Troops 1917

 Money was raised in Thornbury for the purpose of sending each soldier and sailor from the town a Xmas parcel and over 200 were sent out. Each parcel contained a Christmas card, one tin of gingerbread biscuits 50 cigarettes, one khaki handkerchief, and one tablet of soap provided out of the money subscribed and in addition one pair of socks made and given by the ladies knitting party in connection with the Thornbury working party. Pte V C Yarnold In France and Lce-Cpl R H Yarnold In France

In the 1939 Kelly’s Directory – Thornbury:

‘Yarnold, Victor Gerald, watch & clock mkr. High Street’

Around Thornbury Revisited by Meg Wise:

‘Children at the Council School, c. 1905… Victor Yarnold’

6. FLORENCE ELLA YARNOLD

Florence Yarnold was born on 15th March 1893 and baptised at Thornbury on 3rd May 1893. He died on 17th March 1898.

Family Gravestones at Thornbury Cemetery:

‘In loving memory of Florence Ella Yarnold born March 15th 1893 died March 17th 1898.’

7. REGINALD HARRY YARNOLD

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Reginald Yarnold was born at Thornbury on 21st August 1895 and baptised there on 13th September 1895. He was educated at Thornbury Grammar School. In the 1901 census return he was at home, aged five years and born in Thornbury. In 1911 the children at home, who were all born in Thornbury, included Reginald Harry aged fifteen years.

He trained in the outfitting business in Thornbury and later in South Wales. During the Great War he served in the ranks and was awarded the Military Medal for ‘conspicuous courage and devotion to duty’ on the night of 8 December 1917 while serving with the 523 Company Army Service Corps attached to the 2/3 South Midland Field Ambulance RAMC.

Reginald eventually opened his own business at 177 Barton Street, Gloucester one of the premises owned by his father. On 10th January 1922 he married Dorothy Gertrude Thompson Davies (born 3rd April 1895), the daughter of Harry Stanley Davies, a surveyor, at Sandon Church, Essex. Harry Davies had served for 36 years in the Royal Engineers and with the Royal Observer Corps. On completing his service he developed his surveying qualifications to set up business as a builder and successfully completed a number of houses in Essex, principally in the Danbury area.

After living in various houses in and around Gloucester, Reginald decided to build his own house at Barnwood, Gloucester, and this project was completed in 1937 and the house named Gay Bowers (A manorial place name deriving from Essex)

Two sons were born – Anthony Gordon Ford Yarnold and Roy Owen Yarnold.

Thornbury Roots:

Reginald Harry Yarnold  A newspaper report of 6th April 1918 says “congratulations are due to Reginald Yarnold the son of Mr. and Mrs. Yarnold of Thornbury on having been chosen to receive the Military medal for distinguished service overseas. He was one of the first to volunteer from Thornbury. “

Presentation of the Military Medal to No: T4/249140. Dvr. R. Yarnold. 523 Co A.S.C., attd. 2/3 S. Mis. Fd. Amb. , T.F.

‘For conspicuous courage and devotion to duty. On the night of 8th Dec. 1917 Dvr. Yarnold was one of the drivers of an Ambulance wagon with four horses, and was stationed at CHARING CROSS CRATER. S.W., of Beauchamp waiting to collect walking wounded. While waiting the enemy shelled the place heavily and Dvr. Yarnold at great risk ran through the barrage to the Post where Capt. Moore. R.A.M.C. was stationed – a distance of about 200 yds – in order to obtain his authority to move. The necessary permission was given and Dvr. Yarnold succeeded in making his way back in spite of the fact that the remaining driver had been severely wounded, all four horses dead or dying, the wagons damaged and the orderly wounded. With great difficulty and still under heavy fire he organised a stretcher party and conveyed the wounded men to Capt. Moore’s station from which they were evacuated. The Driver died a few hours later.’

Obituary Notices 1967:

‘Yarnold – On June 2 at the Royal Hospital, Southgate Street, Reginald H. of Gay Bowers, 113 Barnwood Road, Gloucester, Beloved husband of Dorothy and father of Anthony and Roy. Funeral Service Tuesday, June 6th, 1.30pm at Barnwood Church. Family flowers only; donations in lieu of Muller Homes for Children, Muller House, 7, Cotham Park, Bristol 6, No letters please.’

‘Founder of City Shop Dies. Mr. Reginald H. Yarnold, founder of the outfitter’s business R.H. Yarnold Ltd., of 177 Barton Street, Gloucester, died on Friday night. He started up in business when he returned home after the First World War during which he won the Military Medal. His first shop was at the present address, and later the premises was extended. In recent years his younger son, Roy, has been managing director while Mr. Yarnold was in semi-retirement. He leaves another son, Major Anthony Yarnold, now serving in Hog Kong, and a widow, Dorothy, of Gaybowers, 113 Barnwood – rd., Gloucester.’

‘Gloucester Funeral. Mr. R.H. Yarnold. The funeral of Mr. Reginald H. Yarnold, of Gay Bowers, 113, Barnwood Road, Gloucester, has taken place. The first part of the service was held at Barnwood Church, the Rev. M.O. Seacombe officiating. The organist, Mr Williams, accompanied the singing of the hymns: ‘The King of Love’ and ‘For the beauty of the earth.’ Cremation followed at Gloucester Crematorium.

Principal mourners: Mrs. D. Yarnold (wife), Mr and Mrs A. Yarnold, Mr and Mrs R. Yarnold (sons and daughters-in-law), Mr. P. Yarnold (brother), Mr and Mrs D. Savery (sister and brother-in-law), Mr D. Yarnold, Mr K. Savery (nephews), Mrs W. Warner (niece).

Also present at the service…’

8. MABEL ANNIE SAVERY

Mabel Annie Yarnold was born on 8th October 1897 and baptised at Thornbury on 29th October 1897. In the 1901 census return she was at home, aged three years. Mabel was a pupil at Thornbury Grammar School in 1910 and at the time of the census in 1911 she was at home and recorded as thirteen-years-old and born in Thornbury.

She married Daniel Savery, who ran an Ironmongery business, during the last quarter of 1929 in Thornbury Registration District. He was probably related to the Thornbury Family of Ironmongers. Mabel died in November 1972 and her husband, Dan, died in a car crash at Nailsea in 1976.

9. ALBERT EDWARD YARNOLD

Albert Edward Yarnold was born on 12th March 1901. In the 1901 census return he was at home, aged one month and born in Thornbury. In 1911 the children at home, who were all born in Thornbury, included Albert Edward aged ten years. He left school in 1915 at the age of fourteen years.

He became an outfitter of Ilminster. He married Marjorie Coombes during the third quarter of 1933 in Chard Registration District. Marjorie was born on 15th May 1910. Albert died on 27th December 1939, by his own hand, and his widow died on 19th May 1985.

10. DOROTHY KATHLEEN WOOD

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Dorothy Yarnold was born on 2nd March 1904. In 1911 the children at home, who were all born in Thornbury, included Dorothy Kathleen aged seven years. She married Norman Edward Wood, a Shell Mex Analyst, during the third quarter of 1930 in Thornbury. She died in Southend-on-Sea during November 1991 and her husband died during the same year.

 


 

 3. ALICE MADDICKS, Great II Aunt 

Alice was born on 26th October 1861 at Hampden Place, Barton St. Michael, Gloucester. She was baptised on 8th December 1861 at the Church of St Mary de Lode in Gloucester. Her parents were recorded in the register as James Henry Yarnold, a joiner, and his wife, Frances Yarnold, of Barton St Michael.

At the time of the 1871 census she was living with her family at St Philip Street, South Hamlets, Gloucester. Alice was aged nine years and born in Gloucester.

At the time of the 1881 census she was living at Berkeley Villas, Bristol Road, Gloucester, with her family. She was aged nineteen years.

In the 1891 census return Alice was living with her family at 11 Hillview Villas, Bristol Road, Gloucester. Alice, aged twenty-nine-years was born in Gloucester.

It is a family tradition that she kept house after the death of her mother and until the marriage of her father to Sarah Cullen. Her brother Albert was only five when their mother died in 1879. Certainly Alice was alive and unmarried on 4th April 1893 as she was present at her sister, Emily’s wedding at Tortworth.

On 3rd November 1894 her aunt, Mary Workman, made her last will and testament and she left a legacy of nineteen guineas to her niece Alice Yarnold.

On February 15th 1896 Alice Yarnold married Charles William Maddicks at the Church of St Paul, Gloucester. Charles was described as a twenty-seven-year-old bachelor and labourer, son of Charles Maddicks a painter. Alice was aged thirty-years, a spinster, and daughter of James Henry Yarnold, foreman. Both were living at 15 Forest Terrace and both signed their names. The witnesses were Eli Thomas Walters and Elizabeth Maddicks.

Charles William Maddicks was born on 1st August 1868 in Clifton Registration District, Bristol, and he was the son of Charles and Elizabeth Maddicks. His father, Charles Maddicks II was born during the third quarter of 1841, son of Charles Maddicks I and his wife Eliza. He was baptised in Bristol on 12th September 1841. Charles and Eliza were bakers and in 1851 we find the family at 19 Eagle Street and in 1861 at 25 Eagle Street, Bristol. Charles Maddicks I had died by 1861 and Charles II was assisting his widowed mother with the bakery.

Charles Maddicks II married Elizabeth White during the second quarter of 1868 at Clifton. In 1871 we find Charles and Elizabeth living at 15 Alma Street, Bristol. Charles was then twenty-nine-years-old baker, his wife aged twenty-seven, and their children were Charles W. Maddicks, aged two, and his brother Arthur J. Maddicks aged seven months.

In 1881 Charles Maddicks II had moved to 25 Wellington Street, St Philip and St Jacob, Bristol. He was described as a thirty-nine-year-old baker born in Bristol; his wife Elizabeth was aged thirty-seven and born in Bedminster; their children were listed as Charles William aged thirteen; Arthur John aged ten; Florence Emily aged eight; Joseph Francis aged six; Alice aged three and Emmeline aged one. All these children were born in Bristol.

On 2nd February 1885 a Charles William Maddicks was sentenced at Gloucester to a term of imprisonment of five calendar months as a result of being found guilty of shop-breaking and larceny. At about this time the family had moved to Gloucester from Bristol.

In 1891 Charles William Maddicks was a lodger at 3 Philip Street, Gloucester, the home of Frank Turner, and was described in the census return as a twenty-five-year-old labourer at an iron works, born in Bristol. Meanwhile his father, Charles Maddicks II was living at Robinhood Street, Gloucester, and was listed as a forty-nine-year-old painter born in Bristol; his wife, Elizabeth, was now aged forty-seven; Arthur was a twenty-year-old painter; Joseph a sixteen-year-old labourer in an engine works; Alice was a fourteen-year-old general servant; Emily was a ten-year-old scholar; Ada a six-year-old scholar and Gertrude was aged three years. Unlike her siblings Gertrude was born in Gloucester.

Returning to Charles William and Alice Maddicks, during the first quarter of 1897 their daughter, Frances Mary, was born at Gloucester followed by Alice Gertrude during the first quarter of 1898.

However, at the time of the 1901 census Alice was a patient at the Gloucester County Lunatic Asylum and she was described as a married thirty-eight-year-old housewife? (sic), born in Gloucester and a lunatic. Ten years later she was still at Horton Road, aged forty-eight-years, married and listed again as born in Gloucester.

She was still alive in February 1912 because the Obituary Notice in the Gloucester Citizen for her late father notes: ‘He leaves three sons and two daughters’ i.e. William Henry, Alfred Robert, Albert, Emily and Alice (Florence died in 1890). Tony Yarnold thought that she might have been living at an institution near Weston-Super-Mare and that she had mental health problems.

The family was now dispersed and we find Charles William, her husband, at the time of the 1901 census, lodging at 5 Robinhood Street with the Jacksons. He was described as a thirty-three-year-old engine fitter, married, and born at Bristol. Ten years later, in 1911, Charles William Maddicks, was boarding with Clara Bayliss, a widowed fruiter of 93 Bristol Road, Gloucester, who had five rooms. He was described ‘C. Maddicks’, forty-six-years-old, a wagon works fitter, born at Bristol, and boarding with him was his daughter Alice. She was described as ‘A. Maddicks’, aged thirteen years, a school girl, born in Gloucester. Mrs Bayliss has a fourteen-year-old-son called Arthur.

Returning to the parents of Charles William Maddicks by 1901 they were living at 30 Linden Road, Gloucester. Charles Maddicks II was described as fifty-nine-year-old painter and his wife Elizabeth as fifty-five. Their children included Arthur John, aged twenty-nine, a labourer; Emma aged twenty, a barmaid; Ada, aged sixteen, a dressmaker; and Gertrude aged thirteen. All the family were born in Bristol except for Gertrude who was born in Gloucester. Living with them were Frances Mary Maddicks, aged four, and Alice aged three, their grand-daughters who were born at Gloucester too.

In 1911 Charles Maddicks II and his family were at 40 Seymour Road, Gloucester. He was a sixty-nine-year-old watchman; Elizabeth was aged sixty-seven; Arthur John, a forty-year-old general labourer; Ada Ella, a twenty-five-year-old dressmaker and all of the family were born at Bristol. Staying with them was Frances Maddicks, grand-daughter, aged fourteen years, and born at Gloucester.

The electoral rolls from 1918 until 1924 place Charles Maddicks at 93 Bristol Road with Arthur Wyndham Bayliss and his mother, Clara Jane Bayliss, but, in 1930, he no longer qualifies as an elector in that area.

Charles W. Maddicks, Senior, of 50 Linden Road, Gloucester, died during the final quarter of 1919 aged seventy-nine-years. According to probate records the actual date was 9th December 1919. Administration was granted to his widow, Elizabeth, on 11th February 1920 at Gloucester and his effects were valued at £33-5-0d.

Alice Maddicks died on 9th January 1936 at the County Mental Hospital, Barnwood R.D., aged seventy-three-years. She was described as the wife of Charles Maddicks, a general labourer, of 2 Sybil cottages, Bristol road, Gloucester. The cause of death was given as 1(a) Cardiovascular Degeneration P.M. certified by J. P. Lynnott, L.R.C.J. and the informant was James Conway, Acting Superintendent at the County Mental Hospital, Wotton Hill. The death was registered on 13th January 1936.

The 1936 Electoral Roll and the 1939 Register of England and Wales have Charles was living with the widow, Clara Bayliss, at 1 Cecil Road, Gloucester. He was described in the Register as a Railway Carriage and Bogie Fitter (Heavy Worker).

Charles William Maddicks died in Gloucester Registration District during the third quarter of 1952 aged eighty-four-years.

Their children were: 

1. FRANCES MARY BALLARD

Frances Mary was born on 9th January 1897 at Gloucester and she was baptised at St Luke’s Church on 10th February. Her parents were given in the register as Charles William and Alice Maddicks of 3 Cecil Road and her father worked as a driller.

In 1901 Frances was aged four and staying with her sister Alice at their grandparents’ home, 30 Linden Road, Gloucester. In 1911 Frances was still with her grandparents who were living at 40 Seymour Road. Frances was now fourteen.

On 18th March 1917 twenty-year-old Frances married Edward Arthur Ballard at Tuffley Church, in the Parish of St Paul, Gloucester. Both bride and groom were living at 2 Highfield Villas, Reservoir Row. Frances was described on the certificate as the daughter of Charles William Maddicks, a Fitter. Edward  was a forty-four-year-old Widower and a Clerk of Works. His father was given as Robert Henry Ballard, a retired Tanner.

Edward was born on 3rd January 1875 at Leigh, Worcestershire and, in 1896, he married Lizzie Florence Lea. On the night of the 1911 census Edward and Lizzie were living in Reservoir Road, Gloucester. Edward was described in the return as a thirty-eight-year-old Builder’s Clerk and he had been married to Lizzie for fifteen years and they had had three children. The children were living with them, namely, Arthur Edward, aged fourteen, born in Gloucester; Edith May, aged eight, born in Ledbury; and Gertrude Phyllis, aged two, born in King’s Heath. Lizzie Ballard died in 1916, the year before Edward’s marriage to Frances Maddicks.

In 1920 Edward and Frances were living at ‘Milton’, Seymour Road, Gloucester but, by 1932, they had moved to 26 Kenya Road, Greenwich.

At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales, Edward and Frances were living at 26 Kenya Road, Greenwich, and he was working as a Clerk of the Works and Drainage Inspector.

Frances died in the Bournemouth area during 1987.

2. ALICE GERTRUDE MADDICKS

Alice Gertrude Maddicks was baptised at St Stephen’s Church, Gloucester, on 18th November 1898. She was described in the register as the daughter of Charles William and Alice Maddicks of 2 Sybil Cottage, Bristol Road, and her father was working as a Labourer.

In 1901 she was staying with her sister, Frances, at their grandparents’ home, 30 Linden Road, Gloucester. In 1911 she was with her father boarding at 93 Bristol Road, Gloucester and she was described in the return as a thirteen-year-old school girl, born at Gloucester.

 


 

4. EMILY ELEY, Great Grandmother

Daughter of James Henry Yarnold and Frances (nee Brown)

Wife of Ernest Edward Eley

Also Mother of Annie Florence Janet Durn, James Ernest, Dorothy Frances Harman, Grace Margaret Eley, Daisy Mary, Norah, John Shield, Phyllis May Wyatt and Ethel Emmie Randall

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Emily Yarnold was born on 12th January 1865, the fourth child and third daughter of James Henry Yarnold, a Carpenter (Journeyman) of Gloucester and his wife Frances. The birth certificate records that they were living at London Road, Gloucester and from before 1869 they were at 2 Philip Street. Tragedy struck the family and Emily’s mother, Frances, died on 14th February 1879. By this time they were living at 4 Berkeley Villas and her father was described as a Cabinet Maker Foreman.

Already, in 1871, Emily Yarnold was staying with her Uncle James Brown and his wife, Jane, in Wotton-under-Edge. She was described in the census return as a six-year-old scholar and her uncle was a Watchmaker. Emily was only thirteen-years-old when her mother died and, by the time of the 1881 census, she was working as an assistant in her uncle’s watchmaker’s shop in Long Street, Wotton-under-Edge. She was then about sixteen-years-old. It was in this shop that she is said to have met her future husband…

For more information see my blog:

Ernest Edward Eley (1869-1950), Farmer of Tortworth, Kingswood and Berkeley

https://wp.me/p4BX9P-LG

5. FLORENCE ANNE YARNOLD, Great II Aunt

Florence Anne Yarnold was born on 8th December 1866. At the time of the 1871 census she was living with her family at St Philip Street, South Hamlets, Gloucester. Florence was aged four years and was born in Gloucester.

At the time of the 1881 census Florence was living at Berkeley Villas, Bristol Road, Gloucester, with her family. She was aged fourteen years.

She died aged twenty-four-years on 25th December 1890 of T.B. On her death certificate she was described as a domestic servant of Hillview, Bristol Road, Gloucester. In her death notice the address is given as 11 Hill View Villas, Bristol Road, Gloucester.

See Gloucester Journal 3rd January 1891 p.8 – Annie Florence.

 

6. CHARLES FREDERICK YARNOLD, Infant Great II Uncle 

Charles Yarnold was born in February 1869 and died on 10th March 1869.

 

7. ALFRED ROBERT YARNOLD, Great II Uncle 

Alfred Robert Yarnold was born on 11th June 1870. He was baptised by the Reverend W. Balfour, the incumbent, at St Nicholas’s Church, Gloucester, on 4th September 1870. Alfred Robert was described as the son of Henry James and Frances Yarnold of St Luke’s Parish, Gloucester. His father was described as a joiner.

At the time of the 1871 census the family was living at St Philip Street, South Hamlets, Gloucester. Alfred R. was aged nine months and was born in Gloucester.

Ten years later at the time of the 1881 census Alfred Robert Yarnold was living at Berkeley Villas, Bristol Road, Gloucester with his family. He was aged ten-years-old.

In the 1891 census return Alfred Robert was living at 11 Hillview Villas, Bristol Road, Gloucester, with his family. He was described as aged twenty-years, a carpenter   and born in Gloucester.

Two sons, Alfred (Bob) and Albert followed James Henry Yarnold into woodworking trades. Alfred of 48 Frampton Road, Gloucester, became Foreman Joiner to Gloucestershire County Council. He married Kate Nora Boulton on 22nd May 1899 at Saul (See Gloucester Journal 27th May 1899 p.7 c.1- ‘Nora Kate Boulton of Saul’). The newspaper report records that the wedding took place at Saul Church. The bride was the eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs Thomas Boulton of Saul Villa. The bridesmaids were Mabel Boulton, sister of the bride, and the bride’s cousin, Agnes Field of Sharpness. The best man was Mr. B. Yarnold. Fifty guests sat down for the reception at Saul Villa and the village was decorated for the pretty wedding.

The banns book for Saul records Alfred Robert Yarnold, bachelor of the parish of St Luke, Gloucester, and Kate Nora Boulton, spinster of ‘this parish.’ Banns were called at Saul on 23rd April, 30th April and May 7th.

Norah was born on 16th November 1876 at Saul. She was a daughter of Thomas and Emily Boulton. Thomas was in turn the son of Edward, a bridge keeper on the Gloucester to Berkeley Canal at Whitminster Lane, and his wife, Selina. Fanny’s father, Edward Boulton, was born in about 1819 at Frampton-upon Severn. His own father and mother were Isaac and Hester Boulton, he an agricultural labourer of Frampton-upon Severn. Isaac and Hester were the parents of Hannah, William and Edward Boulton. Thomas Boulton, who was born in 1824 at Frampton and worked as a bridge keeper at Standish and Moreton Valance, was probably another son of Isaac and Hester and he became the father-in-law of Henry Barton of Moreton Valance.

Norah Kate’s father, Thomas Boulton, was born in about 1853 at Frampton. He was at home, and described as a seventeen-year-old stonemason at the time of the 1871 census. In 1881 he was married to Emily and living at 2 Victoria Place, Saul. In this return he was described, as a twenty-seven-year-old bricklayer, born in Framilode, and his wife, Emily, was aged twenty-seven and born at Saul. Their children were Norah K. Boulton. aged four years and Mabel aged eight months, both born in Saul. In the 1891 census return we find the whole family at Whitminster Lane. Edward Boulton was aged seventy-two years, a bridge keeper, born in Frampton; Thomas Boulton, his son, a thirty-eight-year-old bricklayer, born in Frampton; Emily aged thirty-eight-years, a general domestic servant, born in Saul; and their children Norah aged fourteen; Mabel aged ten years and Lilian aged five years.

At the time of the 1901 census Robert Yarnold, aged thirty years, was a foreman of a joiner and born in Gloucester. He was living with his wife, Nora, and sister-in-law at 48 Frampton Road, Gloucester. Nora was aged twenty-four-years and born at Saul and her sister Lilian Boulton was a fifteen-year-old dressmaker, born in Saul.

In 1911 Robert Yarnold was living at 48 Frampton Road. He was aged forty years and described as a Foreman Joiner (General) working for Gloucestershire County Council, worker, and born in St Luke’s Gloucester. His wife Nora was aged thirty-four-years, married for eleven years with one child and born in Saul. Their daughter Cordelia was aged nine years, at school, and born in St Luke’s Gloucester. Their house had five rooms.

Gloucester Journal, Saturday August 7th 1915:

Weddings at Saul – Beard – Boulton – The Marriage was solemnised at St. James’ Church Saul, on Monday of Mr. Victor S. Beard, second and youngest son of Mr. & Mrs. Fred Beard, and Miss Lilian Boulton, youngest daughter of Mr and Mrs Thomas Boulton, both of Saul. The bride was given away by her brother-in-law, Mr. Robert Yarnold, Gloucester, and was attended by three bridesmaids – Miss D. Yarnold (niece of the bride)…

The chief bridesmaid (Miss Yarnold) wore a pale blue satin gown trimmed with cream lace, and pink roses, a black ninon hat with blue ribbon strings and pink rose trimmings to match. She carried a bouquet of pink and white carnations and wore a gold dress ring set with amethysts, both gifts of the bridegroom…

(Presents….)

Mr & Mrs. R. Yarnold, Gloucester, tea service and tea pot.

Miss Yarnold, trinket set.

At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales, Alfred R. and Nora K. Yarnold were living at 48 Frampton Road and he was described as a retired Foreman Joiner. Living with them was their son, Kenneth.

Alfred Robert died on 24th February 1944 and his wife died on 7th July 1948.

According to probate records Alfred Robert Yarnold, otherwise Robert Yarnold, of 48 Frampton Road, Gloucester, died on 24th February 1944. Probate was granted at Gloucester on 14th June to Norah Kate Yarnold, widow, and Cordelia Emily Annie Pizer (wife of Hubert Gordon Pizer). Effects valued at £1,074 12 6d.

Their children were:

1. CORDELIA (DELIA) EMILY ANNIE PIZER

Cordelia Yarnold was born on 26th May 1901 in Gloucester Registration District and was at home at the time of the 1911 census, aged nine years, at school, and born within St Luke’s Parish in Gloucester.

The Banns Register for St Barnabas’s Church, Gloucester, records that banns were called for Hubert Gordon Pizer of St Luke’s Parish, Gloucester and Cordelia Emily Annie Yarnold of ‘this parish’ on May 31st, June 7th and June 14th 1931.

The couple were married on 31st July 1931 at St Stephen’s Church, Gloucester. Hubert was described as a thirty-one –year-old bachelor and Welder, of 2 Seymour Road, son of Hubert Pizer, a Metalworker. Cordelia was described as a thirty-year-old spinster, of 48 Frampton Road, daughter of Albert Robert Yarnold, a Joiner. Their fathers were the witnesses..

Hubert Gordon Pizer was baptised at St Stephen’s Gloucester on 17th January 1900. His parents, Herbert and Ellen, were living at 31 Stroud Road and his father was described in the register as a Metal Sheet Worker. Herbert was, himself, born in Hull. According to probate records, Herbert Pizer, of 2 Seymour Road, Gloucester, died on 28th May 1934 and administration was granted on 31st July 1934 to his widow, Ellen, and his effects were valued at £350-5s.

Cordelia died on 1st June 1981, at 215 Seymour Road, Gloucester and her husband, Hubert, died on 15th July 1982 at 38 Eldon Road, Cheltenham.

2. KENNETH ALFRED ROBERT BOULTON YARNOLD

Kenneth Alfred Robert Boulton Yarnold was born on 8th March 1914 in Gloucester. At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales, Kenneth was living at home with his parents at 48 Frampton Road. He was working as a Time Clerk with Gloucester Aircraft Company and had formerly worked as a Radio Service Engineer.

Kenneth married Mary Clarissa Finch in Gloucester Registration District during the first quarter of 1955.

According to probate records, Kenneth Yarnold, of 4 Tuffley Avenue, Gloucester, died on 25th December 1961 in Southgate Street, Gloucester. Administration was granted, on 6th March 1962, to Mary Clarissa Yarnold, his widow. His effects were valued at £3,799 13s.


 

8. ALBERT YARNOLD, Great II Uncle

Albert Yarnold was born on 6th January 1874 at Gloucester.

At the time of the 1881 census Albert was living at Berkeley Villas, Bristol Road, Gloucester, with his family. He was shown as aged six years.

at the time of the 1891 census return, Albert was living with his family at 11 Hillview Villas, Bristol Road, Gloucester. He was described as a seventeen-year-old apprentice, born in Gloucester.

Albert was baptised as an adult, on 1st March 1891, at St Luke’s Church, Gloucester. He was described as living at Hillview Villas, Bristol Road, and his parents were Henry James Yarnold, a foreman joiner, and his wife, Frances Yarnold.

 Two sons, Alfred (Bob) and Albert followed their father, James Henry Yarnold, into woodworking trades. Albert moved to Bournville to work for the Cadburys organisation.

Albert married Maud Florence Cox (1882- ) on 12th September 1908 at the Church of the Ascension, King’s Norton. Albert was described as a bachelor, aged thirty-four, a joiner, of 44 Beech Road, Bournville, son of James Henry Yarnold, a builder’s manager. Maud Florence Cox was described as a twenty-six-year-old spinster, of Ye Olde Farm Inn, Bournville Lane, Bournville, daughter of George Cox, Grocer. Maud was born on 26th June 1880.

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In 1911 Albert Yarnold was living in a property with six rooms at 86 Bournville Lane, King’s Norton. He was described as thirty-seven-years-old, married for two years, with one child. His occupation was given as ‘Joiner working in a Cocoa Works’ and he was listed as born in Gloucester. His wife, Maud Florence, was born in London and was twenty-eight-years-old. Their daughter, Frances Eleanor Maud Yarnold was about eighteen-months-old and she was born at Bournville.

At the time of the 1939 Register of England and Wales, Albert and Maud were living at 110 Broadmeadow Lane, Birmingham, and he was described as a Retired Joiner.

Albert worked for thirty-two-years as a Carpenter and Joiner at Bournville in Birmingham and his last address was 110 Broadmeadow Lane, King’s Norton. He died on 23rd November 1952 aged seventy-eight-years and was cremated at Lodge Hill Cemetery on 26th November. His widow, Maud, died on 14th May 1961, aged eighty-years.

Bournville Works Magazine for September 1935:

‘Albert Yarnold. Mr. A. Yarnold had a record of 32 years’ service in the Carpenters’ Department before packing his tools away for the last time in July. These tools performed services which might truly be regarded as wonderful and (sometimes) rather weird, for they fashioned over a span of twenty-one years the “properties” used at parties and dramatic productions at Bournville. A model of Stonehenge complete with prehistoric monster – or a ship, or a hotel entrance, or an ancient motor car – Mr. Yarnold would oblige! He was also responsible for the construction of staircases in the Works, in which work he specialized.

We do not suppose his tools will go rusty now that he has retired, even though the handles of his fishing rod and spade become more shiny. He seems to be equally adept at extracting fish and weeds from their natural elements! His colleagues presented him with part of the cost of a new wireless set, which they trusted will afford him much pleasure in retirement.’

Their children were:

1. FRANCES ELEANOR MAUD MARCISZ 

Frances Eleanor Maud Yarnold was born at Bournville on 16th June 1909 and she as home , aged eighteen months, at the time of the 1911 census. She married Cecil George Osborn on 16th May 1939 and he died on 14th March 1948. In the 1939 Electoral Roll they were living at 45 Sycamore Road, King’s Norton and, in the same year, the Register for England and Wales, describes Cecil as a Cinema Manager.

Cecil Osborn, of 45 Sycamore Road, died on 4th March 1948 at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham and Eleanor married Bazli Zygmunt Marcisz on 2nd October in the same year.

Basil died on 22nd March 1960 and his widow, Frances, died on 30th November 1979 and, after cremation at Worcester, her ashes were buried at Claines Church, Worcester.

 2. MURIEL RICHARDS

Muriel Yarnold was born on 1st April 1912. She married Philip Lovell Richards on 9th May 1936. Philip was born on 21st September 1908 and baptised at St Peter’s Church, Harborne, on 15th November. His parents, Frederic Charles and Lillie Beatrice Richards, lived at 31 Lonsdale Road, Harborne, and his father worked as a Silversmith’s Manager. In 1930 Philip was at home with his family at 13 Victoria Road, Edgbaston.

Muriel and Philip settled at 3 Seymour Avenue, Worcester where they had twins, Jillian and John. At the time of the 1939 Register for England and Wales, Muriel and Philip were still at that address and he was working as a Cocoa and Chocolate Commercial Traveller and listed as being a Special Constable of the Worcester City Police Force.

Muriel Richards died on 15th April 1943 and was buried at Claines, Worcester.

 

 


 

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS FAMILY CONTACT: btsarnia@gmail.com

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