btsarnia

A tribute to the life and work of Brian Torode

Brown Family of Gloucestershire, Watchmakers

BROWN FAMILY OF GLOUCESTER, CHELTENHAM AND

WOTTON-UNDER-EDGE


 Robert Brown (1786c-1861) and Mary Bird (1792-1876), 

born Edinburgh, Watchmaker of Gloucester

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Frances Brown (1831-1879) and James Henry Yarnold

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Emily Yarnold and Ernest Edward Eley


 

ROBERT BROWN, Great III Grandfather of Richard Barton

 Husband of Mary Bird

Father of Frances Yarnold

 Also Father of Robert, John, Mary Workman, Eleanor, Alexander, Charlotte, Edwin, Ellen, and James

Robert Brown was born in about 1786 in Edinburgh, Midlothian. He first appears in Gloucestershire in 1814 when he married in Cheltenham and at the time he was working as a Watchmaker. Later Robert Brown was to work in Westgate Street, Gloucester.

There is an interesting reference to another Robert Brown who was working from

  1. Westgate Street, Gloucester, in 1795. The Gloucester Journal for 5th December 1795 reports:

‘Whereas Susannah the wife of Robert Brown, of the City Watch maker, has eloped without any provocation Therefore I give this public Notice that whatever Debts she may contract I will not pay’

Could this refer to the parents of Robert Brown (1786-1861)???

A Robert Brown was listed as a Watchmaker in Westgate Street in the Gloucester Directory for 1820 and also in Pigot’s Directory for the year 1822/23. In Pigot’s Directory for 1830 Robert Brown was listed as a Watch and Clock Maker of Westgate Street.

We also know that in 1832 a Robert Brown received the sum of £8-0-0d for repairing and winding St Nicholas’s Church clock. This could refer to Robert Brown (1786-) or it could be the one previously mentioned in the Gloucester Journal for 1795.

Robert Brown married Mary Bird at St Mary’s Parish Church, Cheltenham, on 19th September 1814. A witness at the wedding ceremony was a Charlotte Bird, her eldest sister, who was baptised at Stonehouse in 1788. Charlotte was unable to sign her name but Robert and Mary were both able to. Henry Foulkes performed the marriage and the other witness was John Barnard.

Mary Bird was the daughter of Joseph and Frances Bird and she was baptised on 21st May 1793 at Stroud. According to later census returns Mary was born in Eastington some time between 1793 and 1795. However, two of the six children of Joseph and Frances Bird were actually baptised at Eastington. The Birds had one of their children christened at Stonehouse in 1788, another at Randwick in 1791, two at Stroud, in 1793 and 1796, and two in Eastington, in 1798 and 1802.

We know that Robert, the first child of Robert and Mary Brown, was baptised at Cheltenham Parish Church in 1815 and from 1816 onwards the baptisms of their children took place at St Nicholas’s Church in Westgate Street, Gloucester.

At the time of the 1841 census Robert was living at Longsmith Street, near to the Bolt Inn, and the address given in the Electoral Rolls for 1841 to 1861 was Bolt Lane.

In the 1841 census he was described as aged fifty-five-years, a watchmaker, born out of the county. Mary, his wife, was aged forty-five-years. Their children included – James, aged five years; Charlotte, aged fifteen years; and Frances aged ten years. The Lewis Family appear to be living in the same house. At the time of the 1841 census Robert, Mary and Ellen, his children, were living in the High Street, Cheltenham. Robert was a twenty-five-year-old watchmaker and Mary a twenty-year-old milliner. Ellen was only twelve-years-old.

Ten years later, in 1851, the address was given on the night of the Census as Bolt Lane and one can only conclude that they must have lived on the corner of the two roads, with the shop front facing on to Longsmith Street and the residential accommodation accessed from Bolt or Bull Lane. Robert was described as a sixty-five-year-old Watchmaker who had been born in Edinburgh. Mary, his wife, was a fifty-five-year-old woman who had been born in Eastington. His son, James, was described as a fourteen-year-old apprentice, born in Gloucester. Their granddaughter, Mary Brown, aged four years, was staying with them on the night of the census. She was a daughter of Robert Brown, Junior, of Cheltenham.

In the 1861 census Robert is described as a seventy-seven year old Watchmaker of Bolt Lane, born in Scotland. His wife Mary, born in Gloucestershire, was aged sixty-seven-years. His daughter and son-in-law – James Henry and Frances Yarnold were staying with them together with William, their two-year-old child, who would later become a watchmaker in Thornbury.

Robert Brown was working from 45 Longsmith Street according to various Trade Directories at least from 1852 until the 1859 Slater’s Directory.

Their children included a couple who died in infancy – John Brown was buried on 6th September 1820, aged four years, and he was followed by Eleanor Brown who was buried, aged eleven weeks, on 26th September. Robert and James Brown both became watchmakers, one in Cheltenham and the other in Wotton-under-Edge.

His death certificate records that Robert Brown died on 7th November 1861 at 45 Longsmith Street. He was described as a seventy-seven-year-old Watchmaker (Master) and that he died of old age (not certified). The informant was James Brown of 45 Longsmith street, who was in attendance. The death was registered on 9th November by John Oakley Packer.

Robert Brown was buried on 10th November 1861, aged seventy-seven-years. The service was conducted by Charles Henry Bevan at Gloucester Cemetery (Plot 8442 1Up1Right 48).


MARY BROWN, Great III Grandmother of Richard Barton

 Daughter of Joseph Bird and Frances (nee Cratchley)

Wife of Robert Brown

Mother of Frances Yarnold

Also Mother of Robert, John, Mary Workman, Eleanor, Alexander, Charlotte, Edwin, Ellen, and James

Mary Bird was the daughter of Joseph and Frances Bird and she was baptised on 21st May 1793 at Stroud. According to later census returns Mary was born in Eastington. However, two of the six children of Joseph and Frances Bird were actually baptised at Eastington. The Birds had one of their children christened at Stonehouse in 1788, another at Randwick in 1791, two at Stroud, in 1793 and 1796, and two in Eastington, in 1798 and 1802.

Her father was buried at Eastington on 6th June 1802 and from May 1807 we find payments to a ‘Widow Bird’ by the Overseers of the Poor.

Mary Bird married Robert Brown at Cheltenham Parish Church on 19th September 1814. A witness at the wedding ceremony was a Charlotte Bird, her eldest sister, who was baptised at Stonehouse in 1788. Charlotte was unable to sign her name but Robert and Mary were both able to. Henry Foulkes performed the marriage and the other witness was John Barnard.

We know that the first child of Robert and Mary Brown was baptised at Cheltenham Parish Church on 30th April 1815 and from the year 1816 the baptisms of their other nine children took place at St Nicholas’s Church in Westgate Street, Gloucester.

At the time of the 1841 census Robert and Mary Brown were living at Longsmith Street near to the Bolt Inn and the address given in the Electoral Rolls from 1841 to 1861 is Bolt Lane. In the census return Robert was described as aged fifty-five-years and Mary, his wife, as aged forty-five-years. Their children included – James, aged five; Charlotte, aged fifteen; and Frances aged ten years. At the time of the 1841 census Robert, Mary and Ellen, her children, were living in the High Street, Cheltenham. Robert was a twenty-five-year-old watchmaker and Mary a twenty-year-old milliner.

Ten years later, in 1851, the address was given on the night of the Census as Bolt Lane and one can only conclude that they must have lived on the corner of the two roads, with the shop front facing on to Longsmith Street and the residential accommodation on to Bolt Lane.

In the 1861 census Robert is described as a seventy-seven year old Watchmaker and his wife as a sixty-seven-year-old Gloucestershire woman. Their daughter and son-in-law – James Henry and Frances Yarnold were staying with them with William Yarnold their two-year-old grandson.

Robert Brown died at this address on 10th November 1861, aged 77 years, leaving Mary a widow.

I cannot find Mary in the 1871 census.

On 27th November 1876 Mary Brown died at The Almshouses, Wotton, Gloucester. She was described as eighty-four-years-old and the widow of Robert Brown, a watchmaker. The cause of death was given as ‘Asthma many years’ and was certified by John P. Wilton M.R.C.S. Benjamin Thurston registered the death on 29th November and the informant was Sarah Davis of the Wotton Almshouses, who was present at the death.

Mary was probably buried in the graveyard of the almshouses on the opposite side of the London Road.


Their children were Great III Aunts and Uncles:

  1. ROBERT BROWN, Great III Uncle

Robert Brown was baptised on 30th April 1815 at Cheltenham Parish Church. His father was described as a Watchmaker of Cheltenham.

In the 1841 census return he was living at High Street, Cheltenham and working as a watchmaker. He was described as twenty-five-years-old and with him was his sister, Mary, aged twenty, a milliner, and Ellen Brown, aged twelve.

Robert married his wife Sarah Wallis on 31st May 1841 at Staverton Parish Church. He was described as a bachelor of full age, a Watchmaker, of Staverton, son of Robert Brown, Watchmaker. Sarah was described as a Spinster of full age, of Staverton, daughter of Elisha Wallis, Grocer. Both bride and groom signed their names and the witnesses were Robert Glass and Mary Ann Arkell. At about this time Robert’s uncle, Henry Bird, was living in Staverton.

In 1861 Elisha Wallis, Sarah’s father was a Tea Dealer with premises at the junction of High Street and King Street, Cheltenham.

1973 0410176  High Street            WALLIS Elisha              HD W  64   Tea Dealer Grocer         GLS Shurdington

1973 0410176  High Street            WALLIS William             SO U  24   Assistant Grocer          GLS Cheltm [Cheltenham]

1973 0410176  High Street            WALLIS Sarah               GD –  14   –                         GLS Tewkesbury

1973 0410176  High Street            WALLIS Thomas              GS –  10   –                         GLS Cheltm [Cheltenham]

Pigot’s Directory for 1842 and 1844 list Robert Brown as trading as a Watchmaker at 28 Pittville Street (partly formed in 1824 from widening of Portland Passage). Harper’s Cheltenham Directory and Guide for 1844 has him listed at 22 Pittville Street and also at 28 Brunswick Street.  Hunt’s Directory of 1847 lists Robert Brown at 28 Pittville Street.

Cheltenham Examiner 27th September 1843, Page 2, column 7:

‘Mysterious Circumstances. On Monday morning a robbery took place on the premises of Mr. R. Brown, Watch and Clock Maker, Pittville street under the following circumstances:- Mr Brown states that on closing his shop on Saturday evening, he placed the watches entrusted to him to mend (sixteen in number) in a box kept for that purpose, and which he carried home with him to his residence in Bonner’s passage. It continued in his house Saturday night, all day Sunday and Sunday night, and on Monday morning on going to open his shop, Mr. Brown took with him the box, but without inspecting its contents; he placed it on the counter while he took down the shutters, and left it there still unopened while he locked the shop and went to breakfast. On returning from breakfast, he found the shop door still locked; but on opening the box to take out the watches, he found them everyone gone. The police were immediately appraised of the circumstances, but not withstanding the most diligent enquiry, they have not been able to obtain the slightest clue to the discovery of the thieves and the missing property. What renders the search more difficult is the unaccountable remissness of Mr. Brown, in not being able to tell from his books either the numbers or the makers’ names of any of the watches. We are informed that two of the missing articles are gold, and worth a considerable sum; the remainder silver, two of them very old-fashioned and of little value.’

According to Harper’s Directory of 1844 a Robert Brown was living at 28 Brunswick Street (An Historical Gazetteer of Cheltenham, James Hodsdon, 1997: St Paul’s. The southern section, to St Paul’s Road, was known until at least 1884 as Rutland Street; thus on 1834 map, where it appears fully built up, whereas only a short stretch of section north of St Paul’s Road is shown. Steady building here from 1836 to at least 1840 (building certs. for 21 houses). Name commemorates Duke of Brunswick’s visit to Cheltenham in 1836).

In the 1851 census return Robert was living with his family at 2, Warwick Buildings, Cheltenham He was working as a watchmaker, aged thirty-six, and born in Cheltenham. His wife, Sarah, was described as thirty-two-years-old and born in Cheltenham. Their son, Robert, was a nine-year-old scholar, born in Cheltenham, Sarah was aged two years and born in Cheltenham and Eliza was aged two-years and born in Cheltenham.

An Historical Gazetteer of Cheltenham, James Hodsdon, 1997:

‘Warwick Buildings consisted of thirteen houses in a court of the west side of Winchcombe Street, just south of the junction with the present Inner Ring. Listed 1841 Census and shown on 1855-7 O.T.S. Listed for demolition in slum clearance programme no. 2. 1935 (HC, Feb.)’

The Trade Directories (Slater 1852-3; Cheltenham Almanack 1865; Mercer & Crocker 1874; Kelly 1870 and 1879; Royal Cheltenham Directory 1883-4) for the 1850s list him as trading from 27 Pittville Street and this business address continues up to 1879

In the 1861 Census Robert Brown was living at 37 St Paul’s Street North. He was described as a forty-five-year-old Watchmaker, his wife, Sarah, was forty-year-old. The children included Sarah A, a seventeen-year-old, dressmaker; Eliza aged twelve, a scholar; Joseph W. aged eight, a scholar; Frances A. aged three years and Charles H. aged eight months. On that night their four-year-old daughter, Mary, was staying with her Grandparents at Bolt Lane in Gloucester.

The 1871 Census found the Brown Family still living at the same address – 37 St Paul’s Street North. Robert was described, as a fifty-six-year-old Watchmaker, born in Cheltenham and Sarah, his wife, was aged fifty. The children were as follows – Robert an unmarried thirty-year-old watchmaker; Eliza at twenty-one; Joseph W. a seventeen-year-old watchmaker; Frances A at thirteen; and Charles Henry at ten years. Edwin H. Jones, a two-year-old grandson was also staying the night. This address is confirmed by Mercer & Crocker’s Directory of 1874.

Robert witnessed his sister, Mary Workman’s wedding on 13th November 1873.

Sarah Brown, Robert’s wife, died at 37 St Paul’s Street North on 2nd November 1876.

In the 1881 census return the family was listed as living at 39 St Paul’s Street North. Robert Brown was described as a sixty-five-year-old watchmaker who had been born in Cheltenham. With him were Eliza, aged thirty-two; Joseph W. Brown, aged twenty-seven; Charles H. Brown who was aged twenty-years and his grandson, Edwin H. Jones, his eleven-year-old scholar.

In an 1885 directory we find Robert Brown, or his eldest son Robert, trading from 67 Regent Street and living at 7 Sherborne Terrace (situated in Fairview Road, the westernmost six of a terrace still surviving on the north side of the present street, opposite Bence’s).

What we do know is that Robert Brown made his will on 12th June 1885 and excluded his eldest son, Robert from his will. 37 St Paul Street North was to be inherited by his daughter Eliza and his son, Charles Henry Brown, was to inherit his father’s business.

Robert Brown died on 15th January 1889 and was buried at Cheltenham Cemetery.

According to probate records Robert Brown of 7 Sherborne Terrace, Cheltenham, watchmaker, died on 15th January 1889 at 7 Sherborne Terrace. Probate was granted on 16th January 1889 to James Brown, of 3 Long Street, Wotton-under-Edge, watchmaker and brother. Effects were valued at £394-7-0d.

Their children were cousins of Emily Eley, Great Grandmother:

 1. ROBERT (FREDERICK) BROWN, cousin of Emily Eley

 Robert Brown was born in about 1841. On 2nd January 1842 Robert Brown, son of Robert and Sarah, Watchmaker of 408 High Street, was baptised at St Mary’s Church, Cheltenham. In the 1851 census he was at home, aged nine years, a scholar, born in Cheltenham. He was not at home at the time of the 1861 census return but we find him at 3 Winchcombe Place (Parade, now mostly shops, continuing east side of Winchcombe Street beyond north of Pittville Gates – ‘tumble down tenements’ replaced by a new row of houses in 1884-5), Cheltenham. He was described as a nineteen-year-old watchmaker, born in Cheltenham. He was staying with Henry Pilley, a twenty-five-year-old tailor, and his family.

In 1871 Robert Brown was described as a Watchmaker, aged thirty years and unmarried, living at home with his parents.

In the fourth quarter of 1876 a Robert Frederick Brown married Mary (Richmond (?)) at Nottingham.

In 1881 Robert Frederick Brown was a Master Watchmaker of 4 Trent Street, Nottingham. He was married, aged thirty-nine-years, and born in Cheltenham. His wife, Mary, was born in Newark, Notts, and was aged twenty-seven-years. Their daughter Edith Mary Brown, was aged one year and born in Nottingham.

Robert Brown was excluded from any legacies in his father’s will of 1885.

Robert Brown or his father was in 1885 trading from 67 Regent Street and living at 7 Sherborne Terrace (situated in Fairview Road, the westernmost six of a terrace still surviving on the north side of the present street, opposite Bence’s).

I cannot find this family in either the 1891 or 1901 census returns.

Their children were second cousins of Grace Margaret Terrett, Grandmother:

Edith Mary Brown was in the 1881 census and was living with her parents, aged one-year and born in Nottingham. On 3rd November 1894 her great aunt, Mary Workman, made her last will and testament. She gave a legacy of nineteen guineas to Edith Brown the daughter of her nephew Robert Brown.

Flora Brown (?)

 2. SARAH ANN JONES, cousin of Emily Eley

 Sarah Ann Brown was born in about 1844. She was baptised at St Mary’s Church, Cheltenham, on 20th December 1844 and was described in the register as the daughter of Robert and Sarah Brown, watchmaker of Brunswick Street.

She was described as a seventeen-year-old dressmaker in the 1861 census return and was living at home with her parents.

On 21st October 1868 Sarah Ann married Samuel George Jones at St Luke’s Church, Marylebone, by licence. Samuel was described as a twenty-five-year-old bachelor, chemist of 8 Halam (?) Street, Belgravia, son of David Jones, farmer. Sarah Ann was a twenty-four-year-old spinster of 32 Nutford Place, daughter of Robert Brown, watchmaker. The witnesses were Charles Searle and Mary Walker (?).

In 1869 Sidney was described as a chemist of Portman Square, London.

The 1871 census records that Samuel G. Jones and Sarah, his wife, were living at 386 Kingsland Road, Dalston (St John’s Hackney). He was described as a twenty-nine-year-old chemist Born in Wales and she was twenty-five and born in Chillingham (sic). Their daughter, Mary F. Jones, was aged five months and born in Kingsland.

In 1881 they were at the same address. Samuel was now a thirty-six-year-old chemist, born in Wales. Sarah was aged forty-two and born in Cheltenham. Florence was aged ten, Samuel aged six and Alice aged two – all three were born in Kingsland Road.

In 1891 Samuel G. Jones was a forty seven (?) year old chemist born in Wales and his wife was aged forty-nine and born in Wales too (sic). Samuel was aged sixteen, an assistant, born in Kingsland as was Alice aged twelve, a scholar.

In 1901 the family was still at 386 Kingsland Road. Samuel was aged fifty-seven, a chemist (drugs) shopkeeper, an employer, born in Carmarthenshire. Sarah was aged fifty-six and born in Cheltenham. Alice was aged twenty-one and was born in Hackney.

In 1911 Samuel George Jones, aged sixty-eight, widower, was living in eight rooms at 8 Grove Lane, Stamford Hill, London. He had been married and had had three children, two of whom were still alive. Alice Jane was aged thirty-two, single, born in Hackney, a library assistant employed by Islington Borough Council. He died on 3rd July 1918.

Their children were second cousins of Grace Margaret Terrett, Grandmother:

Edwin Henry Jones was born in Cheltenham in about 1869. He was baptised at St Paul’s Church, Cheltenham, on 27th June 1869. He was described in the baptismal register as the son of Samuel George and Sarah Ann Jones, Chemist of Portman Square, London. The 1871 Census finds Edwin living with his grandparents at 37 St Paul’s Street North. He was listed as Edwin H. Jones, a two-year-old grandson who was also staying the night. In the 1881 census return the family was listed as living at 39 St Paul’s Street North. Robert Brown was described as a sixty-five-year-old watchmaker who had been born in Cheltenham and his grandson as Edwin H. Jones, an eleven-year-old scholar.

Florence Mary Haste was born on 7th November 1870 and baptised on 8th March 1871 in Hackney. She was at home for the 1871 and 1881 censuses. She married Frederick Gage Haste at St Peter’s Hackney on 31st October 1892. Florence died on 11th December 1908 at 8 rue de Suresnes, Paris. Her husband remarried on 5th February 1930 and died on 22nd December 1933 at 2 rue Debrousse, Paris. According to probate records the administration was granted on 25th May to Jeanne Barbe Constance Haste, widow, and Helen Neamie Haste, spinster. The effects were valued at £500.

Samuel Jones was born in about 1874 in the Kingsland Road. He was at home for the 1881 and 1891 censuses. He was recorded in the latter return as assisting his father.

Alice Jones was born in about 1879 in Kingsland Road. She was at home for the 1881 census, 1891 census and in 1901 she was described as aged twenty one and born at Hackney.

3. ELLEN MARY BROWN, Infant cousin of Emily Eley

Ellen Mary was born in about 1846 in Cheltenham. She was baptised at St Mary’s Cheltenham on 11th September 1846 and was described in the register as the daughter of Robert and Sarah Brown of 22 Brunswick Street, watchmaker. She was with her grandparents in Gloucester on the night of the 1851 census. Mary Ellen was buried in Cheltenham New Burial Ground on 10th May 1851 aged five years.

4. ELIZA MASLIN, cousin of Emily Eley

Eliza Brown was born in about 1848 in Cheltenham. On 11th May 1849 she was baptised at St Mary’s Cheltenham and described in the register as the daughter of Robert and Sarah Brown, watchmaker of Brunswick Street.

She was at home with her parents and aged twelve years at the time of the 1861 census. In 1871 she was still at home and unmarried. She witnessed the marriage of her aunt, Mary Workman, on 13th November 1873. In the 1881 census return she was living at home with her father, aged thirty-two. She was to inherit 37 (39?) St Paul Street North in her father’s will of 1885.

On 12th October 1889 Eliza married Frederick John Maslin at St Mary’s Parish Church, Cheltenham. She was described as a forty-year-old spinster of 7 Sherborne Street, daughter of Robert Brown (deceased) watchmaker. Frederick of 7 Sherborne Street, was aged twenty-eight, a bachelor, decorator, and son of William Maslin an independent gentleman. The witnesses were Sykes George Adcock, I Maslin and Henry Albert Maslin.

In 1891 the Maslins were living at 7 Sherborne Terrace. He was a twenty-nine-year-old decorator, born in Cheltenham and Ellen was aged forty-two and born in Cheltenham.

In 1901 Frederick and Eliza Maslin were living at 74 Fairview Road. He was a thirty-eight-year-old paper hanger (own account), born in Cheltenham, and she was aged fifty-one and born in Cheltenham too. Their daughter Louisa L. Maslin, was aged eight and born in Cheltenham.

In 1911 The Maslins were in five rooms at 35 Victoria Place, Cheltenham. Frederick was a forty-eight-year-old house decorator working on his own account and born in Cheltenham. His wife was aged sixty-one and had been married for twenty-three years and had one child. She was born in Cheltenham. Their daughter Louisa Liliam Maslin, was aged eighteen, single, born in Cheltenham and working as a dressmaker.

Frederick John Maslin of 51 Winstonian Road, Cheltenham, died on 1st September 1929. Administration was granted at Gloucester to Louise Lillian McKeand, wife of Norman McKeand, on 21st November. Effects were valued at £219-4-3d.

 Their daughter was a second cousin of Grace Margaret Terrett:

 Louise Lillian McKeand was born on 17th September 1892 in Cheltenham. She was at home for the 1901 and 1911 censuses. She married Norman McKeand in 1929 and died in Slough in 1979.

  1. JOSEPH WILLIAM BROWN, cousin of Emily Eley

Joseph was born in about 1853 in Cheltenham. He was baptised on 18th May 1853 at St Mary’s Church, Cheltenham, and was described in the register as the son of Robert and Sarah Brown, Watchmaker of St Paul’s Street.

He was described in the 1871 census as a seventeen-year-old Watchmaker living at home with his parents. In the 1881 census return he was described as a twenty-seven-year-old living at home at 39 St Paul’s Street North. In the 1891 census he was living as a boarder with Rosa Payne at 11 Hereford Place (between Lower High Street and Swindon Road), Cheltenham. He was described as a thirty-six-year-old watchmaker and clock maker. In 1901 he was living at Cumberland Cottage, Grove Street, Cheltenham, which was a common lodging house. He was described as a forty-seven-year-old watchmaker working on his own account at home.

 6. FRANCES AMELIA BROWN, cousin of Emily Eley

 Frances Brown was born in about 1857 and was described in the 1861 census as three-years-old. In 1871 she was again at home on the night of the census and aged thirteen years. Frances Amelia Brown died during the last quarter of 1872 aged fourteen years within Cheltenham Registration District.

  1. CHARLES HENRY BROWN, cousin of Emily Eley

 Charles Brown was born in 1860 in Cheltenham and was just eight months old on the night of the census. He was baptised at St Paul’s Church on 28th July 1861 and was described as the son of Robert and Sarah Brown, watchmaker, of 37 St Paul’s Street North. He was ten-years-old and living at home in the 1871 census return. In 1885 he was to inherit his father’s business. In 1901 he was living at 324 Alcester Road, Kings Norton, Birmingham and working as a Jeweller’s traveller. He was described as forty-years-old, a worker, and born in Cheltenham. His wife, Florence E. Brown, was aged thirty-eight-years and born in Birmingham.

  1. JOHN BROWN, Infant Great III Uncle

John Brown was baptised on 15th September 1816 at St Nicholas, Gloucester. He was buried from there on 6th September 1820.

  1. MARY WORKMAN, Great III Aunt

Mary Brown was baptised on 11th October 1818 at St Nicholas, Gloucester. In the 1841 census Mary was living in the High Street, Cheltenham, with her brother Robert and sister Ellen She was described as a twenty-year-old milliner.

At the time of the 1851 census she was living as a lodger along with her sisters Ellen and Fanny at Oriel House, Bath Road, Cheltenham. The head of the household was Robert Hewer, a stonemason. All three Brown sisters were described as dressmakers and born in Gloucester. Mary was aged thirty-one-years; Hellen (sic) aged twenty-one years and Fanny aged nineteen years.

By the time of the 1861 census Mary had moved to live at 2 Corpus Street, Cheltenham, where she was living with Charlotte Kelley, a sixty-nine-year-old widow described as a Post Office Keeper and born in Stroud. Mary was listed as a forty-year-old spinster working as a dressmaker and born in Gloucester. With them was Emma Bird, presumably a cousin of Mary, who was aged twenty-seven-years and working as a dressmaker. Significantly she was born in Eastington. Also we find Mary Davis, a sixty-eight-year-old servant and widow who was born in Ireland.

In 1871 Mary Brown was still lodging at 2 Corpus Street with Charlotte Kelley who was described as an eighty-year-old annuitant, born at Ebley. Mary’s name, which is written more like Henry Brown, was listed as a fifty-year-old unmarried dressmaker, born in Gloucester.

Mary married John Workman at St Mary’s Parish Church, Cheltenham, on 13th November 1873. He was described as a Widower, of full age, Livery-Stable-Keeper, of Imperial Square, Cheltenham, the son of John Workman, a Cloth-worker. Mary was described as a Spinster of full age, residing at 413, High Street, Cheltenham, daughter of Robert Brown, Watchmaker. Both bride and groom signed their names as did the witnesses Robert Brown, her brother, and Eliza, his daughter.

John Workman was in 1851 the Post Master of 6 Belmore Place (off Bath Road and Sandford Street), Cheltenham. He was described in the census as aged forty years and born in Uley. His wife then was Elizabeth, aged thirty-nine-years who was born in Laugharne, Carmarthenshire. Their children were John aged fifteen years, born in Cardiganshire, a flyman; Mary Ann aged eleven years, a scholar; Henry aged seven years; Ellen aged five years; Elizabeth aged three years and Emma aged ten months. The five younger children were all born in Cheltenham.

Cheltenham Examiner 12th May 1852, page 4, column 6:

‘Cheltenham Town Commissioners… Fly Carriage Licenses were granted to Alex. Dunn and John Workman for the remainder of the current year.’

In the Annuaire for 1860 we find J. Workman, Fly Proprietor, operating from Wolseley Villa Mews, (off Trafalgar Street, Home to a fly proprietor 1847) Cheltenham.

In 1861 the family was living at Wolseley Mews and John was described as a forty-nine-year-old Fly Proprietor, born in Uley. His wife Elizabeth, aged fifty-two-years was born in Wales. Their children included Elizabeth aged thirteen years; Ellen aged sixteen years; Emma aged ten years; Henry aged eighteen years and John aged twenty-eight years and born in Aberystwyth. All the other children were born in Cheltenham.

Cheltenham Examiner 8th January 1862, page 5, column 4:

 ‘Imperial Mews, Imperial Square. J. Workman. Licensed to let for hire Broughams, Flys, Phaetons, etc., by the Hour, Day, or Distance,

In returning thanks for the liberal support he has received for the last 23 years, begs most respectfully to inform the gentry and inhabitants of Cheltenham and its vicinity, that he has Removed to the above Commodious Mews, lately occupied by Mr. T. Kitchener, where he trusts by strict attention to orders to merit a continuance of their patronage and support.

Excellent Loose Boxes and Lock-up Coach Houses. Store Rooms for Luggage. Luggage Removed to any part of the Town or Country.’

In the Annuaire for 1862 J. Workman is listed as operating from Imperial Mews, (1841 census. Home to two livery stables (1847 Directory)) Cheltenham

In 1871 the Workman Family was still living at Imperial Mews. John Workman, aged sixty-years was a Livery Stable Keeper, born in Uley; Elizabeth was aged fifty-three-years and born in Carmarthen. Emma, their daughter, was at home, aged nineteen years and they had a resident servant Louisa Commol of the same age.

John Workman’s elder son, John, died in Cheltenham Registration District during the second quarter of 1871 aged thirty years. His mother, Elizabeth Workman, died in the Cheltenham Registration District during the second quarter of 1872, aged sixty-three-years, leaving John Workman a widower. John Workman married Mary Brown in Cheltenham registration district during the fourth quarter of 1873.

In a Trade Directory for 1876 (check) John Workman was described as a Fly and Pony Carriage Proprietor of Imperial Mews.

On 18th April 1876 John Workman made his will. He was described as a Fly Proprietor and Livery Stable Keeper. The executors and trustees were to be his nephew Henry Workman, a Coal Merchant of Cheltenham, and James Dowrick, a Banker’s Clerk of Gloucester. All his property was to pass to his five children Henry Workman, Mary-Ann Williams, Ellen wife of Thomas Peroteess (sp?), Elizabeth wife of Charles Humphreys and Emma wife of Thomas Birchley. No provision was made in the will for his wife Mary.

John Workman died on 25th April 1878 in the Cheltenham Registration District aged sixty-seven-years leaving Mary a widow. On Mary Workman’s tombstone at Berkeley it states that she was ‘of Imperial Mews, Cheltenham’.

Cheltenham Examiner 1st May 1878, page 6, column 6:

 ‘Death of Mr. J. Workman – The death is announced of another old inhabitant, in Mr. J. Workman, who for many years had carried on business as a livery stable keeper, and until a few months ago when ill health compelled him to retire. He had lived nearly his whole life in the town, and like his contemporary in business, the late Mr. J. Smith, whom he survived but a short time, he had seen vast changes in the vehicular service of the place, those his memory scarcely went back to the time which the late Col. Church Pearce was so fond of re-calling, when only one chaise was to be found in Cheltenham. Mr. Workman died after a long illness.’

The will was proved on 30th May 1878 and was valued at under £4,000.

The business passed to John’s surviving son Henry Workman. At the time of the 1881 census he was described as a thirty-six-year-old Livery Stable Keeper employing nine men and residing at premises ‘at the back of Imperial Square’. His wife Harriet was aged thirty-six-years and their children included Henry aged twelve years; William H. aged eleven years and Florence B. aged fourteen years. In 1901 Henry was described as a Cab Proprietor, aged fifty-seven-years and he was living with his wife Frances, aged forty-years and born in Ireland. In the 1904 Directory we find that H. Workman of Imperial Lane was a Fly and Pony Carriage Proprietor.

Returning to Mary Workman we find her in the 1881 census as a sixty-two-year-old widow and retired milliner, born in Gloucester, lodging with Emma Meyer, a sixty-nine-year-old milliner, at 10 Portland Street, Cheltenham.

Cheltenham MEMORIES; Handwritten Mss papers found in box of  books – no name of scribe but obviously notes taken at and interview of persons whose memories these are.

‘Mrs Watts: War memories 1914-1918.  Interviewed October 1984.

Mrs Watts used to travel from Cheltenham to Quedgeley to work in the munitions factory there. Leaving home at 7am she used to walk to the Midland Station to catch the train through to Quedgeley. Sometimes she worked night shifts. She was a nursemaid 15-16 years old in 1912-1913. Munitions 17-18 years old 1914-1915. NAAFI and then Toy Industry.

When I spoke to Mrs Watts on my first visit to her she told me her father had worked as a coachman at Workman’s Yard in Imperial Lane  “…. From where ladies and gentlemen hired coaches and the coachmen wore silk hats.”

On my second visit she continued:

“During the First World war there weren’t the carriages run by the men wearing top hats as my father did, so when it was given up by the owner, Mr Workman, he used to have his yard and his house in Imperial Lane. Of course he lived there and of course when the yard packed up, the horses…I think the Gloucestershire Dairy kept two of the horses for their use, because it was horses then and not motors. My father for some reason went to see to the horses that were kept in the yard . That gave us the house but my mother didn’t like it at all. So that’s where we were. Now that was the WWI and during that time we were living there. …’

In 1891 Mary Workman was visiting Mary Ann Banner, a widow and milliner and dressmaker of 20 Sherborne Place (off Albion Street), Cheltenham. Mary Workman was a seventy-year-old widow, living off her own means, and born in Gloucester. Mary Ann’s family included two daughters together with Susanna Clayton, a sixty-eight-year-old upholsterer and widow was also in residence.

On 3rd November 1894 Mary Workman of 4 Sherborne Terrace, Cheltenham, a Widow, made her last will and testament. She left her gold watch and chain and locket to her eldest niece living at the time of her death. She gave a legacy of nineteen guineas to her niece Alice Yarnold and a legacy of nineteen guineas to Edith Brown the daughter of her nephew Robert Brown. All the rest of her property was to pass to her brother, James Brown, of 3 Long Street, Wotton-under-Edge, a Jeweller. The witnesses were Fred. W. Fry of Merlin Haven Lodge, Wotton and Edwin Minett Robinson of The Butts, Wotton.

In 1901 the census she was living with her brother and sister-in-law, James and Jane Brown in Long Street, Wotton-under-Edge.  Her name was given as Mary Workman and she was described as being aged eighty-two-years and living from her own means. She had also been born in Gloucester. Two other relatives of Jane were living with them.

Mary Workman died on 9th April 1906 at Pedington, Berkeley, aged eighty-seven-years.

The Gazette reported for Saturday 14th April 1906:

 Death of Mrs. Brown and Mrs. Workman of Pedington near Berkeley

It is our painful duty to record the death of two ladies living in the same house. On Monday Mrs. Brown, wife of Mr. James Brown formerly of Wotton-under-Edge, watchmaker, died and the death of Mrs. Workman (Mrs. Brown’s sister) also residing in the same house at Pedington took place on the next day (Tues.)

Widespread sympathy is felt for Mr. Brown on this losing both wife and sister. Both sisters were interred in the same grave in Berkeley Cemetery on Thurs. Mr. W. Mackintosh was undertaker and the coffins were made by Mr. George Alpass.’

Gravestone in Berkeley Cemetery:

Jane Brown, wife, 8th April 1906 aged sixty-six-years

James Brown, 5th April 1921 aged eighty-four-years

Mary Workman, of Imperial Mews, Cheltenham, 9th April 1906 aged eighty-seven-years

Her will was proved on 24th May 1906 and her brother, James Brown, was appointed her Sole Executor.

  1. ELEANOR BROWN, Infant Great III Aunt

Eleanor Brown was baptised on 20th August 1820 at St Nicholas, Gloucester, and buried from there on 26th September aged eleven weeks.

  1. ALEXANDER BROWN, Great III Uncle

Alexander Brown was baptised on 10th February 1822 at St Nicholas, Gloucester. I cannot find him in the 1841 census.

In 1851 he was living at 35 Hall Street, Dudley in the home of Elijah Bourne, a collier, born at Rowley Regis. Alexander was described as a twenty-nine-year-old Journeyman Watchmaker, born in Gloucestershire. The list appears to give the lodger the name Bourne as well but this is clearly an error.

Alexander probably married Mary Ann Mullender in 1852 within Dudley Registration District. In 1861 Alexander and Mary Ann Brown were living at New Mill Street, Dudley. He was described as a thirty-nine-year-old Master Watchmaker, born at Gloucester and his wife was aged thirty-three-years and born at Wolverhampton in Staffordshire. Their children included Alice Mary, aged eight-years, a scholar, born at Dudley and Robert aged six years, a scholar, born at Dudley. Living with Alexander and Mary Ann was James Brown, his brother, aged twenty-four-years, a watchmaker, born Dudley (sic).

In 1871 Alexander and Mary Ann were still at 1 New Mill Street. He was a forty-nine-year-old watchmaker. His wife Mary Ann was aged forty-three-years and born at Wolverhampton. Their children included Alice aged eighteen, Robert, a sixteen-year-old watchmaker’s assistant, and Mary, a nine-year-old scholar. All these children were born in Dudley.

In 1881 Alexander and Mary Ann were still at the same address and he was a fifty-nine-year-old watchmaker, born in Gloucester. She was fifty-three and born in Wolverhampton. Their children at home included Robert, a twenty-nine-year-old watchmaker and Mary a nineteen-year-old dressmaker. Both were born in Dudley.

In 1891 Alexander was a sixty-eight-year-old watchmaker born in Gloucester and his wife was sixty-three and born in Wolverhampton. Robert J. Brown was listed as thirty-six-years-old and Mary as a twenty-nine-year-old dressmaker. Again both were natives of Dudley.

Alexander Brown probably died during the second quarter of 1893 in Dudley Registration District aged seventy-years.

Finally in 1901 we find Mary Ann Brown, a seventy-three-year-old widow, born at Wolverhampton, living at 1 New Mill Street, Dudley. With her was her son Robert Brown, aged forty-five-years, a watchmaker working on his own account at home and born at Dudley.

Their children were cousins of Emily Eley, Great Grandmother:

 ALICE MARY BROWN, cousin of Emily Eley

 Alice Mary Brown was born in Dudley in about 1852. She was at home aged eight years at the time of the 1861 census and a scholar. In 1871 she was at home aged eighteen years.

ROBERT BROWN, cousin of Emily Eley

 Robert Brown was born in about 1854 at Dudley. He was at home for all the census returns from 1861 until 1901. In 1861 he was described as a scholar, in 1871 as a watchmaker’s assistant and from 1881 as a watchmaker of 1 New Mill Street, Dudley.

MARY BROWN, cousin of Emily Eley

 Mary Brown was born in about 1861 at Dudley. She was at home for the 1871 census aged nine years and a scholar. She was still at home in 1881 and 1891 and described as a dressmaker.

 

   6.    CHARLOTTE BROWN, Great III Aunt

 Charlotte Brown was baptised on 29th February 1824 at St Nicholas, Gloucester. In the 1841 census she was aged fifteen years and living at home.

A Charlotte Brown died during the last quarter of 1843 in Gloucester Registration District.

In 1851 a Charlotte Brown, aged twenty-eight-years and born at Ockham (Dockham in Cheltenham?), Gloucestershire, was living at 21 Rodney Terrace, Cheltenham, and working as a servant. Her employer was Montague Alex, a dentist.

  1. EDWIN BROWN, Infant Great III Uncle

Edwin Brown was baptised on 2nd April 1826 at St Nicholas, Gloucester and buried from there on 20th October 1826 aged ten months.

    8. ELLEN BROWN, Great III Aunt

Ellen Brown was baptised on 16th September 1829 at St Nicholas, Gloucester. In 1841 the census return states that she was living with her brother Robert and her sister Mary in the High Street, Cheltenham when she was twelve-years-old.

At the time of the 1851 census Ellen was living as a lodger along with her sisters Mary and Fanny at Oriel House, Bath Road, Cheltenham. The head of the household was Robert Hewer, a stonemason. All three Brown sisters were described as dressmakers and born in Gloucester. Mary was aged thirty-one-years; Hellen (sic) aged twenty-one years and Fanny aged nineteen years.

Ellen was a witness at the wedding of James Henry Yarnold and her sister, Frances in 1856.

An Ellen Brown married in Cheltenham Registration District during the final quarter of 1856 and probably married Daniel Martin. This Ellen is younger and born in Cheltenham.


     9. FRANCES YARNOLD, Great II Grandmother of Richard Barton

Daughter of Robert Brown and Mary (nee Bird)

Wife of James Henry Yarnold

Mother of Emily Eley

Also Mother of Frances Mary, William Henry, Alice Maddicks, Florence, Charles Frederick, Alfred Robert and Albert

Frances Brown was baptised on 19th June 1831 at St Nicholas, Gloucester. She was the ninth child and fourth daughter of Robert Brown and his wife May. Her father was a watchmaker of Bolt Lane, Westgate Street, Gloucester. Robert had trained as a watchmaker and, after a spell in Cheltenham, set up business in Gloucester in the Westgate community of watermen, foundrymen and other trades associated with the nearby docks and river. In the 1841 census return Frances Brown was at home with her parents in Bolt Lane, Gloucester.

At the time of the 1851 census she was living as a lodger along with her sisters Mary and Ellen at Oriel House, Bath Road, Cheltenham. The head of the household was Robert Hewer, a stonemason. All three Brown sisters were described as dressmakers and born in Gloucester. Mary was aged thirty-one-years; Hellen (sic) aged twenty-one years and Fanny aged nineteen years.

Frances married James Henry Yarnold on 26th June 1856 at Cheltenham Parish Church. Both were described as of full age and James Henry was working as a Carpenter. He was living at St Pancras, London and Frances was living at Northfield Terrace, Cheltenham (off North Place, behind the south side of Clarence Square. Marked on 1834 map as North Field Terrace, part of an ancient footpath across the field). Their fathers were given as Charles Yarnold, a painter, and Robert Brown, a watchmaker. The witnesses were Robert and Ellen Brown.

Frances Mary Yarnold, their eldest child, was born on 24th August 1857 in Longsmith Street, Gloucester (District of St John the Baptist). She was described as the daughter of James Henry Yarnold, Joiner Journeyman, and Frances Yarnold, formerly Brown. Her mother informed the registrar of the birth on 9th September 1857 and her address was recorded as Longsmith Street, Gloucester. Frances Mary Yarnold died in Cardiff on 24th December 1857 at 17 Tindal Street. The cause of death was given as inflammation of the lung.

On 23rd April 1859 Henry James (sic) and Frances, were living at 28 Eclipse Street, Roath, Cardiff, and they registered the birth of their next child, William Henry. His father was described on the certificate as a joiner journeyman.

At the time of the 1861 census Henry Yarnold (sic) and his wife were living in St Mary de Crypt Parish at Bolt Lane, Gloucester, with Fanny’s parents, Robert and Mary Brown. Henry was described as a thirty-year-old carpenter, born in Gloucester; Fanny was thirty-years-old and their son, William, was aged two-years.

On 7th November 1861 the family was living at Hampden Place, Barton St Michael, Gloucester, when they registered their daughter, Alice. Alice was born on 26th October 1861. She was baptised on 8th December 1861 at the Church of St Mary de Lode in Gloucester. Her parents were recorded in the register as James Henry Yarnold, a joiner, and his wife, Frances Yarnold, of Barton St Michael.

From 1862-1864 James Henry Yarnold was listed in the Elector’s list as living at Hampden Place. On 6th February 1865 they were at London Road, Gloucester, when Frances registered the birth of her daughter, Emily.

Alfred Robert Yarnold was born on 11th June 1870. He was baptised by the Reverend W. Balfour, the incumbent, at St Nicholas’s Church, Gloucester, on 4th September 1870. Alfred Robert was described as the son of Henry James and Frances Yarnold of St Luke’s Parish, Gloucester. His father was described as a joiner.

At the time of the 1871 census the family was living at St Philip Street, St Luke’s, South Hamlets, Gloucester. Henry J. Yarnold was a thirty-eight-year-old carpenter’s foreman, born at Worcester; Frances was aged thirty-nine-years and born in Gloucester; William J. was aged twelve-years and born in Cardiff; Alice was aged nine years; Florence was aged four years and Alfred R. was aged nine months. All the younger children were born in Gloucester.

As early as 1871 her daughter, Emily, was staying with her uncle, James Brown, and his wife, Jane, in Wotton-under-Edge. She was described as a six-year-old scholar and her uncle was a watchmaker. Emily was only thirteen years old when her mother died and by the time of the 1881 census she was working as a shop assistant for her uncle, James Brown, by then a Watchmaker of Long Street, Wotton-under-Edge.

Frances Yarnold died on 14th February 1879 at 4 Berkeley Villas, Wotton St Mary, Gloucester, leaving four young children, the youngest only five years. She was described as on the death certificate as the forty-one-year-old wife of James Henry Yarnold, a joiner’s foreman. The cause of death was given as disease of the brain for two months and Apoplexy for one day. This was certified by Thomas Hickes, M.R.C.S.. Her husband, who was present at the time of the death, was the informant when Benjamin Thurston registered the death on 15th February.

It is believed that after the death of her mother Alice did much in the running of the household until the advent of Sarah Cullen, James Henry’s second wife.


  1. JAMES BROWN, Great III Uncle

James Brown was baptised on 2nd October 1836 at St Nicholas, Gloucester. In the 1841 census he was aged five years and living at home with his parents. He worked for his father and was described as his fourteen-year-old apprentice in the 1851 census.

On the night of the 1861 census James Brown was staying with his brother Alexander and his wife Mary Ann at New Mill Street, Dudley. Alexander was described in the return as a thirty-nine-year-old Master Watchmaker, born at Gloucester and his wife was aged thirty-three-years and born at Wolverhampton in Staffordshire. Their children included Alice Mary, aged eight-years, a scholar, born at Dudley and Robert aged six years, a scholar, born at Dudley. James Brown was listed as aged twenty-four-years, a watchmaker, born Dudley (sic).

James Brown, of 45 Longsmith Street, was in attendance when his father died on 7th November 1861 and he was the informant when the death was registered on 9th November by John Oakley Packer.

In 1863 he was probably trading from 3 College Street, Gloucester. He married Jane Lydiard on 2nd March 1863 at St Mary de Crypt, Gloucester. She was born in about 1841 at Cricklade, Wiltshire. He was probably running a watchmaker’s business in Market Street, Wotton-under-Edge by 1867 and at 3 Long Street, Wotton-under-Edge by 1875.

In the 1871 census return he was described as a thirty-one-year-old watchmaker and his wife, Jane, who had been born in Cricklade, was thirty-years-old. They lived in the fifth property listed in Market Street. Living with them was their niece, Emily Yarnold, who was described as a six-year-old scholar, born in Gloucester.

In the 1881 Census he was still at Long Street and was described as a forty-four-year-old Watchmaker. His wife, Jane, aged thirty-nine-years, said that her place f birth was Cricklade, Wilts. With them was his niece, Emily Yarnold, who was described as a sixteen-year-old Watchmaker’s Assistant. Emily’s mother had died when she was only thirteen so the couple seem to have taken care of her.

Ten years later the census return reveals that Emily was still living and working with Uncle James and Aunt Jane at their shop in Long Street, Wotton-under-Edge. She married Ernest Edward Eley in 1893.

Dursley Gazette 8th April 1893:

Marriage – Eley-Yarnold – at Tortworth Parish Church by Rev. P. Arthur Rector. Ernest 3rd son of late James Eley of Maryford Farm, Kingswood and Mrs Eley now at Tortworth Farm. To Emily second daughter of James Henry Yarnold of Gloucester and niece of Mr. James Brown of Wotton-under-Edge.

Dursley Gazette 8th April 1893:

Wedding – On Tuesday at Tortworth Parish Church the marriage took place of Miss Emily Yarnold, niece of Mr James Brown of Wotton-under-Edge with Ernest, 3rd son of the late Mr. James Eley of Maryford Farm, Kingswood and Mrs. Eley, now of Tortworth Farm. The bridegroom is already a tenant on Earl Ducie’s Estate at Brook Farm. The Rector of Tortworth, Rev. P. Arthur, officiated. The bride’s uncle, Mr. Brown, gave her away and she was attended by Miss Eley and Miss Kate Eley (sisters of the bridegroom) and Miss L.Dean of Stroud as bridesmaids. She wore a white dress… Mr Shield Eley accompanied his brother as best man.

The wedding was pretty… bells rang out, organ etc…

After the wedding the party drove over to Wotton-under-Edge to the residence of the bride’s uncle for the wedding repast. Mr Arthur was present, Mr and Mrs Yarnold (father and step-mother), Mr and Mrs Shield of Over, Mr James Shield of Maryford, Mrs Isaacs, Miss Alice Yarnold (sister of bride), Mr Yarnold of Thornbury (brother of bride), Mr Smith Jnr. Crockleaze, Tortworth, …

Later left for Devonshire… Wedding presents…

Again in 1901 James Brown was listed as living at 38 Long Street with his wife Jane. By now he was sixty-four and she was sixty. Living with them was his sister Mary Workman who was described as living from her own means. James was described as a watchmaker who had been born in Gloucester. His wife Jane gave her place of birth as being at Malmesbury. Mary Workman was aged eighty-two-years and she had also been born in Gloucester like her brother. Two other relatives of Jane were living with them on the evening of the census.

Advertisements in Presley’s Almanac:

1869:

  1. Brown (of Gloucester) Watch and Clock Maker

Market Street, Wotton-under-Edge

All kinds of English and Foreign Watches and Clocks repaired and adjusted

Jewellery neatly repaired

New and Second Hand Watches for sale, or taken in exchange

Wedding Rings

1871, 1872, 1873: J. Brown Watch and Clock Maker

                               Market Street, Wotton-under-Edge…

1875, 1878: J. Brown Watch and Clock Maker

                    Long Street (Removed from Market Street, Wotton-under-Edge)…

1889: James Brown…established twenty years….

1896:  James Brown… established 1867

‘Mr. J. Brown’ was on the committee of Wotton-under-Edge Horticultural Society in 1882.

According to probate records his brother Robert Brown of 7 Sherborne Terrace, Cheltenham, watchmaker, died on 15th January 1889 at 7 Sherborne Terrace. Probate was granted on 16th January 1889 to James Brown, of 3 Long Street, Wotton-under-Edge, watchmaker and brother. Effects were valued at £394-7-0d.

He later became Publican of The Salutation Inn, at Ham, Berkeley, and he later remarried after his wife’s death. The index of births, marriages and deaths for the Gloucester Journal includes an entry for Jane Brown who died on 8th April 1906 at Pedington – ‘late of Wotton-under-Edge’. Her burial took place from Berkeley Parish Church on 13th June 1906. She was described as ‘of Pedington’ and her age was given as sixty-six-years-old. She was living close to her niece Emily Eley and her family at Park Farm, Pedington.

The Gazette reported for Saturday 14th April 1906:

Death of Mrs. Brown and Mrs. Workman of Pedington near Berkeley

It is our painful duty to record the death of two ladies living in the same house. On Monday Mrs. Brown, wife of Mr. James Brown formerly of Wotton-under-Edge, watchmaker, died and the death of Mrs. Workman (Mrs. Brown’s sister) also residing in the same house at Pedington took place on the next day (Tues.)

Widespread sympathy is felt for Mr. Brown on this losing both wife and sister. Both sisters were interred in the same grave in Berkeley Cemetery on Thurs. Mr. W. Mackintosh was undertaker and the coffins were made by Mr. George Alpass.’

On 13th October 1906 James Brown married Elizabeth Cope at Berkeley Parish Church. He was described as a seventy-year-old widower and jeweller, son of Robert Brown, jeweller. She was a spinster, aged fifty-two-years, an innkeeper and daughter of James Cope, a plasterer. The witnesses were Fred Merrett and Hilda Martha Cope.

Royce Denning in his ‘A History of Berkeley Vale’ lists landlords of the Salutation at Ham. James Cope was listed in 1902, Elizabeth Brown in 1910 and Edward Hasker in 1931. In 1859 William Cope was a plasterer of Salter Street in Berkeley.

In 1911 James Brown was living in eight rooms at the Salutation, Ham, Berkeley. He was described as seventy-four-years-old and married for five years. He was born at Gloucester. His wife Elizabeth Brown was aged fifty-seven-years and was described as the Licensee – Beerhouse. She was an employer and was born at Berkeley. Also resident were Minnie Holdford her seventeen-year-old niece born in Churchdown; Bertha Holdford, her niece-in-law born in Cheltenham and married for two years with one child; James Holdford her ten month old nephew born in Churchdown. With them was a forty-four –year-old lodger.

On 13th August 1920 James Brown made his will. He was described as a retired jeweller. He bequeathed all his property to his wife Elizabeth Brown for her use absolutely. The witnesses were Wm Hatten and Wm. S. Hatten, clerks to Messrs. Scott, solicitors, of Berkeley.

James Brown died on 5th April 1921 at the Salutation Inn, Ham, and was buried on Saturday 9th April. The Dursley Gazette for 9th April reported that he had died aged eighty-four-years and that his funeral would take place at 3pm on that day at Berkeley Cemetery. He was described as ‘of the Salutation, Ham and late of Wotton-under-Edge’.

Probate was granted to Elizabeth Brown on 10th May 1921, she being the sole executor.

Gravestone in Berkeley Cemetery:

Jane Brown, wife, 8th April 1906 aged sixty-six-years

James Brown, 5th April 1921 aged eighty-four-years

Mary Workman, of Imperial Mews, Cheltenham, 9th April 1906 aged eighty-seven-years

Elizabeth Brown made her will on 24th December 1922. She was living at the Salutation Inn and she left £50 to her nephew and nieces – Henry James Cope of 11 Park Hill Avenue, Mornington, Dunedin, New Zealand; Hannah Elizabeth Dean of Selsdon Hall, Wolverhampton; Hilda Martha Cope of 8 Old Street, Clevedon and Minnie Hill of Ham, Berkeley. She made further bequests to Eva Hill, her God child,  of £20 and Bessie Cope of Cannonbury Street, Berkeley £12. The residue was to be divided amongst her nephews and nieces. The witnesses were George Hill, a groom of Ham and Harry James Holford, a signalman of Station Cottage, Broadway.

Probate was granted on 2nd December 1933.


FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS FAMILY CONTACT: btsarnia@gmail.com

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